Dope Out – Scars & Stripes

Formed on the first breath of 2013, French band Dope Out has earned a potent reputation in their homeland for their aggressive and stylish heavy rock sound. Now with the release of their highly enjoyable second album, Scars & Stripes, they are threatening to provoke the same kind of attention and support on a much broader scale.

Musically, the Paris quartet merges flavoursome traits from classic and hard rock with more punk, metal, and stoner essences for a proposition which feels familiar yet equally fresh and adventurous. The band has honed their sound and invention across a debut EP, All Hopes Inside, released that first year, and the well-received debut album Bad Seeds of 2014. The years between albums has seen Dope Out breach another level and maturity in their music; an evolution making Scars & Stripes a potently flavoursome proposal.

The four tracks making up the Lady Misfits EP which came out January 2016 made a tasty teaser of things to come, its potential straight away confirmed as Scars & Stripes hits ears with its title track. A lone bassline provides the first lure, its throaty twang soon joined by wiry riffs and rolling rhythms as the song brings its appetising bait all together for a predacious stroll awash with flaming melody. Once settled, the grouchy lead vocals of guitarist Stoner step up with attitude the fore, their irritated air matched by the hooks and grooves lining the slice of punk infused rock ‘n’ roll. Varied twists and turns follow to add to the captivation of the strong start to Scars & Stripes; a base the album only grows bolder from.

The following Dive is a just as appealing proposition, matching its predecessor’s success with its fiery web of grooves and enterprise spun by lead guitarist Crash over a rhythmic trespass driven by the jabbing beats of Mad and Doc’s heavy tempting bassline. As with the first, the song sets the tone of the album without exposing its deepest layers of imagination, that discovery really beginning from The Freakshow, which follows, onwards but still inciting a keen appetite for what is on offer so far.

The third song swiftly hits the spot, its initial pyre of sonic taunting mouth-watering but only added to by the rhythmic rumble which is soon aligned to a broadening design of flavours and invention.  Once hitting its resourceful stride, the track prowls like a mix of Dope and Marilyn Manson while its melodic blaze and earthy air has Gruntruck like hues to it. It is compelling stuff, only increasing its hold on ears as it twists and turns with imagination fuelled confrontation, blues grooves and steely tendrils increasing the fun.

Lady Misfits makes a more even tempered entrance, Stoner’s mellow tones joined by a just as relaxed melody as rhythms saunter with similar restraint. It is all a build-up though to a blaze of a chorus which after searing and pleasuring the senses slips back into the highly enjoyable calm, erupting with greater temptation throughout as the track continues to grow and reveal more of its captivating character and resourcefulness.

By now, the band and album has the lid open on their boldest adventure, next up Clan Of Bats bearing a spicy slab of imposing blues hued rock with an infectiousness breeding a chorus which is one of the truly memorable moments within the release. It is also the moment when you feel Dope Out really get to grips with their craft and imagination, the album having a real swagger to its presence and almost mischievous ambition.

The snarling rock ‘n’ roll of next up Shooting Gun keeps attention and pleasure high, its catchy swing and assertive intensity a potent mix before Nose White entangles ears in woozy blues grooves and stalking rhythms as vocals mix belligerence and invitation in their commanding persuasion. Carrying a touch of Black Stone Cherry and Hardcore Superstar to its body, only concentrated pleasure arises with it especially as its shadows darken and its tone and sinews become more invasive, luring the listener into its heart and the waiting devilry of Balls To The Wall. Another major highlight of the album, the song is a beast of almost violent rhythmic intent and sonic trespass, the guitars searing ears with their hook laden melodic flames whilst vocals scowl as the heart of the track erupts.

The album is brought to a just as feverish close by firstly Again, a song with infectiousness in its DNA and blues rapacity in its veins. As many of its predecessors, it has feet twitching and hips swinging with increasing relish, exhausting and pleasuring the body ready for the mellow caresses of closing encounter Soulmate, an acoustic reflection playing like a warm and increasingly enthusiastic night cap on a boozy rock ’n’ roll session.

It is hard to say that Scars & Stripes is overly unique yet has plenty of new elements to provide a truly fresh and increasingly enjoyable encounter; a proposition quite possibly coaxing a great more of the world to listen to Dope Out.

