Hometruths – Open Your Eyes

As the world persistently sails towards greater degeneration in respect and real equality for all, British metallers Hometruths send a ferocious shot across its bow with their debut EP. The Manchester band is a tempest of rage and defiance; one socially, politically, and sonically antagonistic to the inequalities, intolerances, and lack of compassion now seemingly the main fuel of the modern world. The Open Your Eyes EP is their reaction; one that is part reflection, part call to arms, and an advocate of hope all rolled up into an impressive scourge of raging sound and emotion.

Coming forward in the early throes of 2016, Hometruths merge groove honed metal hostility with raw passion driven hardcore. It is a fierce roar with a freshness defusing any recognisable traits, a sound matching virulent infectiousness to its senses trespassing incitement of sound and anger. They pull no punches lyrically and musically and indeed emotionally, every syllable and note incendiary. Familiar essences are part of the mix, hues which are suggested compare to the likes of While She Sleeps, Stray From The Path, and Madball, but also there are the early seeds and rich potential of uniqueness, all striking traits within Open Your Eyes.

The EP opens up with Embers, a minute of rising sonic discord and vocal ire creating a climate of raw discontent in a wake-up call triggering the just as unruly tempest of Feral. With sound and emotion living up to its title in moments, the track imposes on ears with agitated rhythms and caustic riffs, the similarly natured birth of grooves and fury laden vocals involved before it all twists into a seriously catchy incitement. As vocalist Gaz Davies spews frustration and contempt, grooves get instinctively funky, winding venomously around viciously swung beats from Alex Mac and a great grumbling bassline from Dan Hancox with his vocal potency backing up and aligning with the cantankerous prowess of Davies. It is irresistible stuff, the song just growing in strength and persuasion with every corrupted second.

Barely a breath is taken between the outstanding encounter and the equally impressive Divide, a twitch of ears and you miss the moment but not the fresh character of craft and intent quickly confronting ears. The track, even with its own unchained ferociousness and emotion, is more is a predator than its predecessor, sizing up and lunging at the jugular time and time again. Again steely grooves enslave and incite body and appetite, Antony Costello and Jack Day creating a senses eroding web of enterprise and infection while the diversity of spiteful vocals more than fully satisfy.

Successor Vigilante looms out of the dissipating mist of the song, its atmosphere claustrophobic but bearing rousing rhythmic bait from Mac swiftly courted by toxic grooves and intrusive voice. Riffs and rhythms snarl and bruise even as the track shares its own addictive swing in its imagination bred adventure and rancor. Again it is impossible to evade being hooked in by the tenacious landscape of the song though arguably it does not quite go far enough, at times seeming to hold back as things appear poised to detonate to greater creative heights and friction.

WMD stomps in next, its tension racked prowl like a fusion of Die Krupps and Prong, picking its spots before unveiling a slightly friendlier canvas of piercing hooks, magnetic vocals, and mercurial energy; and when we say slightly we mean just that. The track still gnaws and pulls at the senses, beats scything across their surface as guitars and bass twist and turn with a vengeance.

Just stealing best track honours it moves over for the closing despite of Genocide. Its heart is more a hardcore bred animus but just as rich in the metallic and grooves woven assets of those before it and though it lacks their final lethal punch makes a stirring end to an excellent and impressing debut.

Open Your Eyes is a formidable and exciting introduction to a band beginning to really kick up a buzz around themselves, a fuss which can only get bigger as Hometruths bring just that in surely even bolder propositions ahead.

Open Your Eyes is out now through CI Records.

https://www.facebook.com/hometruthsu

Pete RingMaster 06/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Snarling from the inside; talking Threatpoint with guitarist Threatpoint Alex Olivetti

threatpoint _RingMasterReview

Scranton, Pennsylvania based, groove metallers Threatpoint are no strangers to acclaim and increasing fan support thanks to their explosive live presence and a couple of plaudit luring albums. Recently they released their third in RIP, a thrilling new step in sound, craft, and imagination from the band sure to stoke up even keener and bigger spotlights upon the band. We enjoyed a moment of guitarist Alex Olivetti’s time recently to find out more about Threatpoint, there striking new encounter and plenty more…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?   

