Bulletproof Rose – Loud Hard Fast

Bulletproof Rose Promo Picture

Its title is Loud Hard Fast and that just about sums up the new EP from UK rockers Bulletproof Rose, though to that you can add enjoyable if unsurprising. That lack of originality is not necessarily a bad thing in the hands of strong musicians and it is fair to say that the Cumbria quartet is that, and certain familiarity bred from inspirations can often add a captivating essence to songs, which again generally applies here, but for long term and potent persuasion on a national appetite will it be enough for Bulletproof Rose to make a breakthrough we have to wonder.

Hailing from Workington and formed in 2012 with the current line-up uniting last year, Bulletproof Rose has certainly bred a mighty reputation for their live performances and tenacious rock ‘n’ roll locally, spreading further afield in recent times. Drawing on influences like AC/DC, Guns N Roses, and Motley Crue, all open from the first breath of the EP, the band is on a steady rise which Loud Hard Fast can only reinforce, though by how much time will tell.

The song Bulletproof Rose sets the riot rolling, the guitars of Jacob Siddle and Brian Robinson ruffling air and ears with raucous, if restrained riffs as the heavy jabs of drummer Dan Wallace punctuate their caustic tempting. The song is soon into a captivating and more predatory stroll though, the bass of Dane Riach adding throaty enticement as the vocals of Siddle bring their roar into play. Feet and emotions are soon fully engaged by this point, the thumping antagonism of rock ‘n’ roll and fevered energy an easy contagion to be infected by whilst the soaring solos work on the imagination. As suggested earlier there is little to surprise in the band’s sound and subsequently song but it still provides a heavily engaging proposal that feet and satisfaction cannot turn down

Bulletproof Rose Cover Art   The following Gypsy explores a blues/classic rock landscape with fiery riffs and strong armed rhythms. It is a song growing in strength as the intensity aggressively rises within the song but in turn losing a little of that potency when relaxing around moments of melodic and sonic enterprise as band vocal calls try to being an anthemic climate into play. There is certainly the spark of its predecessor lacking in the song but has enough to involve voice and appetite before making way for My Girl. Immediately there is a rawer volatile punk essence and attitude to the song, riffs and beats adding more of a snarl to their presence matched by the impressing voice of Siddle. Expectations are barely challenged across the song but it is another occasion where a juicy and inventive solo aligned to raucous exploits easily compensate.

Bang Your Head is the same, familiarity soaking every aspect but countered by an anthemic roar, the strongest moment on the EP in that respect, and the infectiousness fuelling the encounter. It’s most potent weaponry though is the outstanding guitar prowess igniting the song, especially in a twin solo strike. In some ways the rest of the song cannot quite back this up but again as feet and voice are fully recruited to its cause, there is no doubting that the song provides a fun and pleasing time.

The EP ends with its title track, a song opening on a great seventies rock n’ roll riff which is as much glam, a la Sweet, as it is dirty, i.e. Motorhead. Riffs and rhythms simply gnaw and pound away at the senses, whilst vocally Siddle offers a punkish tone which only adds to the irresistible theatre of rock ‘n’ roll romping with the listener. The downing of aggression for a calmer passage does not quite work for personal tastes, its predacious prowling good but defused by the distance from it guitars are taken by the production, though it all evens out again before the song ends on a highly appetising finale crafted by the impressive and thrilling enterprise of Siddle and Robinson.

It would be wrong to say that enjoyment with Loud Hard Fast was anything but full and as a first introduction to Bulletproof Rose it is a pleasing proposition from a band with some mean creative and technical skills. For real originality and surprises though we will have to wait and hope they are next on the agenda for the band.

