Law 18 – Self Titled

Law18_RingMasterReview

There is little we can tell you about Italians Law 18 beyond that they come from Milan, were formed in 2011, and are a quintet playing “hardcore groove /crossover stoner”. Actually there is one more thing, and that is that they recently released their self-titled debut album and it is one slab of deranged rock ‘n’ roll that we for one have become increasingly fond of.

That description of their sound is lifted from the band’s Facebook page and only tells part of the story, a small clue to the off-kilter fusion of styles the band weave into their compelling creative revelry. Across the album’s nine tracks, you will find everything from groove and nu metal to thrash and hardcore, stoner and punk through to funk and plenty of other bold strains of sound.  Its songs are raw and inventive, ranging from psychotic and quarrelsome to eccentric and tenacious, very often all at the same time, and for the main compelling fun.

The album opens with Dwarfs & Cowboys and an immediate mesh of rich grooves and punkish vocals led by Alessandro ‘Ale’ Mura. Bold rhythms align with Lorenzo ‘Pero’ Perin’s riffs to add thick aggression whilst lead guitarist Davide C springs sonic tendrils into the tempest, a mix which bullies and entices like a mix of Pantera and Suicidal Tendencies as the track develops. It is a relatively straight forward offering but prone to contagious thrash bred surges of intensity amidst sonic drama, each becoming more volatile and extreme with every passing second.

The following You Blind is similarly sculpted but with a swifter eagerness to show its instincts in pushing its boundaries and infusing broader textures of sound and flavours. Hardcore and metallic voracity unite as the initially band prowls before launching a torrent of rapacious grooves and rhythmic agitation upon the senses. It subsequently eclipses its strong predecessor before being outshone itself by Hollow Earth Society. From the initial grazing of guitar and the predacious beats of drummer Luca Ferrario, the song has ears and attention gripped, more so when it slips into an unpredictable web of warped sounds and imagination from its early bout of muscular rock ‘n’ roll. The new and riveting enterprise uncaged is unmistakably System Of A Down inspired and quite irresistible, even with its familiarity to the Californian band, as Law 18 infuse their peculiar strains of heavy and anthemic textures.

art_RingMasterReview The dramatic invention continues with Dominus Caeli, a track opening with a flirtatiously seductive bassline from Lorenzo ‘Tarzan’ Colucci which then incites further jazz/funk exploits from rhythms and guitar. Like an abrasive fusion of Toumaï and Trepalium, the track grumbles and rumbles with punk lined irritability whilst creating an unstoppable and virulent contagion of grooves and raucous aggression. Further building to a hungry prowl courted by unhinged vocal teasing, the song is a thrilling slice of rabid, in sound and invention, metal fired rock ‘n’ roll.

The bass of Colucci again provides a great start to the next track; its heavy pulsing growl the lure into Dirty of Blood and spark for another hellacious assault of hardcore fuelled raging before Leather’s Wreck shares its own expectations foiling landscape of creative bedlam. Both tracks in their contrasting lengths show more of the band’s striking imagination; the brief fury of the first slipping into a mischievous discord hued swagger for a great psyche twisting moment whilst the second provides a noise rock shaped avant-garde adventure. As raw and imposing as it is sonically and melodically seductive, the harmonica skills of Mura excelling with its bluesy expression against the similarly hued guitar resourcefulness of Davide C, the track offers seven minutes plus of ear pleasing and imagination stirring incitement.

An addictive swing and stroll spines the anthemic persuasion of the following Mirror Reflections; its boisterous and pushy antagonism an uncompromising brawl of forceful punk ‘n’ roll. In time, it too evolves as rhythms spring into a demandingly infectious shuffle within post punk like scenery before returning to its tempestuous and bruising rampage of punk metal loaded rock ‘n’ roll.

Rage Against Me roars with defiance from every blues rock pore next as intrigue surrounds each turn in its bracing funk ‘n’ punk stomp. Driven by a grouchy stamping of its rhythmic feet and mass vocal irritability, there is no escaping its instinctive catchiness and highly persuasive ire or from the avalanche of riffs and crushing rhythms which shape closing track 2010. Unleashing a host of heavily spiced grooves, barbarous hooks, and a contagious energy which has bodies as involved as ears and imagination by the parade of vocal provocation across the band, the track is a maze of sonic invention.