Scars & Stripes is digitally out now.

https://www.facebook.com/Dopeout/   https://dopeoutunited.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Love Frame – Forgiveness

love_frame_RingMasterReview

Creating a fiery and rousing alternative rock roar, Love Frame is a quartet from Milan beginning to whip up some eager attention for themselves. They have provided a potent persuasion in sound and craft for a while with their debut album Forgiveness self-released back in 2014, but a success recently given a bigger vehicle to tempt from with its global release via the excellent Italian label Sliptrick Records. Offering eleven varied and dynamically arousing songs, the seriously accomplished release has constantly picked up new recruits to its melodic adventure and shows no hint of slowing down as band and album continue to reach new ears.

Love Frame began in 2008, releasing a mini EP the following year which soon brought the band to the attention of the Italian underground scene. The single/video Night drew stronger attention with its release in 2010 while its successor Run With Us two years later, only confirmed the strength of the band in sound and resulting support. Live too, they have continued to grow and earn increasing praise in Italy and Europe. Beginning to record their first album in the December of 2013, Forgiveness was released in the October of 2014, the band consisting of vocalist Giulia Lupica, guitarist Laerte Ungaro, and drummer Giuseppe La Gala at this point with the trio assisted by bassist Giuseppe Greco, who became a permanent member post album, on the recording.

Influences for Love Frame include the likes of HIM, Placebo, Billy Idol, Alter Bridge, and Hardcore Superstar; flavours which in varying degrees show their inspirations across Forgiveness, starting with opener Halo. From its first second riffs spicily crowd ears as the harmonic tones of Lupica flame up, her voice a swiftly impressive and suggestive proposal. As rhythms find a firmer touch and the bass grumbles, the song opens up its virulent temptation with those early riffs still enjoyably nagging the senses. They never do relent in their great persuasion across the song, just changing their sonic hues as each twist and turn arrives within the striking Forever Still meets Djerv like triumph.

The following Mine has an even more fiery air and character to its presence; the bass again an appealing throaty temper to tenacious riffs and grooves as well as the rhythmic agitation cast by La Gala. Strolling along with a catchy swing to its gait, the song is an ear grabbing flame with Lupica’s vocals hanging emotive tones from every lively incident within its creative drama; an enthralling quality backed by the delicious imagination of guitar and bass.

coveralbum_RingMasterReviewA Stevie Nicks air accompanies the vocals as the melodic caress of Real Love Exhibition simmers and boils next; its initial lure a tender charm which flows across the song with moments of greater intensity and volatility providing sweeping crescendos across its magnetic landscape. It is a bewitching offering then eclipsed by the outstanding Lie To Lie. An early burst of vocal tempting sets up an eager appetite for the infectious blaze of voice and melodic dexterity, the song in many ways epitomises the album itself; easily accessible whilst being anthemically rousing and bursting with adventurous twists and imaginatively skilful turns.

Through the emotive and rhythmic drama of Heart Box and the melodically snarling Maybe, ears continue to be offered forceful captivation. The first of the pair is as charming as it is imposing, dark rhythms and emotionally charged melodies colluding with vocal flames and stirring enterprise, whilst the second also brings contrasting textures together for its own thrilling and galvanic incitement. There is grouchiness to the riffs and equally the basslines skirting their bait and a sizzling surface to Lupica’s ever impressing and enthralling vocals yet it is all woven into a melodic waltz as elegant as it is fierce.

Lupica offers a vocal kiss on the senses as she opens up Blue next, her emotively reflective caress a mesmeric coaxing into the slightly more feisty body of the song With her delivery rising in intensity to match the blossoming sounds, the song is pure seduction, one of the album’s major highlights and instant evidence of Love Frame’s tremendous ability to blend warm and tender textures with livelier and more imposing incitement.

Escape has band and listener lured into a much more tempestuous moment next, its opening rub of riffs alone enough to whet the appetite before the song expands into another memorable escapade which might not quite match up to its predecessors but leaves a want for more the only wish before Save Me provides a commanding serenade which again has a strong and enjoyable air of Danish rock band Forever Still to it.

Completed by the resourceful adventure and sounds of Start Looking For and finally the acoustic romancing of ears and imagination that is Rakkaus On Ikuista, Lupica as beguiling as ever, Forgiveness is a real treat which only increases the enjoyment felt and impressive thoughts nurtured in its company.  It may not be a strictly new release to ponder but it is one all melodic and alternative rock fans should really consider introducing themselves to.

