Aspherium – The Embers of Eternity

Pic -kim gøran høiberg

Aspherium is a band we knew by name and reputation but never quite found the moment to give the richness of attention that all bands deserve. That has forcibly been amended with the release of their third album The Embers of Eternity, which with thanks to our friend Andrew at Stencil PR who directed us its way, suggests we have definitely been missing out.

Hailing from Moss/Oslo in Norway, Aspherium began in 2007 and took little time in brewing up a progressive death metal sound which was unafraid to embrace plenty of additional flavours; a fusion now in full bloom and imagination within The Embers of Eternity. 2011 saw the release of debut album The Veil of Serenity to a host of positive reviews which its successor, The Fall of Therenia, eclipsed as it took the band’s sound to new heights. Slots at major festivals followed as too a couple of tours alongside Decapitated. A swift hindsight exploration in the wake of the release of The Embers of Eternity revealed why the band received strong acclaim and attention at the time but all before has been just the teaser for the might of Aspherium’s third full-length.

The Embers of Eternity is a concept album imagining the future of our own Earth; “The world has become a desolate wasteland, the album about what happened and why humanity did nothing to save our planet.” Lyrically and in story it quickly proved a compelling adventure which is majorly accentuated again by the exploration of sound and imagination around it as immediately proven by the album’s opening title track. Immediately drama and tension soaks the notes and presence of the emerging track; the guitars of Marius Skarsem Pedersen and Morten Nielsen weaving the intimation. Equally they are the instigators of the erupting surge of aggression and melodic enterprise which descends on the senses soon after, the rhythmic voracity of drummer Bjørn Tore Erlandsen and bassist Torgeir Lyby Pettersen fuelling the upsurge. Similarly too, the vocals of Pedersen make for an uncompromising and magnetic proposition amidst thrash bred riffs and the blackened textures which shape the death bred incitement. As each subsequent track reveals, it is part deceptive too, the viciousness of the assault veined and aligned with melodic intricacies and dexterity as their inherent creative emprise though bred on discontent of a world descending into chaos relishes its beauty too.

It is a striking and compelling start to the release but one still eclipsed by the following As We Walk Through the Ashes. It too launches on thrash nurtured hostility with grooves that wind around the senses with lustful toxicity and similarly revels in the more delicate but no less hungry imagination which subsequently makes every twist and passage until the next aggressive captivation as riveting. Unpredictability also shapes the track and in turn the whole album but with a craft and invention which soon becomes expected and keenly devoured. As its predecessor and the songs to come, it weaves a multi-flavoured incitement which took no time to fully immerse in.

The evocative and melancholy opening of The Fallen Monument bewitches before the track explodes in another cauldron of pugnacious trespass and imagination woven fertility; a tapestry of flavours and creative agility breeding a glorious and rousing proposal lustfully devoured by ears and passions alike. It is the album’s finest moment for us but constantly challenged as A Voice For the Silenced and its successor The Shadows of Creation quickly show. The opening atmospheric suggestion of the first had the imagination immediately submerged in its insinuation, its haunting caresses continuing to manipulate as the track erupts with the second casting matching persuasion in its physical venting and melodic storytelling. It is a volatile and gripping mix which savages as it seduces, preys on fears as it nurtures raw hopes.

Through the individual but unitedly insightful and adroit exploits of Echoes of A Lost World and The Beckoning Spire, Aspherium and their album only increased the magnetism. Neither track quite matched up to the heights of the triumph before them had but each gripped with bold ferocity and unpredictable landscapes before Beneath the Shattered Sky bore its own soulful voice and rich adventurous  enterprise on ears to equally inflame those self-same eager reactions.

Until the Embers Fade completes the album, it’s near on eleven minutes alone a journey and exploration worth investing in the sensational The Embers of Eternity for. It is an engrossing and fascinating end to an increasingly compelling release and a fine example as to why like us once you engage in the Aspherium ravening craft and sound there is no turning back.

The Embers of Eternity is available now @ https://aspherium.bandcamp.com/album/the-embers-of-eternity

http://www.aspherium.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Aspherium    https://twitter.com/aspherium

Pete RingMaster 25/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Helldown – In Deaths Hands

The release of their self-titled debut EP in 2016 suggested that Welsh thrashers Helldown had all the attributes to ascend the UK metal ranks, a thought accentuated by their subsequent acclaimed single The Watchers a year later. Now that proposal is about to be made a declaration with the release of new EP, In Deaths Hands, a collection of tracks which whilst suggesting that there is plenty more yet to come from the Swansea outfit, that ascent is well under way.

