Growls and grooves: talking with The Devil In California

The Devil In California_RingMasterReview

“Hailing from the broad, cracked streets of West Oakland, California,” The Devil In California is a band uncaging rock ‘n’ roll which rumbles with attitude and adventurous enterprise. Since forming they have swiftly forged their own identity with a rousing hard/heavy rock sound which devours as it masterfully involves the senses and imagination. Currently working on their second album, we grabbed the opportunity to talk with the heavy rockers to explore The Devil In California past, present, and ahead.

Hi and many thanks for sharing your time to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

Tony Malson – We are The Devil In California; formed in 2013. Our drummer Eddie had an ad out that attracted Jamie (guitar), who brought in Matt (bass) to jam and see what was up. Eddie gave me a call and asked if I wanted to check out the project. I loved the tunes and The Devil was born. Snake was added to the project after mixing our first tunes. The line-up was then complete. We all share a passion for heavy hitting hard rock with influences galore.

Have you been/are involved in other bands before?

Tony – I moved to the bay area in 94 and have been singing in Bay Area bands ever since. Bands like AngryInch, Fiksate, The Servants, Mavalour and played drums/sang in Insecto and Monte Casino to name a few; all an artistic pathway leading to The Devil In California.

Jamie Cronander – Most of us have played in quite a few bands. Some you’ve probably heard of. Some of us have side bands. Some rock bands, metal bands, industrial bands, tribute bands, even trumpet in a brass band. We prefer that the Devil be thought of in its own light.

Has past experiences had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Tony – Every musical experience I’ve had in other acts has contributed to how I approach writing/singing in The Devil. And I’m still exploring different avenues and genres to broaden my musical horizons; so much to learn.

Jamie – TDIC is its own inspiration thing. We draw influence from a lot of things, and most importantly from each other. You’d probably find that all of our other music, be it present or past, does not sound like the Devil.

What inspired the band name?

Eddie Colmenares – I came up with it when doing the initial planning.

Tony – Eddie came up with the name and I liked it right away; perfect for this band.

DIC_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Eddie – There was. I really wanted to put together a heavy, hard rock band that had that southern, slide guitar vibe to it.

Jamie – Matt and I were working on a project that kept getting put on hold by the other members. We wanted to do something that was more heavy, old school, and southern influenced. Alice In Chains, Corrosion Of Conformity, Skynyrd, Pantera, Clutch, STP, Allmans, etc. We had plenty of time, so we started a couple ideas and were directed to Eddie’s ad almost immediately.

Tony – I think the idea of a swampy, heavy, melodic, hard rocking 5 piece was the idea from the beginning. I came in after Jamie, Eddie and Matt had jammed a bit so it changed a bit from there but we all have a similar vision.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Eddie – It’s a mix. First, we aren’t that old of a band, so nothing is ‘too much of the same’ yet. And we are moving up pretty fast – it’s a lot coming at us at once, which in turn drives us more.

Tony – I’ve always been very musically driven personally. My passion to play music and get that music out to the world hasn’t really swayed in the last twenty plus years. I’ve always got the same vibe from the band in that regard. But you can’t grow without change and we tend to evolve in a very natural upward spiral. Has our music changed? Yes. Does it still encapsulate TDIC? Absolutely!

Since those first days, how would you say your sound has equally evolved?

Jamie – Definitely an evolution, but a young one; we have some prettier stuff coming, and some harder stuff coming. We’ve only got the one record out. But if you dig it, fear not. The next record will be just as hard hitting and sing-alongy, but will not be a repeat of the first.

Tony – I’ve always enjoyed the band “process” of learning to play with new musicians and finding that absolute sweet spot where everyone’s talents, technical abilities, and musical emotions come together as one. This process takes years and is a constant evolution. And in my opinion it’s really coming together with The Devil.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

Jamie – A lot of it is that Snake joined later in the process of the first record. He still had a heavy hand in the songs on the record, but the structure was mostly in place. Snake and I work VERY well together, so now that we’re able to do the whole process of guitars together, I think the band is really blooming into something better as we become one.

Tony – Definitely more of an organic flow towards our sound and what feels good.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Tony – Everything from Prince to Pantera inspires me. I’m a huge fan of the Seattle sound that was so instrumental in the 90’s. Alice in Chains have always struck a deep chord with me; Soundgarden as well for that matter. Chris and Layne were and are my top vocal heroes.

Jamie – Alice In Chains is a big common thing for all of us. Their ability to be as pretty and acoustic as they get or ugly and heavy as they get, is intense and the vocal harmonies…so important. For me personally; Corrosion Of Conformity, Pantera, Stevie Ray, Nirvana, Sonic Youth, STP, Allman Bros., CCR. They’ve all changed the way I think about the guitar.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?TDIC_RingMasterReview

Tony – In this band the riffs usually come first. We formulate the tune based on that then I begin to add lyrics and melodies. I prefer to wait until I hear a song and digest the riff before I start to head in a lyrical direction. You never know where inspiration will come from so you can’t fall in love with a preconceived idea.