The Loud Hard Fast EP is available from 27th April from all digital stores.

https://www.facebook.com/BulletproofRose

RingMaster 27/04/2015

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Hellbound Hearts – The Proximity Effect

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It was 2013 when UK rockers Hellbound Hearts caught our ears and imagination with their potential ridden and thoroughly thrilling Outside EP. It was one of those encounters which simply brought energetic and eager life to feet and emotions whilst impressively building on their already well-received self-titled EP of 2011, the year the band emerged. Now they have returned with their thumping new persuasion, The Proximity Effect, an EP which not only realises much of the promise of its predecessors but sets out a new recipe of inspiring adventure to be explored ahead.

The time between the last and new EP seems to have been a testing time for the York band; personnel changes, health issues, and recording issues thorns in building on their already potent presence and reputation. Now the trio of vocalist/guitarist Danny Lambert (ex-Terrorvision), bassist Craig McLaren, and drummer Billy James Mitchell (ex-Glitterati) have overcome all obstacles and unleashed their finest irresistible slab of rock ‘n’ roll yet. Already the band has unleashed their renowned live performances on the year, sure to continue in the vein which earned them success and high praise through performances with the likes of Black Spiders, JettBlack, The Treatment, Terrorvision, Sons of Icarus and Warrior Soul in the past. It is The Proximity Effect which will be the prime weapon in whipping up the broadest national attention though, something it has already begun sparking since its release.

Posters In The Sun descends on ears first, opening with a caress of raw but inviting guitar accompanied by a just as dirty riff, and soon finding heavy beats adding to the tempting. Once the dark tones of McLaren’s bass infuse their increasingly alluring enterprise, the track is stomping with punk attitude and rock ‘n’ roll voracity. Vocals bring their melodic roar to the web of hooks and captivating riffs soon after whilst Mitchell’s swinging sticks just seem to get more compelling and tenacious, much as the song. It is all coloured by a rock pop infectiousness which early on begins to blossom inside the encounter and ripen especially in its chorus. The song is the spice of addiction and makes one highly enjoyable and gripping start to the EP.

The following Ones And Zeros makes a just as imaginative entrance, a weave of melodic chords being accosted and complimented by a great resonance of throaty bass. Swiftly more aggressive than its predecessor but no less virulent, the song prowls and strolls across verse and chorus as a torrent of addictive hooks, musically and vocally, colour the first stage and a mellower catchiness lighting up the latter. Again there is a punk tenacity to the mix of metal and hard rock, resulting in a gripping blaze of sound around a host of creative and vocal temptations.

There is a grungier air to Bones next, a mellower essence which wraps around the alternative metal canvas. Equally though there is a raw aggressive edge to it all which lines the more voracious passages of the song. Riffs and hooks especially ignite thoughts and appetite whilst the punchy beats just keep it all caged in a slightly intimidating frame. Not as immediately infectious as the first two, the track is a growing and mighty persuasion revealing another new twist and flavouring to the band’s songwriting and sound.

Overall there feels a harsher nature, more volatile character to the EP than its predecessor. It never actually erupts in hostility but the danger is there and the songs all benefit from it, as shown by the closing Silence Falls. The last track has an open familiarity to it, bred from its pop punk and alternative rock collusion as much as anything, and is soon seducing with thick melodies and bracing riffs matched by addiction forging rhythms. Stirring up imagination and the pleasures alike with potent and magnetic enterprise, the song is a formidable and mouth-watering end to a similarly impacting release.

It may have been a turbulent 2014 for Hellbound Hearts but they are back, and on even more impressive form with a sound and creative adventure to match. If you are looking for feisty rock ‘n’ roll to invigorate your daily soundtrack then The Proximity Effect is a wise and thrilling choice.

The Proximity Effect EP is available now @ http://hellboundhearts.bandcamp.com/album/the-proximity-effect

http://www.hellboundhearts.com/   https://www.facebook.com/wearehellboundhearts

RingMaster 19/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Dead Shed Jokers – Self Titled

Dead Shed jokers new cover

Released two years ago, the Peculiar Pastimes EP unleashed one of our persistently favourite songs of the past few years in the frenetic and inventive shape of its title track. Now its creators, Welsh rockers Dead Shed Jokers return with their new album, a self-titled affair which is fiery and explosive rock ‘n’ roll at its multi-coloured imaginative best. Across eight tracks, band and sound brew a tempestuous and riveting riot of captivating enterprise and incendiary adventure drawing on every form of rock music you can imagine for one individual and exciting devilment.