Formed in 2013 and consisting of blood brothers in vocalist/bassist Ben and rhythm guitarist Matthew Evans alongside drummer Ross Thomas and lead guitarist Lewis Larkman, Helldown have forged a sound bred on thrash, groove, and heavy metal. As the new release shows it is a potent trespass with thrash metal its instinctive fuel, one still enjoyably raw in its voice and tone to provide an edge and bite numerous like-minded bands have let escape in their growth. True uniqueness may still be absent in the band’s voracious sound but as In Deaths Hands proves it can be comfortably overlooked in the fresh trespass on offer.

The EP opens with The Unnamed, a track instantly entangling ears in ripe grooves and preying rhythms before launching into a predacious assault. The sonic invasion and enticement of both guitars make for a keen tempting, Ben’s vocals as the sound earthy yet magnetic within the harassment of riffs and rhythmic aggression. The subsequent twists and melodic endeavour that emerges revels in the prowess of their creators, the track a persistent hungry nagging endowed with that bright enterprise.

The EP’s best track is followed by Mortal Shell, another swiftly revealing intent and character with rapacious urgency. If at first paling against its predecessor, the track only grew in stature and appeal as its ravening riffs and grooves joined bitter beats and the heavy dark resonance of the bass to forge another thickly satisfying proposal.

There is a definite surface familiarity between the songs within In Deaths Hands, the beginning of next up Heretic highlighting the thought yet again it is a track which develops its own presence and enterprise with strength and imagination, the bass of Ben a riveting ingredient in the prowl of the ear grabbing encounter.

Flames of Heresy bring things to a close, its spirals of grooves waspish in their sting and barbarous in the subsequent harassment they inspire from across the band. The gang hollers that break out only emphasize the anthemic air and roar of the track, even as it prowls and stalks the senses between raucous eruptions.

It is a fine end to a release which only left us wanting to hear more from the band and reinforced the thought that Helldown has a very healthy future within the British metal scene.

In Deaths Hands is released January 17th

https://www.facebook.com/HelldownOfficial/   https://twitter.com/helldown_uk   https://www.instagram.com/helldownofficial/

Pete RingMaster 14/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Meshiaak – Mask Of All Misery

Pic/copyright Karina Wells

Three years back we, as so many, more than enthused about the impressive debut album from Australian metallers Meshiaak and now we find ourselves doing the same again with even greater rigour for its successor, Mask Of All Misery. Everything striking about that first album has been intensified and melded with even richer and bolder adventure resulting in an encounter which left us simply greedy for more.

Calling the band’s sound as metal is the easiest option but does not explore the richness of its tapestry. Thrash and groove metal collude with progressive and voracious rock ‘n’ roll across its unpredictable body with plenty more involved in its imagination. Equally familiar textures invite and tease alongside the band’s own uniqueness as songs rise drenched in drama and invention as well as contagious endeavour.

Formed in Melbourne by Danny Camilleri of 4ARM and Teramaze’s Dean Wells, Meshiaak’s line-up is completed by bassist Andrew Cameron and drummer David Godfrey who has replaced original rhythm caster Jon Dette between albums due to logistical reasons. Together the quartet snarl at and trespass, seduce and fascinate the senses across the ten tracks of Mask Of All Misery bringing reflections on toxic  issues, intimate and worldly, to the fore.

It begins with the enthralling Miasma, a piece of music which instantly hooked the imagination with its mournful orchestration and melodic melancholy. Its initial portentous breath is soon a tempest of sound and intensity cored by a groove which just seeped under the skin. The predominantly instrumental track provides a deluge of craft and suggestion within its polluted air, closing with the same captivation it rose from before the album’s title track launches its own turbulent contagion.

There is no escaping a Metallica tinge to the track as it expands yet we can only say it is one mere hue in the Meshiaak web of imagination shaping this thrash bred but diversely woven gem. Camilleri’s tones are as commanding and gripping as the sounds around him as the track reveals its drama and infectiousness, grooves and hooks breeding the magnetism which melodies and atmospheric intimacy exploits with matching prowess.

