Seething Akira – Sleepy Skeletor

Since emerging back in 2011 within the sea faring surroundings of Portsmouth, British crossover outfit Seething Akira has been teasing away at rich attention with increasing success. We suggest though that it has been a mere nagging compared to the hunger the band can and should expect with the release of debut album Sleepy Skeletor. It is a web of alternative metal and electro rock imagination with plenty more to entice and ensnare. It is a sleepless affair rousing body and spirit which even in its calmer moments has the body bouncing and imagination feasting.

Created by Charlie Bowes (songwriter/keyboardist/vocalist) and Kit Conrad (lead vocalist), the band has leap from local success to national recognition through their sounds and a dynamic live presence which over the years has seen them shares stages with the likes of Skindred, The Qemists, Hacktivist, Senser, Don Broco, and Pop Will Eat Itself as well as play Bloodstock Festival, Victorious Festival, Breakout Festival, Mammothfest amongst others. This year the band was chosen as one of five upcoming bands, alongside, Saint Apache, Damn Dice, The Rocket Dolls and The Sixpounder, to support Pitchshifter on their first UK tour in ten years. The Incoming Transmission EP of 2012 was when our fascination with Seething Akira began, it becoming so much keener as for so many others through their acclaimed 2015 single Airstrike, a song frequently eclipsed and more than matched by the offerings within Sleepy Skeletor.

Walking a fine balance between alternative metal, industrial rock, and electro punk; never fully committing to any but always entangling the richest traits of all and more, Sleepy Skeletor opens properly with The Monster from Brussels. Instantly the synths of Bowes provide an infectious pulse, the guitar of Harvey Ware swiftly adding its lure before the rest of the band jump in with fevered energy to create a Senser like confrontation. Thick and imposing, it is a captivating wall of temptation creating a grooved stroll alongside a Beastie Boys inspired vocal arousal rather easy to become addicted to, its tenacity interrupted by melodic washes of intimation and seduction.

It is an outstanding start quickly matched by recent single Matching Poles of Magnets. With steelier textures to its electro metal predation, bands like Axis Mundi and Silent Descent coming to mind, the track twists and turns with instinctive and rapacious adventure before Half Empty brings a warm calm to the senses. Immediately vocals echo this mellow breath with their melodic unity but equally a rising discontent in the heart of the song brews as things become more intense and irritable. It never reaches an aggressive state though, revolving through melancholic elegance and emotive exposure as a weave of rich enterprise wraps vocal reflection.

I Am The Devil, another single released earlier this year follows, instantly infests ears with its electro metal rumble and a hook which needs meres seconds to have us lustfully wanting more. Something akin to G.R.I.M meets dirt encrusted Pop Will Eat with the rousing catchiness of Hadouken, the track throbs and snarls as the rhythmic prowess and incitement of bassist Richard Ellis Speaight and drummer Stu Radcliffe manipulate.

Featuring Olly Simmons from Brighton band The Qemists, Backlash is next up and similarly merges heavy almost dissonant attitude and sound with electronic trespass as it prowls the senses. It is a predacious edge which never dissipates across the track’s mercurial but persistently invasive landscape. Another of the songs released prior to the album as a single in 2018 ensuring its anticipation was heightened; the absorbing encounter passes over attention to the outstanding Pack Animals. It too has a whiff of Senser to its emotionally and lyrically charged incitement; synth and guitar weaving an intimation of intrigue and danger around the threat of the rhythms as once again vocals irrepressible entice.

The character of successor Paralysed is similarly natured and conjured but swiftly evolving into a melodic croon and seduction which inspired even greater participation before the cycle repeats with greater volatility but equally greater elegance in its respective moments.

The album ends with firstly Even Angels Break Hearts which sees Dani Uziel guesting and finally Disconnect. The first of the two is a fluid blend of sonic antagonism and melodic beauty with Uziel’s tones simply beguiling, she almost like a siren luring ears into Conrad’s feral attack and the song’s tempestuous depths. The second provides three and a half minutes of electro punk metal thick in attitude and malcontent but equally rich in rousing energy and adventurous imagination.

Major attention upon Seething Akira has been a little overdue to our mind; Sleepy Skeletor should remedy that, arousing a whole new tide of fans to their insatiably and dramatically potent sound.

Sleepy Skeletor is out now; available on all major streaming platforms.

Upcoming shows:

Sleepy Skele-tour:

July 6th – Anvil, Bournemouth (Album release show)

July 7th – The 27 Club, Liverpool

July 8th – Mulberry Tavern, Sheffield

July 9th – Satan’s Hollow, Manchester

July 10th – The Underground, Plymouth

July 11th – Fat Lil’s Bar, Witney

July 12th – The Unicorn, Camden

July 13th – The Junction, Ashford

July 14th – The Sussex Arms, Tunbridge Wells

July 15th – The Joiners, Southampton

———————————————–

August 25th – Electrowerkz London supporting CUBANATE

August 26th – BYLINE FESTIVAL, Pippingford Park, Ashdown Forest with Pussy Riot, Badly Drawn Boy, The Vapors, The Blow Monkeys, John Cleese, Hugh Grant, Alexie Sayle…

November 19th – Wedgewood Rooms, Portsmouth supporting PITCHSHIFTER

http://www.seethingakira.com/   https://www.facebook.com/seethingakira   https://twitter.com/SEETHINGAKIRA

Pete RingMaster 03/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Beware! Monsters – Friend or Faux

beware-monsters-friend-or-faux-cover_RingMasterReview

An invigorating kaleidoscope of sound amid rousing creative dramatics, Friend or Faux is the debut album from British outfit Beware! Monsters. It is an encounter bred on a fusion of electro infused rock ‘n’ roll, rap, drum ‘n’ bass, and dubstep; like a fusion of Hadouken!, G.R.I.M, and Abandon All Ships but swiftly finding its own character in a provocatively fun album with a snarl in its heart and lyrical suggestiveness.