Sure, Threatpoint is Chris James (vocals), CJ Krukowski (drums), Matt Van Fleet (bass) and myself, Alex Olivetti (guitar). The band formed in early 2012. CJ and I were in a band that had just broken up and Chris’ band at the time had just broken up as well. We knew each other for a few years since our old bands used to play together. Our bassist Matt is actually the one that told Chris we were looking for a singer, since they used to be in band together. That’s where the initial seed for the band was planted. We’ve had many line-up changes through the years and now Matt is officially a part of the band. It’s very fitting since he’s the one that pretty much put the band together and it’s great since we all knew each other prior to starting this.

So you been involved in other bands before, how have those experiences impacted, if at all, on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Yea, I played in quite a bit of bands actually; cover bands, duos, acoustic, rock, metal. I joined my first band in high school and haven’t stopped since. I think being in different bands doing different styles opened my mind up to more music outside of rock/metal and even rounded me out more as a guitar player. I’m always open to trying different musical ideas and evolving as a band and as a musician.

What inspired the band name?

We were throwing around name ideas, one idea had the word “threat” and another idea had the word “point” in it. So we just decided to combine the two. No crazy meaning behind it, just trying to come up with something cool.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We just wanted to be a heavy, honest, in-your-face metal band; which I think we’ve achieved. We like to write music that the audience, as well us, can connect to.

threatpoint _RingMasterReviewDo the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

We all still love music but I think being more seasoned with recording three full-length albums and a lot or touring helped us grow not only as a band but as people. We inspire each other, since we all have different musical tastes. We’re always looking for new bands to listen to and draw inspiration from.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?    

When we first got together I think we were just trying to find our sound and trying different ideas and seeing what sounded good, our second album Careful What You Wish For is definitely faster and more aggressive and I’d say our latest album RIP is a combination of the two. We also recorded an acoustic EP and are currently working on new material and still expanding our sound.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?   

I’d say a little of both, we’ve naturally all grown as musicians and songwriters over the years and we never want to make the same album twice. We are always looking for new influences and ideas to expand our sound.

You mentioned the wide range of inspirations among you; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?  

Yea, we all like similar bands but we all have different musical tastes from blues to death metal.  We take ideas and inspiration from many bands and combine them together.

Is there a particular process to the songwriting within the band?    

Not really, songs can spark from any ones ideas. We’ve had songs start off from guitar riffs, bass lines, drum patterns and even lyrics and a vocal melody. We all bring our ideas to the practice space and work from there. The fact that everyone in the band contributes to the writing process gives us our character and sound. We put all of our styles and influences in a blender; that’s where the Threatpoint sound comes from.

How about the lyrical side, what inspires that the most?

Our singer Chris, who writes all the lyrics, can give you a more definitive answer but overall the songs are about going through life, struggle, hope and spirituality. We try to stay positive lyrically, we make songs that are relatable to anyone for any situation they may be going through.

Can you give us some background to your latest release, RIP?art_RingMasterReview

The whole process for RIP from writing to the release was about a year and half. We wanted to expand upon what we’ve done in the past, some of the fastest songs we’ve written are on this as well as some of the most laid back tracks. We also had our friend Lauren do guest vocals on one of the songs. Thanks to our good friend Nick we just released our first music video for one of the tracks off of the album, Bury the Wicked.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.    

The overall meaning behind our latest album title, RIP(Rest In Peace), is letting go or getting rid of anything that drags you down, whether it be people, objects or just taking yourself out of any situation in life that causes distress. A couple of the tracks(RIP, Tombstones of my Enemies and Bury the Wicked) all deal with that subject specifically.

Do you enter the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?    

We like to go into the studio with songs about 80% finished, it makes the actual recording process less stressful, but we always leave room for the magic that can happen in the studio. Usually songs that are my least favorite at the beginning of the process turn out to be my favorite in the end.

 Tell us about the live side to the band?    

We all love to play live, that’s where we are in “the zone”. The songs are written with the live show in mind, we write upbeat, heavy music and are very energetic onstage. When the fans get into it, we feed off of their energy, and the vibe is unreal. I’m pouring sweat at the end of every set even if we only play a handful of songs.

threatpoint_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there still the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

We have some cool venues and some very talented bands in our area. From touring, we’ve discovered that more rural venues and places in the middle of nowhere have bigger crowds that go crazy for metal. We’ve gained some awesome followings in areas outside of our own so we make sure to return to those places whenever we get the chance.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band?    

It’s an easy tool to get your name out there, promote and connect with just about anyone. There’s a little bit of a struggle as there are so many bands nowadays so it’s a little tougher to stick out from the pack. The fact you can watch live concerts online is great but I also think that its hindered turnouts for shows in general.

