Yorkshire Rats -Sea of Souls

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It is with thanks to Carl of the excellent Chalkman Video that UK punk rock ‘n’ rollers Yorkshire Rats and their debut album Sea of Souls recently and firmly hit our radar. He gave us the heads up on the Leeds quartet having recently shot a video with the guys, and led us to one of those albums which lights ears initially but equally simmers away in the psyche to emerge as one thrilling riot of temptation.

Yorkshire Rats began in 2004, formed by Don Mercy once of Abrasive Wheels and Billy No Mates. Soon into their aggressive stride the band subsequently released, in the words of their bio, “a rabble-rousing 7” and a hooligan fuelled EP.” 2006 saw the band support to great success Rancid but then go on an extended hiatus. They have now returned fuelled to the top with contagious rock ‘n’ roll tenacity, punk confrontation, and potent lyrical incitements, all found to great effect on debut album Sea of Souls. Consisting of Kurt Alexander, Matt Lee, and Chris Furness alongside Mercy, Yorkshire Rats confront, incite, and thrill across thirteen tracks of bracing punk ‘n’ roll antagonism.

There is an instant stirring up of ears and appetite with album opener Hurry Up and Wait, the rolling heavily jabbing enticement of the drums swift persuasion. Raw guitar caresses need little prompting to add their lures, or the swagger lined bassline which jumps in at the same time. It is a feisty and contagious uniting topped by expressive vocals with a delivery which is part challenge, part invitation. The song is the kind of attention grabber all albums should start with, a song revealing the heart of a band’s sound and encounter’s intent with anthemic guile.

sos album artThe following Glory Days opens on a juicy stroking of slim but pungent riffs before opening up into a dusty rock stroll still driven by the initial hook lined guitar bait. The track does not quite have the bite of its predecessor but compensates with a catchiness and blaze of sonic enterprise which again has an early appetite fed well before making way for the album’s title track. Sea of Souls shows a whisper of the Californian punk influences which also colour the band’s sound, whilst the track itself gently but firmly embraces ears and thoughts with infectious rock sounds and lyrical suggestiveness.

The pair of Everyday and Mary Comes First offer fresh variety to an already flavoursome encounter, the former infusing a Flogging Molly lilt to its guitar endeavour whilst rhythms cast an anthemic baiting and the latter with a smell of Tom Petty to its riffery, in a striking landscape of emotive contemplation and rock ‘n’ roll contagion. Both songs have feet and emotions fired up, the first especially incendiary with its magnetic mix of flavours and almost predatory hooks, but as great as they are, they find themselves shaded by the Green Day-esque Lawful Civil Rights. Guitars and bass bring even stronger glimpses of the Cali scene whilst spinning their own anthemic and addictive proposal around punchy beats and expressive vocal reflection.

The opening dark and predatory bass resonance bringing Struck Down into view is one of those invitations only the deaf can resist, especially once guitars add their sonic scythes to the portentous air. Erupting in a tempest of rhythmic aggression and hostile attitude driven by belligerent vocals, the track weaves in strains of psychobilly and blues tinting into its punk roar, creating one of the most momentous and memorable exploits upon the album.

The calm and inviting balladry of You Don’t Know Anything entices ears and emotions next before Only the Rich Men stomps and rumbles with its raucously engaging sounds. Each again shows a different colour to the Yorkshire Rats sound, not major side steps but hues which reveal the strong variety to the bands creativity and tone.

No Freedom as the previous song is another rock ‘n’ roll romp, but with more rigour in its energy and infectiousness in its punk devilry. Rhythms brew up an inescapable slavery for feet and emotions whilst riffs and vocals blaze over deviously addictive hooks. Though not quite the final song it still makes for a mighty finale before Sea of Souls closes with a trio of excellent acoustic demos of Mary Comes First, Only the Rich Men, and the title track.

You cannot quite call Yorkshire Rats a new band, even with their prolonged absence, but they take ears with a freshness which makes their debut album play like a starting point for the band. A base for bigger and just as enjoyable things to breed from we suspect.