There is also a more than light touch of Semitt Falls to the Manchester band’s proposal which is no surprise as Beware! Monsters features former members of that band in guitarist Paul Kendrick and bassist Sidge Rushton. In fact vocalist Jay Kane was also one of the founders of the unpredictably inventive Semitt Falls, linking up once more with former band mates and newcomer in drummer Corentin Neyran for a new adventure in 2016. Beware! Monsters swiftly found eager appetites devouring their boisterous sound live and subsequently with Friend or Faux and its enjoyably intrusive and bold sixteen track proposal.

Book ended and broken up with ‘skits’ of evocative aural suggestion, the album starts proper with Make Wubz Not War and a deliciously heavy bassline with funk in its heart. As electronic and guitar cast essences attach themselves, the irresistible coaxing leads ears into a lively stroll abound with rock bred devilment and electro enterprise. With Kane’s rapping an equally persuasive motion in the thrilling scheme of things, the song sparks thoughts of previously mentioned Londoners Hadouken! and fellow Mancunians G.R.I.M but as also suggested earlier shows plenty to forge its own identity.

A mightily anthemic trespass on body and imagination, the great start continues with Truth, a milder mannered encounter sound wise but with a bite to its words and an underlying defiance to its intent as melodies seduce and rhythms bounce. Rushton’s bass again is an imposing treat more than matched by the frantic urges of the electronic antics around it and Neyran’s tenacious beats.

A wonderful nagging quality is shared by Kendrick’s guitar in the following Higher, its riffs and grooves a magnetic persistence supported by funk fuelled rhythms and an instinctive catchiness brewed in quick time by the aligning of individual revelry. With a touch of Axis Mundi to its body, the fiercely enjoyable track is followed and eclipsed by Beware of the Monsters, a pop rock scented affair with classical strains in its melodic endeavour and rapacity to its captivation loaded rock ‘n’ roll; it ultimately a resourceful carnival with the snappy raps of Kane as its side show barker.

The brief Project Dystopia is a similarly alluring affair at ease either snarling or roaming through ears in a reggae graced haze before making way for the punchy dynamics of A Long Way From Home, a track epitomising the album in the diversity of styles and textures employed in its imaginative carousel. Though it lacks the same spark as its predecessors for personal ears, the song is a compelling and skilfully woven proposition before the short almost gothic lure of In Ravens We Trust pulls intrigue into the waiting drama of We Are The 48. The track is another rock heavy slice of goodness with a predatory edge to its rhythms and vocals amidst the entwining of fiery grooves and smouldering melodies.

The Messengers of Deception rumbles and grumbles next without skimping on veins of seductive melodic enticement and its own distinct web of rousing creative espionage while No False Idol smoulders around another earthy bassline as an Enter Shikari meets Electric Six escapade blossoms into something fiercely unique and explosive to Beware! Monsters.

The cosmic toned A Revolution in Progress stirs the senses and emotions next, its intimate yet worldly challenge a tempestuous blend of rock and metal as at ease gently caressing involvement as forcibly stirring it up, all with a craft and invention which sets another certain highlight within Friend or Faux.

Closing with The Haunting is Over, a short evocative instrumental, Friend or Faux is one of those striking debuts which lingers in ears and thoughts long pass its presence. Certainly some tracks surpass others but from its first eventful second through to its suggestive last, the album is an impressive introduction to a band already outshining its member’s previous successes.

Friend or Faux is out now @ https://bewaremonsters.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/bewaremonstersuk/

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

One Morning Left – Metalcore Superstars

OML promo_RingMaster Review

Metalcore Superstars is the new album from Finnish melodic metalcore band One Morning Left, and our introduction to a sound which quickly you get the marmite factor feeling about in, it breeding love or eager dislike with little in between. As the eleven rousing tracks of the encounter run riot through ears with their bedlamic burst of styles and flavours, we quickly fell into the former opinion and keenly embraced its ferocious mayhem.

It has been three years since the quintet released their seemingly well-received second album Our Sceneration; it’s uncaging in 2013 quickly followed by the band increasing their live presence and hitting stages alongside the likes of like Adept, F*ckface Unstoppable (Bam Margera), Protest The Hero, and We Butter The Bread With Butter and more across Europe. 2014 saw the band begin working on Metalcore Superstars, its creation an extensive affair as the band honed their new ideas into its slightly psychotic character until arriving at the seriously eventful confrontation grabbing ears today.

Maybe the best way to generalise the One Morning Left sound is ravenous metalcore with the punk contagion of Billy Talent, the techno adventure of Silent Descent, and the mischievous prowess of Hollywood Undead; it coming with a hardcore/avant-garde surge of attitude. The result is a full-on and enjoyably unpredictable protagonist, even if one that flirts with a loss of control at times.

art_RingMaster ReviewOpener OML_KVLT sees the band announcing themselves in anthemic style, the vocals of Mika Lahti a busy and tenacious mix backed by those of guitarist Leevi Luoto. Checking out tracks from previous releases, there seems a lighter tone to the creative devilment of One Morning Left this time around with Metalcore Superstars but equally a more rabid snarl to their sonic and lyrical warfare amidst bolder drama to their imagination. The first track continues to stir ears and appetite with its fiery nature and pungent tapestry of flavours, subsequently creating a virulently infectious incitement that chews on the senses.

