Bear Bone Company – Self Titled

BBC_RingMaster Review

We are always up for an artist letting their music do all the talking compared to others which spew suggestions of being the next best thing then bringing disappointment with a formula or uneventful sound, but there are some who go too far the other way and do themselves no favours by being as secretive about themselves as an orgy in a vicarage. One such band is Swedish rockers Bear Bone Company, an outfit with a sound which takes ears and body on an invigorating ride but keeps pretty much silent when it comes to self-promotion. With a stonking self-titled debut album recently unleashed via Sliptrick Records making a rich roar though things hopefully will become livelier for and with the band, a result the powerhouse of tenacious rock ‘n’ roll certainly deserves.

What we can tell you about Bear Bone Company is that they come from the Örebro area of their homeland, were formed in 2012, and now have a line-up of guitarist/vocalist B.K., bassist/backing vocalist J.Martin, and drummer Knauz. Their sound is a healthy blend of classic and modern heavy rock with spices of metal, and their first album is produced by Ronny Milianowicz (Dionysus, Sinergy, Saint Demon). More we cannot say but that is fine as the album is worthy of all the attention anyway.

bearbone-_RingMaster Review     It opens with Fade and instantly has ears entangled in a tasty groove within firmly probing rhythms. Bass and guitar only increase their individual lures as the song expands to embrace the impressive tones of B.K. and the rousing air of the song. As to be heard across the album, there is something familiar to the band’s sound, the likes of Theory Of A Deadman and Black Stone Cherry amongst a few brought to mind, yet as the song shows there is a fresh and rich edge which is distinctive Bear Bone Company, the outstanding Kiss N Tell swift confirmation. The second song enters on a grouchy rhythmic and spicily sonic stride, relaxing into a more recognisable prowl soon after whilst still retaining its initial irritated nature. The band crooned chorus offers additional Poison meets Velvet Revolver like revelry but it is the antagonistic side of the mighty song and its searing flames of guitar which stirs the imagination most.

Both the excellent Don’t Belong and the rigorously enticing Burkitt Lymphoma hold ears and attention tight, the first with a more controlled and even tempered hard rock character wrapped in fiery textures and enterprise and its successor through a steamy wash of guitar and again fearsome riffs. The latter though also slips into a more comfortable melodic prowess and catchy endeavour to keep its body unpredictable and fascinating. Once more major surprises are scarce but there is no escaping the sound is gripping and all Bear Bone Company.

The anthemic blaze of Down In Flames provides a stirring incitement next, B.K. as vocally strong and impressive as ever as the song stalks the senses and treats the ears with its bluesy intoxication whilst Bear Bone rocks like a predator in heat, grooves and riffs casting a primal rock ‘n’ roll swing as the bass venomously snarls. Both tracks hit the sweet spot before the predacious allure and presence of Way Back Home casts its sonic web over the imagination and by now a fully eager appetite for the release. Every track upon the album is in some ay a fire of anthemic tendencies, this one more of a smouldering pyre of enterprise which burns its way into the memory and a lingering appreciation.

Drinkin’ Time stomps with zeal loaded rock ‘n’ roll next, its easy presence not living up to what has come before yet still leaving satisfaction keen whilst Hangin’, another maybe promising more than delivering for personal tastes, strolls along with an infectious nature and accomplished body to easily please. Neither quite catches the imagination, though it again is just individual tastes involved, and both overshadowed by the emotive weight and call of Fallin’ Down. Its tangy grooves and persistent riffery is simply flavoursome bait alongside a similarly weighty lure of vocals, all spun around the potent rhythms of Knauz to strong success.

The final pair of songs upon the album add further tinder to its fire, Life’s About engagingly tangling classic rock and metal with soaring vocals and prowling rhythms whilst Suicide canters through ears with attitude soaking its intent and an inner fire fuelling its punk/heavy rock ‘n’ roll predation. It is a tremendous close to a rather potent and thoroughly agreeable encounter, an album easy to keep returning to and roaring along with to the neglect of others.

Hopefully the release and assumes success of the album will inspire Bear Bone Company to reveal more of themselves and even more so push their presence into the faces of potential fans as there are surely plenty of unaware heavy rock appetites waiting to be fired up by the Swedish trio.

The Bear Bone Company album is out now through most online stores via Sliptrick Records.