Hailing from Aberdare/Merthyr, Dead Shed Jokers impressed with debut album Peyote Smile in 2011. It awoke the UK scene to a new almost mischievously inventive band which the Peculiar Pastimes EP reinforced with its title track alone. The rest of its tracks were live cuts which confirmed that on stage the band was just as furiously explosive and compelling too. All the attributes and qualities of both releases have been pushed on again with the Pity My Brain Records released new album, but equally an even greater impacting, attention grabbing diversity and maturity has festered inside the band’s songwriting and sound. The result a release which is as unpredictable as it is stormy and as fascinating as it is immediately contagious.

The album opens with Dafydd’s Song and instantly throws a wall of fiery grooves and imposing rhythms against ears. Its melodic toxicity and scorching guitar endeavour has the imagination whipped up just as quickly too, especially as classic rock tones align to the drama of the vocals now riding the ferocious wave of sound and adventure. There is a theatre to song and sound, something evolving to matching success across the remainder of the album, and coloured by the increasingly impressive vocals and spicy grooving.

From a sensational start things mellow with Delay the Morning. Well for its start anyway as gentle melodies court a scuzzier atmosphere. Once the vocal roar erupts though so the intensity of the encounter grows, every element uniting in a bracing storm of sonic hooks, tangy grooves, and driving rhythms wrapped in raw energy. There is a touch of bands like The Dropper’s Neck and Damn Vandals to the song especially in its punkish psyche lit elements which equally only adds to the intriguing and addictive character of the outstanding creative brawl.

A Cautionary Tale as its predecessor begins its tempting with a gentler coaxing before flexing its rhythmic muscles and sonic sinews for a theatre of explosive rock ‘n’ roll. There is a carnival-esque quality to its underlying swing whilst the busy sounds around it weave a tapestry of everything from alternative and progressive rock to dark and psychedelic rock ‘n’ roll. Intimidating and transfixing, the excellent offering makes way for Memoirs of Mr Bryant, the band’s recent single. Rich in blues hues and face melting energy, the track bellows and stomps with aggression and tempestuous intent, at times seeming to flirt with the senses but for the main treating them to a furnace of invention and power.

The volcanic and ferocity of the album seems to kick up another gear with Made in Vietnam, as does the infectiousness and warped ideation. A rugged assault in some moments, a sultry seducing in others, the track is a maze of sonic endeavour and melodic flaming employing a volatile fusion of stoner, hard, and blues rock. Once again ears and appetite are inspired to offer lustful reactions, as they are also with the enthralling Love is Diseased which follows. Swimming through a psychedelic haze, the song ebbs and flows in intensity, increasingly tightening its grip on thoughts and psyche with vocal harmonies, furious riffs, and sweltering grooving, not forgetting the submerged but open catchiness at its core.

The release is brought to a fine end by firstly the irresistible raucous stroll of Rapture Riddles, a blistering stomp of searing creative intrigue and vocal drama, and lastly Exit Stage Left (Applause). The final song is a voice and piano led calm after the tempest of creative fury igniting the rest of the album, and another enjoyable twist in the adventure of the release. It too has a fierce edge which emerges towards the song’s closing touch showing that even in more peaceful waters there is never a moment where you can make assumptions about the songwriting and invention of Dead Shed Jokers.

Rock ‘n’ roll can come in many forms, and most infused into this album, but often there is that final spark of creative danger and bravery missing. Dead Shed Jokers are fuelled by it and it is at its most accomplished and exciting on their new release. Now it is time for the world to show the same boldness, grab a listen, and reap the rewards.