It is a great close to an album which grabs attention from the off but really blossoms as a whole and excels in its individual elements with each subsequent venture into its frenzied rebellious world. Law 18 has sculpted something very worthy chunk of anyone’s time but especially for those with a taste for bold yet organic blurring of genre walls but still simply want unbridled rock ‘n’ roll.

Some bands and releases just seem to be on the same wavelength as personal creative adventure;

The Law 18 album is out now @ https://law18.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/Law18band/

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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27 Tons of Metal New England – Various

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And Bluntface Records do it again, thrusting the underground scene at the senses courtesy of another essential compilation of some of the most striking and potential drenched bands around. This time the US label is exploring the underground metal scene from New England, which on the evidence of 27 Tons of Metal New England, is simply writhing with great ravenous bands and sounds. The release is as diverse in styles as it is voracious in creativity and though with the amount of bands and metal subgenres involved personal tastes will obviously find a greater hunger for some over others, it is fair to say that the album from start to finish is a compelling treat with no weak spots, and all the more tastier for being completely free.

The encounter opens with Carnivora and a track taken from their outstanding EP, The Vision. Pessimist’s Tongue is the Danvers quintet at their full blistering best and weaving suggestive ambiences into subsequent tapestries of rabid vocals and rancorous intensity. Yet despite its almost cancerous intent and creative breath, there is anthemic energy and a web of searing adventure from the guitars involved, which in turn sparks addictively imaginative exploits from the band across the song’s corrosive landscape.

It is a scintillating start to the release pushed on by Alterius and their uncompromising melodic death metal trespass on the senses, A Citadel’s Demise. The song comes from the band’s latest EP Voyager, and merges classical overtones into its fluid brutal and seductive tempting. Like being serenaded whilst the beast tears your throat out, the track stalks ears and psyche setting in motion a keen appetite to know more, a success matched by Revere quartet Travel Amygdala and their aggressively smouldering Died by a Bullet. Entangling its inventive metal bred sound with progressive and grunge seeded imagination, the song aggressively crawls over the senses enticing and intimidating, especially as it builds in energy and tempestuous air. There is also a potent sludge feel to part of its character too, the thick prowls between forceful strides of creative and vocal drama carrying the strongest whiff, with ultimately everything uniting for one riveting proposition.

Bostonian black metal trio Ashen Wings comes next, the band’s raw and carnivorous sound a bracing magnetic scourge delivered to ears from Cancerous Bones. As insidious and ruinous as you can imagine, it also spawns a swing to its gait which only adds to the addictive proposal on offer before making way for the just as destructively virulent Scourge of the Hierophant from Sorrowseed. A blend of blackened death metal with a healthy vein of classic and melodic tenacity, the increasingly thrilling track smothers ears and appetite with pestilential persuasion whilst provoking the want to offer vocalist Lilith Astaroth some soothing for her surely shredded vocal chords.

band-contacts-page-127 Tons of Metal New England      Walk the Earth (No Longer) from sludge/doomers Conclave steps up next, the nine minute intrusion an accomplished and enthralling predation cast with rugged heavy riffs and heavily swiping rhythms, all lorded over by just as unpolished and alluring vocals. From their Breaking Ground EP, the song is as effective descending on ears in top gear or in crowding their walls with a lumbering and weighty provocation within a long but never less than thickly engaging incitement.

The same kind of hold is seized by Beneath The Burial next and their track In Memory, its fusion of hardcore ferocity and metal spawned sonic invention a fury of searing grooves, vocal animosity, and subsequently predatory imagination. As the album itself, there is a wealth of flavours emerging across the track musically and vocally, which only adds to the slow but fiercely burning persuasion of the song to inspire a want for more as it makes way for Skin Drone and God Complex. One of the few bands these ears had already come across and previously devoured, the duo of Bluntface Records founder Otto Kinzel and Erik Martin of Erik Dismembered and Critical Dismemberment unleash one of those examinations which you never know whether to fear or whole heartedly embrace, the latter always the chosen reaction of course. Like a sonic scavenger, the track vocally and musically spills its creative industrial/metal animus on to the senses within an evocative ambience which then inspires a melancholic exploration of emotive and creative expression. The song is a cauldron of inventive sound and emotional intensity, a rich picking for those with an avant-garde side to their preferred examinations.