Sea of Souls is out now via Indelirium Records @ http://indeliriumrecords.com/releases-carousel/idr067-yorkshire-rats-sea-of-souls/ and most online stores.

http://www.YorkshireRats.com/     https://www.facebook.com/yorkshirerats

RingMaster 26/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Come The Spring – Revive EP

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   Come The Spring, come the roar, certainly on the evidence of the UK band’s new EP Revive, a creative bellow which simply ignites ears and emotions. The six track encounter is a tempest of alternative and punk rock, a feisty and impassioned encounter which from a decent but strong start emerges as one fiery and memorable proposition. The EP comes with a snarling attitude and aggressive nature but around its confrontational jaws, band and songs unveil a resourceful and melodic tenacity which is as alluring as the intensity within both is ferocious.

Brighton bred Come The Spring formed in 2012, its line-up including previous members of bands like Rydell. It was not long before locally and subsequently across the UK, that the band’s live presence was earning them a potent reputation and loyal following, The sharing of stages with artists such as Hot Water Music, Green Day, Braid, Texas is the Reason, Appleseed Cast, Piebald, No FX, Samiam and numerous more only accelerated their ascent and reinforced their reputation for having a striking and uncompromisingly stirring sound. Released via Engineer Records, Revive is the band’s new assault on a broader attention, an encounter easy to see earning rewarding success.

EP opener 24 makes an ear pleasing and imaginative introduction to the release, its initial stroke of guitar the prelude to an emotive melodic caress and potent rhythmic enticement. It is welcoming coaxing also carrying a rawer edge, a provocative texture just as keen in the swiftly impressing tones of vocalist Sam Craddock. The song slips into an increasingly rigorous stroll whilst a volatile energy and causticity brews in the heart of vocals and the expanding sound. The snarling bassline is a constant intimidation in this but it is the following blaze of angst in Craddock’s delivery which finally ignites the air, expelling agonized tones against the magnetically radiate enterprise of guitarists David Gamage and Simon Goodrick. The track provides a highly satisfying incitement, the bass of Mark Wilkinson almost persistently carnivorous as it backs the rampantly skilled swings of drummer Jamie Donbroski, but lacks that final spark which would turn an undoubted impressive proposal into a great one.

The brief chilled ambience and sonic ire of the following Winterlude is the same, an accomplished and intriguing offering but pleasing rather than exciting before things really kick up a gear in CTS.Revive.CDcoverappeal and invention. Memory and Resonance is next, launching another deliciously throaty bassline and fiercely expressive vocals at the listener from its first breath. To this guitars swiftly add their vibrant and spirited endeavour to the shadowed heart of the increasingly gripping post hardcore seeded track too. It all breeds an anthemic potency which was less pronounced in the first pair of songs and gains even greater contagion from the next up Air That I’m Breathing onwards. The fourth track of Revive is a wonderfully turbulent yet melodically engrossing tempest of emotion and craft, a tempting fusion of alternative and melodic rock with punk antagonism, and another rich roar that inescapably gets under the skin and into the passions. The EP started in fine fettle but by this point is really revelling in a fresh creative prowess and the potential of one increasingly impressing band.

Maps comes next and from a charmingly subdued and melodically evocative start, courted by great bass sculpted shadows, explores an intimate and increasingly expansive bellow of emotion and sound. The guitars flame with sonic flair and inventive enterprise whilst vocally once more Craddock shows the power of his voice and expression. It is hard to day that the track allows a breath between the more voracious characters of the songs around it such its intense passion, but it is fair to say that it is a less agitated storm amidst its predecessor and the closing might of Home, Sick and Tired. The final track has the biggest punk heart and hostility of all the songs but is still unafraid to exploit the rich hues of searing melodies as it provides a dramatic and thrilling, fully rounded creative storm.

It and Air That I’m Breathing steal the show, suggesting the future capability of the band to create inspirational songs and templates for fierce rock ‘n’ roll is ripening nicely. They are tracks strongly backed by the rest of the collection of highly enjoyable songs though, so much so that Revive leaves only excited and impressed thoughts on Come The Spring.

The Revive EP is available digitally now and on CD from on 22nd March 2015 via Engineer Records

https://www.facebook.com/ComeTheSpring3

RingMaster 13/03/2015

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Cléo – Pinball Machine

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A song which leaps through ears with all the energy and excitement of a carnival, Pinball Machine is one of those singles which simply gets under the skin. The new release from rock popper Cléo, the track with its tenacious punk like character and full on fun attitude is not necessarily a brand new adventure for the pop world but certainly makes for an enjoyable and captivating escapade.