Bury The Bodies is next up, strolling in with a tempestuous if controlled breath which vocals echo within the melodic wiring of Wells. It is an absorbing encounter only more fascinating with its haunting strings, open emotion, and classic metal lining; eclipsing its impressive predecessor through every drama filled second though its pinnacle moment within the album is quickly matched by the equally thrilling City Of Ghosts and its hardcore bleeding rock ‘n’ roll. As with all tracks, it soon evolves in enterprise and flavour, its body a flood of styles and textures honed into one predacious and thickly rousing incitement.

There is something Bloodsimple like to the following Face Of Stone, certainly initially but it too evolves its own character and web of diversity while Tears That Burn The Son finds an industrial edge to its thrash/groove bred trespass of the passions. There is a climatic tone to the track which only accentuates its catchiness and seductive irritancy, volatility that fuels an anthemic dispute and urgency swiftly contrasted by Doves and its melodic drama though the fire in its heart is a perpetual eruption across its serenade, the sparks raised by both the stirring tones of Camilleri and the sonic calm of his companions in maybe the album’s most majestic and darkest moment.

Through the aggressive defiance of In The Final Hour and the predatory instincts of Adrena, the album only entrenched itself deeper under the skin even if neither quite matched the heights of those before them. Truthfully though both songs left a lingering impression and manipulation with the second a ferocious insurgence we keep finding ourselves drawn to.

Godless brings the album to a fractious close, its dirty toxic breath and tetchy exploits raw magnetism and a great splenetic end to the album though it makes room for some just as arousing emotively embroiled vocal dexterity and melodic temptation.

If Meshiaak impressed and thrilled fans the first time, their second album will have them drooling; it did us and continues to as it lingers in the speakers keeping the exploration of new discoveries on delay.

Mask Of All Misery is out now via Mascot Records / Mascot Label Group.

http://meshiaakband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/meshiaak

Pete RingMaster 26/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

King Hiss – Earthquaker

Having found ourselves more than caught up in the sound and adventure of King Hiss through their Snakeskin EP back in 2013, there is always a real leak of eager anticipation approaching every new encounter with the Belgium hailing rockers. So far it has been rewarded with a creatively roaring and rousing experiences especially with the band’s last album Mastosaurus but nowhere to the extent of lustfulness found for its successor, Earthquaker.

The band’s new album is a thunderous and explosive unleashing of a sound which has developed with the same hunger as we have found for its evolving exploits. To use our own words, Mastosaurus proved “exceptional and increasingly so with every listen” but is now simply left in the dramatic wake of Earthquaker.

King Hiss create a tempest of sound as infectious as it is invasive as they embrace the key essences of hard and stoner rock alongside the rich marrow of grunge and groove metal. Familiar and unique flavours continually entangle and flourish in the band’s increasingly distinct songwriting and music and fair to say over three full-lengths it has grown to be as irresistible and we suggest as essential as anything out there in the rock landscape.

Earthquaker is pure creative virulence from start to finish, even the introductory forty odd seconds of Critical Failure pure enticement as its intrigue flooded menace lined coaxing invades ears and imagination to draw the listener into the unscrupulous swing of the album’s title track. Grooves immediately infest and shape the song, Earthquaker infesting speakers and listener with relish before developing its darker and deeper web of textures and threat. The tones of vocalist Jan Coudron as ever enthral as they drip with drama and emotion whilst the melodic and voracious exploits of guitarist Joost Noyelle enthral as they invade. With rhythms pure manipulation, the track had album and us boisterously bouncing in no time.

Defiance urging incitement and spirit erupts in the following Revolt!, the track as feral as it is skilfully composed in its intent and craft. Whipping up a storm, drummer Jason Bernard drives the rebellion of song and word with glee whilst the bass of Dominiek Hoet is a snarling predator in the mix of temptation and riot, they together inciting the epidemic of untamed contagion unleashed. Even so, its virulence is eclipsed by that of Desertsurfer and with almost immediate effect. From the first second the track is an unapologetic weave of addictive hooks and grooves wrapped in melodic and harmonic temptation yet as all songs is wired with muscle and attitude bordering on the confrontational.

Through the Alice In Chains meets Twelve Boar predation that is Monolith and the dirt clad but melodically seductive GTWHR, the boldness and variety within Earthquaker is further accentuated. Unpredictability and evocative enterprise is as openly persuasive in both as across the whole release and further cemented within the grime laden, grooved rock ‘n’ roll joy of Kilmister and in turn Butcher and its gripping ruination. The track is as mesmeric as it is threatening, Coudron at the head of its haunting presence and instinctive blood lust with inescapable rhythms stalking and striking out within another compelling web of drama springing from Noyelle’s strings.