The scorching designs and temperament of Dirty Birdy from metalcore furnace Don’t Cross the Streams is next; band and track a scarring addictiveness which without springing major surprises has ears and heavy enjoyment sealed from the first clutch of seconds. Their triumph is quickly backed by Stoughton power/progressive metallers Forevers Fallen Grace and Clarion of Regret, another song which needed warming to before its potent expanse of craft and enterprise became an inescapable hook, and after them Makavrah with the excellent Awakening The Ancients. The Peterborough hailing doomsters have a sound which is dangerously mesmeric, a senses meddling sonic bewitchment which as shown by its twelve minutes of evolving soundscape, is hex like in its ingeniously dramatic and creative exploration. With echoes of Show Of Bedlam to it, the track is one delicious incessant crawl.

The industrial endeavour of Isolated Antagonist more than lives up to its offering’s title next, Infection a contagious causticity of sound and emotion with vocals to match as it worms under the skin and into the psyche with lingering rewards, whilst the following Composted bring a carnal presence and hostility into the equation with their track OB/GYN O.G. The band’s death metal onslaught has the voracity of thrash and swagger of groove metal to it, and as hungry hues only help to create an immense and irresistible corruption.

Both Charlestown sextet Untombed and Mike Kerr Band keep the riveting roar of the album going, the first with their groove and antagonism loaded death metal antipathy, Criminal Inception. Savage and violently catchy, the track is another which is maybe not gripped by original exploits but is one spilling a fresh venom which leaves a great many of fellow emerging genre bands in the shade whilst its successor is the title track from its creators recently released new album The Truth of the Lion and features Texan vocalist Adrienne Cowan and Jim Oliveira in its classic/melodic metal lure.

Power groove metal is on the agenda next through Before the Judge and their track Bobby D. With a highly agreeable nag of riffs and grooves lining its erosive blaze, the song stirs the blood band-contacts-page-2_RingMaster Reviewwhilst pouring more diversity into the compilation, variety further expanded by The Aberration and their track Bologna Skins are the Next Big Thing. The band consists of Travis O’Connell (guitar) and Jim Cole (drums), an instrumental duo creating, on the evidence of their contribution, compelling proposals of snarling progressive metal loaded with uncompromising attitude.

Melodic death metal quartet My Missing Half scars air and ears next with The Lives I’ve Ruined, a song with essences of The Black Dahlia Murder and At the Gates to it whilst finding its own magnetically inventive nature. The track leaves emotions and senses breathless but hungry for more as so many on the release, including Seeds of Negligence and their maelstrom of varied and inhospitable metal posing as The Reaper. The song is a bruising and vicious temptation of death, groove, thrash, and progressive strains of extreme metal, an incendiary incitement sparking a lust for further confrontation.

Dover trio Cactus Hag drags the listener back into a rich immersion of sludge and doom invasiveness with Grand Lodge of the Mirage, the track an insidious erosion snuffing out light and hope whilst sparking just as strong enjoyment. Its smothering rancor is contrasted by the brighter and superbly volatile adventure of G.O.G. from Side Effects May Include, the song another entwining a mass of different styles into its individual tempest of heavy rock and creatively rabid metal, and another only leaving the urge to go explore in their wake. Which is something which also applies to Pelham’s Epicenter and the thrash fuelled insurgency of See Through. With strands of alternative and groove metal to its robust and tenacious exploits, the track is as anthemic as it is strikingly inventive, and amongst admittedly many, an instinctive favourite.

band-contacts-page-3_RingMaster Review     Fog Wizard get body and passions inflamed again with Fear the Kraken, a rapacious prowling built like Sabbath meets Motorhead with the attitude of Stuck Mojo and the combined snarl of Slayer and Black Flag. One slab of real pleasure is replaced by another and the abrasive kaleidoscope of sound unveiled by Sonic Pulse through Defenders of the Good Time. A brawling festival of power and thrash metal with a flurry of heavy and classic metal hues for greater captivation, the track is a ferocious blaze equipped with drama, familiarity, and inescapable bait.

The heavy weight slab of talent is brought to an impressive end by a trio of bands to also keep a close eye on, starting with the bestial sound of extreme metallers Graveborn. Their mercilessly hellacious and skilled Leviathan is sheer sonic and rhythmic savagery with just as brutishly varied vocals, and another big enticement before heavy/thrash metal Verscythe prove their classic seeds in the richly magnetic Land of Shells.