Forgiveness is out now via Sliptrick Records through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/loveframepage    http://www.loveframe.net/   https://twitter.com/loveframeband

Pete RingMaster 04/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Heartbreak Remedy – Midnight Groove

Heartbreak Remedy Promo _RingMaster ReviewShot

Embracing a host of flavoursome flavours in their energy loaded sound, UK quartet Heartbreak Remedy create rock ‘n’ roll which just rolls with the instincts to party. The weight of proof comes in their self-released debut album Midnight Groove, a collection of tracks which may have found variable success with personal tastes at times but all left an appetite for more of their feisty enterprise.

Hailing from Cumbria, Heartbreak Remedy emerged in 2013 with the intent of merging LA’s classic rock sound with seventies bred grooves. The band’s founders, vocalist/bassist Matty Penn and drummer Stephen Jackson soon linked up with guitarists Callum Glynn and Luke Blair, that union the springboard for Heartbreak Remedy and a live presence which began with a debut show at Trillians in Newcastle playing alongside Enuff Z’nuff. 2014 saw the band playing across the UK, their own potent gigs beside support spots with the likes of The Quireboys, The Electric Boys, Kory Clarke/Warrior Soul, The Burning Crows, Bad Touch, Falling Red, and Knock Out Kaine. A full UK tour with The Last Vegas only added to their emerging presence and reputation whilst with two well-received EPs also under their belts, the band more recently has shared stages with Hardcore Superstar, Keri Kelli, and Brad Gillis, and played the Hard Rock Hell Road Trip in Ibiza. Now with its national release, it is the turn of Midnight Groove to awaken new ears.

Heartbreak Remedy seemingly gets referenced to the likes of Mötley Crüe, Lynyrd Skynyrd, and Deep Purple most often, something relatively understandable as the opening track of Midnight Groove erupts in ears. There is certainly something familiar to their sound and seemingly no real intent to be dramatically adventurous but for heart bred rock ‘n’ roll there is little to dismiss the album over or first song Convoy. As soon as a single groove entangles ears attention is awake and seriously intrigued, especially once increasingly anthemic rhythms pave the way for a vocal bellow from Penn and the riff driven stroll it sparks. The beats of Jackson become even crispier bait as the bass of Penn offers a great grumbling lure whilst with acidic hooks and sparkling guitar endeavour wrapped in blues rock hues dancing in ears, the track gets more adventurous and compelling with every passing minute.

Heartbreak Remedy Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review  The following Already Gone is a slightly mellower proposition energy wise and in tone, and maybe because of this lacks the same spark as its predecessor, though the guitars again potently entice with their melodic narrative before Cocked and Loaded from a great devilish bassline emerges as another fiery slice of blues/hard rock. Vocally Penn is a touch wayward at times but equally more expressive as the track dangles spicy grooves and magnetic bait from the bass in ears.

Things really pick up with Tell Me Why, the track a sonic floozy of southern grooves and seventies seeded funk ‘n’ roll. Rhythms add a dark edge to the encounter, the muscular tones of the bass aligning to jabbing swipes from Jackson as the guitars of Glynn and Blair weave a contagious temptation of sultry grooves and riffs. Quickly establishing itself as a major highlight of the album, it seems to ignite something in the release as the following pair of All You’ll Ever Be, with its tangy lining to a nest of writhing grooves, and the pulsating Girl At The Bar keep the new plateau of good times rolling. Both tracks enjoyably explore contrasts and essences of discord, with the latter also slipping into something more eighties glam rock coloured to pleasing effect. The fact that there is a constant raw almost punkish surface and inner flame to the band’s sound only adds to the potency of indeed all three tracks and those to follow.

The skittish beats and southern seducing of Heartbreaker provides feet and imagination with the base for a good time which the southern/seventies hard rock textures of Southside recruit in its own dusty stroll before Rose clams things down with its soothing melodic croon. Guitars cradle ears with their tantalising melodies and evocative reflection whilst Penn almost mesmerises with his emotive croon. The song reveals more of the depth and diversity in the band’s sound, than arguably all the previous songs added together, simultaneously adding another high point to the release.

Next up Perfect Crime reveals more of the punk essence which lies within the band’s sound, fusing it with a dirtier hard rock proposal before its successor Thrill Me. Kill Me musically snarls around more restrained but nicely diverse vocals and Ice Queen sizzles in a bluesy climate, its guitars a sonically bubbling and hazy protagonist around funky rhythms and plainer vocals. It is a slim yet rich fusion of contrasts which works a treat though is over shadowed by the album’s closing triumph it is fair to say.