Pete RingMaster 12/11/2015

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Theia – Take The Pill

THEIA_RingMaster Review

The ‘medicinal’ value of the sound within Take The Pill certainly and potently represents its title, the new album from UK rockers Theia, a rousing feel good remedy of attitude loaded rock ‘n’ roll sure to energise any day of unenthused emotions. It vociferously grumbles, tenaciously rumbles, and unleashes ten hungrily blazing roars for one highly enjoyable snarl within the landscape of this year’s British rock scene. Pushing boundaries and forging unfamiliar territories may not be the biggest element of the Burton Upon Trent trio’s debut full-length, but in providing a furiously thrilling and enlivening rock ‘n’ roll, Take The Pill is nothing less than a hammering success.

Formed towards the start of 2012 and drawing on inspirations from the likes of Buckcherry, Winterville, Alter Bridge, and Black Label Society for their uncompromising, metal infused hard rock, Theia has swiftly and increasingly over these past three or so years, gained a strong following and acclaimed reputation for their voracious rock sound whether live or on releases. 2014 saw the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Kyle Lamley, drummer John Tolley, and bassist Paul Edwards come together and the band’s single Whoop-Dee-F***ing-Doo! whip up fresh and eager attention, building on that gained by earlier EPs, itself eclipsed by recent single Ride On. Now Take The Pill shows that the taste of the band’s first album they gave was rich but also only half the story, and easy to expect their success to be easily surpassed by the band’s tremendous new release.

cover_RingMaster Review     Take The Pill comes to life with opener We’re Alive, it sauntering in on a melodic coaxing alongside a boozy sonic caress, both guitar spawn and thickly enticing. They continue to entice with their intoxicating lures whilst in the background there is a sense of something fiercer brewing, this eventually honed and emerging as an ear entwining groove that instantly hits the instincts and eager swing of the body. As with all subsequent tracks, there is a just as immediate familiarity to the flavours woven into the song but also freshness and virulence which dictates the way thoughts, appetite, and pleasure go.

With fine guitar craft and a great vocal delivery from Lamley, backed by a great rhythmic shuffle from Tolley, the song is a great anthem to start things off with From The Streets backing its potency with its own rock ‘n’ roll stroll wrapped in spicy blues hued grooves, broad vocal roars, and enjoyable imagination in the tapestry of recognisable and fresh spices. Keeping ears and neck muscles keenly involved, the song passes its infectious baton onto Society On Mute, an impassioned and muscular canter rippling with metallic riffs and thumping beats alongside a lure of bass from Edwards which borders on the carnivorous in tone. Breezes of some of those earlier inspirations are an open spicing too as also the individual craft and invention which colludes to create a track that stomps and atmospherically seduces throughout its fiery presence.

Video Memories needs barely a handful of seconds to grip ears and an already bred hunger with its growling bassline and grizzled riffs, their antagonism perfectly tempered by the melodic flames and vocal harmonies colouring the track. It is stirring stuff but quickly overshadowed by the mighty Anybody Else, a swagger of southern rock equipped with the juiciest of grooving and another bestial bass sound cast by Edwards. Vocally too, the song is a mix of stylish antagonism and anthemic adventure which at times flirts with prime Pantera bait, a great tempting emulated again later in the album once Electric Witness first unveils its addictive and magnetic hard rock croon, its every element again coming together in superb creative unity. It is a track which musically gets more crotchety around melodically enticing vocals, another string to its already persuasive bow that only hits the target before the outstanding Overthrown springs another open and pleasing Pantera-esque hook within its contagious endeavour.

Take The Pill is completely in total control by this point, keen ears backed by greed for the high energy and thickly convincing adventure of the band’s sound. The album increasingly becomes more compelling as each song passes through ears into the imagination, the next up Some Days ensuring that does not change, its voracious heart and attack pure fire breathing rock ‘n’ roll; a quality similarly running through the core of Ride On and closing stomp Whoop-Dee-Fucking-Doo!

The first of the pair merges dirtily fuzzy riffs and throaty predation from the bass with the clipping of ears by Tolley’s persistent rapier swings, all imposing yet enthralling traits framing a web of infection driven by winy grooves and sonic imagination. Its successor just rocks like a dog in heat, the finest asset any slab of rock ‘n’ roll can have in our view and again grooves, hooks, and enterprise create a tasty tempting bringing the sinew swinging party to an exhaustive close.