Completed finally by Vacant Eyes and the melody sculpted funereal death/doom exploration that is The Dim Light of Introversion, a track thick in atmosphere and haunting trespasses for a darkly compelling seducing, 27 Tons of Metal New England is an intensive journey through the depths and expanses of New England’s underground metal scene. It is one of the most extensive and rewarding compilations in a long time which from start to finish, enthrals and assaults, entices and transgresses. If any metal fan does not come away from the encounter with at least a handful of new lusts we would be amazed. So no dawdling, go and get one of the biggest and best free treats of the year,

27 Tons of Metal New England is available for free download @ http://bluntfacerecords.com/27-tons-of-metal-new-england

RingMaster 06/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Charge – Sweet Lies

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With a band name like Charge, you need a sound with a suitable intensity of energy and boldness to it, and that is exactly what the French metallers provide with debut album Sweet Lies. It is a storming onslaught of voracious and volatile rock ‘n’ roll, a multi-flavoured adventure which might have a few minor issues but provides a seriously exciting and potential soaked incitement. The band has been around since 2004 and have tucked a couple of EPs under their belts but Sweet Lies is their first thick nudge on appetites beyond the Paris and French rock scene, and makes a rousing invitation many will be compelled to eagerly embrace.

Forming around eight years ago, Charge quickly brought out the demo Ain’t My World, recorded with producer Francis Caste (Zuul FX, The ARRS) who returned to work with the band on their first official EP 8 Miles Away in 2009. It is fair to say both as well as a live presence dishing out adrenaline driven and raucously varied metal, brought potent attention and a swiftly growing fan base locally. The band’s line-up has been through a few changes since day one but now with the release of the album, vocalist/rhythm bassist Ravin, guitarist Sacha, drummer Loïc, and lead bassist Lionnel are now looking at broader spotlights to breach. Consisting of the songs from their EP and new tracks produced by Spirou (Bérurier Black), all mixed and mastered by Caste, Sweet Lies opens with a contagious riot and just does not look back.

From the first surge of the initial groove, the album and its opener Alone has ears and imagination hooked. The potent first breath is swiftly a surging torrent of bass riffs, thumping beats, and squalling sonic enticement, a magnetic start soon providing an inescapable onslaught of anthemic bait. Thrash and groove metal collude with heavy rock and punk essences in the now riotous affair, whilst vocally Ravin, though at times a little wayward, just fires up the gripping turbulence further. The union of basses brings a great growl to it all and provides rich depth to song and subsequently album though Charge does not exploit the opportunities they offer enough in some ways. With both openly skilfully played, the band never quite finds the experimental potential explored by for example Morkobot, but it is a dual attack sculpting thick irresistible bait and resourceful adventure as evidenced straight away by Fantasy.

The second song has a much more restrained start but one soaked in menace and predatory intent. The twin prowl of certainly not identical bass provides a bestial and sinisterly charming proposal pierced by the forceful jabs of Loïc and entwined in the just as rabidly delivered and resourcefully crafted sonic laces of guitar. Eventually the controlled stroll succumbs to a brewing intensity, erupting in a ferocious rampage but one easily slipping through the gears in all directions. There is an element of post punk to the colder acidic hooks and of nu-metal in the psyche enslaving devilry, everything coming together for one thrilling stomp.

Both 84 and That’s It keep album and emotions ablaze, the first merging raw elements of pop punk with melodic rock and more whilst turning each flavour into a cauldron of hostile and infectious endeavour. Its successor is even more contagious, bass and guitar grooves aligning with gripping hooks for a flowing tempting within the lure of the other growling almost carnivorous bass and the senses punishing beats. It also spins a weave of melodic and milder tempered exploits which adds to the irresistible romp before making way for the pungent drama and addictiveness of Just Want More. Also as punk as it is metal, Russian band Biting Elbows coming to mind at certain points, the track is a barbarous and wholly catchy incitement on ears and passions, and as the album just increases in potency and persuasion with every listen.

The sheer force and busy assaults of songs does at times hide the individual skill and invention of the band members, but each only impresses and shows a hungry imagination throughout even if, as suggested earlier, they have the potential to explore greater triumphs not quite realised here. With songs like the following One though, there are no complaints just more anticipation of their future. The track is a juggernaut of heavy duty riffs and towering beats insatiably rolling with the handbrake off over the senses. To that vocals scowl and roar with impressive potency whilst tangy grooves and even spicier hooks leap out from every corner and twist of the exceptional infestation of ears and emotions.