A big thanks for sharing time with us Alex; anything you would like to add?

Thanks to you for the interview and helping to spread the word and thanks to anyone or everyone who has supported us in any way possible…THANK YOU. To those who haven’t checked us out go to our website and come say hi to us at a show!

Read our review of RIP @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/01/24/threatpoint-r-i-p/

http://www.threatpointofficial.com     https://www.facebook.com/threatpoint

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Threatpoint – R.I.P.

threatpoint_RingMasterReview

Inescapably enjoying their second album Careful What You Wish For when being introduced to it and the band last year, we suggested that it was easy to see US groove metallers Threatpoint “making their presence a global one if not now certainly on a near horizon.” That album evaded the luck to make the bridge but now expectations of such success are rising again with its successor R.I.P., a release which eclipses the last in every department.

Formed in 2012, the Scranton, Pennsylvania hailing quartet quickly showed themselves a formidable and exciting proposition through debut album Dead to Rise in 2013 and a live presence eagerly devoured locally and further afield. Taking inspirations from an array of metal and heavy rock borne flavours for their groove metal seeded sound, Threatpoint merged familiar and increasingly inventively fresh essences in the following Careful What You Wish and it is fair to say that the latter side has grown yet again within R.I.P., that alongside imagination and sheer creative ferocity.

With newest member and bassist Matthew Van Fleet alongside founding members in vocalist Chris James, guitarist Alex Olivetti, and drummer CJ Krukowski, Threatpoint immediately absorb ears with the portentous lure of the album’s title track. Its initial coaxing is a dark harmonic drone courted by drama carrying atmospherics. From within the evocative draw, riffs and rhythms gather and surge hungrily through ears, quickly finding their assault bound in just as rapacious grooves. Death and thrash nurtured textures are soon fuelling the rousing starter, the raw ire loaded tones of James orchestrating the anthemic prowess of the chorus whilst Olivetti’s enterprise only blossoms across each invasive groove and melodic flame.

It is an invasively potent beginning to the release reinforced by next up Deadend Machineland. It too needs a mere handful of second before settling into a predatory confrontation equipped with its own senses stirring confrontation. Like a gunslinger, it stands sizing up the listener as James’ prowls the imagination, subsequently uncaging a blast of multi-flavoured metal with a good sense of restraint to emphasize its invention before Tombstones of my Enemies presents a riveting trespass of scowling riffs, intrusive rhythms, and a sonic web woven with melodic dexterity, all emerging from a great initial melodic haunting. As each song before it, the track reveals a new character to the Threatpoint sound, R.I.P. already outshining its predecessor in diversity while matching its raw intensity.

art_RingMasterReviewThy Will Be Done is a grievous groove fest littered with invasive hooks and sonic irritability around the equally fuelled growls of James while Light Bleeds Through the Black straight after is a sinister at times almost darkly lecherous protagonist of ears and imagination interrupted by predatory bursts of volcanic ferocity. Both crowd around barbarous basslines from Van Fleet and the wickedly swung beats of Krukowski, a union of dexterity as addictive as the ravenous enterprise around them. The fade out of the first is annoying but a minor gripe in one of the album’s major highlights, a height matched by its successor and the demonian seduction of Bury the Wicked where again lava-esque enterprise meets provocative malevolence.

Through the classic and thrash metal spiced theatre of Laugh Now…Cry Later and the carnivorous canter of Writings on the Wall, the band continues to enthral an eager appetite for the magnetic adventure of the album even if neither quite stirs personal tastes to the same lusty responses as those before them or  the outstanding One in the Chamber…One in the Chest which follows. Its grouchy growl alone whips up unbridled attention, its predacious bassline and similarly natured grooves just as masterful in enslaving the passions as the song twists and turns with inventive rabidity.

The murderous swing of Face Your Fear is the foundation to another pinnacle within R.I.P., a track which courts a host of varied metallic styles as it venomously struts around body and thoughts before making way for the equally gripping theatre of Angels with Broken Wings which features the striking vocal presence of Lauren Balogh, vocalist for DramaScream and SuperRadical; her union with James a major reason for the track sparking another wave of lust.