After recent singles, we had strong hopes for Take The Pill but it still took ears and expectations by surprise, emerging as a bigger, bolder, and far more creatively boisterous incitement, even those lead songs coming over taller and broader in their bellows. Ok Theia might not be breaking moulds with Take The Pill but rock pleasure does not come much more captivating and enjoyable as this.

Take The Pill is out now on CD @ and through most online stores digitally and physically.

Pete Ringmaster 26/10/215

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Voodoo Vegas – Hypnotise EP

vv3_RingMaster Review

A rock ‘n’ roll holler to reinforce their growing reputation as one energy rousing proposition, UK stompers Voodoo Vegas release the Hypnotise EP offering four songs that bellow and tenaciously stomp through ears from start to finish. Instantly it is a thickly enjoyable encounter which just hits the spot time and time again to give body and satisfaction a very healthy workout.

The successor to their well-received 2013 debut album The Rise Of Jimmy Silver, the Hypnotise EP is a potent build on its success and introduction to those new to the Voodoo Vegas roar. There are no major surprises unearthed by band and encounter but with the accomplished craft and open imagination of the band coursing songwriting and sound, the EP is more than just a solid proposition to support their rich live stature earned over the past couple of years or so. 2014 saw the quintet play a special guest slot for Status Quo in Holland, share the stage with Y&T on their UK/European Tour, and play a host of their own shows across the UK and Europe, as well as play a host of festivals. This year Voodoo Vegas played an acclaimed performance at the Camden Rocks Festival 2015 amongst many shows and with producer Will Maya (The Answer, Breed 77) record Hypnotise. It has been a busy time for the band east to expect being matched as their EP does the rounds tempting fans and newcomers alike.

VV2-cover-flattened_RingMaster Review   Hypnotise opens with its title track, swiftly creating a blaze of tangy grooves around antagonistic riffs and spiky rhythms driven by the strong vocals of Lawrence Case. Almost as quickly the song slips into a less imposing but no less magnetic stroll around an early entering chorus, undulating its intensity and attitude thereon in with fluid and pleasing prowess. The guitars of Merylina Hamilton and Jon Dawson provide a constant web of enterprise throughout the song which keeps ears happily fed whilst the bass of Ash Moulton brings its own throatily seductive groove.

It is a potent start with numerous rewards for the appetite and imagination to get hold of but soon eclipsed by its successor, Tied Up. From its first breath as a blaze of guitar, the track strolls with a predatory nature and tone, entwining it with fiery and feisty endeavour from across the band whipped up into extra zeal by the rapier swings of drummer Jonno Smyth. Hard and glam rock ‘n’ roll but with plenty more essences boiling in its belly, the song is a perpetually magnetic captivation with a simultaneous snarl and creative glint in the eye.

From one highlight to another in the blues seeded shape of Round & Round, a swagger of a stomp that just gets stronger and more inventive with each passing minute and rewarding listen. The harmonica skills of Case bring new intoxication to the song around midway, though bass and guitars had already whipped up a greedy lick of the lips for their devilish imagination by that point anyway.

The two songs offer the peak of the release but closing track Killing Joke has plenty in sound and anthemic imagination within its more intimidating canter to leave ears and pleasure ripe. As throughout Hypnotise hooks and grooves are forcibly appealing, being perfectly backed by feisty riffs as vocals alongside rhythms expose the pungent heart in a fine end to the EP.

As suggested, the Hypnotise EP is open in its inspirations, most likely Aerosmith, Guns ‘n’ Roses, and AC/DC amongst them, and does not venture into the unknown but for thick invigorating rock ‘n roll it, and Voodoo Vegas, leave no one wanting.

The Hypnotise EP is out now on iTunes

Upcoming Live Shows:

23rd Oct – WESTBURY, UK – Charlies Bar

24th Oct – EVESHAM, UK – Iron Road

21st Nov – BOURNEMOUTH, UK – The Cellar Bar

28th Nov – POOLE, UK – Mr Kyps

12th Dec – IPSWICH, UK – The Music Room (with Gilby Clarke)

13th Dec – LONDON, UK – The Underworld (with Gilby Clarke)

14th Dec – BILSTON, UK – The Robin (with Gilby Clarke)

Pete RingMaster 14/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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One Year Delay – Deep Breath

OYD_RingMaster Review

Turning a jumble of varied metal/rock styles into an unpredictable sound which eagerly romps in the ears and captures the imagination, Greek Hard Rockers One Year Delay make their full introduction with debut album Deep Breath. Offering seven songs which entwine flavours from nu and alternative metal with grunge and punk rock in rock ‘n’ roll also unafraid to embrace more classic/hard rock hues, the release is a roller coaster of invention and undulating but perpetual success.

