Medusa – Headcase’s Handbook

15072752751_fe2ca517ca_z

It is fair to say that Medusa’s last album Can’t Fucking Win kicked up a potential drenched storm which grabbed the attention of a great many. It was a potent and thrilling stomp with a fiery character and a middle finger raising attitude which pushed the London trio into a broader spotlight. Its successor Headcase’s Handbook is spawned from the same belligerent seeds but comes with a new richness of adventure, songwriting, and quite simply creative maturity. It is fuelled by punk fired rock ‘n’ roll and makes another pungent step in the ascent of the inventive tempest that is Medusa.

Formed in 2006 by vocalist/guitarist Julian Molinero, Medusa swiftly made an impression with their self-titled album which came out in a matter of weeks after the start of the band. It was an eighties inspired entrance which made a strong base from which the band’s sound and eventually second album Can’t Fucking Win was bred. Recorded with producer Romesh Dodangoda, Medusa’s 2011 sophomore album showed an evolution in all aspects of the band yet still held onto the striking raw and honest core which lit up its predecessor. That same breath of sound frequents Headcase’s Handbook but as before comes with another leap in depth and growth which is as open and forceful as it is mouth-wateringly enterprising. Recorded with producer Lee Batiuk (Deaf Havana) at Regal House Studio, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, the album roars and flirts with salacious intent and imagination, the band unleashing a hungry and bracing dose of honest rock ‘n’ roll.

The RingMaster Review was honoured to be the band’s first port of call with the album within days of its completion, and we were instantly hooked and gripped by a broad smile as the release began its feisty persuasion with opener Sid and Nancy. A whine of guitar leads into choppy riffs and the expressive tones of Molinero, the combination an immediate lure which only flares with stronger persuasion when the track brings out its punk antagonism in voice and riffs. Instantly contagious and increasingly more so as the bass of Milo De Nack flirts with ears and the imposing beats of drummer Stefan Hale, the track is a raw and insatiable riot starting things off explosively, one with a poise and resourcefulness which right away highlights the band’s evolution between releases.

Things take another step up with Lip Service, a track bringing again that punk rock tenacity into a hard rock web of spicy guitar craft from Molinero, a weave completed with equally tangy riffs and hooks. This is courted by a just as coverinfectious rhythmic and vocal adventure, neither bursting their boundaries but both aspects bringing the heart of the track rich and catchy expression. It is an outstanding song continuing the impressive start to the album, a loft plateau which is not quite matched by either the following Absinthe Minded or Luxury Crisis. Both tracks though reveal further intriguing and inescapably appealing facets and twists to the character of album and sound for a lingering satisfaction. The first merges melodic country kissed rock with a blues flaming for a tantalising caress of provocative and imaginative endeavour complete with evocative washes of guitar and mandolin like vivacity. Though it lacks the spark of the first songs, it grips ears and appetite with ease much as its successor, a song with an inventive canvas of rolling and roaming rhythms picked at by a repetitive sonic plucking. This is coloured by the impassioned vocal delivery of Molinero and melodic enterprise extending from that riveting initial guitar temptation.

Lydia stomps in next, riffs and beats almost furious in their strength and voracity before relaxing into a more controlled but no less fiery stroll. Not for the first or last time there is a feel of Hagfish to the punkier edge and contagion of the song whilst the melodic enticing of the encounter has a classic lilt which comes with a whisper of Turbonegro in its texture. The track almost brawls with the senses leaving them greedy for more, a want fed by the different but just as flavoursome Call of the Abyss. Again predominantly punk and hard rock meet in a rigorous collision of catchy and unfussy rock ‘n’ roll, though there is plenty more spicing the song’s unpredictable and passionate presence as it tightly grips thoughts and emotions.

As masterful and compelling as the two tracks are they are overshadowed a little by The Sweetest Elixir and its thrilling temptation. Electronic toning wraps ears first before heavily striding beats and velvety basslines join the successful coaxing. Lording over this is the excellent vocal lure of Molinero, his smoother delivery drawing the listener swiftly in to the track’s narrative. As it weaves and swerves with bass and guitar imagination, the song swells in potency and invention, becoming the pinnacle of the album with its melodic emprise. It is a delicious song, as mentioned a major peak in the release, setting a touch challenge for the following track to try and rival, a test which Black Snow more than takes in its bordering on deranged stride. A maelstrom of disorientated rhythms and sonic bluster sets the persuasion in motion before it breaks free to establish a predatory and intimidating shadowed clad prowl. With vocals back on more crazed intent and the bass finding its throatiest intimidation yet, the track rages and roars with irresistible animosity and persuasion. It is a fury though which ingeniously explores more reserved and experimental tendencies too and an emotional veracity and ire, the result one more seriously impressing proposition.

