Adrenechrome – Tales From Adrenechrome

Pic Credit Dave Saunders_

Pic Credit Dave Saunders_

Just like a blurring of reality and fantasy, the sound of Canadian metallers Adrenechrome is a muggy fusion of styles and flavours, and just like a drug addled climate, it provides an adventure which devours and permeates every pore of the senses and emotions. Taking their name from the a fictional drug in the film Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas, Adrenechrome cast a kaleidoscope of rigorous and virulent tempting as creatively progressive as it is thunderously rock ‘n’ roll, as predatory thrash bred as it is spatially grooved, and as imaginatively ravenous as it is simply seductive. The evidence is all there within new album Tales From Adrenechrome, a seven track encounter which from its classic comic like cover, created by Clownbaby and Tim Kehoe, through to its final suggestive note, is a compelling exploration of self experiences, fantasy, sci-fi, and classic literature.

Hailing from Ontario, Adrenechrome began in 2010, formed by veterans of the music scene with bands such as Gaswitch, Shimmy Rabbits, and The Doug Trucker Band in their histories. Debut EP Hideous Appetites emerged in 2012, inspirations from artists such as Pantera, Black Sabbath, Thin Lizzy, Metallica, Mastodon, High on Fire, and Children of Bodom colouring a sound which soon lured strong support and attention to the release and equally the band’s adrenaline driven live presence which over the years has included playing with Corrosion of Conformity, Green Jelly, Ninjaspy, and Manahan. It is a reaction and success sure to be matched and overshadowed by Tales From Adrenechrome as it spreads its creative rabidity from hereon; with it the band ready to breach and incite richer and broader spotlights.

Album Cover - Adrenechrome - Tales From Adrenechrome _RingMaster Review   The album opens with A Familiar Face, an immediate tempting of bold rhythms and melodically spun sonic enterprise woven into a warm instrumentally led tapestry. The track swiftly captivates as its hooks and grooves seduce as the bass swings and drums badger, a union which only captures ears and imagination with vocal harmonies adding just one more flavoursome texture to the album’s initial temptation.

Things quickly get rugged and heavy as Lockstep storms in next; its thrash breeding is full rabid evidence as vocalist Chris Friesen rides his own riffs and the raw flames of fellow guitarist Tim Kehoe. As becomes the norm, the track is soon evolving within ears. The fury of more extreme metal hues collude with heavy Mastodon resembling grooves and a Torche likened web of flavours as the licking of thrash seeded and groove metal honed flames continues. It is riveting stuff, the body and emotions involved in the devilment as easily as pleasure and an appetite for more, which the song continues to offer with its persistently twisting proposal and Black Brubeck continues with its superb jazz lit imagination and progressively sculpted inventive waltz. As avant-garde as something from a Trepalium or a Pryapisme, and as heftily compelling rock ‘n’ roll as a predacious roar from an Anthrax or High on Fire, the song is irresistible; a fascination with mischief in its heart and fiery passion in its soul.

As all tracks, God Sized Shadow is nurtured with the same fire of intent and character, it even more rapaciously dirty and intrusive than its predecessor but with, greater degrees, the same kind of cosmic air and aggressive volatility, the blackened shades of the latter especially potent. Bewitching and intrusive, with the excellent dark grouchiness of Mike Van Dyk’s bass and the lethally swung beats of drummer Matt Copeland gripping, the track is a primal yet worldly blaze with the rawness of a Triggerman and dark seduction of a Faith No More.

The Heart and The Feather instantly incites ears and thoughts as clean vocals impress within a hug of spidery grooves and sonic expression, Friesen becoming even more compelling as he mixes up his delivery with dirtier tones and rasping expression. Musically the song matches him, again that bedlamic quality a perpetual enticement of unpredictability and highly persuasive surprises woven in to a mix of fierce and richly spiced metal and heavy rock styles. Hips are soon swinging and imagination entangled in the proposition, a success just as easily inspired by Hideous Appetites, a manic appearing and skilfully conjured smog of ferocious enterprise and dynamic devilment; a ravenous beast of a song with melodic and antagonistic weaponry.

Completed by the cauldron of warmth and hostility that is The Lead Elephant, a track which majestically merges melodic tempting, sonic trespasses, and cantankerous metal ‘n’ roll within its tenacious and often enjoyably bruising tempest, Tales From Adrenechrome is a thrilling beast. There is no moment where emotions and appetite are not inflamed and pleasure thicker than the grooves it unleashes.

Grabbing a dose of Adrenechrome is a no brainer as far as we are concerned, Tales From Adrenechrome the release declaring a new band to challenge if not quite now certainly ahead those ‘giants’ mentioned.

Tales From Adrenechrome is out now @ and through most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 28/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out

The Five Hundred – Winters

TFH_RingMaster Review

Every now and then, without any debate, lustful pleasure is ignited by a release; by a band exploding on the sweet spot of ears and instincts with something which just seems to know what the passions like. Such an encounter for us is Winters, the debut EP from UK metallers The Five Hundred. It is hard to say what particularly incites such enthused reactions and appetite, the release weaving its fierce tempting with a host of familiar flavours and styles, but every one of its four incendiary tracks is hellacious manna to the ear and imagination; something we suspect to not be alone in feeling.

The Five Hundred emerged in 2014, a Nottingham quintet previously known as DAOR. In no time their fusion of brutal and melodic metal was whipping up ears and thick attention, every strain of extreme metal and numerous other styles seemingly entangled into a compelling maelstrom of enterprise and confrontation which now fuels Winters and already an acclaimed live presence which has seen the band share stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Fear Factory, All Shall Perish, Architects, and TesseracT. Recorded with Justin Hill (Sikth, Heart of a Coward), Winters is the band’s first fearsome roar at national spotlights, and if our ears are anything to go by, heading to rich success in awakening that broader focus.

Winters EP Front Cover_RingMaster Review    The press release suggests that the band switching to 8 string guitars has been a new spark to their sound and invention; whether it has or not, all that matters is that Winters is a full-on tempest of persuasion from first breath to last. The EP starts with its title track and straight away is grumbling in ears through the predatory bass of Andy Crawford, it a grouchy provocateur within a surge of wiry guitar. The hefty swings of drummer Liam Perez show no light in their nature either with each beat a shuddering impact as guitarists Mark Byrne and Paul Doughty weave more compelling bait for vocalist John Eley to spring from with great diversity. Just as musically the release ticks all the boxes so does the attack of the frontman, his fluid mix of clean, punkish, and outright raw hostility equally accomplished and perfectly measured in the split of all his strains of potency.

Death and heavy metal collude with metalcore and post hardcore ferocity though that is a simplifying of the hues creating the first and each track within Winters, as Come Closer swiftly proves. The lead track with a great video in tow, it emerges from a misty sonic atmosphere with military rhythms and emotive vocals, they still more in the background until a ravenous stomp of belligerent rhythms and caustic riffs is triggered. It in turn breeds a sonic blaze which is not so much mellow as less vicious than the surrounding and perpetually prowling ferocity soaking the walls of the incitement. Again at times as punk as it is metal and a constant exploit of seriously enticing elements amidst slithers of unpredictable ingenuity, the track is a ravenous treat but outshone within seconds.

The barbarous majesty of the first two tracks carries on in the outstanding Shutter to the Light, its immediate swagger as seductive as it is venomously violent. Like an anthem for the derailment of all that is hopeful, the track bellows at and trespasses the senses and imagination with enthralling enterprise, yet within its despoiling character harmonies and melodies are unleashed to wrong-foot and seize the passions even tighter. Everything about the track whips up a greedy appetite and pleasure; from the irresistible prime hook to the increasingly formidable vocals and the raging invention culturing the creatively rabid storm.

The EP is closed by The Cannibal Hordes, it also a quite thrilling and blistering arousal of ears and satisfaction. Melodically acoustic in its first caress, defiantly cantankerous from the second onwards, the track spits hostile intent and roars melodic understanding; vocally and musically entwining both with a skilled volatility that ensures expectations never gets proven. As suggested earlier, many elements and flavours are recognisable, bands like Fear Factory, Lamb of God, In Flames, and Hatebreed coming to mind, yet no song utters anything other than something unique to The Five Hundred.

The Winters EP is a crushing and scintillating introduction to The Five Hundred, band you should expect to hear a lot more of in sound and acclaim ahead, if only from our enraptured lips.

The Winters EP is out now digitally and on CD via

Pete RingMaster 24/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out

Deadly Circus Fire – The Hydra’s Tailor

DCF_RingMaster Review

Casting a creative and impassioned roar which just gets richer and more compelling with every listen, The Hydra’s Tailor is a majestic beast of an album; a release that invasively seduces and cantankerously snarls. The second album from UK metallers Deadly Circus Fire, it has been the source of much attention and highly enthused praise already, so time we thought to get involved in its acclaimed proposal and fair to say disappointment was not on the agenda.

Fusing persistently unpredictable explorations of progressive metal and rock with just as magnetically carnivorous textures, The Hydra’s Tailor is already no stranger to drawing keen attention, just like the band’s debut album The King and the Bishop which was heartily embraced by fans and media alike. Drawing on inspirations such as Tool, Mastodon, and Deftones, the London based Deadly Circus Fire laid down a fiercely inviting teaser for this their latest emprise of sound and imagination through a couple of eagerly welcomed singles and since their release, they have signed with Musicarchy Media for the release of the crowd-funded, The Hydra’s Tailor as well as share stages with the likes of Crossfaith, Funeral For a Friend, and Bleed From Within across the UK and Europe. Right now they are lighting up European venues supporting Skindred on their Pump Up The Volume tour, just as The Hydra’s Tailor does the same to ears and speakers.

Artwork_RingMaster Review     The album starts with In Darkness We Trust, its keys spawned melancholic air embracing the immediately enticing and impressing voice of Adam Grant. The duet is bewitching, a solemn yet magnetic coaxing into the heart of the album and second track Animal. Riffs instantly begin prowling ears as it opens up predatory scenery, vocals again a potent enticement as the firm swings of drummer Paul Igoe resonate and the guitar of Save Addario spins expressive sonic enterprise around the still ravenous riffery. Grant again strikes with compelling vocals, his presence backed as resourcefully and potently by the tones of Mike Enort, whose basslines are no slouch when it comes to casting dark temptation either. Whereas the opener was a minimalistic treat its successor shows the shape of things to come with its unpredictable and seamlessly diverse landscape, it also a triumph in its own right.

The following Where It Lies expands from an acoustic flirtation into another mesh of wiry guitar tendrils and emotive flames, ebbing and flowing in aggression and intensity but relentlessly seducing in charm and adventure. As vocal craft and imagination shadows every step made by the ideation building the track, a scent of bands like Circles and Palms lay upon the fascinating encounter, Karnivool too in the song’s mellower moments but all spices to something already showing Deadly Circus Fire uniqueness.

Victim is another entering with an antagonistic glint in its creative eye, rhythms and riffs aligning their rapacious natures as Metallica-esque grooves line the emerging tempest. This time there is a whisper of bands like Bloodsimple and Lamb of God to another song which needs little prompting to evolve into new pastures of tenacious ideation and compelling craft, subsequently an air of Porcupine Tree and Tool just as suggestive across the outstanding incitement.

Another pinnacle comes with the stunning blaze of Devil’s Opera, a track as infectiously catchy as it is mouth-wateringly involved. It takes ears, emotions, and the imagination on a heady ride of united enterprise and individual exploration, a flight which twists and turns with an inventive turbulence that only ignites the appetite to greedier intent towards album and band. It is a forceful yet respectful invasion of the senses continued in Rise Again, it too aligning riffs and rhythmic rabidity with a fire of sonic invention and emotion driven melodic expression guided by the superb voice and delivery of Grant.

The brief instrumental tempting of Martyrs provides a relaxation for the senses next and a new spark for the imagination to play with before the exceptional House of Plagues groans and grinds ears with guitar endeavour around an enjoyably volatile blend of vocals. That bestial intent continues as melodies catch flame and rhythms jab with the stealth of a predator, all contrasts uniting in a scintillating emprise of emotive and provocative ingenuity, one that gets more ravenous and thrilling over each passing minute. Amongst so many within The Hydra’s Tailor that linger and relentlessly lure constant attention, as the album itself, the track is pure addictiveness as it takes best track honours.

Through the bold air and wonderfully fluid and varied tapestry of Aeden and the climatic atmosphere and soundscape of the album’s title track, The Hydra’s Tailor continues to enthral and tempt lustful reactions, its namesake another especially mesmeric blaze of dexterous songwriting and skills matched in sound. Both songs add thick layers to the epic nature of the album with the next up Turning the Tide equally as mighty with its agitated rhythms and sonic swirl of discontent. Equally within its stormy nature though, melodies brew, calm emerges, and bewitching harmonies entice to engross and excite before the turmoil returns in similarly exhilarating style.