One Year Delay began in early 2012, coming out of the Greek city Kalamata with a sound which through numerous line-ups, the current in place earlier this year, has evolved into the tapestry of adventure which potently marks Deep Breath. The album was recorded in 2014 with Toby Wright, the band travelling to the Sound Emporium Studios in Nashville to make it, with the release finally mastered by Andrew Mendelson. Unveiled through Pavement Entertainment, Deep Breath is an ear catching proposition fuelled with a potential suggesting a bright and for us all a rewarding horizon ahead of the sextet.

deep_breath_oyd_RingMaster Review   The album opens up with Gunpoint and badgering bursts of sound and energy which soon merge into a predatory stroll with intimidating riffs and threatening rhythms prowled by the instantly appealing vocals from Orestis Alimonos. As grooves spring their bait and intensity darkens, the song growls and lurches from one antagonistic twist and roar to another, but within this brews a melodic lure of clean vocals and keys seeded enterprise. The song has the unpredictability and imagination of a System Of A Down, if not the sound which is closer to the alternative metal prowess of Israeli band Onoma. Increasingly addictive the track gets the album off to a rousing start.

Headhunters steps up next and again riffs and beats make a potent invitation to which Alimonos once more adds vocal drama and energy backed by the equally strong tones of Steve Tsotras. Striding with an antagonistic swagger, the snarl and lure of the song is accentuated by short scything grooves and fiery sonic enticement through guitarists Nick Koumoundouros and Nick Trimandlilis, the former enticing with individual flames of hard rock enterprise across the metal bred proposal. A continuation of the riveting start to the release, the track makes way for the melodic rock meets groove metal triumph of Truth, Dare, Despair. The song dances on ears with a swirling web of riffs and rhythms, bait as much punk as it is metal and rock ‘n’ roll, to forge its own familiar but personal character; though imagining Drowning Pool meets Finger Eleven gives you an idea to another quickly persuasive encounter by One Year Delay

A sludgy air and gait comes with the following Water Under the Bridge, its slow movement and enticing croon stoner-esque but equally grunge coloured with a whiff of doom rapacity. Though not as immediate on ears and thoughts as its predecessors, or ultimately as dynamic, time allows the song to tempt and unveil intoxicating attributes which in turn gives a keen appetite for the album another reason to indulge often, the same applying to the Nirvana toned Miss You which takes over next. Its gentle voice and guitar entrance is a good welcome but it is when the song picks up its energy with the beats of Sotiris Papadeas a shuddering impact and the bass of George Manesiotis a highly agreeable heavy shadow that it comes into its own. Still the track lacks the same rich and inventive spark of earlier songs but satisfaction is nothing less than strong as it swings through ears.

The band is back spitting aggression with Try to Stay Alive but also entering a raw rap /groove metal crossover with warm rock melodies and Korn like boldness in ideas and unpredictability. It is a great adventure in idea which at times simply enthrals and thrills and in other moments loses its grip with unfulfilled promises, but again a want to hear it again is never far from thoughts after each venture into its potential.

For personal tastes the first half of Deep Breath easily outshines the second but as proven by the closing blues rock call of 5m, 9k, there is always plenty to seriously engage thoughts and have enjoyment fully on board. The last song is a potent weave of heavy riffs and provocative rhythms within scenery of spicy grooves and vocal tempting bringing the album to a rich and persuasive close.

You sense it is early creative days in the growth of One Year Delay but Deep Breath, as a first album, suggests things are definitely heading towards very exciting places. They are already there in many ways with their first full outing but when maturity and natural evolution comes to the fore too, keeping a close eye on One Year Delay might be a clever move.

Deep Breath is out now via Pavement Music through major online stores.