The album closes with firstly the more restrained rock ‘n’ roll of Think It Over, a track not bursting with surprises but loaded with anthemic potency and finally the acoustic ballad Cherry Red. The song is a strong end to close out the album on a high, even if not one getting the blood boiling. There is little to dismiss it for though, and it ensures Headcase’s Handbook departs on a lingering touch.

Medusa gets better and bigger with every release, Headcase’s Handbook proof and easily their finest moment to date. It should be a break-through release for the band and if it just misses out on that success, whilst surely drawing a wealth of attention and acclaim its way, you can be sure the band will make that strike sooner rather than later.

Headcase’s Handbook is available now via Cyberpunk Records and @ http://medusaworld.bandcamp.com/album/headcases-handbook

http://www.medusaworld.co.uk

RingMaster 02/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Heavyweights – Keep Your Friends Close

1547958_676988512351566_1991278438_o

Seemingly embracing the pop infectiousness of Blink 182, the rawer aggressive contagion of Mucky Pup, and the addictive hook invention of Hagfish, US pop punksters Heavyweights provide more than enough with new EP Keep Your Friends Close, to suggest they are a band in the midst of carving out a healthy future for themselves. Consisting of five tracks which easily cast an enjoyable and inventive stomp of infectious hooks and melodies, the release is a captivating proposition which has attention focused and appetite stirred for its not startling but certainly pleasing sounds.

Formed in 2011, the Baltimore quintet of vocalist Dave Heilker, guitarists Eric Navarro and Sean Ryder, bassist Punk Rock Chris, and drummer Kurt Speiss, have brought inspirations from the likes of All Time Low, Fall Out Boy, Blink 182, Man Overboard, New Found Glory, and The Wonder Years into their refreshing sound and enterprise. With debut EP The Sound of Time Running Out and an acoustic split release with fellow Maryland band A Place in Time under their belts, Heavyweights now make another sizeable and compelling statement in their emergence with Keep Your Friends Close.

It opens with the relatively brief It’s Not Pretty, But It’s Us, a track which makes an ok entrance but evolves into an intriguing slice of melodic punk which is at ease either make a slower expressive suasion or launching into an eagerly KYFC Cover Squareenergetic proposition. It is not a song which ever explodes, though it drop hints at times that it might, and does not excite the ears as potently as subsequent tracks, but it makes a firm and engaging start to the EP. The band displays their imagination and skill within the song, pushing it further with the following Dior 999. The second track bursts from a magnetic bassline with nostrils flaring in its energy as emotive intensity colours the creativity of the guitars and passion of the vocals. Swiftly contagious and gripping, choppy swipes of riffs and persistently twisting hooks embrace the strong vocals of Heilker which in turn are backed by those of Speiss and Navarro, the song alone pushing the release to a new exciting plateau.

Bonfire seizes its opportunity to next entice ears, guitars swiftly moving in to lay a web of sonic bait and melodic endeavour over the imagination whilst vocals parade the track’s narrative. Rhythmically both Speiss and Chris sculpt their most compelling cage of temptation yet on the EP, backing up the rich weave of enterprise from the rest of the band in another highly pleasing song. Heavyweights take little time to show they know how to sculpt catchy and resourcefully smart enticements in their songs, Bunkbeds next proving the point. Also featuring Mike Hayden, the track instantly sparks thoughts of Hagfish with its infectious start, vocals and hooks familiar bait to the Texas band. It is a lingering spice but one soon merged with a Fall Out Boy like drama and powerfully evocative textures which create another vibrant and hunger sparking romp of sound and ideation.

The release closes with Anna Marie, an infectious and melodic stroll of pop rock which flows with fiery and emotive melodies matched by vocals, all amidst punchy hooks and jabbing rhythms. Not quite holding the spark of the previous pair of songs, it still leaves the imagination busy and appetite full whilst adding fuel to already impressed reactions for band and EP.

Keep Your Friends Close does not set pop punk ablaze but certainly suggests that Heavyweights have the potential to leave that kind of mark on the genre ahead whilst providing strong and richly pleasing encounters along the way.