The album is closed by the celestially lit, intensively aired Universe; a song which soars and bullies its way into ears and the psyche whilst leaving a great resonance and glow from its respective merger of harsh and tempestuous textures with absorbing beauty. The song is just masterful, repeating the major success cast before it across The Hydra’s Tailor with its own impressing adventure.

The good things heard and read about Deadly Circus Fire barely do the band justice, and now having been infected by The Hydra’s Tailor it feels safe to say if there are those yet to feel the power and prowess of the band the chance of finding reactions breeding the same kind of enthusiasm as us here, is high. There is only one way to find out of course and that is one of the heartiest recommendations made at The RR this year, go explore.

The Hydra’s Tailor is out now via Musicarchy Media @

Pete RingMaster 17/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out

Stone Cold Dead – Lava Flows

STONE COLD DEAD _RingMaster ReviewPhoto 1

Lava Flows is one of those encounters which grabs rigorously, cuts off all forms of escape and in turn plies you with intoxicating persuasion which leaves you woozy and desperate for more. The heavy weight groove fest is the debut album from Greek metallers Stone Cold Dead, a band entangling the richest essences of groove and heavy metal with those of experimental and alternative rock. The result is a virulent form of predatory rock ‘n’ roll which leaves a thick greed for more as ripe as the outright enjoyment experienced from its thrilling introduction to a band destined to great heights.

Stone Cold Dead is the brainchild of former Rotting Christ and Nightfall guitarist George Bokos, a project which is not so much a solo adventure but one luring the talent of equally experienced and innovative guests. The Athens hailing Stone Cold Dead gave a potent hint of the quickly impressing sound fuelling the album a few short weeks back with the release of the single Hubrism, a teaser which awoke intrigue and anticipation with ease band now proven to be just the one facet of a triumphant beast.

The first inescapable seduction of the album comes through the union of Bokos’ glorious baritone guitar enticement with that of Charis Pazaroulas’ (ex-Ostrobothnian Chamber Orchestra) irresistible bowed contrabass temptation. Both aspects are a theatre of invention and controlled rabidity, of creative attitude and expression colluding to create bestial stomps of fierce rock ‘n’ roll with an unrelenting appetite to devour and incite ears and imagination. That ingenuity alone makes Lava Flows a must investigation but add the majestic and fearsome rhythmic bait bullying and igniting the senses throughout , and you have a proposition which is pure metal alchemy. Split into three sections; Stone, Cold, and Dead, which “unfolds along the Cosmic Tree, which connects three different realities”, Bokos has given the three tracks in each part to a trio of exceptional drummers to drive, twist, and elevate the nature and personality of each movement within the album. Yannis Stavropoulos takes the first section, to be followed by Dimitrios (Vorskaath) Dorian, the multi-instrumentalist behind Zemial, and Nile drummer George Kollias respectively. It is an aspect to the release that just adds further formidable drama to the provocative journey of the album, a potency which makes more of a thrilling impact than was definitely expected.

cover_RingMaster Review     The album opens with Climbing The Cave and straight away it is prowling ears with sonic craft as a rhythmic rumble builds into an anthemic addiction. As becomes the diverse mouth-watering norm across the release, riffs nag and gnaw on the senses as quickly enslaving vocals and the jungle of beats from Stavropoulos descend to seduce and ravage the body. Like a mix of Bloodsimple, Killing Joke, and Black Tusk, the track swings its bait whilst drilling deeper in to the psyche with every torrent of rabid riffs and web of insatiable grooving. It is probably right to say our passions were hooked from this point, a submission ensured by the contrabass seducing of Pazaroulas but only confirmed time and time again across Lava Flows starting with Cyclone Speaking.

Instantly the second song is more bestial in the tone of guitar and bass, and strolling with an antagonistic gait soon drawing in melodically enflamed roars of sound and voice. Rhythmically things are another maze to explore and be willingly trapped by as the melodic tenacity of Bokos flirts and explores new designs and instincts within the bruising rock ‘n’ roll climate. As with its predecessor, swift submission and a lusty reaction from body and thoughts are given, a success found again by the album’s title track. Lava Flows, as its title suggests, smoulders and crawls from its first breath but around an already keen burst of rhythms which provide the spark for a subsequent sludge bred swagger as volatile in energy and hunger as it is immersive in weight and ambience. Pazaroulas again bewitches with his bow on strings whilst Bokos and Stavropoulos entrance as they turn limbs and neck muscles into their puppets.

An apt colder steely hue flows through the album’s Cold section, Death Drive preying on ears with increasing intensity and energy as a punk ‘n’ roll attitude and irritability runs through the song’s pulsating veins. The craft of Dorian has a more rock ‘n’ roll energy and swing to its attack which is translated in the sound around it, that in turn creating another strain of alternative and groove metal united in stoner-esque toxicity to grip ears.

Both The Black Snake and Hubrism transfix with their individual invention and natures, the first emerging on a tribalistic, mystique clad trespass breeding a caustically flamed swing of riffs and incendiary grooves. The perpetual niggling quality of both continues to make the juiciest irresistible bait matched by vocals, rhythms, and that contrabass and bass ingenuity, manna throughout the album. Here it creates an emprise of colourful melodic and sonic mystique within a net of addictive creative voracity whilst its successor is a more sinister and disentangled weave of voices and atmospheric intimidation crowded by a great irritant of waspish grooves and robustly dynamic rhythms. Once more songwriting and sound infests and twists the listener this way and that with startling invention and imagination, and though many elements are familiar there is no doubting they are employed and evolved into something rabidly fresh and unique to Stone Cold Dead.

The exceptional Deconstructing The Architect is the first offering in the Dead segment of the adventure, Kollias sculpting a wonderfully intrusive and anthemically invigorating wall of rhythms as the guitars open up their own net of inimitable and irrepressible imagination and craft. The body becoming a puppet to the strings of band and album is nothing new at this point but certainly strung out and sent into their biggest frenzy yet as the song builds into its Torche meets Mastodon meets Trepalium emprise of sound and temptation.

A shamanic scent opens up with the entrance of Umbilical Cord next, the guitar again spinning a sultry and exotic coaxing before the track erupts into its muscularly predacious and erosive glory, which itself is never absent of unpredictable and smouldering flavours from distant shoes and cultures. The track, as all, simply engrosses and thrills, a tempting emulated in the closing extensive exploration of And The Tree Becomes A Sphere, a travelogue of sound and inspiring hues in its own right that has ears and thoughts as enslaved as the emotions amidst a massive greed for more.

Lava Flows is real heavy groove woven magnificence for the ears, and even if others find themselves to be not quite as lustful in reactions as we found ourselves to be, Stone Cold Dead are still a big reward all should give themselves a chance of getting excited over.

Lava Flows is out now via digitally and on CD via Volcanic Music @

Pete RingMaster 10/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out

Demons Of Old Metal – Dominion

DOOM 2_RingMaster Review

We all know rock ‘n’ roll is spawned in hell and eager through hordes of bands to spread its glory, an infestation proven over the decades to only thrill especially in the hands of bands like Demons Of Old Metal. Theirs is a forcibly vocal and thrilling stomp consuming the senses which is in full roar within the glorious shape of new album Dominion. The UK band has been around a little while, working away at trying to “win back the souls of those that have turned their back on sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll!” From the fact that their new release is our and a great many others introduction to them suggests it has been a slow battle to date but things are about to get hot and dirty we suggest once their outstanding album uncages its contagion.

Formed around the time 2010 turned into its successor, Demons of Old Metal emerged as four veterans of the UK metal scene united to play “what got them into music in the first place – classic metal.” Casting a sound, presence, and stage show coloured by schlock horror inspiration, the band released their debut offering on the Halloween of 2012, in the riot of mini-album, The Demonic Chronicles Vol. I. It as a well-received and praised proposal followed by the band creating metal havoc across the country live and the subsequent releases of Vol. 2 and 3 of The Demonic Chronicles over the next couple of years.

The Torbay hailing band’s sound is mutant rock ‘n’ roll rising with creative bloodlust from a twisted blend of Pantera, Them County Bastardz, Hell Yeah, Steel Panther, and Machine Head, to give its hellacious voice some description. And as Dominion swiftly reveals, it is an infestation of ears and imagination refusing to take no for an answer with its virulent hostility.

Dominion Artwork -_RingMaster Review   The album announces itself with the brief theatrical Domintroduction before launching itself at the senses, with nostrils flared, through the outstanding Fakeskin. Riffs and rhythms quickly build a wall of spite and enticement, already badgering and welcoming a just as instant appetite for the provocation. As the expressive punkish tones of vocalist Tombstone Cowboy leap into the brewing tempest, electronic slithers and teases play, a side-helping of temptation to the full meal of a voracious onslaught luring away as the guitars of Tombstone Cowboy and Psycho Wing continue to rampage and flirt with the throaty toxicity spread by bassist Babyface Stephens s. With the scything violence of drummer Dr Doom simply nasty and gripping, a rich Slipknot essence can be added to the suggested breeding of song and album, but all flavours here and ahead stretched and mutated into a web of metal distinct to the demons.

You Version 2.0 leaps on the listener next, its physical and emotional agitated an open toxicity within another storm of merciless rhythms and riffs bound in nagging grooves and confronting vocals. The electronic sparks of the first song is replaced by a more industrial metal predation, thoughts of Pitchshifter teasing throughout whilst heavy and more classically honed spices venomously soak the pores of the track and senses. It’s addictive quality is emulated by both Dance of the Damned and Open wide and Scream, the first stalking its victim with rugged textures and the electronic toxins woven by Digital Death whilst growing into its spite with an increasing weave of flavours and inhospitable but gripping enterprise. The successor to this Devildriver like animus of a song, stomps with a dirty rock ‘n’ roll swing and theatrical snarl, its lure smothered by a sonic climate of intensity and rancor. The band seamlessly fuses the contrasting yet similarly belligerent winds of that invention, creating a hellish primal nursery rhyme as catchy as it is intimidating.

There is a ‘mellower’ trespass next with The Quiet Ones, its southern rock flames and dirt lined grooves locked into a thick turbulence of riffs and rhythms, neither outweighing the other but mutually leading to a moment of groove heaven and an increasingly explosive and vicious outpouring of sonic rabidity. A borrowing of a Rage Against The Machine tempting only adds to the fun, and as much as the album bruises and devours it also offers a rich tongue in cheek layer through lyrics and mischief.

Grind was a little ‘disappointing’, though only in the fact with its title hopes were it would burrow into flesh and psyche like a drill bit. Instead it spun a wiry web of grooves and sonic tenacity amongst a threat of rhythms and riffs; the result being another inescapably persuasive and seriously enjoyable intrusion before making way for the writhing and relentless nagging of Behind the Mask. With a ripple of rap metal to its persistent niggle of riffs, the song demands attention, evolving new strains of melodic and cantankerous imagination in return. Longer to hit the same rapturous reactions as most of its predecessors, the song easily succeeds in leaving satisfaction full before being over shadowed by the excellent The Star of your Nightmare. Its electronic coaxing amidst prowling riffs is almost Marilyn Mansion like but in no time a cancerous violation unique to Demons Of Old Metal with the track emerging as a theatre of cinematic mayhem and sonic ingenuity.

Cast around a fiery acidic groove, See How They Die seduces and menaces before overpowering its initial rich flame to dominate through bearish riffs and ill-tempered rhythms, the vocals bridging both emotions with open relish. Like The Union Underground with anger problems, the song is a grizzly treat leaving Get Outa Dodge to provide one last growl of insatiable and uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll, and ending the album on another big high.

British metal/rock ‘n’ roll is building towards a new heyday going by releases over the past few months, and when it erupts in full voice, there is no way Demons Of Old Metal will not be there leading the thrilling riot.

Dominion is out December 1st with pre-ordering available now @

Pete RingMaster 05/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out

Metal Devastation Compilation Vol. #1

Metal Devastation Radio - Metal Devastation Compilation Vol #1 - cover_RingMaster Review

Put together and unleashed by Zach Moonshine and Metal Devastation Radio, Metal Devastation Compilation Vol. #1 offers two mighty reasons all metal/rock fans should go check it out and treat themselves. Firstly it was created to raise funds for those battling cancer and to help the families involved, which sadly includes Zach’s own mother-in-law who was recently diagnosed with stage 3a large cell squamous carcinoma of the lung that has spread to her lymph node. With all involvement from the album creators to artists purely voluntary and all proceeds going to the cause, the compilation is very worthy of attention and add the second mighty lure in the fine horde of independent bands, 39 of them, offering their support and sounds, the album is a no-brainer involvement for all.

Within its first handful of tracks the quality and diversity of artists and sound is gripping, a trend never deviating until the final triumph offered by one man Canadian death-grinders Pink Carnage and their glorious trespass of ears and psyche going by the name of Children Of The Damned. The track is a brilliant conclusion to a release which starts off in riveting style too, that variety of temptation springing from opener We Will All Be Trees by Ottawa death metallers …From The Deep. Its ravenous stalking and infestation of the senses makes way for the raw metal of Cape Town quintet Nethercyst and in turn the grooved punk metal of 94 Blades and after the Arizona outfit, the dark invasive black metal courtesy of Iranian band Akvan. The four tracks epitomise the strength and diversity of the album and indeed global underground scene, but still just the tip of the creative iceberg.

It would make War and Peace look like a novella to make a comment on every single song within the album in this review so allow us the indulgence of revealing particular favourites, a choice hard enough in all honesty such, without exception, the mighty propositions making up the album. The thrash/death metal incitement of Le Règne du Chaos is one to grab ears; its creators the French band Amzera who recently released their debut EP to potent responses.

The melodic metal adventure of Canada band Dark Insignia had ears and imagination entwined too through their Longest Day whilst straight after them in the song line-up, Buffalo hailing Dark Morning had feet and neck muscles energised with the sinew driven hard rock revelry of Devour, again the two band’s position side by side showing the potent mix of styles and textures making up a perpetually enthralling playlist.

There are plenty other incitements raising personal lust including Chicago five piece Destroythm, their track Dead Man’s Switch a ravenous slab of groove/alternative, and rapacious metal, whilst another Cape Town hailing band in Devilspeak snarl and chew at the same senses to thrilling effect, the effect of the pair’s hostility soothed by the glorious swagger and charm of EVP from DC trio Hellpie, its bluesy, dark rock ‘n’ roll irresistible.

Danish power rockers RedWolves are another creating an inescapable excitement for our ears with their melodically flavoursome yet muscular sound whilst Rock N Roll Villain Society do what they do best, create a boozy rock ‘n’ roll anthem to get fully involved with.

That vast stretch of styles impress again as side by side both the gripping extreme avant-garde metal of Skindrone and tempestuous antagonistic metal of Skin Kage inflame ears and imagination in their specific ways, successes backed by an array of subsequent storms and provocations including one from Burlington bred death thrashers The Desolate and another through the Antwerp thrash/hardcore crossover sound of Toxic Shock. As mentioned earlier, there are respites from the furies within the album, rich propositions like the bewitching atmospheric stoner seeded exploration of Californian duo Tvsk but generally they are quickly followed by more rousing confrontations like the stirring blues spiced heavy metal/rock uncaged by N. Carolina twosome White Knuckle Black Out.

With the album brought to a rich close by firstly Italian symphonic metallers Winterbreed and their song You Will Cry My Name and the earlier mentioned Pink Carnage, exhaustion is matched by thick pleasure and an urge to explore all those involved, a reaction no one will escape. With more mouth-watering songs from the likes of Critical Dismemberment, Ohol Yeg, Light Keeper… actually we will stop there because every band deserves a bold mention but space limits that so do peruse the track-listing below, hit the links in their names and explore all the bands making up the release, new favourites are a definite result. Then, or before, give yourself deserved pleasure by going over to purchase a copy of the compilation which in turn means helping a very deserving cause.

Metal Devastation Compilation Vol. #1 track-listing:
…From The Deep – We Will All Be Trees 05:28
Nethercyst – Deceit Of The Fallen 02:27
94 Blades – Capone 03:44
Akvan – طبرستان 06:53
Amzera – Le Règne du Chaos 06:12
Anschluss Amor – Faith 04:54
Brutal Death Fuck – Baptized In Cum 03:40
Clawhammer – Damn The Man 05:29
Critical Dismemberment – Feel My Wrath And Tremble 03:46
Dark Insignia – Longest Day 06:43
Dark Morning – Devour 04:04
Destroythm – Dead Man’s Switch 06:59
DevilSpeak – Violently Leading The Blind 05:02
Distis – Destiny 05:23
Dying Eyes Of Sloth – Flesh Collector 03:26
Gravehuffer – Husk 03:12
Hellpie – EVP 05:14
Into The Coven – The Haunting 05:08
Light Keeper – Hard Ride To Hell (Devil’s Train) 04:09
Nostra Cantus – Mind Of Diseases 09:31
Moloch – Nur Der Tod Ist Wirklich 04:40
Morkta – Sorrow In Suffering 04:00
Necrotion – Tormented Unrest 04:16
Ohol Yeg – Obscure Is The Human 04:40
RedWolves – Letting You Go 05:17
Requiem For Oblivion – A Grim Jest 05:27
Rock N Roll Villain Society – Outlaw Trucker 03:06
Shotgun Justice – Nothing Left To Fear 05:54
Singe – Scorch 04:34
Skin Drone – Death Sentence 04:57
Skin Kage – Of Wolves 05:04
Splithammer – Down 03:41
The Desolate – Sentinel 04:55
The EyeSores – Monstrosity 03:45
Toxic Shock – Feeling The Pain 04:19
Tvsk – From Ashes 06:26
White Knuckle Blackout – Gravel 06:50
Winterbreed – You Will Cry My Name 06:24
Pink Carnage – Children Of The Damned 02:16