Cléo is a Brazilian bred singer/songwriter/ actress/dancer who now resides in London. The list of inspirations on her creativity and music is long and includes the likes of Madonna, Cyndi Lauper, No Doubt, Pat Benatar, Britney Spears, Spice Girls, Green Day, Foo Fighters, and Linkin Park. These are flavours at times openly colouring her shapely sound but equally, and certainly with Pinball Machine, Cléo has her own rich vein of distinctive creativity lighting up her music too. 2013 saw the release of the extremely well-received Unlucky Girl EP, an encounter converting more fans, media, and pre-assuming critics to the visually and aurally vibrant presence of Cléo. Now Pinball Machine is poised to stir up ears and attention once again and such its charismatic and mischievous enterprise, it is hard to imagine it luring a new rush of interest.

Cléo is the initial temptation in the single, her raucous call the spark to short choppy riffs, jabbing beats, and a thickly provocative bassline. It is a potent coaxing with a great almost predatory nature to it, an edge leading ears and appetite into the swiftly looming frisky chorus where harmony soaked vocals and melodies bounce with energetic eagerness.

As it continues to flirt with its more shadowy side as well as magnetic festivity there is that constant, almost Gwen Stefani like, familiarity to the song yet tempering that, Pinball Machine offers subtle twists of attitude and latent aggression which turns the offering into something personal and invitingly individual to Cléo. Quite simply Pinball Machine is a persistently alluring proposition from a lady we can expect to hear much more of in the future.

Pinball Machine is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/pinball-machine-single/id959356901#

http://www.cleospage.com/

RingMaster 01/03/2015

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This Legend – It’s In The Streets

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With the pedigree of its members, expectations for the debut album from This Legend were demanding but also wanting to be seriously surprised. After a strong but underwhelming start, the LA quartet not only fed all wants whilst utilising familiar pop punk ingredients in a series of relentlessly contagious encounters, but sculpted a continuous adventure of unique and gripping twists across the release. The result is an album which, like an old friend instinctively and continually ignites the sweet spot of desires of the genre whilst creating brand new and captivating temptations. It’s In The Streets is a gem of a proposition which does surprise and find its own character but also provides that recognisable essence which turns every song into an instantaneously bordering on anthemic lure.

Formed by ex- Yellowcard members Longineu Parsons III (drums) and Ben Harper (guitar), the former leaving the band earlier this year and reuniting with his friend who left their former outfit nine years earlier, This Legend was soon bulging with experience and talent as the pair brought in vocalist/guitarist Chris Castillo (Stanley and the Search), and bassist Steven Neufeld (Hey Mike!) to complete the line-up. Signing with Cyber Tracks, an LA based record label owned by El Hefe (of NOFX) and his wife Jen Abeyta, the band soon set about recording their debut with producer Sam Pura (The Story So Far, State Champs). In what has already been a busy year for the new band, This Legend now unveil its opening shot and you can only surmised that the attention and workload is only going to get more hectic as its virulent charms spreads their pleasure.

As mentioned the album did not exactly blow ears and thoughts away at first though opener Lyrics With My Pen certainly strides in on a rhythmic temptation which instantly grips attention. It is a dramatic start which loses its potency ruffas the song relaxes into an accomplished and confident stroll of warm riffs and spicy hooks stroked by the excellent vocals of Castillo. The track does little wrong to be fair but equally just provides what so many other genre offerings seem to, something enjoyable and engaging but nothing out of the ordinary, even with the impressive craft of Parsons III pounding away throughout. Subsequently though the track turns out to be an appetiser for greater things which are hinted at by the following Feeling Like I Should and fully triggered from Holiday From Crazy onwards. The first of the pair is a warm and radiant persuasion, a lively croon where vocals and guitar provide a colourful emotive portrait from which the chorus finds a rich infection to spark the imagination. It is the little twists of chords and hooks though which intrigue and ignite the song; elements explored even more from hereon in as its successor takes over. The third song flies at ears with melodies and rhythms pumped and creative tenacity aflame. There is a spicy mix of early Green Day and Simple Plan to the song but the rich hues of sonic adventure and rhythmic drama are the riveting and ear exciting endeavour which makes a great song into something special.

The album’s title track with its emotive depth and vocal expression thrills next, rhythms intimidating bait within the rawer but no less seductive landscape of the energetic and controlled blaze. Again there is a dramatic edge to vocals and sound which elevates every syllable and note into something unpredictable, fresh, and exhilarating; the track a swift peak emulating its predecessor but in turn matched and exceeded by the volatile stomp that is My City. Wonderfully exhausting and inescapably contagious, the track is a highly charged punk antagonist flooded with fiery melodic hooks and teases within another knee weakening, passions lighting rhythmic assault. To seal its dominance on the album, it also provides a mouth-watering change of gait and hook clad predation, a twist which actually rings a bell of undefined influences but puts the icing on a flavoursome chunk of pop punk.