The Keep Your Friends Close EP is available now @ http://hvywts.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/Heavyweights

8/10

RingMaster 10/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Get Stoked – Washington Street EP

_MG_5277

Creating a proposition which simultaneously invites the listener to brawl and party with its feisty mix of pop punk and rawer hardcore aggressiveness, the Washington Street EP is one impressive entrance from US punks Get Stoked. It unleashes five tracks which show an imagination and want to invent something strikingly different yet comes with a familiarity which plays like a returning friend loaded up with devilish intent. It is a highly enjoyable romp which dares to be adventurous and is confident enough to employ those highly flavoursome and recognisable spices.

Hailing from Mount Pleasant, Michigan, Get Stoked consists of vocalist Cameron Wheeler, guitarists Ryan Turek and Zach Smith, bassist Ben Jensen, and drummer Jacob Cardona. Other than the quintet citing influences such as The Wonder Years, The Story So Far, Set Your Goals, A Day To Remember, and All Time Low upon their music, there is little more we can tell about the band other than they write and craft rather appetising slices of sinew sculpted pop punk.

Released via Imminence Records, Washington Street opens up with the instrumental Intro, a minute and a half of thumping rhythms provoking through infectious riffs and hooks courted by a dark toned bass temptation. It is not an ep_Cover_3explosive piece but one hinting at the potent offerings to come whilst treating feet and imagination to an energetic dance. Its successful beckoning is followed by the imposing presence of Actions Speak Louder Than Words. Starting with the strong tones of Wheeler over swipes of guitar and an increasingly intimidating run of beats, it is an engaging if unsurprising start even with the also appealing backing vocals of Turek building up the lure of the song. It is when the track suddenly twists into a livelier surge of antagonistic beats and scything strikes of guitar that it comes alive, slipping into a melodic flame of expectations feeding and ear refreshing pop punk revelry. From vocals to sonic incitement, heavy rhythms to abrasing riffery, the song is a thrilling stomp which allows its inventive unpredictability to run naked through the track. The song also shows why the band has been compared to some of their inspirations but just as strongly and pleasingly it lights the senses with older essences of Hagfish and Mucky Pup.

The following Hand In Your Demise takes little time in seizing the imagination and appetite, its opening roam of compelling rhythms and an evocative melodic tendril the forerunner to a blaze of sonic endeavour and melodic tenacity ridden by once again impressing vocals and flirtatious energy. The track is soon stamping its rhythmic feet with firm intent too whilst the guitars cast a web of emotive and infectious designs to which Wheeler wraps his pleasing delivery and lyrical narrative. Though not quite matching its predecessor, the track similarly just grows and excels vocally and musically the deeper into its body it goes to provide another exciting proposition.

Forward Progress lacks the spark of the last pair of songs but nevertheless parades a strong mix of ideation and sounds revealing more of the depth and expressive ability of the band whilst shaping another infectious and provocative encounter. It is soon left in the shadow of the closing title track though; a song from its opening crystalline melody embraces a string of styles and inventive exploration. A rugged cage of riffs and beats initially traps ears with a vocal drama from Wheeler captivating the imagination. The track then bursts into another pungent stride of pop punk clad in a hardcore predaciousness before slipping into something melodically comfortable and anthemically contagious. It is an enthralling slab of punk rock which alone provides enough evidence to suggest Get Stoked is a band with the potential to make major strides and create impressive marks on the punk scene.

That suggestion is more than backed up by the rest of the Washington Street EP, a release easy to recommend to those wanting something more substantial and braver in their pop punk.

The Washington Street EP is available now via Imminence Records @ http://imminencerecords.bandcamp.com/album/washington-street

https://www.facebook.com/GetStokedMI

9/10

RingMaster 20/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Call It Off – Liars

by Nastassia Winge

Liars is not going to set new standards for punk rock but with its proudly romping pop punk veined with spicy essences of power pop, the latest EP from Dutch rockers Call It Off is certainly a refreshingly enjoyable encounter. It brings five easily accessible tracks to the ears, songs giving feet and voices an invigorated work out through anthemic urgency and melodic infectiousness. Liars may not drive you to a rooftop to roar about its creators, besides you will be too busy dancing, but it easily ignites an eager appetite and attention for the Eindhoven quartet.