Jamie – Usually it stems from me and Snake bringing in riffs we’re having fun with. We’ll hash them out at home a bit, record the ideas, send it to the guys on line, and then bang on it all together in the studio.

How about the lyrical side of your songs, where do you, more often than not, draw inspirations from?

Tony – My lyrics are largely derived from the life experiences of myself and those that surround me. Inspiration can take many forms. I’m always open to a new vibe or sound or riff. It’s kept me coming back for years on end. I love writing and recording new material.

Can you give us some background to your current release, Longer Ride Down?

Eddie – We only have the debut release out, so really, the background is “we formed, and wrote a record in a year”. We go back into the studio this winter for the follow-up.

Tony – It’s a hands down, kick ass, hard rockin’, heavy grooved, melodic, ear bender. If you dig heavy riffs with harmony and soul all wrapped up in emotion then you’re in!

Can you give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Tony – I’ve always gravitated towards the darker side of musical tastes. The beauty in expressing that space is undeniable. It can be very moving and haunting at the same time. That being said, positivity needs to reign supreme in your approach to life as well as music. You usually have to traverse the darkness to see the light.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Eddie – Oh lord, hahaha… they are final final final, and then we still change things. All songs are prepped long before we are in the studio.

Tony – We always do a pre-production round of recording before we do the final tracking. 99% of our changes to our songs happen in prepro. Then we are super close to the final product when doing the final version in the studio.

Jamie – We usually end up pre-producing songs in full three times at least. The first takes are to nail tempos, and see if we feel like they need anything, like additional breaks, leads, backups, etc. As for the finals, we record them just guitar, bass, and vox, lay drums over them, then redo the instruments over the drums.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Tony – We want you to walk away from our live show saying, “That was one of the best bands I’ve ever seen”. So our approach is filled with intensity and vigor. We all have a professional approach to our live show but realize that without a little danger and spontaneity it’s hard to take it to the next level.

TDIC_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

Tony – We have made a good splash in the Bay Area. It’s not an easy place to play music as the people and crowds are so diverse. This diversity is what we love but it also lends to many different kinds of music being played out live. There is no “one scene” in the bay so you have to fight a little harder for your rock and roll piece of the pie; which only makes you a better act in the end.

Eddie – The San Francisco / Bay Area is a fickle place. If you want to do well locally, you better be really good out of the gate, and then keep it coming. Fortunately we have some great, loyal fans. We’re at that stage where when we are playing and I look out at the audience, I don’t even know 70% of the people. That’s awesome.

Are there still the opportunities to make a mark there if the drive is there for new bands?

Tony – Absolutely! There are always opportunities to take advantage of. No excuses. Get out there and attack the scene. Write good tunes, play a great live show, and leave it all on the stage. You will see results.

Eddie – Yes, but it’s a whole new paradigm now. Be ready to work your ass off if you want to do anything other than play your local bar. Nobody is going to come along and hold your hand these days. No label is going to show up at your local show and whip a contract out of their suitcase to hand you. That is absolutely over – doubly so if you are not in an “urban” act, or are a rapper. We do pretty much everything in house, and it’s a just as much a job as it is a band.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Tony – The music industry is an ever changing beast due to the internet and social media today. You have to get on board and ride that bitch to your benefit or it will leave you behind in an instant. There is always more to be done but we are benefiting from it for sure.

Eddie – I think social media was far bigger of a deal just a few years ago than it is now. The stream of having said that, at least 80% of our exposure is through some sort of social media interaction.

Jamie – The internet is basically the only way to discover music these days. If you’re not on FB, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, and everything else, you’re not putting in the work. People do still buy physical CDs, but usually they’ve been watching your video before that.

Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

Tony – It’s a positive in the end. It has to be. You need to make it so and will it to be. Even a bad situation offers lessons towards a positive outcome. Ask questions. Investigate all the solutions. If you’re not failing in some arena then you’re not trying hard enough.

Once again guys, big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Tony – Thank you! And yes, our new album is in the works and due out this winter. We have some more touring this summer going down as well. Keep an eye out for some new videos and some surprises from The Devil. Let’s Rock!

Eddie – Thanks! And please stay tuned – more is coming!

All – Please follow us on your favorite social media site!

https://www.facebook.com/thedevilincalifornia   https://twitter.com/eldiabloencali

https://www.instagram.com/thedevilincalifornia   https://www.youtube.com/thedevilincalifornia

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 10/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Perfect Fault – Electric Mountain EP

perfect fault photo

What to do if you have some spare time from your day job. Well if you are guitarist/vocalist Hywel Griff (Howl Griff), guitarist/vocalist Dan Edwards (Sons of Merrick/ Pig Irön), bassist Rob Taylor (Profane and the Sacred), and drummer Mark Sharpless (Sons of Merrick), you get a band together called Perfect Fault, descend on a studio, and create some tenaciously rousing rock ‘n’ roll. The result of their exploits is the thoroughly enjoyable Electric Mountain EP, a release unafraid to weave a tapestry of recognisable flavours into songs which what they lack in originality they compensate with hook laden virulence.