The following Heavy Metal Finland flirts with nintendocore like bait initially, it’s tempting aligned to vicious growling and broody dynamics which erupt further within the emergence of the tempestuous proposition. Without the constant spark of its predecessor, the track pleases as it toys vocally with heavy and death metal spices as well as similarly varied textures musically; enjoyably backing up the strong start without quite making the same impact.

The guitars of Luoto and Ari Levola aggressively dance with sonic attitude within ¡Derailed! next, but also they are unafraid to unleash some funk seeded flirtation whilst keys engage in a kaleidoscope of electro flavours and atmospheric suggestiveness. All the time moving towards a bruising confrontation, the track provides a galvanic finale within a formidable rhythmic web cast by drummer Niko Hyttinen before the outstanding You’re Dead! Let’s Disco! has body and energies fully involved in thumping aural devilry. Like Hadouken! meets The Browning, the track is a chest beating slab of sonic and vocal defiance again lit by the off-kilter imagination of keys and programming from Veli-Matti Kananen and bracingly driven by his bass lines and the swinging scythes of Hyttinen. Careering on the precipice of psychotic chaos, the track leaves body and emotions bursting with lust, a success matched by The Recipe, it a more controlled but no less forcibly resourceful and deranged web of concussive textures and fascinating theatre.

Kings and Queens throbs and pulsates straight after, its opening a haunted cascade of electronic splatters leading to a warmer toned but more punk bred aggressor as melodically engaging as it is infectiously cantankerous. That Billy Talent air is at its strongest here in a song with an inventive weave maybe less exploratory than others on the album but is still sculpted from a heftily flavoursome torrent of ideas. Its lean take on that thick diversity elsewhere works a treat, providing one more major highlight.

A muggy collage of metal and punk ‘n’ roll colours Fast and Furious 6.66 next, its electronic calms only bringing more intrigue loaded variety to ultimately an enraged bluster of the song whilst Devil’s Nest rumbles and grumbles from a sinister melodic entrance into an exotically hued adventure with duelling contrasts against aligning radiances and hostilities. A dogged but invitingly invigorating swamp of noise and flavour, the track grips attention and eager involvement with its theatre of enterprise leaving the album’s title track to bully and harry senses next, though it too is unafraid to seduce with the beckoning fingers of melodies and harmonies.

A great carnival-esque air comes with the riveting Eternity; the penultimate treat playing with a My Chemical Romance meets AFI hand within its just as potent murderous traits to ingeniously nag and thrill ears before making way for the closing turbulence of Sticks and Stones. Like being rabidly assaulted by a seductive temptress bound with irritable intent and wrapped in orchestral grandeur, the track is one enthralling end to an inescapably magnetic release.

For some, the creative turmoil and bordering on insatiable imagination of Metalcore Superstars may not hit the spot for ears or desires, but it only left us exhaustively wanting more. So be brave and take on the adventure One Morning Left offers with their latest proposal we suggest; it just might ignite your day.

Metalcore Superstars is out now in Finland via Inverse Records with full release from February 22nd in central Europe through Bleeding Nose Records, and across America and Oceania on Imminence Records.

http://www.onemorningleft.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Onemorningleft   https://twitter.com/onemorningleft

Pete RingMaster 25/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Scarlet Echo – An Exact Portrayal of Nothing in Particular

SE_RingMaster Review

Starting off 2016 in fine style, we look at an album released just a few weeks back with keen intrigue inspired by the more recent single taken from its compelling body. An Exact Portrayal of Nothing in Particular is the debut album from Scarlet Echo, a UK band whose sound, self-described as ferocious echospheric music, expertly sparks ears and imagination into eager involvement.

Proof came with the single Emergency Exit last month, a song stirring up ears and appetite with invention sprung from a fusion of post punk and indie rock. An Exact Portrayal of Nothing in Particular quickly shows that its nature is only one hue in the musical tapestry of the band, a design equally woven from varied electronic and shoegaze nurtured threads. Since forming in 2012, the Essex hailing quartet of Hannah (vocals/guitar), Jamie {guitar), Miles (Bass), and Alex (drums/samples) has incited a healthy buzz and following through their live presence, the sharing of stages with the likes of Bassment Jaxx, Rat Boy, Hadouken, Buzzcocks, The Hoosiers, and Department S amongst highlights. Now they have begun brewing a greater intensity of attention their way through An Exact Portrayal of Nothing in Particular, a tempting in force from its first moments.

Album opener Mainstream swiftly stirs ears with bounding rhythms and dramatic melodies, both aspects as shadowy as they are vibrant whilst laying down the platform for the distinctive vocal presence of Hannah. Miles’ throbbing bassline makes a just as gripping entrance; its post punk throatiness the perfect foil to the Lesley Woods (Au Pairs) like tone of Hannah’s voice. The emerging catchiness of the song draws in all these magnetic hues, in turn creating a flirtatiously gripping stroll part eighties and part modern persuasion.