Barely a year old, Call It Off are four musicians who unite with plenty of experience earned playing in different bands over previous years. Pulled together by a mutual love of punk rock, chatting leading to actually writing music together and subsequently the birth of the band last September, the foursome of vocalists/guitarists Maurice Bolier and Adrian DeLange, bassist Lesley Klaverdijk, and drummer Sergei Christian made their first mark with debut EP Lovers late 2013. A clean strike across the bows of attention, the release made a good base from which Liars has confidently moved the band’s songwriting and sound on. Its songs are short and punchy but come with a fluidity and swagger which capture ears and imagination like returning friends, the band’s influences an open colour across the release it is fair to say.

Those inspirations are unavoidable from the first moments of opener Famous Last Words, potent spicery of Green Day and Blink 182 a clear flavouring though there is plenty more to the songs than a cloning of past protagonists. callitoff_liarsFrom its first swipe of rhythms and riffs, from which a teasing melodic tendril wakes ears potently, the song strolls with melodies swinging from sturdy rhythms and jangling riffs aligned to appealing vocals. The first song also holds a rawer edge like a mix of Story Of The Year and NOFX, though this only glances over the rich melodic and sonic enterprise rippling within the highly pleasing opener.

The strong start is soon shown a pair of heels by the excellent Burning Bridges. From its first roar the song roams the awakened appetite with again jangle clad riffs and a great coaxing of power pop harmonies, the track potently contagious from its first breath. The dual vocals work even better on the second track whilst the moody bass tone delivered by Klaverdijk comes with a shadowed mischief to alone entrance the imagination. That Green Day reference is even stronger here but adds to the instant connection of the song, its simple but expressive invitation impossible to resist adding your own personal attributes, or in some of our cases, disasters to.

     Stuck With You has a slightly more reserved urgency yet still rocks like a hound in heat with infection soaked hooks and melodies. That strong whiff of Billie Joe Armstrong and co continues to brew a strong yet captivating smell whilst there are moments where the song offers small tinges of Hagfish to its sharp hooks and underlying rhythmic antagonism. As all the songs it is like an old returning friend more than a new encounter, a feeling which stops the track leaving thoughts awe struck but undoubtedly has them riveted and fully involved in its raucous revelry, a lure just as addictive in the stomp that is I Don’t Wanna. As anthemic as you can get, the track simply provokes the passions and body from start to finish, providing a punk bred festival of adrenaline and passion.

The EP closes with Call Me, a track with wandering melodic adventure and emotive textures. Driven by a spine of firm rhythms aligned to a throaty bassline, the song flirts with ears through evocative enterprise from the guitars and the fine blend of vocals as it sways and rolls across the ears with arguably a more adventurous seduction than found of the other tracks. It makes for a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable encounter.

As mentioned, Liars is not quite a release to set punk rock on fire but it definitely nudges it firmly to the presence and rich potential of Call It Off.

The Liars EP is available now via White Russian Records @ http://callitoff.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/callitoffNL

http://www.callitoff.nl/

8/10

RingMaster 18/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Turbogeist: Ancient Secrets EP

turbogeist

    Having fallen in love with an Alien Girl…the first single and song from UK punk rockers Turbogeist which mischievously teased these ears two years ago, anticipation going into the Ancient Secrets EP was on full alert with arguably already preconceived  reactions ready to pounce. The five track release certainly did not let down or disappoint expectations and though it did not quite light those same fervour lit fires as did the single, the EP is a thrilling and richly satisfying piece of devilment.

The London based quartet take their influences from seventies punk and eighties hardcore with particular inspiration from the likes of The Replacements, The Damned and The Misfits. Their sound though is more open than that suggests, with loud whispers of garage punk and feisty rock n roll adding their devious temptation to the energetic and raucous flavours the band taunts and pleases with. Lyrically the songs of the band and on the EP are just as cunning, the mix of sci-fi tongue in cheek pestering wrapped around  thoughts on the ‘stuttering evolution’ of man as aggressive and devilish as the infectious musical  brawling around them. Co-produced by the band and Chris Sheldon (Pixies, Radiohead, Foo Fighters), the digital and numbered coloured vinyl 10” releases of Ancient Secrets should be the first key to a deserved wide recognition for the band, which the released of a debut album later in the year will undoubtedly feed upon.

Mermaid’s Revenge winds itself in to view with sonic flames of guitar coaxing the ear whilst rhythms and bass shuffle into TURBO_CVR2position. With all things in place the track swaggers with confidence and mischief as the vocals begin the tale of man’s ill-fated attempts to conquer nature and the siren lure of the deep blue. Aided by strong group backing shouts and a muscular prowl to the gait of the song, things become more contagious and riveting by the sinewy second with the elevated energy and scorching breath of the song now a stirring punk and rock anthem for the ear. As across the release, the song fails to find that irresistible lure of the previously mentioned single but undoubtedly holds sway over the passions with accomplished intent and antagonising presence.