Pete RingMaster 08/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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City Of Thieves – Incinerator

CoT_RingMaster Review

We just cannot say no to a rousing slab of rock ‘n’ roll at The RR and that is exactly what UK hard rockers City Of Thieves uncage with their debut EP, Incinerator. It is five tracks of varied, no frills heavy rock which may not carry too many big surprises but potently feeds the instincts to roar and brawl with revelry. After the first minute of its opener you will kind of know and certainly welcome what you are going to get thereon in, but with a formidable freshness and passion to it too, it quickly shows why there is a thick buzz brewing up around the band; Incinerator inciting heavy satisfaction as it sonically lives up to its name.

The London quartet emerged in May of 2015 and as soon as their sounds hit ears and their feet stomped on stage, City Of Thieves began stirring up rich attention. Their live debut was an acclaim awarded introduction at his year’s Camden Rocks Festival, whilst debut single and now EP title track Incinerator, saw the band play listed on the New Rock Show on Planet Rock Radio for 7 weeks. Since then the band has found itself booked for this year’s Hard Rock Hell, Legends Of Rock, and Rockstock Festivals, played Bloodstock, and seen their EP already covered in plaudits.

EP Artwork_RingMaster Review     Recorded with producer Toby Jepson (Little Angels, The Answer, The Virginmarys), mixed by Mike Fraser (Metallica, AC/DC, Slipknot, Aerosmith), and mastering by Simon Francis (Kodaline, Kaiser Chiefs, Primal Scream), the Incinerator EP starts with a bang and never looks back. That first single opens things up, enticing ears and teasing an instant appetite with its initial predatory prowl of riffs, they courted by the swiping beats of drummer Will Richards and the gnarly tones of Jamie Lailey’s bass. Pretty soon things have ‘relaxed’ into a fiery stroll as the guitars of Ben Austwick and Adam Wardle spin a melodic web of grooves and spicy riffs , and Lailey unveils his sandy, slightly grizzled vocal tones. Like an old buddy, a familiarity entwines with the sonic enterprise and stalking rhythms, and like a returning friend it only pleases as it comes further alive with individual prowess and a creative energy which many bands never ascend to, especially within a debut.

The great start continues with Buzzed Up City, a mellower and warmer grab of the senses but one not scrimping on vociferous snarls within its fiery heart as the band embraces a more classic rock tone with eighties hues in its infectious rock ‘n’ roll. It hits the spot with accuracy though is still eclipsed by its predecessor and the following Lay Me To Waste, the best track on the release. From the almost carnivorous tone of the bass, the rebellious nature of drums and riffs, and grooves which flirt like a lithe seductress, the track smoulders and blazes with a virulence and enterprise which swiftly captures the imagination, and of course greedy ears.

Here Comes The Shot is more of the same infection in its individual way. Its bluesy air and rumbling rhythms also immediate persuasion as vocally again Lailey, like the song and indeed EP, brings a ‘this is how it is, take it or leave it’ attitude and the taking is the only reply possible to the rousing anthem.

A live acoustic take of Mr 50/50 brings the release to a fine end, the song a closing reminder of the core craft and qualities of City Of Thieves always lying beneath the full on riotous sound of other tracks whilst providing a last shot of aural liquor complete with boozy harmonica.

The bottom-line here is that there are few BIG surprises with Incinerator but an unbridled dose of fun and rousing rock ‘n’ roll, and who is never up for that?

The Incinerator EP is available now via Townsend Records / Monster Box Music

Pete RingMaster 23/09/2015

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Theia – Ride On

Theia collage pic_RingMaster Review

Just ahead of their debut album, UK hard rockers Theia have stoked the fires of anticipation with new single Ride On. It is a blaze of anthemic power and voracity merged with bluesy melodies and an enterprise which plays like a familiar friend whilst leaving you guessing as to its next magnetic move. The release is muscle swinging rock ‘n’ roll and the juiciest taster to the band’s impending new full-length Take the Pill.

Formed in 2012, the Burton Upon Trent band draws on inspirations from bands such as Buckcherry, Winterville, Alter Bridge, Black Label Society and many more to colour their robust sound and in turn invigorating single. A couple of well-received EPs in 2013 awoke ears to the potential and rebellious nature of the band’s sound, a proposition which has just kept developing and blossoming to back their increasing reputation as one stage shaking incitement earned across gigs and festivals. Now the trio of vocalist/guitarist Kyle Lamley, bassist Paul Edwards, and drummer John Tolley are poised to make a big impact with their first album on the UK rock scene, one possibly to emulate the success of their celestial namesake, certainly if Ride On is an indication of what is to come.