Dead Shed Jokers is out now via Pity My Brain Records digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/dead-shed-jokers/id983757315 and on CD where the first 100 will receive some extra goodies via https://deadshedjokers.bigcartel.com

https://www.facebook.com/DeadShedJokers

RingMaster 14/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Vie Jester – Etches In Aether

Photography by Jess Santana

Vie Jester may be a new name and unknown quantity to you right now but if they continue producing offerings like Etches In Aether, they will soon become a heavily talked about and devoured proposition. Progressive and hard rock, alternative and melodic metal, they and more are all woven into the attention and imagination grabbing tracks five track proposal, a skilled and exciting tempest of diverse sounds uniting in one seriously compelling and thoroughly enjoyable encounter.

Vie Jester hail from L.A. and consist of vocalist/guitarist Kyle Edward Guerrero, bassist/vocalist Jaime Salas, and drummer/vocalist Cliff Conway. They cite influences such as Tool, Mastodon, Mars Volta, Kanivool, Soundgarden, Deftones, Queens of The Stone Age, Pantera and many more in their own creativity, that list alone hinting at the diversity of the band’s sound. 2013 saw the release of the three-track debut EP Cognisense, a seemingly well-received entrance by the band, but just the groundwork for the impressive Etches In Aether to now take things further

vie jester cover   The EP swiftly has attention and appetite for its sounds awake and hungry through opener Saint. Electro like rubs tease initially, stimulating the imagination with their spicy textures as a mellow sigh of vocals caresses the senses. It is a striking and intriguing start soon leading to a bedlamic expulsion of voice and sound which in turn unlocks the heart and might of the song. A great throaty bassline emerges as even more flavoursome vocals add to the great start whilst rhythms strike with potent jabs and sonic enterprise continues to flirt with ears and thoughts. Equipped with a virulent chorus and an evolving array of creative spicery, the Tool meets Pigeon Lake sounding like track is simply outstanding, a glorious opening to the EP and broad introduction to the band.

Hollow Graffiti has it all to do to match such an immense start but is soon holding its own with another sparkling electronic like essence from the guitar of Guerrero setting things off. With a brooding yet feisty tone to the bass of Salas and punchy beats from Conway, the song casts its own unique and gripping creative narrative in sound and lyrical persuasion, more swift evidence of the variety filling the EP. Vocally the three unite to create Queens of The Stone Age sounding harmonies, inspirations again open but continuing adventure and ideation at the melodic heart of the song is a sonic exploration all Vie Jester.

The following Meridians enters on a prowl of a gait, its rhythmic muscles and intensity heavy but soon tempered by the colourful designs being unveiled by guitar and vocals. The song is a transfixing mix of imposing shadows and colour rich light in texture and character, the dark nature of bass and drums encroaching on the flames of the melodies and the warm seduction of the guitar igniting the track’s portentous corners. More of a slow burner than its predecessors, despite making an immediate thrilling impact, it grows to be another pungent example of the band’s potential and already established invention.

A mellower and almost jazzy climate wraps Dig It next, its air sultry and hazy whilst its core is a rich blaze of melodic intensity and vocal emotion. As in all the songs, there is also an infectiousness which oozes from every groove and rhythmic enticing but also from the more experimental aspects of songwriting and sound. It too takes a little more time to find the same place in thoughts and passions as those before but undoubtedly succeeds over time.

As it started Etches In Aether ends on a pinnacle, the release bookended by two major triumphs around nothing but exciting endeavours. Amplify slips in without any major declaration, almost worming its way into ears and affections sneakily but in no time has both enslaved. Vocals and melodies flame with intensity throughout its body whilst the bass discovers a grouchy snarl which only adds to the increasing drama and lure of the song, which itself is a temptation growing within ears and emotions with every note, harmony, and spark of imagination.