Drop Dead Leader may have not quite ignited the same lust as those before but with its southern tinged invention it still left imagination and pleasure united companions while Vomit had the former alone more than involved in its own adventurously fertile curiosity and craft; another major highlight added to the bulky amount already provided by Earthquaker.

The album is brought to an end through firstly Black Wolf, a track which weaves and swerves like a rattle snake before striking and unleashing its resourceful and venomous prowess, and lastly the sonic infection that is Sum of all Nightmares. Again grooves and hooks are as lethal and irresistible and the carnivorous riffs and barbarous rhythms escaping the band within both songs unbridled pleasure and rousing incitement.

In many ways it is no surprise that King Hiss had us over excited once again as they just get better and better but Earthquaker is a whole new ballgame for the band and their truly dextrous sound which no one should pass by without at least one concentrated listen.

Earthquaker is out now @ https://kinghiss.bandcamp.com/album/earthquaker

https://www.king-hiss.com/   https://www.facebook.com/kinghissband   https://twitter.com/kinghissband

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Dog Tired – The Electric Abyss

The metal world has never been majorly short of striking and often influential bands from Scotland and adding to that list of potent protagonists is Dog Tired. They are not newcomers as such having emerged in 2004 and have earned a strong reputation and loyal fan base for their riff driven metal but with new album, The Electric Abyss, they have revealed themselves ready to step into a far larger spotlight.

Hailing from Edinburgh, Dog Tired are described as “Merging the relentless brutality of Gojira and Entombed with the riff orientated assault of Pantera and Metallica.” It is a fair description for the band’s multi-flavoured metal but only hints at its voracious sound and presence. At times across their quartet’s latest release, it is a proposition which involves the familiar with their own imagination but persistently comes through speakers with a character and freshness individual to Dog Tired.

The Electric Abyss opens with its title track, the song looming out of sonic electronic mists with dark ominous shadows behind a foreboding breath. In swift time heavy ravenous riffs laid down their claim on an already eager attention, as quickly erupting in a predacious contagious stroll as rhythms equip the emerging track with their own imposing bait. The grouchily throated vocals of Chris Thomson in turn make for a vociferous incitement, growling across the wiry exploits of guitarist Luke James and the virulent rhythmic trespass of bassist Barry Buchanan and drummer Keef Blaikie. It is a persistent and rousing nagging which only proves more persuasive as imagination brings greater twists and richer atmospheric intimation.

It is an outstanding and impressive beginning to the album and never relinquished favourite track honours but harried for that positioned across The Electric Abyss and quickly proven by the following Flesh Church. Its visceral trespass is bred on a mix of death and groove voracity, everything slightly less urgent than within its predecessor but just as predatory and even more sinisterly emotive. There are moments when the track uncages its vigour but still there is a dark restraint which only helps thicken its lure before Dagoth’s Nine accosts the senses with its creative animus. Grooves and indeed vocals in part have a harmonious toning which escalates the inherent catchiness of the pugnacious assail escaping the craft and invention of the band.

Beyond The Grave provides the best beginning to any track within the release, its rhythmic incitement within almost perniciously alluring waves of sonic intimation pure temptation and only escalated as the bass unfurls its bestial and virulent provocation. The track’s expanding prowl continued to seduce from under the skin; its addictive lures and feral snares quickly and insistently compulsive as Thompson’s barbarous tones prey on song and senses alike as another major moment within the album is discharged,

The melodic elegance and calm of Aeon provides a magnetic respite and seduction from the voracious darkness before and after it, the instrumental a beacon in the surrounding storm which returns with almost carnal relish within Lord Of The Vile. From its deception of atmospheric tranquillity if one embracing dark whispers and portentous intimation, Slayer-esque riffs erupt as rhythms venomously pummel. Immediately a viral contagiousness invades ears and appetite, the outstanding track swinging and savaging with insatiable intent and zeal; as throughout the release individual craft uniting with collective imagination and invention.

Both 1968, with its carnivorous stalking of the senses amidst a blackened hue as crawling riffs court ravenous grooves and vocals, and the primal gait and breath of Hunter’s Moon left little for ears and pleasure to want for, the first of the two especially inspiriting with its successor a full and riveting adventure all on its own as its instrumental landscape, lined with a slight Celtic lit intimation, twists and turns with rousing and potent effect.