Pete RingMaster 05/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out

Deep Desolation – Possession

possession cover_RingMaster Review

Living up to its name in so many ways, Possession is an occultist waltz with the devil, black metal fuelled rock ‘n’ roll which just gets more compelling and adventurous track by track. The latest album from Polish metallers Deep Desolation, the release offers five tracks which devours ears and in turn imagination as black and doom metal gets entangled in psychedelic and progressive enterprise, all around blasphemous and challenging intent.

Deep Desolation hails from Łódź, emerging in 2009 with their debut album Subliminal Visions coming at the beginning of 2011. That same year saw the band unite with Primal and Iugulatus for the split release Chapel Of Fear with a year later second album Rites of Blasphemy was unleashed. Well-received it showed the growth and evolution running through the band’s sound which continues and blossoms in Possession. At times the new release is not an easy listen, making no compromises for the senses with its barbarous rancor and intensity, but from start to finish, and as suggested with stronger persuasion song by song, it is one seriously fascinating and enjoyable encounter.

The quartet of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Meriat, lead guitarist Markiz, bassist Piorun, and drummer Wilku begin their insidious incantation of pestilential temptation with Bestial Mind. Opening on an almost shamanic rhythmic invitation, the track is soon a brewing tempest of sonic agitation and thickly landing beats with guitars and bass entangling in tempestuous manner and creativity as they await crawling vocals squalls. The song continues to prowl with a doom rich breath, before unlocking a canter of spicy groves and melodic hooks which soon have ears and the imagination enthralled. Never unleashing its full venomous urgency, the track continues to stroll and prowl, malevolence an oozing hue across atmosphere and voice with a leaning towards progressively honed groove metal an additional magnetic texture.

Each listen reveals a little more going on within the quickly enticing animus of sound and intent, potency echoed throughout the album and certainly in the rabid depths and intrusive endeavours within Place Of The Darkest Thoughts. No reins shackle the energy and intensity of this track, its instinct to rock ‘n’ roll feeding the cancerous intent, creative adventure, and pure ferocity within it. In time bass and guitars spill a cascade of hook loaded bait as sonic and rhythmic savagery prevails around them whilst an almost schizophrenic passage of off kilter classic metal enterprise wrong foots and thrills simultaneously.

Both Demonic Elation and The Wizard Of Overdose keep ears enthralled, thoughts intrigued, and pleasure full. The first is an intensive dark trespass of sound and heart which truly comes to life when the psychedelic imagination of the band starts to wrap and infuse its black metal canvas. Before then it is a solid encounter but once the mystical imagination invades, it becomes another impressive beast before making way for its successor and its similarly persuasive tempest ignited by melodic and psych rock invention. The core groove is pure addictiveness and as confirmed by the final song on the album, Deep Desolation is at its most striking and unique when bringing their psychedelic and often deranged imagination into the mix, something hopefully they will explore and exploit much more ahead because we will then get more triumphs like Divine Dance.

The closing track is epic; eighteen minutes plus of heavy rock ‘n’ roll blackened and twisted for a glorious escapade of extreme metal irreverence. It is easily the best track on Possession, the realisation of all the band’s attributes in craft and sound in one extensive doom leaden, sludge thick, creatively carnal rampage of fierce and compelling metal and such a success because this time it is a groove and melody rich endeavour being given a black metal and doom infusion rather than the other way round.

As mentioned Possession gets bigger and better with each passing track, its finale the major treat which alone suggests that if Deep Desolation continue down this route they have the potential to intrude on the broadest metal spotlights.

Possession is out now via Old Temple / The End Of Time Records.

Pete RingMaster 07/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out