If any of the names referenced as inspirations above grab then Vie Jester should be a must investigation, though as Etches In Aether shows, you should not expect to hear anything particularly similar either. The band has its own creative agenda and one, as suggested earlier, with the promise of major rewards if more exciting releases like this are unleashed.

Etches In Aether is available now digitally @ https://viejester.bandcamp.com/album/etches-in-aether and physically via http://www.viejester.com/store

http://www.viejester.com/     https://www.facebook.com/viejester

RingMaster 09/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

 

 

A.D.D. – Core

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It may be labelled as hard rock, but the roar of sound which escapes the craft and imagination of Chicago band A.D.D. is just as much metal and punk, and very often more so. It is a fiery and aggressive mix which makes the band’s second album Core, one of the most enjoyable slabs of voracious rock ‘n’ roll to be heard this year and most likely moving forward. It is a release which does not dramatically startle yet leaves ears and emotions seriously gripped and hungry. It is not an obvious classic encounter either yet can stand toe to toe with those which might be offered such label in creative tenacity and sheer pleasure. However you see and hear it though, Core is an encounter which does what all great rock albums do, leaves the listener breathless, adrenaline soaked, and highly excited.

Though still a young band A.D.D. (Analog Digital Disorder) are no strangers to attention and increasing acclaim. Their first album was been an eagerly devoured and purchased introduction on CD and download whilst live the quartet has only impressed and built a potent stature through shows with the likes of Korn, Chevelle, Halestorm, Sevendust, Alterbridge, and Buckcherry amongst many. Equally they have played and left events like Throttlefest, Summerfest, and WIIL Rockfest with success and praise soaking their wake. Now the band is ready to breach the broadest spotlights with Core, and such the impact on personal ears it is hard to see them losing any momentum in their ascent, indeed only accelerating it. Mixed by Tadpole (Disturbed, 3 Doors Down, Staind) and mastered by Grammy Award winner Trevor Sadler, the Pavement Entertainment released album hits the sweet spot straight away and never relinquishes its ultimate grip again.

I Regret sets things off in immense style, the track an instantly robust punch of rhythms and an aggressive snarl of riffs bound in spicy sonic tempting. There is grouchiness to its attitude, epitomised by the throaty growl of bass, and an instantly matching snarl to the voice and delivery of Matilda Moon (Margaret Young). Her vocals roar and soar with emotion and aggression across the song, simultaneously offering a warm and melodic vitriol which reminds of punk metallers Mongrel and their front lady Jessica Sierra, and indeed the song has a feel of their US compatriots but in openly individual ways. It is a mouth-watering opening to Core, melodies and harmonies as ripe and pungent as the more hostile elements of the outstanding encounter.

Print     The following Not My Way comes with a more even tempered but no less compelling presence. Moon and guitar embrace ears initially with expressive restraint before the track erupts with predatory riffs and heavy jabbing beats in a furious and highly flavoursome weave of sound. Part confrontation but more magnetic croon, the song captivates and tantalises with evolving adventure. The guitars of Dave Adams and Jeremy Sparta alone absorb an eager appetite but aligned to the pungent rhythms and Moon’s increasingly impressive tones, it is a mouth-watering trap for the imagination and passions.

Hear Me Now steps up next with muscles openly flexing in every swiping beat from Jason Delismon as aggression wraps every snarled syllable from Moon. Though it has a fuller melodic rock canvas to its thick bellow, there is still that metallic intensity and punkish roar at large, the track all the better for it, and something missing from Was My Life next. It should be noted not everyone will feel the same about the song, but for personal tastes it is one of two times where the album goes astray. Led by the vocals of Sparta, who right away we emphasize has an impressive voice and embraces the soft/hard rock balladry of the song with skill and inventive colour, the track simply breaks the flow and charge of the album with its soft hearted endeavour. It is a potent showing of another side to the band’s sound and songwriting but feels out of place in the surge of the release. It is a personal thing though and as the saying sort of goes, “it’s not them it’s me”.