     Skin & Bones comes next and provides an impassioned stroll within bracing riff laced scenery speared by again perfectly barbed hooks, Castillo especially impressive and engrossing vocally, whilst Life Pushes Hard dances with ears through tangy melodies over a feisty shuffle of rhythms and bass temptation. Both tracks keep ears and appetite greedy, the first especially raising a new hunger before the pair of I Deserve Better and Moving On add their creative spoils to the feverish revelry. The first of the two excels with its spiky riffs and wiry grooves and the second through its tantalising weave of emotive melodies and vocal reflection. Though it lacks the extra something to flirt with the passions, the song’s fresh enterprise and skilled structure only leaves satisfaction grinning.

A highly agreeable if safe offering comes next with Regrets, a song which does not venture too far from pop punk limits, unlike other songs on the album, but with vocals and rhythms especially finding essences of the distinct hues veining previous songs it unreservedly pleases before the urgently catchy Get Fast takes over to cast its own feet inciting contagion. Its rawer tone makes a tasty complement to the breezier breath of the previous song and sets up the aural theatre of final track Josh Lights A Fire perfectly, the closing song if not quite in sound definitely having that dramatic essence which Fall Out Boy embrace.

The song is a terrific end to an excellent encounter, a release which stands fully alone from the past adventures of This Legend’s personnel. Actually It’s In The Streets suggests that the band has the potential to eclipse their band’s previous endeavours, time will tell but more treats like this will go down nicely.

It’s In The Streets is available now via Cyber Tracks @ http://www.cyber-tracks.com/store/

http://thislegend.com

RingMaster 20/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

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Gorilla Punch Radio – Self Titled

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Embracing a wealth of rock spices and varied flavours, Gorilla Punch Radio on the evidence of their self-titled debut album, tries and succeeds in making every song a slice of impacting revelry whether they are crooning the emotions or making irresistible incitements to feet. Offering ten tracks which leave lingering impressions with their tenaciously crafted and presented exploits, band and album makes for one attention grabbing, ear pleasing introduction.

Hailing from Leeds, the quartet of vocalist James, guitarist Boothy, bassist Sam, and drummer Paul, from the little you can find out about the band online, formed the band at least three years ago and have certainly honed their sound over time to a thoroughly magnetic proposition. Taking inspirations from the likes of Kasabian, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Foo Fighters, Coldplay, James Brown, Radiohead, Green Day, Muse, Nirvana, and Michael Jackson and more, many which can be heard as spices within the album, Gorilla Punch Radio parade a maturity of musicianship and songwriting which suggests experience and definitely imagination is ripe in the band.

The album opens with the single Bragging Rights, a storming stomp of a song which alone has sparked an eager interest in the band. Fiery riffs warm ears right away before the equally appealing vocals join firm rhythms in building up 884477_505528759557315_2743931573666742889_oan attention awakening start to the song. In full swagger, the track finds a blues breath to its melodic endeavour and garage rock urgency to its stride, infecting the imagination and emotions like a horny mix of The Stones and The Killers. It is a richly contagious start to the album ensuring appetite and satisfaction is at a high ready for the following adventures.

Pick Yourself Up, the second single from the album, comes next and instantly swings a mellow tone over the senses, acoustic enticing and again the impressive vocals of James caressing ears with reflective expression. The song soon lifts its feet for the feistier engagement of the chorus whilst the earthy yet elegant croon of the song continues to embrace thoughts. The song is a gripping proposition which gains strength with every listen, much like the album. With bulging beats and group harmonies pushing its climax to greater potency, the excellent track makes way for the melodic rock stroll of I’ve Got Your Back. Though the song does not quite match its predecessors in presence and magnetism, it is a lively proposition blessed with a jazz funk jangle and sultry flames of guitar but it is it’s the rousing quality which the band instil in all their tracks, even the ballads, which steals the imagination.