The following Zero Friends stands eye to ear with the listener and makes its statement on social networking and its effect, something which always feels ironic considering the unavoidable need bands today have for the medium, but Turbogeist is a band not fearing nipping on the hand that feeds. It is a brief punch of a punk song which again lifts emotions and satisfaction to pleasing heights soon equalled by Black Hole. Immediately forging through the ear with thumping rhythms and apocalyptic declarations, the track is the band at its heaviest and vigorously potent, a classic metal wind guiding its hardcore soaked concentrated aggression. Already across the EP there is diversity to the sound within the distinct umbrella sound of Turbogeist which excites and fires up expectations for the impending album.

The opening to Up Front instantly feeds the inner fervour with uncompromising bone splitting drum beats and a gravelly primal bass grind which seduces with predatory persuasion, soon joined by taunting vocals adding a tease through repetitive announcements. It is an inciting entrance which explodes into a prime punk abrasion to spark further greed in the passions for its uncomplicated yet insightful sonic and rhythmic hooks and barbed company. Ending as the favourite track on Ancient Secrets, it seals any doubts, which were barely audible, into a lost cause.

Closing song Rats is a final riot for an ardour seeping fever to devour, the stormy union of classic rock and garage punk a last infectious entrapment on the EP. Released via Spinefarm Records, Ancient Secrets confirms that our earlier set in infatuation was well placed and probably set to find deeper lust ahead with the debut album. Cross Every Time I Die, Red Tape, The Cramps, and Hagfish and you do not get Turbogeist but you come closer to their individual sound.

http://turbogeist.com/

8/10

RingMaster 21/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

www.audioburger.com

 

Forever After: Pictures EP

This year has seen many impressive and promising pop punk bands emerge but the majority offer the same conclusion, still to find a distinct personal voice to their sound. These bands share a similarity to each other and those before them to make the moment enjoyable but the future the canvas where hopes of standing out from the crowd, or not will play out. UK band Forever After is one of those rare exceptions, not only does the band ooze great promise ahead with the impressive EP Pictures but already has stepped into a unique place of their very own.

The bio for the Essex quartet states ‘for fans of Lower Than Atlantis, Deaf Havana, and The Maccabees. You cannot argue against that but easily can add the likes of Buzzcocks, Undertones, and Hagfish, such the feisty new wave and original punk essences which tantalise and molest the passions wonderfully throughout. Though not quite perfect Pictures is outstanding, an immediately exciting treat to fire up the heart which just gets better and better with every play.

Formed at the beginning of the year, Forever After soon had audiences baying for more with their live shows which included playing alongside bands including Mallory Knox and Ten Second Epic. Released earlier as a free download, Pictures too only excited a crowd looking for something different and with its official appearance November 5th, as the band prepare to record its follow up, a wider recognition seems inevitable once the four tracks thrust their wanton hook smart dance on more and more eager ears.

Touring The Map opens the release up with fiery riffs and thumping beats, as most pop punk songs do. It pulls attention its way without startlingly offering anything new, leaving expectations exactly where they are when being confronted by another pop punk effort. Into its stride the track whips out teasing hooks, beckoning melodic weaves, and the excellent distinct voice of guitarist Dom Littler. Suddenly you realise you are in the midst of a sonic storm of originality and outrageous infectiousness, the beats of drummer Craig Mcqueen persistently probing the ear whilst bassist Harry Stokley prowls the song with throbbing intent whilst adding his own fine vocals to back up Littler. This alone would certainly ensure a fresh sound and experience but with the excellent guitar invention of Sam Byford, his melodic weaves bordering on lustful irreverence, the song is an irresistible piece of aural mischief, the thing sonic wet dreams are made of.  The song is brilliant, one which leaves one breathless whilst in full union with its passion physically and vocally, and the beginning of one of the bigger musical indie thrills this year.

The following (Old) School, is as it says on the tin, well in part as original punk flavours vein this great slab of rock n roll. Slightly grittier than its predecessor but equally as contagious, the song is a kind of mix between Bad Religion, Radio Stars, and Maximo Park but again belongs to no one but Forever After. A more abrasive affair the hooks easily captures the imagination whilst the vocal harmonies and melodic flames from the guitars just ignite further thrills and appetite for much more form the band. Like the first, the song is a shifting beast of pleasure, the rhythms erupting into excited bursts and bass offering a swagger which sets it apart from but perfectly in league with the charge of the guitars.