ALBUM-ARTWORK-FRONT_RingMaster Review   It is a thrilling start to the album, fully waking ears and attention for the following calmer mystery of Factory Floor to play with. Coldly atmospheric and romantically melodic, the track taunts and caresses the imagination with, again, a blend of melodic and raw textures. The Passions come to mind as the song writhes impressively within ears, but as shown time and time again, Scarlet Echo twist any elements into their own imaginative devilment; a Talking Heads spiced bassline perfect evidence from within the excellent encounter.

A fiery climate is explored by the sonic heat of Mass Production next, the addictive song a sultry resonance of sound and emotion driven by tenacious rhythms quickly matched in success by the sizzling blues wrung blaze of Technophobia. Its fire is interspersed with evocative slithers of calm, though it is the almost occultist air of the blistering rock expulsions which steals the show within the brief but scintillating proposition. The song shows yet another side to the band’s sound, its volatile might at times like a mix of Jingo and Jess & the Ancient Ones.

Falling Prey offers an instrumental relaxation from the fire, its shimmering melodic beauty and warm ambience enticingly mesmeric before making way for the boisterous adventure of Emergency Exit. The track opens with a splattering of guitar tempting, those bubbling lures soon joined by The Cure like potency of the bass. The minimalistic landscape of the song is beguiling, almost Young Marble Giants like on its way to brewing a livelier and thicker contagion driven by dynamic rhythms, guitar jangling, and the excellent character of the vocals. As a single the song impressed but fair to say it has only grown in stature over time, creating another major pinnacle of An Exact Portrayal of Nothing in Particular.

The smoky jazzy air of Paradigm envelops the senses straight after to fine effect; its charm and muggy seducing an absorbing temper to the revelry of its predecessor whilst casting its own hard to resist instrumental flight into imagination feeding pastures and provocative aural scenery. Its potency is emulated and surpassed by the outstanding Silicone City, its unique exploration a trigger to adventurous thoughts and heavily pleased ears as guitar and voice simmer and sway over the tempestuous incitement of bass and drums.

The album is brought to a close by firstly the sonically evocative, ambience soaked Ataraxy and lastly the poppier shuffle of Lose Control. Neither track quite lives up to what came before them yet each has body and satisfaction eagerly on board with their creative and dramatic captivations.

Scarlet Echo is a band destined to further transfix and thrill as they grow and creatively spring from this impressive debut. An Exact Portrayal of Nothing in Particular may have been released at the tail end of 2015 but for a new year of musical exploration we could not have got things off to a better start.

An Exact Portrayal of Nothing in Particular is out now through iTunes or at http://scarletecho.bigcartel.com/product/an-exact-portrayal-of-nothing-in-particular

http://www.scarletecho.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/scarletecho    https://twitter.com/scarletecho

Pete RingMaster 04/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Scarlet Echo – Emergency Exit

SE pic_RingMaster Review

Every now and then a band comes along and just grabs attention by the balls with an almost knowing instinct on what the passions go for. For us UK quartet Scarlet Echo is such a proposition, and though their new single Emergency Exit is just one song from an album yet to be heard here, it and the band have quickly given a keen to be greedy appetite one thrilling poke.

Formed in 2012, the Essex hailing Scarlet Echo has earned a strong word of mouth reputation through their live presence and compelling sound, a buzz reaching us well before a note was heard. The past couple of years or so has seen the band share stages with the likes of Bassment Jaxx, Rat Boy, Hadouken, The Buzzcocks, The Hoosiers, and Department S, and it is the latter in their early days which new single Emergency Exit brings to mind in some ways.

Taken from An Exact Portrayal of Nothing in Particular, the band’s debut album, Emergency Exit instantly splatters ears in inviting melodic drops cast by the guitar. They are quickly joined by the dark throaty temptation of the bass, it in turned courted by the excellent and diverse vocals led by Hannah. The jangle of her and Jamie’s guitars continue to coax and excite as the rhythmic shadows sprung by Miles and the swinging beats of Alex bring further irresistible bait. There is a definite eighties hue to the post punk meets indie rock contagion seducing ears and the imagination, with that colouring of Department S, their early singles especially hinted at, coming to mind as the song hits its dynamic stride. Also though, the melodic prowess of The Passions is reminded of by the single and the darker tonal might of Au Pairs and Horse Party, a band also exciting the now, comes to thoughts too as the track continues to transfix and thrill.

Ultimately though, the outstanding Emergency Exit with a matching video, breeds a character and addictiveness solely Scarlet Echo sculpted with a need to explore their album growing in its wake, and with increasing impatience after every listen.

Emergency Exit is available now, as also An Exact Portrayal of Nothing in Particular, via iTunes.

https://www.facebook.com/scarletecho   http://www.scarletecho.co.uk   https://twitter.com/scarletecho

Pete RingMaster 15/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Never A Hero – UnEvolution

Never A Hero 2

Bursting with variety, so much so that at times you are not sure where the band’s intention with their sound is going, it has to be said that UnEvolution is one rather enjoyable and memorable encounter. The second album from UK alternative rock band Never A Hero explores a much broader landscape of sounds and imagination than that tagging suggests. It does not always come off as potently in places as in others, and the album is soaked in a familiarity assumedly bred from inspirations, but still the release is one fun and highly appetising enjoyment.