Completed by the thunderous charge and choleric tempest of Death Rides Again, the album hits a whole new plateau in its second half following a nothing but impressive and thoroughly enjoyable first. It is the spark for expectations that Threatpoint will finally find worldwide awareness for their ever growing and increasingly inventive sound. R.I.P. may be its name but the album is the birth of greater things and success for the band.

R.I.P. is out now across most online stores.

http://www.threatpointofficial.com    https://www.facebook.com/threatpoint

Pete RingMaster 24/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

King Hiss – Mastosaurus

Pic:  christophe brysse

Pic: christophe brysse

Severely hooked by their debut release, the epic 2013 Snakeskin EP and fully wrapped up in the creative confines of debut album Sadlands the following year, it is fair to say that anticipation for the second full-length from King Hiss was as eager as for anything else offered this year. Mastosaurus does not disappoint either, quickly confirming existing thoughts that this is a band not only going places but on the point of major recognition while revealing a new creative plateau to their rousing songwriting and sound.

Formed in 2011, with a line-up seeing guitarist Joost Noyelle, vocalist Jan Coudron, and the rhythmic might of bassist Dominiek ‘Visioene’ Hoet and drummer Jason Bernard linking up, Belgium hailing King Hiss quickly began making a strong impression with their striking mix of rapacious riffs and murderous rhythms. As shown by the previously mentioned releases, it was a proposal helping the band earn a powerful reputation and acclaiming attention, for their live presence and sound and records. Mastosaurus is bound for greater success and spotlights as King Hiss reveal a new imagination and craft in songwriting and its rousing results. A concept album portraying the epic adventures of a doomed antihero, it storms ears from its first breath with songs which are as fearsomely meaty as they are imaginatively infectious and beguiling. Throughout grooves entangle the body and infiltrate the psyche as rhythms and riffs devour; fiery melodic interplay a lava-esque hue to the anthemic roar on offer track after track.

The album opens up with Homeland, the creaking wood of a ship luring prowling riffs which in turn align to a sonic fuzziness around a heavy portentous bassline. It is an intriguing start, a muggy opening coming further alight as Coudron’s impressive delivery enters the quickly set affair. Heated grooves bring an Alice In Chains like essence to the dark tempest brewing within ears, a thick smog of emotion and intensity as catchy as it is threatening. Eventually it ignites in a volcanic assault that simply blisters and captivates before making way for the even more impressive attack of Tourniquet. Straight away intoxicating wiry grooves are gripping and seducing the imagination, their exploits matched by the great harmonies and growling bassline surrounding Coudron’s ever compelling presence. There is no escaping another AIC/Queens Of The Stone Age flavouring in a track which is almost bestial as it makes its infectious and formidable King Hiss distinct presence.

kinghiss_mastosaurus_artwork_RingMasterReviewThe outstanding Black Sea, Slow Death comes next, part shanty part stoner infused rock ‘n’ roll, it takes the contagious elements of its predecessors turning them virulent around a vocally driven, melodically suggestive drama. There is something familiar to the song, something which often occurs across Mastosaurus, and is soon realised as being the inventive juice of the band which previously made their earlier encounters stand out, just in a more enterprisingly imposing and striking form now.

The rhythmic thunder of Bernard brings We Live in Shadows to life and to glory next, his swinging tenacity matched in temptation by the sonic flames of Noyelle as Coudron roars with evocative expression while the album’s title track similarly sees the drummer unleash the most anthemic prowess as danger and tempestuous suggestion surrounds him. The track is soon a blaze of vocal and sonic fire as a stormy barrage of riffs and those rousing beats descend; the song just as venomous in its calmer trespasses through eager ears. Mastosaurus is pure creative drama which even if it does not have the body throwing itself around has the imagination and passions twisted around its little finger.

The initial acoustic coaxing of Stuck in a Hole leads into another swarm of melodic incitement, they in turn slipping into gentle seduction before their captivating kindling erupts into an incendiary roar; proceeding to smoulder and ignite again and again across the mighty track. The song is further confirmation of the new diversity and invention in the textures and ideation making up the album’s songs, that essence just as ripe within successor Egomaniac; two and a half minutes of ferocious breath-taking sinew driven rock ‘n’ roll with its own style of voracious contagiousness.