Attention and emotions are flying and rigorously enthused again with the voracious Damn Thing, a rhythmic trap of a song with bracing and soaring melodies aligned to matching harmonies. Crossing a volatile landscape of ideation and aggressive sound, the guitars and Moon simply enthral across the song’s lively length. Their passion and invention helps build an anthemic incitement which is imposing and rewarding from start to finish whilst the closing snarl of the song just sends shivers and tingles down the spine, a reaction swiftly soothed by the melodic charm and warm caress of So The Pain. Vocally and lyrically emotive, and soaked in an angst lit aural embrace, the track blossoms a provocative web which brings whispers of one of the band’s influences, Heart, as well as more classic rock imagination through the guitars. The fade-out is disappointing but the song a fascinating and exciting encounter showing even more of the depths to A.D.D.

Nightmare is next and also explores a broader and calmer weave of melodic rock but comes littered with dramatic and inventive twists from guitars and vocals around a carnivorous spine of bass and drums, whilst its successor Nothing Left, sees the band turning back to the more recognisable hard and classic rock recipe but with a fiery and thrilling intent to its melody rich power ballad canvas. It also has a tempestuous air and agitated nature in riffs and rhythms which makes for an unpredictable and highly enjoyable proposal.

So Much is seeded from that classic bed of inspiration also but this time as with Was My Life, lies like a cuckoo in the cradle of the album despite also being a skilfully and impressively sculpted proposition. As the earlier song, others will devour it with greed and rightfully so, but for our tastes it finds barren ground and a want to dive into album closer Black to keep the exhilarating growl and tempest of Core in top gear. The closing song is a beast of a track, from vocals to riffs and rhythms to sonic toxicity, a predator of ears and emotions unafraid to add tangy spicily coated melodies and harmonies to its seduction. As it started, Core goes out on a pinnacle, finishing off nothing but lofty peaks to be honest, despite a couple of aberrations in our likes.

A.D.D. is a band poised to leap into the big time, if not with Core certainly sometime ahead, and with seriously thrilling albums like this already fuelling their rise, it would be stupid for anyone to wait.

Core is available now via Pavement Entertainment on CD @ http://official-a-d-d-store.myshopify.com/collections/frontpage/products/a-d-d-core-cd and digitally on most online stores.

A.D.D. has upcoming live shows at…

Fri. Mar. 27th – Mojoes – Joliet, IL – HEADLINE CD Release show

Sat. Apr. 4th – Crazy Coyote – Burlington, IA

Sat. Apr. 11th – Freakster’s Roadhouse – HEADLINE – Pontiac, IL

Thu. April 16th – Nevin’s – HEADLINE – Plainfield, IL

Fri. Apr. 24th – On the Rox w/ Wayland – Jacksonville, IL

Thu. May 7th – Mojoes w/ Black Stone Cherry – Joliet, IL

Sun. May 10th – High Noon Saloon w/ Y&T – Madison, WI

Sat. June 5th – Metal Grill – Milwaukee, WI

Fri. July 17th – Rockfest – Cadott, WI

https://www.facebook.com/Analog.Digital.Disorder

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The Senton Bombs – Phantom High

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If there is one thing predictable about UK rockers The Senton Bombs, it is that they will persistently offer feisty dirt encrusted, punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll. You can always assume a fresh fiery breath driving each and every offering unleashed by the Blackpool hailing quartet too. It has so far been that way since the band’s first album, Sweet Chin Music of 2009, and it continues with new EP Phantom High. Consisting of five diverse songs all bred from punk ‘n’ roll aggression and carrying a hard rock swagger, the encounter is quite simply an attitude loaded stomp of raw and feverishly flavoursome rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in 2004, The Senton Bombs has been a regular draw of praise and increasing attention thanks to their passion driven live performances and trio of albums, of which Chapter Zero in 2013, brought the thickest wave of acclaim yet. You know what you are going to get with the band; sounds and songs which devour the energy out of the body and feed the instinctive rocker in us all, but equally each of their releases to date has pushed the band’s music and invention in bold strides and ahead of the band’s fourth album later this year, Phantom High is exactly the same. It suggests a new strength of diversity emerging in their songwriting but similarly an even more potent roar and snarl of the rock incitement which sets them apart from most.