Never A Hero emerged in 2009 when members from two bands came together to write and create new music well away from their usual styles. Debut EP Socially Awkward was recorded and unveiled in 2010, its re-release two years later awakening even greater attention. Between its outings though, the band were already finding radio airplay as well as TV coverage through debut single From Heroes To Angels, a success pushed on by second single Trippin’ On Speed and its video in 2011. Their first album Bleed Between The Lies was released at the end of 2012 to potent responses as subsequent singles taken from it like Burning Skies. Now they have just uncaged its successor UnEvolution, laying down rich bait for its arrival on a UK tour, and already it is making an open stir on the British rock scene.

The post hardcore like A Thousand Days Wasted opens things up, the track just glancing past one minute in length but in that turbulent time already hinting away that there may be much more lying in wait in the depths and invention of any song than revealed on its surface. This is soon evidenced by Mr Munchausen, an energetically striding slice of rock ‘n’ roll from its first breath and swiftly bringing metal and other heavy textures into play. Electronic tempting flirts away in the scenery of the evolving melodic rock encounter too, adding unpredictable and tantalising hues to the enjoyable roar of the song. Vocalist Phrixus has an excellent expression and quality to his voice and is just as strongly backed by the tones of guitarist Mickey Thin and bassist KB. As suggested there is a strong element of familiarity to songs on the album and rampant here but it only adds to the satisfaction. Sick Puppies and Fall Out Boy come to mind in varying ways, always good spices in a blaze of a song.

Never A Hero Artwork   A breaking storm and the drama of strings opens up Nightboy next, the track soon striding purposefully with feisty riffs and warm melodies, heading to a potent chorus which it maybe me but amazingly has a healthy feel of Bryan Adams to it. Never thought healthy and that name would escape these fingers together. The guitars of Thin and Kaji 2.0 recruit keen attention to the song alone but with the scything beats of drummer Daisy Lai and the ever alluring vocals of Phrixus, it is another easily accessible and pleasing proposition.

Not Too Cool To Dance takes another turn in the album, its electro punk like stomp almost Hollywood Undead like whilst the rapping vocals has a touch of bands like G.R.I.M and Hadouken to them . It is a stonking start which loses its allure a touch with the following melodic relaxation, strength soon regained as a mix of styles creates a reserved but tempestuous proposal. Again the song wins out and joins the opening pair in leaving ears and thoughts thoroughly contented before making way for the electro meets alternative rock exploits of It’s The Way. Hard rock textures and melodic flames add to the tempting, as do excellent female vocals leading to a touch of Forever Still to the encounter, but ultimately the track does not have the spark of those before it and feels a little safe to be honest. Nevertheless it keeps the album’s potency high as does the electro/hard rock mixed offering The Crow That Follows You Home, it too not sparking the same flame of emotion as the first trio of songs but leaving ears and appetite for the release more than happy.

The orchestral piece God Is Complex brings an interlude next though its epic and evocative presence which rather than allow a breath to be taken brings new theatre and anticipation to the imagination before it embraces the following Kramer. Electro rock with a whiff of Nintendo-core merges with melodic rock, a blend the band increasingly does well and makes strong persuasions with across UnEvolution it has to be said. The track proceeds to stomp and bellow as guitars stir up its canvas and the bass provides a great dark almost sinister attitude to the boiling vocal emotion. It is a great track re-igniting early pleasures whilst again making you wonder what is the prime Never A Hero sound or it starting point.

The more classic hard rock embrace of Falling Up is next and has ears aligned with ease before The Idiots Are Winning bounds around with its tempestuous and openly infectious revelry. Once again a wide twist of styles are tangled to create a recognisable but contagiously magnetic slice of pop rock, this the best way to generally describe the album maybe. The theatrical Succubus sees a clash of mature melodic rock with a more basic street punk narrative, but with guttural roars, grooved infestations, and psyche lit drama breaking out, the song is nothing but thrilling persuasion, especially when it breaks into a fiery swing at one point.

The album ends with the Time To Crucify, a song though individual feels like a reprise of all that came before in one final tapestry of sound and flavours. It is a good end to an increasingly enjoyable encounter. Bands with vast diversity are the most exciting and potentially important bands in music, and that part of Never A Hero makes a good album a great offering. UnEvolution might not be the best album to hit the year so far but it is one of the more enjoyable and that works for us.

UnEvolution is out later this year @ http://www.neverahero.net/shop

http://www.neverahero.net   https://www.facebook.com/neverahero/

RingMaster 17/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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G.R.I.M – Answers

GRIM

Having laid down their web of devilish temptation with the Sounds Like These EP, UK experimental rockers G.R.I.M return to increase the irresistible toxicity of their mouthwatering revelry with new single Answers. Again the Manchester hailing quartet twists the essences of numerous styles into their own unique and virulently compelling contagion as the single builds on their striking debut. Creating a stronger and more startling canvas of sound upon which the band sets free a riotous maelstrom of anthemic rhythms, imposing textures, and a psychotically charming inventive seductive, the track is a demon puppeteer to feet and psyche. It unleashes merciless bait throughout, a tempting which holds more unpredictable turns and deranged enterprise than to be found in the dark corridors of bedlam, a proposition which just inspires similarly raucous reactions

Formed in 2011 Great Riddims In Mind, better known as G.R.I.M, took little time in recruiting a fervour soaked local following with their fusion of styles such as dubstep, hip hop, dub, metal, and drum and bass to their sizzling noise rock core. To be fair any labelling is redundant when the foursome of vocalist Lance Hargreaves, guitarist James Glenn, bassist Nathan Larkin, and drummer Kyle Larkin cast their creative net of intensive rhythms, scorching guitar blazes, and vocal chants, and that is just simplifying their songwriting. With a serious reputation for thrilling live performances around their home city across renowned venues such as DryLive, Roadhouse, Sound Control, Antwerp Mansion, and Retrobar, the band certainly raised potent attention with their first release but it is in the outstanding Answers where you feel the trigger to wider recognition lies.