Starting with a burst of sixties garage rock, thoughts of The Monkees swiftly hinting, Burn this City to the Ground erupts in a blaze of raw rock ‘n’ roll with hooks and riffs creating a scintillating tapestry. The track stands like a union between the more mod like rock of The Who and Secret Affair and the stronger blues bred enterprise of a Bad Company. The track continues to twist and turn with relish in its invention and passion in its expressive colour. The bass provides its own sublime throaty temptation whilst the magnetic guitar craft of Boothy simply ignites the track further for another major moment of the album.

Both Shadows and Follow You wind things down a little, certainly against the previous treat, but each immerses the listener into scenery of down to earth life and emotion. The first of the two glides with another impressive acoustic seduction aligned to reserved yet pungent rhythms which punctuate the evocative vocals and their lyrical narrative. There is an intimacy to the track, as many on the release, which draws in thoughts and connections. The second of the pair has that same charm as it bewitches from the start with a slow brooding expression and sound before erupting in a folk seeded romp which swiftly has feet and emotions waltzing with its punchy persuasion. A song which you could not dislike if you tried, it adds another string to the creative bow of Gorilla Punch Radio and texture to the album.

As does the excellent funk festivity of Tease, a sultry boogie primed for personal and dance-floor use. With a gnarly tone to the bass as flirtatious as the melodic vivacity and Red Hot Chili Peppers like rhythmic agitation, the track is an addiction waiting to prey on body and soul. It is a powerful weapon for the album emulated by the smouldering melodic flight of Breathe, its glowing melodies and enticing vocal harmonies absorbing hues in a riveting weave of emotional and sonic exploration.

The album is brought to a close by firstly the climactic power of Song for the Underdog, a track with thumping rhythms courting a compelling anthem of strenuous riffs and incendiary hooks. It is a glorious call to ears and passions, the best track on the album and incredibly virulent in every individual casting of the band’s lines as well as their combined explosive ingenuity. It epitomises the band’s songwriting, huge hooks and binding grooves locked into expressive and intricate invention. It is followed by Jane, the song another mesmeric ballad where vocals and guitar simply shine. To be honest the big sinew busting songs from the band have the edge for personal tastes but there is no escaping the elegance and beauty of their balladry or its persistent suasion.

Gorilla Punch Radio is a band you are destined to come across time and time again, as they can only get even better which is a truly exciting prospect after the impressive triumph of their album.

Gorilla Punch Radio is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/gorilla-punch-radio/id888458114?ls=1

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Gorilla-Punch-Radio/126158307494364?ref=h

9/10

RingMaster 28/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Call It Off – Liars

by Nastassia Winge

Liars is not going to set new standards for punk rock but with its proudly romping pop punk veined with spicy essences of power pop, the latest EP from Dutch rockers Call It Off is certainly a refreshingly enjoyable encounter. It brings five easily accessible tracks to the ears, songs giving feet and voices an invigorated work out through anthemic urgency and melodic infectiousness. Liars may not drive you to a rooftop to roar about its creators, besides you will be too busy dancing, but it easily ignites an eager appetite and attention for the Eindhoven quartet.

Barely a year old, Call It Off are four musicians who unite with plenty of experience earned playing in different bands over previous years. Pulled together by a mutual love of punk rock, chatting leading to actually writing music together and subsequently the birth of the band last September, the foursome of vocalists/guitarists Maurice Bolier and Adrian DeLange, bassist Lesley Klaverdijk, and drummer Sergei Christian made their first mark with debut EP Lovers late 2013. A clean strike across the bows of attention, the release made a good base from which Liars has confidently moved the band’s songwriting and sound on. Its songs are short and punchy but come with a fluidity and swagger which capture ears and imagination like returning friends, the band’s influences an open colour across the release it is fair to say.

Those inspirations are unavoidable from the first moments of opener Famous Last Words, potent spicery of Green Day and Blink 182 a clear flavouring though there is plenty more to the songs than a cloning of past protagonists. callitoff_liarsFrom its first swipe of rhythms and riffs, from which a teasing melodic tendril wakes ears potently, the song strolls with melodies swinging from sturdy rhythms and jangling riffs aligned to appealing vocals. The first song also holds a rawer edge like a mix of Story Of The Year and NOFX, though this only glances over the rich melodic and sonic enterprise rippling within the highly pleasing opener.

The strong start is soon shown a pair of heels by the excellent Burning Bridges. From its first roar the song roams the awakened appetite with again jangle clad riffs and a great coaxing of power pop harmonies, the track potently contagious from its first breath. The dual vocals work even better on the second track whilst the moody bass tone delivered by Klaverdijk comes with a shadowed mischief to alone entrance the imagination. That Green Day reference is even stronger here but adds to the instant connection of the song, its simple but expressive invitation impossible to resist adding your own personal attributes, or in some of our cases, disasters to.