Recorded at the Cariad Studios in South London as mentioned on a downtime from its creator’s main projects, Electric Mountain is a richly pleasing stomp and a four track appetiser for a proposed album later in the year. It is fair to say that the release stokes the fires of anticipation for that prospect as easily as it leaves ears wanting more. Sometimes you only want sounds to rock out with, something adventurous within its own confines that fills the gap like a favourite meal, and Electric Mountain fits the bill from start to finish.

The encounter opens with its lead single Headstrong and immediately takes ears in a hug of crisp beats, bruising riffs, and a lure of spicy grooving. Vocals are a quick protagonist too, bounding across the increasingly eventful landscape of the song with relish and an anthemic presence to match the sounds around them. There is an old school feel to the song, its punkish tempting having a ring of rockers like Eddie and the Hot Rods and Dr. Feelgood whilst equally there is a grungier essence reminiscent of nineties band Skyscraper to the roar of the terrific opener. The song maybe a little low on surprises but in offering rich enjoyment it is full to bursting, just as its successor.

Electric Mountain Artwork   The following Cup Runneth Over strolls in on a seventies rock like toning around inviting beats but is soon embracing a great agitated vocal presence which in turn stirs up the fluidity of the music, jerky beats and riffs colluding with jagged hooks before slipping into a Cheap trick like melodic crooning. The invention continues to catch expectations by surprise, and though we have suggested originality is the rarest commodity on the EP there is no doubting the band turns established textures and flavours into something fresh and spicy.

As fun and satisfying as the first two tracks are, the greater triumphs come in its second half starting with Flowers On The Lamppost. Prowling, almost predatory riffs and rhythms court ears first before vocals add their dark intent to the enticing mix. Once more a punk edge and attitude fuels the proposal whilst its chorus has a seventies glam rock vitality reminding of bands like The Tubes, though without going anywhere near the theatrical excesses of the Americans. Thumping rhythms steer the track with varying intimidation straight into the core of appetite and passions whilst the post punk like enterprise of the guitars works impressively on the imagination. The song is a mini kaleidoscope of flavours within a menacing stalking and easily the best thing on the release.

The closing Dodo is like a mix of its two predecessors, once more punk and melodic rock uniting in a tantalising concoction of mischievous sound and ideation. Into its gripping stride the track swaggers like a blend of Top Buzzer and Terrorvision, a creative treaty bound in a sonic lure of psyche and groove rock making a compelling end to an increasingly intoxicating release.

Electric Mountain definitely needs numerous plays to really appreciate what is going on as plenty of its unique endeavours are understated within the anthemic surface of familiarity, but from its first touch the EP is a highly satisfying escapade to get hungry over. Roll on an album we say.

The Electric Mountain EP is available now via Cariad Records @ https://cariadrecords.bandcamp.com/album/perfect-fault-electric-mountain-ep

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Perfect-Fault/772646976107941   https://twitter.com/perfectfault1

RingMaster 02/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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TIGERPUNCH to make the ‘Fight Of Your Life’, from 20th October‏

Tigerpunch Online Promo shot

Quirky Groove Rocksters ‘Tigerpunch’ have arrived and deliver a tasty offering for your consumption. The band release ‘Fight Of Your Life’ EP on Monday 20th October, through all national outlets.

 

Tigerpunch were spawned from the depths of Wolverhampton by brothers Rich and Jay, when, as they put it, “their dreams of becoming Pokémon Masters fell through”. Jay was drinking away his sorrows one night with ‘handsome man’ Rich when they discovered the brilliance of the movie ‘Kung Fu Panda’. Much gibberish and dark rum ensued, and as soon as the word ‘Tigerpunch’ was uttered, the duo knew they’d found a band moniker that knocked out all others.

 

The pair delved deep and let creativity reign. Pooling from the heavy groove-rock godly exploits of Audioslave and Rage Against the Machine, and inspired by the beauty and guile of The Foo Fighters and Nirvana, Tigerpunch were born.

 

Late last summer, whilst sailing the seas of knowledge and nonsense (aka the internet), the two piece came in contact with former hitman and canoe enthusiast, Russell Latham, who came onboard and completed the team of heroes.

 

Now, as a perfectly formed trio, the band of merry men are travelling from town to town and are gathering pace as they win over audiences. Supports with I Am Giant have furthered their cause and ploy for world domination. So too has the recording of their debut EP ‘Fight Of Your Life’ which hits everywhere and anywhere this Autumn. With five stout cuts of buoyant rock groove that swing back and forth, from the infectious ‘My Pet Hate’ to the raucous beatings of ‘Serve The Freakshow’, the manly men from the West Midlands have a solid record in their hands. The threesome have further live shows mapped out for the rest of the year; be prepared to witness a show that’ll leave you inspired, overwhelmed and sexually confused.

 

-TIGERPUNCH RELEASE ‘FIGHT OF YOUR LIFE’ ON MONDAY 20th OCTOBER THROUGH ALL STORES-

 

https://www.facebook.com/tigerpunchofficial