Both Renegade with its rich bluesy atmosphere and ridiculously persuasive chorus and the antagonistic nature of Killer Hand further ignite hungry ears and an already greedy appetite for Mastosaurus, the second of the two especially momentous in the soundscape of the perpetually riveting and galvanic release. As all tracks, each invites and receives bold participation before Requiem for the Lost brings the mighty encounter to a startling close. With a grouchy resonance to keys and an emotionally raw melodic touch which at times with no word of a lie reminds of Wings, the instrumental is a melodramatic and melancholic epilogue to the tale and triumph before it.

Mastosaurus is exceptional and increasingly so with every listen as it reveals fresh textures and layers to its turbulent, often rabid, and constantly explosive body. King Hiss is ready to challenge to the frontline of European metal/rock with an album many bands there will only wish they had in their arsenal.

Mastosaurus is out now digitally @ https://kinghiss.bandcamp.com/album/mastosaurus and physically @ http://bit.ly/1PhHbS1

http://www.king-hiss.com   http://www.facebook.com/kinghissband    http://www.twitter.com/kinghissband

 Pete RingMaster 08/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Magoa – Imperial

magoa-photo_RingMasterReview

If nothing else, these past couple of years have revealed that the French metal scene is at a striking high if maybe still not truly recognised outside of its national borders. That might be on the verge of changing if it continues to persist in producing bands and releases like Magoa and their new album Imperial. An outfit established within the French metal underground, the Paris hailing band has unleashed a proposition which just demands the richest attention.

Imperial sees the band’s tapping into and unleashing a brutality and a grouchily uncompromising attitude not as vocal in their music to date; a coincidence that the band kept everything about its creation in house? It is emotionally and physically raw yet woven with an imagination which makes its grievous groove infested sound stand out from the crowd. Imperial is a cauldron of varied strains of the fiercest metal genres honed into a virulence which infests ears, appetite, and psyche alike.

The successor to their well-received second album Topsy Turvydom of 2013, Imperial swiftly hints at something having stirred within the Magoa heart and creativity which eclipses all before with each passing minute let alone song. It opens up with its title track, a rousing call to arms which drifts in on a sonic mist broken up by warlike strikes. A melancholic melody slips into the brewing climate, vocalist Cyd Chassagne close behind sharing his dirt encrusted snarls as that lone melodic lure begins to flame with greater intensity within a growing tempestuous air. As grooves begin winding around bruising rhythms, the track rises to real anthemic heights, its roar of a chorus as defiant as it is provocative and contrasted superbly by the beauty of keys and mellower caresses of emotion.

It is a potent start which is soon over shadowed by the snarling brutality of Resistance, grievous riffs and senses shuddering rhythms to the fore. The track is superb, an angry beast of a proposal but one unafraid to show melodic elegance and sonic grace like oases within its vicious onslaught. As its predecessor, the song is a spirit raising anthem which arouses body and emotions before Sailors swings in with its own host of irritable beats and riffs, they soon evolving into one ridiculously infectious and addictive incitement. A great blend of vocal ire is matched by the array of textures within the track’s fiery sound, guitarists Vince and Drayton spinning an imagination snaring web of intrigue and suggestiveness, the bass and drummer  Martin’s lethal swipes antagonistic weight to be feared and embraced.

pochette_RingMasterReviewThere is something familiar about the encounter but an indefinable essence which just spices things up here and within tracks like the following heavyweight swing fest of Kill Us. It descends upon the senses with raw aggression and intent, taking them on a groove spun, melody enriched ride of fearsome yet anthemic savagery which just sparks the instincts.

Through the haunting melancholy of Merge, a less imposing affair but just as emotionally intense as cleaner vocals and resonating rhythms court piano nurtured melody and electronic atmospherics, and the brief and equally impacting Remember and its reminder of conflict’s casualties and protagonists, Imperial strikes another stirring chord with both setting up emotions for the thumping roar of Faith. Like a reassuring beacon within the more murderous aspects of the album, it is pure contagious revelry with its own truculent presence.

The calmer nature of Afterglow follows uncaging a nu/groove metal trespass which bellows with warrior strength and countenance but equally engages in less bruising exploits which further entangles the imagination. Sonic and melodic invention is as prevalent as another great mix of vocal confrontation, all topped off by deliciously scything strings.

Physical barbarism and emotive reflection unite within Endlessly next, the track a mix of bloodlust and warmer enticement, emotionally and musically, with the former holding the reins throughout, while Pray for Us is an emotion driven sonic clamour which whilst maybe lacking the spark of other tracks before it, leaves ears enjoyable ringing and appetite hungry for more which the bewitching Untouchable delivers with its low key but atmospherically thick and emotionally commanding serenade. Cyd’s clean vocals glide over the senses, the gentle haunt of keys and guitar fingering the imagination as the song resonates in thoughts as darker clouds loom on the back of heavier lumbering rhythms.

The album ends with the ruthlessly addictive and mercilessly anthemic The First Day, a track which will either have you cowering or raising a fist in defiant unity while summing up everything impressive and compelling about album and the new character of Magoa’s songwriting, invention, and inescapable sound.

If Imperial came from a Lamb Of God, Slipknot, or In Flames people would be raving about it; hopefully they still will just with the name Magoa upon their lips.

Imperial is out now across most online stores and @ http://magoamusic.com/shop/

https://www.facebook.com/Magoaband/   http://magoamusic.com/   https://twitter.com/magoamusic

Pete RingMaster 21/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Last Ten Seconds of Life – The Violent Sound

tltsol_RingMasterReview

Having beat up on and seduced the US metal scene, Pennsylvania hailing The Last Ten Seconds of Life are abut to do the same to a global attention with new album The Violent Sound. It is a success not too hard to imagine almost expect as the release unleashes twelve brutal alternative/nu/groove metal furies that just grip and excite ears and imagination. The band’s sound has plenty more in its arsenal of flavours and temptation but a mix of Korn, Mudvayne, and Britain’s own Anti-Clone is a fair indication to the downtuned tempest the Mansfield based quartet uncage.

Formed in 2010, The Last Ten Seconds of Life has risen through the local and national US metal scene, earning a potent reputation for their fearsomely impressive live shows and releases like debut album Know Your Exits of 2011. The past year though has seen the band evolve their sound into a whole new and striking adventure with new vocalist John Robert C. coming in, his irritable grouchy growls and impressive broader versatility seemingly, on the evidence of The Violent Sound, just bred for the band’s evolution in songwriting and imagination.

Engineered by Grant McFarland and produced by Carson Slovak (August Burns Read, Texas in July), The Violent Sound is the first offering from the new line-up and pretty much goes straight for the jugular as Little Black Line opens things up. Its initial lure though is the clean tones of John Robert, enticing within brewing discord honed tempestuousness which blossoms into a predatory stroll that as good as stalks the senses. The harsh rhythmic tenacity of drummer Christian Fisher is bound to the barbarous groove and tone of Mike Menocker’s bass, both a formidable invasion of ears as the guitar of Wyatt McLaughlin creates a sonic smog of portentous temptation.

Though the song never brutalises, its intent and weight takes no prisoners, setting the listener up for the intensive examination of The Drip. That Korn-esque texture to the band’s sound swiftly seduces ears within the encounter, interrupting a primal trespass equipped with scything grooves and vocal antagonism around rhythmic animosity. The track is glorious, another aural predator further impressing in melodically bred moments of emotive resonance before Bloodlust lives up to its name in tone and emotion. It is a savage uncompromising affair but again one with twists into unpredictable and sinister passages which even if only brief draws the imagination further into the violating tempest.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe following Six Feet is just as diverse in its attack and simply imperious, its volatile climate and grievous intensity skilfully contrasted by the melodic and harmonic swoops upon ears; the two colluding in bewitching espionage before the track is back devouring all before. As much death metal seeded as any of the flavours previously suggested, the track is a carnal incitement igniting an already keen appetite with the album’s title track reinforcing its increasing hold. The Violent Sound roars with sonic spittle lying upon vocal ire as rhythms pounce with animalistic predation, a vicious stalking leading to the calmer melodic and cleaner vocal enterprise of the band which is as virulently infectious as anything escaping the crushingly relentless ferocity.

A Marilyn Mansion air accompanies the flirtatious swagger of Casanova, an irresistible track with all the grooved swerves and salacious moves of a venomous pole dancer while Bag of Bones worms into the psyche with a niggling groove prone to discord fuelled expulsions of sonic unpredictability. Around it, the track brews another fury which buffets and abuses the senses, every swipe and incursion eagerly welcomed as the track swings like a hungry hound with a creative deviousness just as eagerly abound within successor Switch, a volatile fusion of metal and heavily boned rock which either licks at the psyche like a demonic lecher or presses in on the senses like a murderous vice.

That sanguine essence is even more prevalent and zealous within next up Blind Faith but equally the band’s harmonic imagination is a rich lure, so much so that you do not know whether to bow to its seduction or run for the hills, the former ultimately the only reaction to the brilliant protagonist.