The third track called Interlude is just that. It is an ok instrumental but out of place on the release and just feels like a filler which is needless on a brief EP. Saying that though it leads perfectly into final track Say It True so maybe just reinventing it and making it a proper intro to another great song would be a rewarding thing to look at. The closing track is a riot of manic guitars, anthemic energy and shouts, and challenging rhythms all wrapped in irresistible invention and magical enterprise. The track just kicks up a storm of pleasure from which escape is impossible and full engagement willing.

Pictures is outstanding, simply as, and Forever After a band destined to make the future one thrilling and explosive punk rock adventure.

www.facebook.com/foreverafteruk

http://foreverafter.bandcamp.com/album/pictures

RingMaster 04/11/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

<iframe width=”400″ height=”100″ style=”position: relative; display: block; width: 400px; height: 100px;”

Radio Friendlies -There Is No Radio Friendlies EP

Just when you thought the warmth of summer was over Dublin band Radio Friendlies arrive to unleash a new inviting heat with their excellent new EP There Is No Radio Friendlies. Consisting of four sizzling and vibrant songs, the release is an erupting sunspot in the sky of indie pop to leave one thrilled and energised.

Consisting of Stevin King (vocals/guitar), Dara Coleman (drums/backing vocals), and Kevin Keane (bass/backing vocals), the band has been on a steady rise the past year or so, and a climb which with the release of their new EP on September 28th, one can only see an acceleration to. The band takes its inspirations from the likes of Ash, The Pixies, Foo Fighters, The Beatles and Nirvana, though many more spring to mind as the songs romp across the ear. One year ago debut EP Signs was released, its arrival well received by fans and media alike, as well as garnering a great interest and download success in Mexico. Shows at venues like Dublin’s Academy 2, The Crawdaddy, Whelans-Live, The King Kong Club in The Village, and An Brog in Cork City, as well as impressive festival appearances including Cube Fest, Duisigh Festival, and Upload Festival, has only elevated their stock, but one feels with There Is No Radio Friendlies, wider recognition is surely on the near horizon.

All The Girls is the first song to engage the ear, its initial guitar strokes bursting into an energised stroll through to the heart. It is an infection which only takes a few moments to begin its magnetic pull with blazing guitar sonics and smart harmonies lighting the air. It is not a song which manages to venture into a full stomp, its pace reserved but openly keen, yet the song has one feeling charged and locked in a firm and heated embrace. Well crafted and imaginative, the band mixing up its stroll in pace and ideas nicely, the song has one licking lips for what is to follow.

What does step up to share their charms is even more impressive, almost putting the opener in the shade. Cry is a definite Weezer sounding love affair for the ear. Gentle and respectful, the track has a shadowed tone which certainly points to that Pixies influence, the melodies having that Frank Black created discord which fires up the passions. Released as the lead single from the EP a few weeks ago, the song is an open invitation impossible to refuse let alone ignore; its body a delicious dessert of irresistible melodic power pop.

Next up Dead brings a punk attitude to the table, its feisty and intimidating yet again controlled air, a stirring and compelling companion for the ear. The thumping pulse of the track gets the blood pumping faster whilst the again melodic might of the band just leaves one riveted. Reminding a little of Hagfish, the song is another triumph to set the soul aflame and bring the voice into play.

The closing Let’s Go, Explode, is the best of the lot. Another pop punk gem likes its predecessor, the track has a snarl to it somewhat absent elsewhere, its riotous heart ready to party and leave only debris in its wake. With an ear blistering groove, group shouts, and juicy hooks splicing the air like sabres, the track is aural excellence, your best friend from its first sonic handshake. Like a fusion of Janes Addiction, The Super Happy Fun Club, and Nerf Herder, it simply brings the fullest pleasure and an inciteful invigorating energy.

The There Is No Radio Friendlies EP is outstanding, the proof that pop punk, power pop, or indie pop, whatever you wish to call the style of sound of the band, is still not only one irresistible taste when at its best but has one exciting new flavour to make the heart drool called Radio Friendlies.

http://radiofriendlies.com/

http://radiofriendlies.bandcamp.com/releases

RingMaster 26/09/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The best and easiest way to get your music on iTunes, Amazon and lots more. Click below for details.