Kingdom brings the record to a close, the final track another slab of animated and invigorating skill and enterprise leaving this listener welcomingly harassed and aroused. It is a song summing up the craft and invention of Dog Tired and the thick textures and varied nature of their sound within a recognisable yet individual extreme metal tempest.

As much as The Electric Abyss made a potent mark first time around it was with subsequent plays that it truly blossomed into one of our favourite metal onslaughts of the year; give it time and it could be yours too.

The Electric Abyss is out now; available@ https://dogtired.bandcamp.com/album/the-electric-abyss

http://www.dogtiredmetal.com/   https://www.facebook.com/dogtiredmetal   https://twitter.com/dogtiredmetal

Pete RingMaster 27/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mortal Infinity – In Cold Blood

Unleashing thrash metal with a similarly keen instinct for death and groove metal, German metallers Mortal Infinity unveil their third album this month. In Cold Blood is a nine track trespass of old school meets new enterprise incitement, a release which left us basking in thick satisfaction.

Hailing from Zeilarn, Mortal Infinity emerged late 2009 and swiftly set about creating and releasing in the May of the following year their first EP, Eternal War. Since then they have unleashed a pair of albums in District Destruction of 2012 and three years later Final Death Denied. Both were well-received without really breaking the band out upon major attention, a possibility which In Cold Blood makes more likely given the luck all artists need.

Presenting a collection of songs which unapologetically embrace the influence of bands such as Exodus, Testament, and Slayer, In Cold Blood swiftly reveals its rich web of flavours within opener Fellowship Of Rats. Immediately riffs urgently descend on the senses, the guitars of Sebastian Unrath and Sebastian Brunner hungrily surging forth as the swings of drummer Adrian Müller bite. It is familiar territory but no less appetising for it. The raw and earnest tones of vocalist Marc Doblinger soon enter the affray too as all the while rapacious basslines escape the strings of Alex Glaser.

It is a great if unsurprising start to the release which is taken up a notch by the following Misanthropic Collapse. From its first breath seriously appetising grooves collude with hunger bearing riffs, rhythms again an imposing attack in the contagion of it all. Once more there is plenty to recognise but there is a freshness which as with its predecessor marks it out before the quickly impressing Repulsive Messiah steps up to prowl the listener within an apocalyptic collage. Within moments it becomes a nagging addiction of guitar as Doblinger stalks the landscape with his predatory words, death metal hues adding to the drama and temptation. Subsequent threads of melodic enterprise vine the confrontation bringing bolder imagination to the band’s sound.

Dream Crusher equally hooked quick and eager attention with its burly outpouring of carnal riffs and voracious rhythms, grooved wiring increasing its compelling presence. A Lamb Of God like spicing only accentuates its potency as too the momentary calm which deceptively hints at a twist but not the one which actually emerges to add to the pleasure.

From the stalking ferocity that is Long Forgotten Gods and the sinisterly Silent Assassin (Champion Of War) to Devastator, Devastated with its voracious and dextrous siege of sound the album only captured the appetite as the specific craft of individuals unitedly caught the imagination, the melodic dexterity veining tracks alone potent persuasion and only accentuated by the shades of death, groove, and heavy metal upon their thrash bred canvases.

The album’s title track equally hit the spot from its initial thrash borne chugging to the rhythmic agility of Müller and the grooved swing of its gait. Drama soaks its every move which only added to the classic breeding it springs from and the inventive dynamics it is shaped with.

Finally Ghost Ship Sailor sails forward to complete the release; the song drifting in on its own murky waters aflame with heavy metal spirals of guitar amidst a death metal sprung climate until eventually its thrash invasion breaks out, rampaging with hostile zeal. Arguably the most adventurous of the tracks and the most imaginative it provides yet another appealing aspect to In Cold Blood, one which took longer to take to but with rich rewards.

In Cold Blood is not without moments which did not quite grab as strongly as others, certain times when its twists and turns felt unnatural yet equally it all added to the intrigue and attraction of an album we only felt full enjoyment with. Whether the release is a breaking moment for Mortal Infinity time will tell but it certainly sees them moving in the right direction.