Like Rose earlier, Far Away is a captivating ballad with Penn really coming into his own as acoustic guitars embrace every syllable and escape of emotion. An increasingly impressive treat, it is a fine end to a rather enjoyable proposition from Heartbreak Remedy. Midnight Groove suggests at times that maybe the band’s sound is more potential than realisation right now, but to that offers the promise and excitement of bigger and bolder things ahead.

Midnight Groove is released on Friday 11th September through all stores.

Pete Ringmaster 10/09/2015

V For Violence – The Book of V

VFORVIOLENCE-band_RingMaster Review

Finnish metallers V For Violence first made an attention nudging statement with up their debut album The Cult Of V in 2009, now after a fair time in the making they unleash its successor The Book of V. Vocalist Jarkko Lähderanta said of the band’s new offering, ”The Book Of V took years to get its shape and sound. We wanted to take the next step in songwriting and paid more attention on details.” It is an intent finding success as the eleven tracks contagion frisks ears and sparks the imagination, and though it easily lures references to other protagonists in the industrial/alternative metal scene and styles around it, the album is simply one rousing and thoroughly enjoyable ferocious stomp.

Formed in 2007 by Lähderanta, drummer Miikki Kunttu, and guitarist Janne Salo, V For Violence was soon luring ears with their first demo in 2008. Its track/video Boy Called Fucker was a swift spark in the band being eagerly devoured by fans and media too, helping lead to their signing with Osasto-A Records soon after for the release of the 2-track single Constant Of Death in the summer of 2009. It was a strong teaser to their impending debut album The Cult Of V released in the November of that same year. The full-length was a well-received proposal pushing the band towards stronger spotlights backed by a live presence which by this point had already seen V For Violence support Hardcore Superstar and in turn going on to the sharing of stages with the likes of Die So Fluid, Cold Cold Ground, Amorphis, Hypocrisy, Underoath, and Architects at shows and festivals. Now with bassist Jani Rahkonen and guitarist Riku Vuorio alongside Lähderanta, Salo, and Kunttu, V For Violence have the long awaited The Book of V poised and ready to stir up the metal scene.

And that it pretty much does even if its originality is locked in the arms of open familiarity to a few heavyweights. Like a fusion of Fear Factory and Marilyn Manson in league with Dope and Powerman 5000, the album and opening track, The Halted Saint explode on the senses with anthemic ferocity. For some you suspect that recognisable air might not work as well as for others, but V For Violence bring their own raw and aggressive twist on things too ensuring that each track has something fresh and extra to say and certainly grip a demanding appetite and imagination by. The band’s new single clouds ears with thick industrial smog but swiftly sends sinewy tendrils of guitar and scything rhythms through it as the climate begins to clear on a corrosive and quickly addictive stalking. Those previously mentioned references straight away work on thoughts as too Society 1 in regard to the caustic and impassioned, bordering on sexual, intensity driving the encounter. Grooves and hooks just spark whilst the strong vocals of Lähderanta roar with expression and incitement for an outstanding start to the album’s fury.

V-For-Violence-TheBookOfV-cover__RingMaster Review     The potent beginning continues with the predatory prowl of The Downfall Pt. I: To Feel Alive. Initially it smoulders within imposing walls with mellow melodies and vocal coaxing but is soon building a volatile atmosphere and intimidating lining of textures, though still dipping into its elegant reflective heart throughout. Once more Manson is an obvious comparison to a song which at times has you drooling and in other moments simply fascinated by its adventurous nature and spicing.

Never Enough uncages the darkest bestial bass riffs and salacious grooves next, splintering them with vocal bellows and psyche gripping hooks to get very greedy over whilst Like It Like That and I Need You spew inescapable virulence in their individual characters. As most songs, choruses conjured are like infection dosed traps, impossible not to be fully involved in whilst around them creative snarls and in the latter of this trio, sinisterly dramatic nuances toy with the imagination. It is fair to say that a few songs share a closely seeded template but many, as here, create from that something strikingly inventive and captivating.

Band and album continues to hit the spot as tracks like the carnivorous A Place To Fill with its electronic festivity and guitar led twists, and the wonderful sonic groan and intimate melodies of God On Trial just ignite the senses. The second of these two is another major pinnacle in the album, every minute a cauldron of emotion and flirtatiously venomous enterprise equipped with unpredictability before it has to make way for Sodomedia which rivals it with its own hellacious and irritable industrial grooving. Once more limbs and thick involvement in the tempest is unavoidable, the breath taken too in the exhausting pleasure consuming the senses

The following Not A Word with its more hard rock seeded swagger lacks the spark and triggers of its predecessors yet again has a keenly persuasive impact on ears and satisfaction whilst What The Fuck! throws its attitude out with zeal, rhythmic and vocal relish fuelling the Five Finger Death Punch/ American Head Charge spiced confrontation.

The Book of V closes with the sweltering croon of The Downfall Pt. II: Amourageddon, its initial acoustic and emotive smoulder again as in Part 1, rising to dense intensity and melancholic ire whilst this time embracing classical and symphonic hues alongside an evocative industrial climate. A relative slow burner compared to other tracks within the album, it constantly evolves and reveals new treats to bring the release to a fine conclusion.

Fair to say we greedily devoured The Book of V and continue to, each track a tasty slice of invigorating fire and hostility. If any of those previously mentioned comparisons do not work for you than possibly V For Violence will struggle to persuade too but for the rest, this is one easy to recommend incitement.

The Book of V is available now via Inverse Records.

Pete RingMaster 08/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Damn Dice – The Great Unknown

Damn Dice Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

If some new metal infused hard rock ‘n’ roll is on the agenda then checking out the debut album from Damn Dice would not be a bad move. Unleashing twelve tenacious slices of hard rock, a dozen slabs of fiery, adrenaline fuelled stomps, The Great Unknown easily suggests the London based rockers are a band to keep a close eye on. It starts with a bang, ends with another invigorating stretch of songs, and though for personal tastes its middle section ebbs and flows in persuasion a touch too much, the whole album leaves full enjoyment as its prime legacy.

Damn Dice began in 2011 and quickly made a potent impression and impact with a live presence which in no time had a UK and European tour supporting LA Guns on its CV. The next couple of years saw the band reinforce their strong emergence whilst luring increasing acclaim through impressing headline shows and the release of their Wild ‘N’ Ready EP in 2013. It soon had the likes of Classic Rock AOR, Powerplay, Black Velvet, and Music Week offering eager praise whilst the single/video from it, Take The Fight saw the band regulars on Scuzz TV and indeed radio. Now the band is ready to make a hefty nudge on broader attention with The Great Unknown, an encounter as rousing as it is skilfully crafted, as riotous as it is familiarly infectious.

Recently Damn Dice has grown to a quintet with the addition of Diego, but it is the foursome of vocalist Alex, guitarist Wallis, bassist Marco, and drummer Fransoa who has ears ringing with opener Power. From a controlled and sonically suggestive start, the track is soon living up to its name with a charge of bone splitting beats and hungry riffery. Aligned to the quickly impressing tones of Alex, he supported as strongly across the rest of the band, and featuring an already grouchy presence by the bass, band and song is soon a virulent anthemic temptation. Bands such as Skid Row, KISS, and Hardcore Superstar are suggested as references to the Damn Dice sound, and certainly essences of them and others are open hues in the character and energy of the song though it matters little within the rampant fun of the encounter.

Damn Dice Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   The seriously enticing start to The Great Unknown continues with What Now? and its initial rhythmic coaxing which courtesy of the bass, borders bestial. Its growling is the spark to a great contrast of niggling hooks and infection spewing grooves with vocals and melodies just as magnetic in one of the band’s previous singles. It springs a web of addictive enticement and inventive enterprise though again there is something recognisable to the encounter which fair to say only add to its allure before Driven brings its antagonism lined classic hard rock resourcefulness to court ears. Not as immediate in its persuasion as the first two, the song eventually proves to be just as inescapable for body and voice, as too the following Down, both songs easy to lock on to anthems sure to inflame any hall or speaker over time. The fourth track has an even more old school colouring to its fresh romp but as enjoyable as it proves to be, it is from here that The Great Unknown struggles for a while to match its early prowess.