It is a success and creative endeavour matched by that within Wise Blood, The Last Ten Seconds of Life again creating a concussive, sublimely seductive siege of ears and senses, trapping the imagination with exotic grooves and spicy melodies amidst vocal dexterity before Social Suicide casts a paradox of contrasting textures which simply captivates with ridiculous ease.

With the groove entangled, sinisterly shadowed Last Words completing the ferocious proposition, The Violent Sound is destined to push The Last Ten Seconds of Life firmly into the broadest metal scene. If not, there is something seriously wrong.

The Violent Sound is released by Siege Music on October 21st.

https://www.facebook.com/thelasttensecondsoflife   https://twitter.com/TLTSOL?lang=en

Pete RingMaster 20/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Outright Resistance – Me Vs I EP

Outright Resistance

Outright Resistance

There has been a following roar of impressed voices and recommendation to the ascent of UK metallers Outright Resistance within the UK metal scene and especially over recent weeks with the release of the band’s new EP Me Vs I. It is a defiant and aggressive growl of raw groove woven metal often openly suggesting inspirations from bands such as Lamb of God, Chimaira, Stone Sour, August Burns Red, The Agony Scene, and Pantera but unleashing its if not fully unique certainly own kind of irritable sound.

Formed in 2011, the Stevenage bred band soon had debut EP Don’t Eat My Organs stirring up awareness whilst hitting the local live scene with a raw passion. Shows with the likes of Hacktivist and TRC were including in a host of gigs across Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, and London, all adding to a growing reputation which was invigorated further by last year’s Poveglia EP and especially now through Me Vs I, with being one of six finalists in the 2015 London arm of the Bloodstock Metal to the Masses competition in between.

Me Vs I opens with its title track, a short piece of drama which finds more sense and potency once having journeyed through the whole EP and its honest no punches pulled look at prejudices and ignorance among other things. Maimed In Chelsea is the next proposal and boy does it start off with a wallop, riffs nagging the senses before being quickly joined by thumping rhythms and the grasping roars of vocalist Paige Lee. In no time it is into a grouchy stroll with Pantera-esque grooves entangling harsher rhythmic predation. Backed by the band, Lee continues to orchestrate the venomous nature of the track with her imposing vocal trespasses, the guitars of Michael Worsley and Joe Jacobs creating a contagious web of grooves and riffs for an outstanding full start to the EP which just becomes more addictive and viciously dynamic with each passing minute.

me-vs-i-artwork_RingMasterReviewProve Them Wrong steps forward next, displaying an even eager desire to consume the senses as riffs and the scything beats of Michael O’Neill descend. Soon displaying a more familiar heavy metal nature to its onslaught and melodic toxicity, the track is a hungrily enjoyable canter with the bass of Chris Everett a predatory incitement alongside the growling antagonism of Paige. Missing some of the extra sparks which ignited its predecessor, the song nevertheless leaves a heavily satisfied appetite behind before the outstanding Pain grabs attention next. From its first rhythmic coaxing there is a belligerence and defiance to the character of the song, a tempestuous attitude which fuels riffs and voice but still content to share its moments with spicy melodies and electronic intrigue across an increasingly rousing and enjoyable encounter.

An echo of Paige’s own personal journey having to deal with transphobia, Gee, Dysphoria challenges as it roars, rhythms a concussive assault and riffs a relentless incursion on the senses as vocals uncage an animosity toned but plaintive call for understanding. With melody spiced grooves and fiery enterprise straddling its intensive outpouring of the heart, the song demands attention being soon matched by successor Destiny Is All and in turn outshone by the closing ravaging of Take The Blame.

The first of the two stalks the senses; riffs again a niggling proposition as beats cantankerously swipe and vocals crawl with similar intent over song and listener while the second is a thrash/death metal spiced tempest as virulently catchy as it is violently imposing and bound in short but flavoursome grooves. Standing alongside Maimed In Chelsea as the EP’s best moment and showing the most adventurous nature of all, the song is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable release.

Me Vs I lives up to the promise and potential suggested by plaudits towards the band so far, suggesting greater things to come from Outright Resistance while leaving keen enjoyment.

The Me Vs I EP is out now @ https://outrightresistance.bandcamp.com/album/me-vs-i

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Pete RingMaster 20/10/2016

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