The EP opens with its title track, and from the initial sonic scythe of sound, swiftly has ears, feet, and emotions engaged in its adrenaline soaked charge. Vocalist Joey Class uncages his recognisable and alluring tones almost as soon as riffs rub invitingly on ears and rhythms jab with eager intent. Guitarists Damien Kage and Johnny Gibbons proceed to weave a bait of aggressive riffery and spicy enterprise as the track continues its contagious stomp, a solo especially tangy on the ear, whilst drummer Scott Mason and the bass lines of Class sculpt a frame to it all which is anthemic as the roar of the song itself.

10520105_10153295061197281_6683385127408093904_nThe track is an irresistible persuasion and straight away matched by the similarly outstanding Lights Over Phoenix. Whereas the first song was a riot of dirty hard rock and aggressive punk tenacity, the first single from the EP is a more pop punk seeded infection. Small but potently coaxing riffs are aligned to the equally mellower delivery of Class’ sandy tones, a tempting entrance which instantly has ears keen and toes tapping. Bass and beats need little prompting to add their punchy contributions soon after whilst the guitars flame and entice with gripping eagerness and temptation. A more restrained but no less addictive romp to the first, the track strides with unbridled infectiousness and tantalising enterprise creating an encounter sounding vaguely like a mix of Turbonegro and Hagfish, but ultimately all Senton Bombs.

   Black Chariot slows the energies down if not the enthusiasm for the release next. It is a blues rock spawned prowl, employing more classic and southern rock flavouring than anything they have bred before. The vocals are impressive, cleaner and clearer than those usually offered by Class and just as compelling, and  easy to hope they are used more ahead, but in tandem with the dirtier delivery.

The excellent croon of a song allows a breath to be taken by the listener too, enabling a restocking of energy before Passions of the Passive Aggressive unveils its own blues rock inspired bellow of aggressive and chest thumping, belligerent rock ‘n’ roll. Actually the song does not really explode at any point but through its taunting stalking of ears and urgent eruptions of intensity and scorching voracity, it again has limbs, neck muscles, and emotions inflamed.

Phantom High is finished off by the excellent Surf 6-66, again hard and classic rock thrust into incendiary punk ferocity. Think The Ramones embroiled with Mötley Crüe and you get an inkling of the lingering devilry bringing it all to a mighty close. The excellent song epitomises the EP as a whole, The Senton Bombs sound we have come to eagerly devour navigating new variety and insatiably captivating waters.

Phantom High is not a stop gap release before the band’s new album but a massive teaser of bigger and bolder things to come from the band giving further evidence that The Senton Bombs are one of those shaping a new heyday for British rock ‘n roll.

Phantom High is available from March 23rd via Holier Than Thou Records

http://www.sentonbombs.com/bio   https://www.facebook.com/thesentonbombs

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

https://holierthanthourecords.bandcamp.com/track/lights-over-phoenix

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Zoner – Euharmonic Elevation

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Here we have an album which if in the mind to, you could pick at and suggest a few deficiencies but there is no escaping it is also one compelling and enjoyable proposition. The release in question is Euharmonic Elevation, the second album from rock/metal band Zoner. That is a simple description for a proposition with a sound which draws on a myriad of styles and flavours in its almost deranged invention. Release and band are a one of a kind, though each also draws on open inspirations which we will come to shortly. It all results in a collection of songs which hold few major surprises yet are one big and riveting surprise.

Zoner is the solo project of Antonis Demetriou, a musician and songwriter hailing from Nicosia, Cyprus. His music as mentioned is bred from a vast array of spices across numerous decades, and his band as described by Demetriou himself, “a rock/metal band with influences ranging from ‘ABBA to Zappa’ via all the VERY best in pop, rock, prog, punk, funk, disco, hard, heavy and thrash!” 2012 saw the release of debut album Spectraphonic Deviation, and now the artist returns with its successor, again a self-released, recorded, and produced offering, deserving of intrigued attention.

As opening track In the Name of Creativity establishes itself in ears, the first thing with captivates about the sound is its strange similarity to Bill Nelson, well his Red Noise guise certainly. Zoner is a more voracious and heavier proposition but from vocals to the sonic invention, there is a definite if coincidental feel of the ex-Be Bop Deluxe man to proceedings. The first track strides with muscular rhythms and stirring riffs from its initial sonic invitation, swiftly settling into a heavy rock and classic metal fusion. Vocally Demetriou is engaging and though he is arguably not a natural vocalist, any weaker moments are more than compensated by his inventive expression. The song itself continues on to explore new progressive and melodic textures, its technical intricacies as potent as the simplicity in which everything successfully fits together.

The enjoyable start is swiftly continued by the stronger lures of Hail Rock ‘n’ Roll, a rock ‘n’ pop romp living up to its title with hook laden riffs and an equally addictive bassline. Thumping beats only add to the contagious drama whilst the swing of the song forms the lead into a catchy chorus as flirtatious as the intrigue wrapped guitar work. Its finale of persistent title chants is irresistible and sets ears and imagination up nicely for the melodic elegance and croon of Patience of a Saint. A smouldering landscape of sonic enterprise, the song is an easily endearing encounter. The vocals are similarly mellow and it all makes for a partly mesmeric offering until it unlocks its heart of classic rock tenacity. It loses some of its grip from this point but still holds attention with unpredictable twists and keys sculpted tempting.

Politics of Modern Love steps in next and soon steals top honours on the album. The song makes a low key start, coaxing the listener gently before revealing a predatory prowl of riffs and dark toned vocals. It is a transfixing and thrilling turn, a post punk/ experimental adventure with a minimalistic air leading to a full blaze of striking imagination and creative exploration.

Both A Wasted Life and Are You the One keep ears and appetite satisfied, the first again bringing an eighties new wave/ post punk tempting to its theatrical hard rock canvas. As its predecessor, the track is riveting scenery of pungent sonic interplay and tenacious enterprise, an enthralling dance with recognisable flavours and expectations defeating invention. Its successor is equally unpredictable but does not have the same success with personal tastes. At times it is a stirring and invigorating exploit but in other moments, especially its start, leaves emotions flat. When it does hit the mark though, primarily when it unleashes its aggression, the song is a feisty enjoyment ending on a much loftier peak then where it started.

Early thoughts and expectations of The Sabbath Waltz arising from its name alone are soon confirmed by its muscular riffs and heavily landed rhythms. It is heavy metal with a sinister tang and melodic flaming, but again reaping spices from previous decade in its colourful web of sound and creative thought. Imposingly magnetic, the track crawls over senses and psyche, leaving another lingering lure easy to want to hear more of.

The closing Turning Point of No Return is an acoustic crafted ballad with Latin bred drama and character, another which misses our appetite but easy to see being a rich pleasure for others. It is a decent end to a release which keeps luring attention back its way. It has shortcomings; the production in certain areas shallow and not helping vocals at times but Demetriou himself has admitted that he is not really an engineer/producer but handles these tasks out of necessity. It cannot defuse the core quality, passion, and invention of the music and songs though. There are also other elements which at times you might wish for something different or for them to be tweaked but it is all relative to taste and again only increases the weight of the potential of the artist and sound, suggesting that given the chance to record with the right people and circumstances, Zoner might just have something very special lurking inside.

Euharmonic Elevation is available now on CD and across most digital stores.

http://www.zonermusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/zonermusic

RingMaster 17/03/2015

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