To be fair though with The Way To Go from a sizzling electro touch going on to offer a bouncing boisterous shuffle of riffs and rhythms whilst Caught In The Ride and Words uncage a snarling catchy canter and evocative flame of emotion respectively, satisfaction is left smiling and the body catching its breath in their wakes. The latter two songs also unveil a spicy sonic enterprise and melodic imagination which only lures ears before Bang Your Head hits the album’s earlier plateau again next, its full throttle charge equipped with commanding rhythms and rip-roaring riffs and enslaving vocals. Once more Damn Dice are not exactly tapping into the hard rock unknown but its weighty slavery of ears and thick tempting is unavoidable before it quickly moves over for the equally dramatic and incendiary rampage of No Fear. As a few songs on the album, its start is thrilling drama but whereas others at times never manage to live up to their entrance in the rest of their bodies, the song continues to build a theatre of craft and adventure, not forgetting an invigorating anthem that only leaves a hunger for more and more you get with the outstanding Take The Fight. Unafraid to throw in a dose of rock pop for its contagious chorus, it takes little time to see why the song raised such enthusiasm and focus when released previously, its potency just as fierce and forceful now.

The album is brought to a close by the sinew built, rhythm swinging Rock (Like You Mean It), a song which arguably feeds expectations a touch too much yet still grows to be a more flavoursome beast with every listen, and lastly the compelling croon and passion of the excellent Home, where musically and vocally Damn Dice just reinforce the diversity of their sound to give a last treat for ears.

The Great Unknown is nothing less than thorough enjoyment from start to finish with certain stretches where it really gets to grips with wants and tastes. Different songs will work for individual appetites but if hard rock and metal infused rock ‘n’ roll hits your sweet spot then Damn Dice and their album is well worthy of an hour of your time at the very least.

The Great Unknown is released August 24th through most stores.

RingMaster 24/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Silent Jack – Snakebite

SJ

    Silent Jack is one of those propositions where you pretty much know what you are going to get flavour wise but not necessarily the juicy way they unleash it on the senses. Hailing from Birmingham, the British quartet engage and riot with the imagination through a sound bred openly in eighties hard rock and filtered through a glam rock mischief. Their new release Snakebite is an exciting offering which provides all the attitude, endeavour, and enterprise needed to suspect that the band is on a path to strong recognition. The seven tracks which provide its rippling temptation is a mixed bagged when it comes to offering surprises to expectations but an unqualified success in contagiously recruiting thoughts and emotions into the fiery bosom of the band’s captivating presence.

Listening to the release you can easily assume the influences which have inspired the band, the likes of Motley Crue, Guns ‘n’ Roses, Hardcore Superstar, Ratt, Buckcherry, and Black Stone Cherry clear flavours throughout Snakebite. It is easy and arguably fair to say that there is little new or original within the encounter but that cannot take away from the thrills and spills which sparks the real enjoyment it consummately provides. Formed in 2009, Silent Jack has won over its home town tenfold and now it is looking to seduce the rest of the country and beyond, and though it might take more than this brawl of pleasure to achieve that they are easily on course and capable.

The band gets off to a flyer with opener Brand New Start, beats and riffs an immediate potent coaxing before the guitars of vocalist Rich Silent-Jack-Snakebite-Cover-300x300Mason and Adam Carson boil up the air with rapacious riffing and sonic flames. The bass of Dickie Spider brings dark intimidation into the mix next whilst drummer Scott Carson intensifies his punchy raps as the track expands into a stronger feisty stride. The guitars continue to snarl as Mason unveils his appealing vocals, the song already flowing infectiously across the senses as rhythmic swipes and a predatory tone adds to its persistent persuasion. The track has the potential to be a hard rock anthem in so many ways and with the sonic flair and adventure woven into the encounter by Adam Carson it is a virulent enticement which has imagination, appetite, and passions alive.

The following King Cobra is just as addictive, it’s rapping beats and more distant scrub of guitar a teasing entrance which easily leads greed into the heart of another blaze of accomplished rock ‘n’ roll stoked with flailing sinews and melodic acidity. As with the first the contagious call of the song is irrepressible and irresistible, the chorus call alone incitement to listener participation and emotions thirsty for more. Once again individual skills and ideation impress but together the band most light up ears and the continually bubbling promise of the band.

Going Down ensures the impressive start is continued, its salacious lure of guitar from the first breath of the song seducing instant submission which the rampaging rhythms and caustic riffery only accelerates. There is a great raw edge to the track which sets it apart from the first two and a groove which twists rapaciously around the imagination, persistently licking at the passions with its serpentine tongue. Once more maybe something truly different within hard rock is scarce in the songs, as the release, but unleashing such epidemically catchy and enthralling adventure as it does there are no complaints valid enough to defuse the enjoyment of the song.

A scorching fire of guitar sculpting and intense rhythmic pressure opens up the next up Love Factory to make an instant strong impression, the grumbling nature of the bass adding enticing intrigue to the satisfying invitation offered. A heated blues flames joins the blend soon, wrapping every twist and turn of the song as Silent Jack stomp once more with a skilled and confident swagger. Feet and voice are soon enslaved and enlisted by the stroll and infection of the song, its gait a compelling bait and chorus another which only the dead could ignore.

The first four songs are the pinnacle of Snakebite though the remaining trio of tracks still add to the stature and potential of the band as well as the pleasure gained from the release. The imposing ballad Angels Cry is first and easily shows the vocal prowess of Mason and emotive craft of the band’s songwriting within its shapely and flavoursome design. It does miss out on the spark of earlier tracks though to merely satisfy rather than potently excite as equally does Made In Heaven. The song like the previous one, is impressively sculpted and veined by sonic hues which ask for attention as the display of anthemic vocal tempting, but the trigger to make the encounter larger than life is absent. Nevertheless both songs and the closing Hot Luvin’ with its masterful teasing bring the release to an invigorating and pleasing conclusion.

Snakebite is a proposition which hard rock fans should take a punt on as you can see them devouring the release greedily. Certainly originality is low and a wish for some experimentation which would lead to a distinct character for the band would be welcome but it cannot deny that Silent Jack has delivered a very enjoyable encounter and have the wares to become a real force in European rock ‘n’ roll. It may take time but we are not betting against them.

The self-released Snakebite is available now!

https://www.facebook.com/silentjackband

8/10

RingMaster 08/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Boiling energies and contagious storms: an interview with Rikki from Sister

Rikki

Swedish metallers Sister has built and earned a strong reputation for their raw and voraciously energetic sounds as well as live performances which leave a swarm of other bands in the shade. Creating a mix of punk and sleaze rock with horror punk and metal bred tendencies, it is a contagious and at times anthemic brew which is increasing in potency all the time, as proven by the band’s brand new album Disguised Vultures. The release is an encounter which increases infectiously and addictively the more time you allow its persuasion,  proving the Stockholm quartet a band very hard to ignore or not find a sweet spot for. To learn more about the band we had the pleasure of talking with bassist Rikki, at the same time finding out about the new album, the band and horror punk, touring and much more…

Hi Rikki, welcome to the site and thanks for agreeing to talk with us.

What was the spark which brought Sister to life and did you have an immediate direction you wanted to explore?

Sister came to life in early 2006 and I joined one year later. There were a few years with all intentions of being a band reaching high but at the same time making all the mistakes and being all about having a good time all the time. Maybe one year before the debut album Hated, that was released 2011, we felt that we were something to be reckoned with without putting much effort into it and started thinking of what we could do if we make something real out of it. I think it pretty much was at that time all the things fell into the right places.

1743529_10152244327941694_138724050_nWe called your sound and album in our review of your brand new release Disguised Vultures, ‘Raw and contagious, seducing like Frankenstein Drag Queens from Planet 13 meets Crashdiet in a glam cast pit of degenerate rioting’. How would you describe the Sister incitement to newcomers?

You got the raw and contagious there and I like that he he. I would add a high energetic live act. We are a band that love being on stage and that’s our place in this world.

What are your most potent inspirations as a band and as an individual?

We are all about all kinds of music. From bands like Misfits and Guns n Roses to bands like Lynyrd Skynyrd and Roky Erickson. We get inspirations from everything around us. I find inspiration in everything I like and respect.

We mentioned new album Disguised Vultures earlier, your recently released second album; how were the feelings on the eve of its release and since?

Last album was a big chaotic process since we signed with Metal Blade and had to write songs, record and release an album in a pretty short time period. This time we had a lot of time getting everything done and deciding how to go through with it. Like the first time, we finished in the last second this time as well though. It has to be done that way I have learned by now. The songs were written one year ago so it feels great to finally get them out.

There seemed to be a rather strong anticipation and now a hungry appetite for the album, was this something even with your confidence in its potency you expected?

It’s the way it should be. Would be pretty boring the other way wouldn’t it. We just go for all the stuff we want to achieve with an album or whatever we are doing at the moment. I knew this album would be the perfect follow up to Hated and the new album really feels like a step in the right direction.

How do you see you music and style has evolved between Disguised Vultures and its predecessor?

I loved the fact that we recorded the drums, bass and rhythm guitar live this time. It was a thought that appeared very early, maybe shortly after the last album was released. That next time we’ll do it live in the studio. I think we achieved a more organic sound and it’s a much rawer and heavier sound than the last time. I think also it’s a more diverse album as well. On the debut it was all about fast punk songs. We are exploring more grounds this time.

sister 2Did you approach the new album differently to Hated, were there lessons learned first time around you could utilise and build on?

Yeah make sure you have time haha. Actually it could be a good thing to do an album without having the time to think about everything. It becomes very honest. But if problems turn up you are pretty fucked. We’ve learned a few things about being a band and to record the last couple of years as well. Not much but a few hehe.

You may disagreed but it seems like earlier releases, Hated and before that the Deadboys Making Noise EP, certainly lyrically and in sound may be too, embraced expectations with a typical horror punk provocation. Disguised Vultures feels like in both aspects Sister has moved on to try to evolve and sculpt its own identity. Has this been something you have given a focused attention to look at or it has been just an organic progression in your writing?

I actually have no idea when the horror label people put on us even took place. We have never written songs about horror movies or stuff like that. We write music about real life not after life haha. I guess when you look in a certain way people try to put you in the genre that they think is the closest one. We have always considered ourselves being a band that like a lot of different music genres and we have since the EP just decided not to think about genres and just play what we want. It is always different depending who you talk to. Some say we are sleaze, some say horror, some say just pure punk music. I consider us being a bit more confusing genre wise than just being just one of those.

Tell us about the recording of the new album. Did you have a deliberate intent with it and its sound?

Our friend Martin Sweet produced it and Linus Nirbrant did the mix together with him. The mix process took the longest to get right since we really knew from the start what we wanted. We were very much, like always, involved in all parts of the process. We knew what we wanted to do and how to do it and since we have worked with Martin earlier we know each other very well. He got us from the start.

Do you write songs and have them worked out fully before the recording process or a band which likes to create predominantly in the studio environment?

Everything was written half a year before we entered the studio. You always make a few changes in the studio but the main stuff was already written this time. On the first album we changed more while recording than this time.

How does the writing process within Sister play out generally?

Someone has a song which is taken to the rehearsal. Usually there is a melody or a half-finished song and then we pretty much finish the song in there. It can be very different from song to song but usually it’s like that.

Are you more often than not a put the lyrics to music band or vice versa?

It can be either way.

There is a definite anthemic and stand up against the wrongs of society etc. provocation to your songs lyrically which transfers to sister 4the music on the album, but how much do personal issues, reflections, or experiences also inspire your songs?

Cari and Jamie have written the lyrics on this album. Some songs are pure angst about things and some more complex. The song Disguised Vultures for example is about the clash between the world on tour and the world back home. On tour playing in front of big crowds and then being back home without any money and all that. It can be two very different worlds.

Disguised Vultures like its predecessor has been unleashed on Metal Blade Records; they seem like a rewarding home for Sister?

Yeah it’s been good. Their reputation and arms reach out over most parts of the world and that can be very good for us of course.

The band has toured and played around Europe extensively over the years, as well as playing at some prestigious festivals; the biggest highlights for you so far?

Playing the big stage right before Mastodon on Sonisphere Madrid 2012 was a highlight of course. I can get used to doing that stuff haha. The tours with Hardcore Superstar, Crashdiet and Wednesday 13 have been really good as well. We have played in northern Europe a lot since the EP (Germany has been like a second home country hehe) so it has been great playing in Italy, Spain and France the last couple of years. Our first two tours in the UK were done last year and were awesome as well. Hope to be back there real soon!

Is there any particular country or nationality of fans which unite and ignite to Sister over all others?

It’s been real good all over Europe the last few years. Northern Italy has always been crazy. Manchester and London on the UK tours have been awesome. Paris was really great, Berlin as well. Hard to pick a favourite.

sister 3What does Sister have in store for 2014 now the album is out?

We are in the middle of discussions about some real cool stuff tour wise. We’ll see if it can be done. It would be big! The booked official stuff is a release party here in Stockholm in the middle of February and some shows in Sweden and Finland. We just want to hit the roads soon!

Big thanks for chatting with us; any parting thoughts you would like to leave the readers contemplating?

Likewise! If you haven’t been to a Sister show, make sure that you do when we’re around! And check out our album Disguised Vultures!

Read the Disguised Vultures review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/01/21/sister-disguised-vultures/

www.sisterofficial.com

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 14/02/2014

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