The single opens with a restrained stroking of guitar which is soon aligned to pumping beats and coaxing vocals. It is a skittish recruitment Answersof attention and appetite, sounding out the senses ready for the imminent expulsion of wantonly swinging grooves and wildly adventurous beats ridden by feistily enthused vocals. In full flight the track twists and flirts like a rapacious lap dancer as melodic toxins and hypnotic rhythms veining and puncturing the swerving rampancy. Playing like a meshuga planted by a union of Hadouken!, Lazy Habits, and Great Imitation with the extra relish of Swound!, the track soon has passions enslaved but it is only the start as it swoops into an atmospheric deviation, glorious orchestrated flames reaching to the sky as a Shrikes like disorientation and experimentation works on the senses. That exploration then evolves into a hip hop shaped lunacy, the song lifting its knees to its creative chin to wrong foot assumptions before moving once more into a delicious Mike Patton like invention.

The song continues to entwine those characters whilst adding new aural voices across its riveting climactic body, all the time sending waves of contagion and anthemic fuel into the passions. Seemingly increasing its thumping stride and urgency as it nears its conclusion, Answers is a predatory enticement with cracked intentions and irresistible weaponry which not only realises the promise suggested by the band’s last EP but uncages even greater potential for their sounds and an impending spotlight coated stature which you just know G.R.I.M will be exploiting ahead.

The single also comes with an equally dramatic and thrilling video directed by Joshua Leo Dorfman and produced by G.R.I.M and Fallout Productions. It brings its own enthralling premise and larger than life colour to the song, its story and cast as dynamic and energetically agitated as the thrilling song itself.

G.R.I.M is one of Britain’s most exhilarating and exhaustingly inventive secrets though Answers might just make that a soon to be well recognised mystery.

Check out the Answers video @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k13smeVyrLw

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https://twitter.com/GRiManchester

10/10

RingMaster 07/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Death and the Penguin – Accidents Happen

Death and the Penguin

Providing a clutch of immersive anthems, though may be not in the recognisable sense, Accidents Happen the debut EP from UK indie/rock band Death and the Penguin is not only magnificent stands as one of the most startling and compellingly invigorating releases to hit the senses this year so far. Consisting of six tracks which are as bewitchingly eclectic and striking as they are voraciously imaginative and inciting, the EP is a mouthwatering persuasion which boldly tempts and riotously seduces with an invention and virulence that is unstoppable. For a debut it is extraordinary and for a first step by a band one of the most exciting entrances in a long time.

Taking their name from a satirical novel by Ukrainian Andrey Kurkov, the London quartet of Tobias Smith (vocals, guitar), Christopher Olsen (guitar, keyboard, vocals), Andrew Acred (bass, keyboard, vocals), and Timothy Brennik (drums, percussion, vocals) make a first impression which it is hard to imagine could have been any more potent and incisive then what it is. It is a release which starts off with a stirring proposition and just gets better and bigger with each track, all the while revealing the depths to the band’s songwriting, craft, and adventure whilst soaking it in a promise which more than suggests of even greater things to come.

Opener Snuffed Out instantly awakens thoughts and attention, a blaze of guitar which almost swarms over the senses igniting an instant D&TPAHappetite with its Echo and the Bunnymen toning to the melodic flames leaving the fingers of Olsen and Smith. There is a throaty resonance to the sound which becomes a specific essence of the band across the EP to relish as well as a sweet tasting discord which only accentuates the impact of first impressions. As the song spreads its narrative, a Radiohead like whisper chills the lively ambience as a cleaner and warmer but no less striking version of an At The Drive In like rapaciousness rallies a greedy appetite. It is the dark heavy voice of bass and the coring riffs which steal the thunder though, their continuing likeness to McCulloch and co. irresistible. Though more of a grower than other tracks, it continues to worm its way under the skin and into the psyche, proving to be a dramatic and impossibly infectious not forgetting momentous first slice of temptation.

The following Space 1998 casts a spatial embrace around ears initially, its warm and intriguing elegance asking the imagination to play which it eagerly does, especially with the heavily weighted thump of beats and guitar snarl which joins the beauteous lure. From that union a dazzling mathcore weave of bass and guitar steps forth to toy and quickstep with the senses, their bewildering quickstep and groove unbelievably magnetic. The vocals as in the first song impress from the lead to the eager backing whilst the fire and passion in the band leaves no element unwashed as evidenced by the simply mesmeric chorus. For undefined reasons there is a feel of latter period XTC to the song which only adds to the insatiable funk and jazz bred ingenuity of the stunning and constantly developing landscape.

The song marks a loftier pinnacle in the terrain of the release, elevating past its predecessor before next up An Opening unveils an atmospheric and haunting embrace over the senses. It is a brief and highly evocative piece which swaps the adrenaline fuelled romps of other songs for a melancholic intensity and though it does not inflame emotions as elsewhere the track certainly leads thoughts into a potent venture.

Strange Times has no problem in setting a fuse to a predatory hunger with its roaring entrance; guitars, drums, and keys making a melodic cacophony courted by the ever heavy breath of the bass whilst vocally the band soars with relish and energy. The entrance immediately sparks thoughts of Young Knives though as ever the song twists and lurches through ingenious detours and turns in its way to seducing the passions. Continuing to ebb and flow in its evocative intensity, the eruption of a fire bred guitar surge and the persistently provoking rhythms of Brennik scorch and bruise the senses respectively as the band sculpts another gloriously unpredictable and vigorously compelling exploit.

The persistently rising curve of brilliance to the EP shows no sign of levelling out as it and band step to another level with the closing pair of songs. The first is Bitumen, a track which brings the anthemic unity of the chain-gang into a blues kissed slab of pure invention. As primal and tribal as it is voraciously soulful the track is just brilliant, a sonic and rhythmic alchemy which seduces and smothers every pore of body, mind, and heart. An element of De Staat comes to mind with the agitated glory of the drums and percussion, but again the song is as unique and distinct to Death and the Penguin as you could expect and wish.

As the track closed it has to be admitted that we thought the release’s pinnacle was found but The Words That Maketh Murder soon shoves that thought aside. The song leaps at the ear with a wind of raucous vocals and grooved sonic groans, like a mix of Collisions and Hadouken it consumes the ears with a punkish recruitment which has a greedy attention basking in the subsequent flow of emotive vocals and imaginative intrigue. The switching gallop and canter of the chorus is sensationally incendiary, whilst the increasingly fertile landscape of the track with its swing and groove lilted swagger just concentrates the submissive toxins of the quite genius encounter. With another flood of infection cruising through a climax clad in a kaleidoscope of inventive colour and sonic mystique to end things on a plateau, Accidents Happen is simply incredible and already the instigator to suggestions that the Death and the Penguin is the next big and important thing within British rock music. Time will tell but we will not be betting against it.

Accidents Happen is released on May 5th through Best Before Records.

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9.5/10

RingMaster 04/05/2014

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Semitt Falls – I Know Bear Heads

semitt falls pic

Like a great many we were impressed and excited by Monkey See, Monkey Do Doo, the debut album from UK band Semitt Falls. It was an unpredictable and inventive twisting of flavours and imagination which marked out a band with the potential to rise to major things. It also set a high benchmark for the band to follow but for the only time they meet expectations the Stockport quartet easily take that plateau and lose it in the wake of their scintillating new EP I Know Bear Heads. The four track release is a tremendous weave of captivating invention and busily flavoured enterprise which makes the earlier album look like mere foreplay to the main event. Fusing electro metal with more of its muscular cousins and then aligning them with a breath-taking web of genres such as drum and bass, hip-hop, dub, reggae, and dubstep, the band conjures a kaleidoscope of sound which tantalises and seduces whilst sparking a riot in the passions.

Semitt Falls was formed in 2012 by Paul Kendrick (guitar, vocals and programming) and Jay Kane (vocals, synths) after the demise of their previous band Halt Under Heavy Fire. Linking up with ex-Fortune Favours Nothing member Danny Houghton (drums) who since the EP release has left the band, and subsequently ex- Son of Shinobi Craig Gilroy (bass , vocals) after a few line-up changes, the quartet evolved an initially post-hardcore sound into a more electronic rock sculpted persuasion, a sound which has continued to move and change with every song and release. The release of Monkey See, Monkey Do Doo in May of last year thrust the band into a wider focus of attention with its intensive diversity and mouthwatering adventure but as mentioned it now seems just an appetiser for greater things from the band, a mightier exploration starting to confidently flex its muscle and invention upon I Know Bear Heads. With a line-up for the EP seeing bassist Sidge Rushton replacing the departed Gilroy, Semitt Falls have unveiled a riotous temptation which just will not take no for an answer.

The EP seizes ears, imagination, and passion right away with opener FIRE!FIRE!FIRE!, a track also featuring G.R.I.M. Folderfrontman Lance Hargreaves. Funnelling through a distantly starting corridor, riffs and vocals emerge in a flood of energy and transfixing sonic confrontation. Once fully exposed and immediately into its rampant stride the song sees mixed vocal squalls igniting the senses whilst resourceful riffery and a rhythmic cage sculpt compelling narratives to secure a swiftly brewed appetite for the song’s presence. Ripe with swipes of hip hop vocals, dubstep conjuring, and a metal bred antagonism the track is an irresistible rampage merging the electronic addictiveness of Pendulum with the punk metal of The Prodigy and Skindred. It is a thrilling introduction to the release breeding a keen hunger and greed for what is to come.

The following We Be Dinosaur takes little time in offering something different, a quality repeated from their previous album, every song a unique and individual character and proposition to the next. Opening with an evocative electronic caress with shards of crystalline causticity, the track at first has an Enter Shikari like coaxing to its offering though it is soon evolved into a stomp of ska and reggae fusion guided by excellent darker vocals and a delicious trombone croon from Rushton and Andy Jones. Adding some punk rapaciousness and electronic teasing to the impressive spread of vocals and exhilarating invention, the track roams and incites the passions like a mix of King Prawn, Hadouken, and Daft Punk with adding essences of Dizraeli and the Small Gods. It a glorious landscape of pleasure and imagination which takes the impressive start of the release up another notch or two in thought and creative wantonness.

The title track brings a less urgent presence to tempt the senses, vocals and guitars showing a more deliberate restraint to their enticement which the keys and vocals wrap in an evocation of sound and absorbing soak of emotion. With samples also adding their unique touch to the flowing musical narrative it is a strong and engaging encounter but one just failing to match the heady heights and quality of its predecessors. Nevertheless the song embraces focus and appetite tightly warming them up for the closing exploits of Global Warning. The final track retains the smouldering charms of the previous song whilst inviting the more predacious energy and snarl of the first two tracks, the result another incitement to launch a fresh breath of ardour for band and release even if again despite its glowing elegance and magnetic craft it just misses hitting those early plateaus.

Immediately a gripping and entrancing tempest of imaginative excitement, the EP just gets better and stronger with every traverse of its easily impressive body. Semitt Falls has all the potential and promise to be the next big thing in electro rock experimentation, something rigorously confirmed by I Know Bear Heads.

http://www.semittfalls.com

Get the I Know Bear Heads EP as a buy now name your price at http://semittfalls.bandcamp.com/album/i-know-bear-heads-ep

9/10

RingMaster 17/12/2013

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Go-Zilla – Self Titled

Go-Zilla

Taking limbs and spirit on an energetic charge of vibrant and imaginative adventure, the self-titled album from UK dance rock band Go-Zilla certainly surprised what were admittedly limited expectations going into it and sparked nothing less than the urge to eagerly shout out about what is an invigorating and enterprising release. It is not without flaws and moments where passions are not sparked into any kind of flame but for the main the London trio has created a triumph which has energy and appetite hungry for more.

Formed in 2011, the threesome of Jon Youseman (vocals and synths), Chris Jones (vocals and guitar), and Glenn Rice (vocals and drums), taking inspirations from many genres and especially the likes of Skrillex, The Prodigy, and Pendulum, set about creating their own sound with their early demo’s finding strong and positive receptions when released online. Constantly gigging ever since their official step in public view at the end of 2011, Go-Zilla has earned a strong reputation and passionate fanbase which their debut album has already driven to greater levels as it works its magnetic charm on new more willingly submissive hearts.

As mentioned the release has faults which admittedly still are rife with such promise that you feel greater things are on the near Go-Zilla - Self titled - coverhorizon, at the moment just brewing in the band’s inventive thoughts, but the moment the opening Go-Zilla (Intro) emerges from the shadows with pulsating beats and refreshing melodic temptation, senses and emotions are scooped up in a brief but lasting riot. The synths douse the ear in incendiary dance calls whilst rhythms stomp with sinews bare-chested within the embrace and though it is barely over a minute the instrumental arouses a greedy appetite with ease, a brewing greed soon being satisfied by the following Camden Queen. Once again drums and rhythms lay down heavy boots to draw on primal needs whilst guitars and synths sculpt a warm and intensity fuelled dance. The vocals singular and as a group are impressive, both elements melodic and harmonious within a Pendulum like temptation which leaves the listener breathless but primed for more of the same.

As much as more of the same would have been welcome, Go-Zilla have too much going on in their imagination to simply keep to a winning formula and pleasingly across subsequent tracks show an exciting range to their songwriting and sound. Our Tomorrow which features guest vocals from Gemma Dand, opens with a great horn blaze before walking a restrained gait as antagonistic vocals make a harsher narrative. Once into its stride the melodic calling of the band leads into an enjoyable mix of alternative and electro rock, a mix of Enter Shikari and Funeral For A Friend with an open contagion to its emotive persuasion.

     Get On the Dancefloor is one of the songs which you take to bed and bust moves to in your dreams, its infectiousness as virulent as lust in a school of teenage boys, and just as lingering. With the punk feistiness of Hadouken egging on roaming electro fingers the track is a tempest of insatiable beats and rabid energy though also containing some moments of listless calm which is ingeniously and smoothly entrenched into the kinetically driven party. It is an excellent track showing yet further depth of diversity in itself and the album, as do the likes of the following Throwdown, a track which is as much pop punk as it is electro rock, and the emotively woven Chasing Shadows. Both tracks in their different ways mark a shift in the release to more indie rock seeded designs though still the synths and electronic heart of the band steers the intriguing endeavour, the second of these two adding a slight hip hop essence certainly to the vocals. Though nicely done the track is one of the weakest and less inspiring on the album but still gives credence to the promise flowing throughout every second of the album.

What Would You Give also struggles against the stronger tracks though it’s Hollywood Undead like snarl leaves good impressions even if the group vocals later on have the opposite effect, but things are soon blazing again with the duo of Don’t Wait for Me and Keep Breathing. Completely unexpected and out of character for the album so far, the two songs are acoustic guitar driven tracks of melodic beauty and impressive vocal elegance, the first still infusing potent electro narratives and the second an anthemic heart bred glory with loud melancholic whispers. It is a stunning track and rivals for best on the album whilst furthering yet again the depth of the band’s imagination and skills.

After the more than decent aggressive stance of The Rise, the album ends on another highlight in Wolfpack. Featuring the great vocal tones of Betty Be Famous, the track returns to the opening punchy dance of the album, bone shuddering beats and electro squeezes chaining up the senses for melodic waters to lay their dramatic caresses upon before the track sways and writhes with addiction forming wantonness across the ear with more teasing enterprise and striking craft.

The album still suggests that Go-Zilla is looking or deciding on which way to take their sound and ideas but it also shows they have many options which they have explored on the release with imagination and impressive invention. It is about time the likes of Pendulum had real competition and though really it is too early to declare, Go-Zilla suggest in time they might be one up to the challenge.

Go-Zilla is a name your own price release @ http://gozillaofficial.bandcamp.com/album/self-titled

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8.5/10

RingMaster 17/06/2013

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