In Cold Blood is out September 6th; available@ https://mortalinfinityofficial.bandcamp.com/album/in-cold-blood

https://www.facebook.com/MortalInfinity/   https://twitter.com/mortalinfinity

Pete RingMaster 07/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Transport League – A Million Volt Scream

The fifteen years since first leaving Lucifer’s fires has not dampened the roar in the heart and throat of Transport League or the voracious swing in their feral enterprise, nor indeed the ravenous virulence of a sound which is always preying on new hellish flavours. The proof is all there in the viscera of their new album, A Million Volt Scream: a release which lures, embraces, and devours the senses with the greatest ravening intent yet from the Swedish outfit so that never has the well-established term upon the band’s music, Boogie From Hell, been more apt.

Emerging in 1994 Transport League embraced the sound of early Clutch with as they say “some hints of Cathedral and Corrosion of Conformity.” Swiftly it established its own ever evolving character and by the 2013 release of fifth album, Boogie From Hell, was the fuel to that enduring moniker. Even as the band has continued to explore new shades and avenues it has remained fitting to that declaration as shown by A Million Volt Scream. It is an encounter bred from a ferocious cauldron of mutually heavy metal and rock with just as healthy and hungry essences of punk, sludge, and alternative trespasses; infernal rock ‘n’ roll if you would.

A Million Volt Scream wasted no time with subtle persuasion, warning sirens allowing a moment to run away before its title track opener stalks with eager rhythmic instincts. That alone proves gripping bait but once the band’s renowned rapacious grooves uncage their swing, entanglement is inescapable. The track hits its stride with a devilish swagger, the vocals of guitarist Tony Jelencovich a masterful scowl within the unappeasable contagion. Rich imagination only adds to the temptation, the track’s Pantera meets Rob Zombie like breath twisted and ignited with industrial lined apocalyptic proclamation.

1200 Goddamned follows, the rhythms of drummer Mattias Starander again a potent and insatiable coaxing before the song uncages its full belly of riffs and grooves, the exploits of Jelencovich  and lead guitarist Peter Hunyadi mercilessly infectious and invasive just as is the former’s great grungy tones. Even with its eager swing, there is a riveting predatory edge to the bass of Dennis Österdal, his lines threat and temptation together much as song and sound around them across the release.

Fair to say with ears and appetite already hooked both only found a lustier attention as next up Monster Human leered in and began stalking their ground. Its menacing bounce and mischievous sonic glints swiftly stole subservience, another Rob Zombie-esque swing this time merged with a Rammstein scented industrial intimidation only adding to the captivation before relief at the departure of its fiendishness is swiftly stolen by the dark deeds and drama of Dawn Of Lucifer. The band’s already multi-flavoured sound is stretched again as the track’s alternative metal breeding reveals the seed of bands similar to Faith No More, Dog Fashion Disco, and Mushroomhead though emerging as inimitable Transport League alchemy. Simply put though, as to be honest applying to all tracks within the album, it is inventively yet instinctively bred rabid rock ‘n’ roll and proved unapologetically irresistible.

Vultures is next up, the song immediately wrapping grooved sonic wires around the senses then manipulating them like a puppeteer to its own carnal swing. Carnivorous in every essence, viral with just as forceful a zeal, the track is another esurient stalking and a major contender for best track honours while Vanished Empire brings its own creative enmity to bear with dissonance carrying craft and again a strain of rabidity to offer its own imposing challenge.

Facedown Bondage might not quite have ignited the same heights of delirium but with its southern rock irritancy and contagion aligned to groove metal embroiled contention it too proved thick pleasure to breed greed for as too Slave In Orbit with its low slung stoner grooves and funk metal intimation. As with all tracks though, it is the perpetual current of imagination which adds the unpredictability and individuality that seals already done deals.

The final pair of Creature Grunts and Rabid Horizon leaves nothing to be desired as A Million Volt Scream departs as impressively as it began. The first is another song which sparks thoughts of Mike Patton and co at certain moments as it hungrily strolls, its severe catchiness spun with intoxicating grooves and rhythms which manage to simultaneously punish and seduce. The final track is basically a slab of untamed rock ‘n’ roll, a beast of intensity and motion which even the dearly departed could not prevent swinging their bones to.

Their sound is indeed boogie from the inferno below though such it’s and specifically the inescapable temptation of A Million Volt Scream it is hard to tell if Transport League work for the Devil or he dances to their tune.

A Million Volt Scream is out now via Mighty Music; available @ http://targetshop.dk/transport-league and https://targetgroup.bandcamp.com/album/a-million-volt-scream-2

 https://www.facebook.com/transportleague/

Pete RingMaster 090/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright