Gone By Friday – Quarter-Life Crisis

GlamourByFriday

Having grabbed attention with debut album Noisetank in 2011, New York pop punksters Gone By Friday have taken their time with its successor, whether by choice or not, but now return with Quarter-Life Crisis and it is fair to say that the band has upped the ante in sound, adventure, and fun.

The Queen’s quartet has discovered a new vivacity and energy in songwriting and sound, and they were no slouches there anyway as their last album proved. The eight tracks making up Quarter-Life Crisis simply leap at ears with a creative and imaginative vitality yet still retain the raw touches and essences which helped the band stand out in the first place. There is a maturity to the release which translates as contagious invention and whilst the release is still pop punk in its core form it captivates with raucous charm and fevered enterprise.

Formed in 2009 and tapping inspirations from the likes of Bouncing Souls, Greenday, Lagwagon, Rancid and Blink 182, Gone By Friday soon found their feet in the New York underground scene. The FreEP, a free to get EP and their live presence soon gripped ears and appetites, as well as establishing a base for their sound which Noisetank potently built upon. Now with another leap, Quarter-Life Crisis is here to re-ignite their tempting of new and broader awareness, and it gets off to a stomping start with The Hadean. The track opens on a blaze of guitar riffs which instantly has an old school punk/seventies R&B persuasion before muscular rhythms and scythes of sonic colour add to the heavily enticing start. There is a heavy rock essence with a touch of Sum 41 to it also, though it is not long before the pop punk heart of the track is romping with melodic infectiousness. The throaty basslines of Sean Ho provide their own striking bait within the encounter, but only matched in potency by the swinging beats of drummer Chris Berardi around the guitar enterprise of Peter Berardi and Billy Kupillas, with the latter’s vocals similarly bringing rich lures.

GBFcover   The strong start is swiftly matched by the raucous revelry of It All Starts With Me, a thumping stomp of a song with grouchy basslines and addiction forging hooks galore. At only a handful of seconds past a minute in length, it is far too short but still provides a tsunami of contagion and energy to exhaust and thrill without reservation. The sigh of disappointment at its brief tenure is soon forgotten once the clunky riffs and anthemic tenacity of Poison Jam steps up to ignite ears and energies all over again. There is an open familiarity to the song yet it matters little as its catchy devilry embraces body and emotions with insatiable energy and creative appetite, a mix driving the release as a whole.

600 Miles opens on a delicious acoustic enticing next, guitar and voice an immediately engaging proposal backed by the percussive and broader sonic imagination brewing away within the energetic croon of a song. Though it does not quite generate the more heightened reactions of its predecessors, the song leaves satisfaction full and appetite greedier, wants fed with gusto by Say My Name and the album’s title track. The first of the two is another acoustically opened encounter but straight away has rawness to it, a scowl of sorts which bursts into a fiery and aggressively melodic provocation. Its successor soon outshines it though, its opening dance of once more acoustically bred riffs carrying a Latin tempting which in turn ignites a voracious and welcoming tempest of compelling hooks, anthemic vocal harmonies, and irresistible nineties inspired persuasion. The song is a glorious rampage which alone sums up all you need to know as to why Gone By Friday makes for a thoroughly fulfilling feel-good proposal.

The album closes with The Story So Forgotten, a track like the last which feels like an old friend in familiarity but a brand new acquaintance in sound and temptation. It’s increasingly building and almost volatile anthemic intensity brings Quarter Life Crisis to a mighty conclusion, followed by another sigh that it is all over before fingers twitch and submit to pressing play again.

If the likes of Goldfinger, The Bouncing Souls, and Blink 182 whet the appetite then Gone By Friday have a treat for you, but equally they offer plenty to entice and please all pop punk fans within Quarter Life Crisis, so off you trot…

Quarter Life Crisis is available now @ http://gonebyfriday.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/gonebyfriday

RingMaster 01/04/2015

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Come The Spring: Seven For A Secret

Come The Spring

    Seven For A Secret is the debut release from UK band Come The Spring, a six track mini-album which openly ripples with enterprise. It is a release to which recognition of its potency and accomplished craft in songwriting and sound is easy to state but despite all its strengths there is a feeling of lost opportunity with the band failing to ignite any strong passions with its presence.

Hailing from Brighton, Come The Spring has drawn plenty of attention and fervour towards themselves since forming in the middle of 2012. With members who have the strong experiences of being in bands like Rydell and My So Called Life previously, and also sharing stages with the likes of Hot Water Music, Greenday, Nofx, Texas is the Reason, and Braid, the quintet hit the ground running and soon drew the attention of Engineer Records who release this their debut. Musically the band craft a sound which is rich in the essences of bands such as Hot Water Music, Fightstar, The Gaslight Anthem and more, that possibly the reason the release did not ignite the fires inside which one was expecting considering the brewing excitement around the band, their sound having a too strong a similarity to others.

Conditions opens things up strongly with its initial sonic embrace soon joined by firm beats and an eager wash of striking guitar comethespringcaresses. As the rich and expressive vocals make their presence known, an infectious hook veins the track to help ensure the song is a lingering pleasure. Into its stride the melodic flames of the guitar and rich tones of the bass standout along with the vocals to enthral and satisfy making an impressive and promising start to the release.

The following Northern Star contrasts the keen energy of its predecessor with a restrained and emotive gait. It is a gentle encounter with a certain passion which brings crescendos within the expressive breath of the song. The bass with its melancholic and exhilarating downcast voice steers the stormy atmosphere and reflection of song and its heart into a compelling company for ear and thoughts. As its moves towards its climax, the song shifts and raises the heat with good variety and invention and across its length evolves into a magnetic long-term treat.

The following Patching the Cracks Doesn’t Make it Foolproof and Readbeforeyouwatch both offer capturing elements which entice and infect the passions but equally neither can sustain the effect as they employ familiar underwhelming loud whispers to wrap around the stirring moments. Despite that the two tracks do hold attention and thoughts firmly in their grasp during their company and it is only after that they disappear from view and memory too easily for the fullest of satisfaction. Again as in all songs, they do not leave the listener short on skilled musicianship and passionate songwriting and again help to breed a strong sense and promise that the band is moving on to major things and releases in the future.

      The State isn’t Important as Long as we’re One is the weakest song on the release, a track which passes by without inspiring any real reaction though again it is sculpted and presented impressively and makes a decent enough lead in to the excellent closer Statues. On military driven drum recruitment and angular guitar riffs the song strikes up sparks of real pleasure with its contagious energy and melodic beckoning and ensures as it began that the album ends on a high.

Come The Spring seems to be tagged as post hardcore but stand more as a melodic punk/alternative rock band, though they do recruit other strong flavours to their creative cause. Seven For A Secret is an appealing debut from a band which you can only see unleashing some very notable releases ahead. This album is not quite one itself but for an introduction easily inspires the wish to keenly investigate future efforts whilst in the now makes for an enjoyable to spend your time.

http://www.facebook.com/ComeTheSpring

6.5/10

RingMaster 22/03/2013

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