A fuzzy lure of guitar starts things off, its bait soon joined by the gloriously carnivorous of bass which is instantly given a welcoming clarity from which to growl from. Thick beats add to the building drama which is fully realised with the richly spiced grooves cast by Lamley. Never quite exploding into the riot it continually hints at, the song instead places infectious layer upon infectious layer, bluesy endeavour an intoxicating hue to air and the guitar spawned enticement lighting it as rhythms craft a compelling frame to one virulent anthem.

Ride On gets the job done without unnecessary excesses and delusions of grandeur; it is hard rock with a recognisable smile and mischief but lit by a freshness which just hits the spot. As mentioned earlier it is muscular rock ‘n’ roll, a flavour to feed most appetites.

Ride On is out now.

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2015

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Nine Miles South – Self Titled EP

Nine Miles South promo_RingMaster Review

It is proving to be a rather exciting year for UK rockers Nine Miles South which is coming to a thrilling head with the release of their self-titled debut EP and a couple of big shows, all sure to confirm that their groove loaded southern rock ‘n’ roll is ready to awaken the broadest attention. Their three track release is an invigorating and exciting slab of resourcefully varied hard rock; heavy and contagious, creatively aggressive and addictive, it has body and appetite on red alert by track one, seduced by the third and though it weaves plenty of familiar sounds and textures into its persuasion, the EP just hits the sweet spot that lies within all rock fans.

Nine Miles South was founded by Danish bred Seb Mikkelsen, the band forming after the vocalist/guitarist had moved to the UK from his homeland. Based in Guildford and with a line-up completed by guitarist Jon Antony, bassist Andy Sleigh, and drummer David Wilson, Nine Miles South took little time in awakening strong support and awareness through their tenacious live presence. Shows with bands such as Kobra And The Lotus as well as their own gigs and strong festival appearances have marked the band out leading to good radio play. After a couple of recently highly successful London shows and ahead of the band playing Hard Rock Hell in Wales on November 13th with amongst many, Black Label Society, UFO, Helloween, Pat Travers, and Gun, and also supporting Skinny Molly at the North Devon Arena in Ilfracombe on November 18th, Nine Miles South release their first EP, an easy to suspect spark to increasing and eager attention.

NMS FRONT COVER EPP_RingMaster Review   Produced by Samuel Burden, the EP opens with The Reckoning, a mighty anthem for ears and emotions. A slightly reserved beginning cups ears first, a sultry climate of guitar and melody backed by the vocal twang of Mikkelsen swift enticement which only grows more gripping as thick fisted rhythms join the increasing energy and roar of the song. It is still not in top gear but casting an inescapable anthem for body and voice which only blossoms into virulence as grooves twist and entwine the psyche and hooks lurk in very corner and evolution of the outstanding song. As suggested the overall sound has a recognisable air but it only adds to the drama and potency of the tempting, especially which sixth gear is finally unleashed for a boisterous finale.

The excellent start is backed well by Leave Me Be, another making its entrance on a gentle melody from the guitar whilst quietly brewing a more intensive character which erupts soon after. A more emotively coloured and controlled stroll, the bluesy track spins a weave of melodic and vocal expression wrapped in low key but pungent grooves, these further punctured by firm rhythms. The bass of Sleigh has a great growl whilst the guitars of Antony and Mikkelsen create a croon of enterprise to match the resourceful vocal tones of the latter, backed well by Antony and Sleigh. Without quite matching the heights and irresistibility of its predecessor, the song has ears and attention riveted before Fingernails brings the release to a rousing close.

The third track has the imagination drifting off to dusty, country blues rock lands within seconds, grooves and riffs instantly sculpting a southern seeded canvas to lose oneself in, before shadowed rhythms lined with spiky beats and grooved invention build tantalising scenery. Imagine a mix of Bad Company, Down, and The Bastard Sons and you get a whiff of the excellent climax to one thickly enjoyable encounter.

The last few months has seen a new wind of attention and buzz around Nine Miles South which can only get bolder and louder with the release of their first EP. It is rock ‘n’ roll with a twang and very easy to suggest you go get some.

The Nine Miles South EP is available from September 7th

Pete Ringmaster 07/09/2015

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