The epidemic lure and rampancy of the album continues with its title track, punk metal unleashed with addiction spawning relish and aggression but aligned to searing flames of sonic enterprise and the ever seducing blend of ravenous bass invention. Such the potency of its onslaught, even sitting down and listening to the album’s best song leaves exhaustion in its wake.

Sweet Lies is brought to a fine close by Ain’t My World, the most hostile and raw encounter on the release, though the band is as unpredictable as ever slipping slithers of melodic calm and warm melodic enticing into the hellacious storm with skilled efficiency and effect. It is a striking end to an outstanding release. There is often something familiar to songs with the encounter but as everything it only helps make tracks an adventure in recognising their source and in baiting a thick physical offering from the listener to its temptations.

Charge, if not through Sweet Lies, at some point will not be just a treat for the French to bask in and be battered by, though the invitation from this album really should be checked out now by all.

Sweet Lies is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/sweet-lies/id912217677

http://www.chargerocks.com/   https://www.facebook.com/ChargeRocksBand

RingMaster 13/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Ophite – Basic Mistakes

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With their Basic Mistakes EP our introduction to the band, French band Ophite from out of the blue sneaked up and dared ears and imagination to party with its individual revelry. It was an invitation impossible to refuse as six multi-flavoured and devilishly captivating tracks provided easily one of the most enjoyable and irresistible romps this year so far.

Formed in 2012, the Paris quartet consists of vocalist Marie Portier, guitarist Yoann Dolmare, bassist Nicolas Guenard, and drummer Kevin Jr. Musically the band conjures up tracks which blossom on essences of grunge, blues, groove, and pop but equally offer numerous other spices and textures to fascinate and entice. Anticipation for Basic Mistakes had already been sparked by the release of the video for the track Phoenician Sailors, but the EP whilst fulfilling all the promise found in that one song, reveals an even greater tapestry of invention and adventure to the band’s sound.

The title track opens up the devilment of sound and persuasion, a thick bold bassline with a suitable swagger the first line of alluring bait instantly accompanied by a percussive enticing. The potent coaxing is just as quickly joined by bluesy strands of guitar and similarly sultry riffs, as well as the immediately magnetic tones of Portier. Her voice as the bass line, has a swing to its delivery which is emulated in the fuzz lined sonic enterprise of guitar, a tempting which has ears quickly onside whilst the funky, Red Chili Peppers like stroll of the song has feet and body enthralled.

Ophite-Basic-Mistakes   The track is a vibrant and hazily captivating start quickly backed and surpassed by the fiery stomp of Catacombs Of Happiness. Hooks and sonic tempting opens up the quick step of throbbing bass rhythms and crisp beats, it all ignited further by the lively and impressive vocals. Virulent rock pop with a grunge spawned edge and punk mischief, the track balances pure melodic catchiness with unpredictable agitation, rhythmically and sonically resulting in a glorious and addictive incitement.

The diversity of Basic Mistakes is as striking and compelling as the sounds themselves, the following Somebody Take Me Surfing combining surf rock and punk pop with a more sobering post punk saunter. As guitars expel sultry caresses of melodic twang and the bass casts a darkly seductive tempting, the song is a bewitching croon, especially as harmonies from Portier flirt with celestial elegance. Her more down to earth lead delivery makes a great temper to the exotic climate of the song and bridge from that to the stormier chorus. All the time there is creative devilry at work though, lurking in the lining of the song rather than playing openly like in its predecessors, which adds a mischievous and expectations defeating invention to the song.

The One In My Head re-embraces the flames of blues rock next, guitars blazing within the controlled walls of the encounter though rhythms and at times vocals do have moments of losing their composure to great effect whilst its successor My Pretty Columbine is a riveting acoustic croon of voice and guitar with additional creative tinkering. Both tracks offer something different to the release, new food for thought in songwriting, and yet more of the impressive musical imagination of the band.

The EP closes with Phoenician Sailors, which on the CD version comes in the form of the video clip earlier mentioned. Reggae seeded guitar taunts open up the inviting swing of the song, a pulsating bass line soon showing the same kind of inspiration as Portier spreads her expressive tones over the inescapable lure feeding ears. Like a sea with increasingly turbulent waves, musically the song evolves from a gentle wave to a rocky and feisty protagonist, bringing an outstanding release to a climactic and hypnotic close.

It is probably fair to say that Ophite is an undiscovered treat for most right now but take our word for it deserving of investigation because of Basic Mistakes alone. It is potently accessible and at times offers a familiar if indefinable temptation, but they are just two pleasing aspects which converge with imagination, craft, and a creative rebellion to create one highly exciting encounter.

The Basic Mistakes EP is available now

https://www.facebook.com/groupeophite

RingMaster 11/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Cry Excess – Ambition Is The Shit

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In your ears, in your face, and for a great many destined to be in the passions, the debut album from Italian metallers Cry Excess is an introduction demanding to be taken notice of. Ambition Is The Shit unleashes ten tracks which furiously roar with adventure and imagination, and all coming with a tapestry of flavours drawn from everything from metalcore to groove metal and industrial to mathcore. Ground-breaking it is arguably not but seriously captivating and contagiously invigorating Ambition Is The Shit is a bellowing success.

Hailing from Turin, the quintet has been turning up the heat at home and building a formidable reputation and following for themselves. Now Cry Excess is ready to infest the world with their ferocious sounds through Ambition Is The Shit and it is hard to see them not continuing their striking ascent, especially as tracks like album opener Ripshit (Hands Up For The Italians) and more so the following The Public Enemy invade ears and attention. The first song rides in on a gentle electronic breeze, little rumbles of tempestuous electro teases littering its haunting slightly portentous air. As soon as a heavy footed swipe of drums and short stubby riffs descends, everything intensifies and crowds around the initial rap metal seeded vocal delivery. The track continues to present an agitated character and presence, seemingly and intriguingly trying to find its feet and full height before its successor takes over. It is an imaginative and fascinating start straight away surpassed as the second song strides in on sonic predation and rhythmic antagonism; both lorded over by caustic vocal squalls. Like The Browning meets Bury Tomorrow clad in the exploration of Destrage, a band which comes to mind most across the whole album, the song blazes with contagion and enthralling enterprise.

Hustler comes next and as the first two opens with calmer waters, its electro shimmer aligned to constricted vocals and a magnetic coaxing. Whispers of nu-metal add to the flavouring as a sample sets the impending scene of hostile passion and savage confrontation. Its brief but potent two minutes makes a thick appetiser for the title track which follows with nostrils flared and riff loaded guns blazing. Keys bring a warm embrace to the turbulence whilst vocals show a great diversity and imagination, they continually one of the big draws of the album. Predominantly though, the song is a voracious beast of sound and intent, harassing and bruising the senses with skilled inventiveness and blustery passion.CRY EXCESS FRONT COVER

Both the melody rich tempest of What Keeps Us Alive and the dance revelry of You Hate Because You Can’t Compete keep things stomping and impressing nicely. The first may have a canvas of sonic and melodic charm but still confronts like a raging predator and protagonist of ears and appetite, revelling in its raw and at times unpolished but persistently virulent creative fervour. Vocals again provide clean and seducing anthemic bait from within the chaotic and delicious bedlam around them whilst the song’s successor saunters in on an electro swagger and proceeds to flirt and rigorously dance with an electronicore tenacity and devilry. There is great diversity to the album even though the maelstrom of sounds often offers a similar surface storm, and this song epitomises the depth as potently and openly as any.

Through the corrosive rabidity of Rebel, Forever and the anthemic march of Unto Death, band and album leave ears and appetite greedy whilst Neither Forgive Nor Forget kicks the thrills up another gear with its heavily shadowed and intimidating senses crowding cloud of sonic and vocal voracity. The rich blend and extremes of guttural roars and melodic coaxing from the band continues to spark within ears, providing a beacon in the tsunami of noise and hostility, as also does the great nintendocore twist just before an even greater and exhaustingly welcome abusing of the senses.

The album closes on the fierce drama and tumultuous intensity of I Never Liked Clowns, a bestial incitement of stabbing riffs and crippling rhythms swinging from stretched vocal exploration and volcanic sonic eruptions. The track sums up the whole of Ambition Is The Shit in many ways, a conquest of ears and passions which is not spinning a web of new invention but creating an irresistible and hellacious devilment to submit to. Expect big things from Cry Excess ahead and even greater furies of highly pleasurable incitements like this.

Ambition Is The Shit is available via Luxor Records from January 27th @ http://www.luxor-records.com/#!store/cfvg

https://www.facebook.com/cryexcess

RingMaster 27/01/2015

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