     Stuck With You has a slightly more reserved urgency yet still rocks like a hound in heat with infection soaked hooks and melodies. That strong whiff of Billie Joe Armstrong and co continues to brew a strong yet captivating smell whilst there are moments where the song offers small tinges of Hagfish to its sharp hooks and underlying rhythmic antagonism. As all the songs it is like an old returning friend more than a new encounter, a feeling which stops the track leaving thoughts awe struck but undoubtedly has them riveted and fully involved in its raucous revelry, a lure just as addictive in the stomp that is I Don’t Wanna. As anthemic as you can get, the track simply provokes the passions and body from start to finish, providing a punk bred festival of adrenaline and passion.

The EP closes with Call Me, a track with wandering melodic adventure and emotive textures. Driven by a spine of firm rhythms aligned to a throaty bassline, the song flirts with ears through evocative enterprise from the guitars and the fine blend of vocals as it sways and rolls across the ears with arguably a more adventurous seduction than found of the other tracks. It makes for a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable encounter.

As mentioned, Liars is not quite a release to set punk rock on fire but it definitely nudges it firmly to the presence and rich potential of Call It Off.

The Liars EP is available now via White Russian Records @ http://callitoff.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/callitoffNL

http://www.callitoff.nl/

8/10

RingMaster 18/07/2014

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Gaz Patterson – Dodging Bullets

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Following up his impressive and thoroughly enjoyable debut album King Of You, UK one man pop punk/power pop protagonist Gaz Patterson returns with Dodging Bullets, an eleven track romp to light up ears. Bred from the same stock as its successor but showing a new strength of maturity amongst the riot of hooks and cast of melodic temptation, the new release pushes the already strong emergence of the man up numerous notches.

Hailing from Bedlington in Northumberland, Patterson again keeps within existing boundaries with Dodging Bullets. As with the last album, songs hold a familiarity which ensures they make friends long before their hearts are fully spilled. Once more it is hard to avoid making comparisons to modern Green Day and Blink 182, but at times there is a strong Ramones seeding to songs which offers a vibrant and anthemic lure. As the first album, Dodging Bullets is not without a few things which need honing, but for richly pleasing, feet grabbing pop infused punk songs, it fills all needs.

The release opens with Into The Sun and a sparkling of keys swiftly joined by hefty swipes of guitar and rhythms. It is a potent start which takes little time before settling into a wide gaited stride of thumping beats and enticing riffs speared by a similarly alluring tidy hook. The track is an anthemic beast, guitars and bass sculpting a frame for imagination and emotions to latch onto whilst the punctuation of drum swipes just intensifies the bait on offer. It is not a majorly dramatic start or song but one which hits the sweet spot persistently, especially with the tempting melodic enterprise streaming with variation from Patterson’s guitar. With the man providing every aspect of the album, it is easy to see and eagerly appreciate his skills and talent, as well as his ability to write ridiculously catchy songs.

The first track does offer the first hint of the only element which off and on just misses the mark though, the vocals. It is not Patterson’s lead attack, that only recruiting ears and attention with ease but the production around his voice which leads to questions, it bringing a hollow resonance to the delivery which does not fit easily in the arms of the sounds. It is a niggle more than an issue but something may be worth thinking about as is the additional backing vocals and harmonies behind the man which are a little hit and miss across the album and often do not need to be there such the power of his lead. Nevertheless it does not stop the opener from lighting an appetite for the album into which the following Devil Girl sparks a wave of greed. The track is a gem, vocals and riffs immediately rubbing invitingly on ears before the song bursts into a boisterous rampage. Guitars and drums lead the way with an irresistible revelry whilst the bass adds a throaty depth to the mix but it is when keys suddenly rein things in for a brief melodic breath that the songwriting of Patterson shows its growing confidence and potency.

Both Bitter Sweet and Hold On keep things rocking, the first pulling on the reins of urgency compared to the last song but still cantering with keen endeavour and tempting riffs aligned to infectious hooks whilst the second adds a caress of acoustic guitar to a key sculpted melodic swagger with appealing touches of discord. Neither matches the strength and pull of the first pair of songs but easily bind ears in an appealing and imaginative hold before the might of the title track takes over. Thrusting a flame of hard core inspired rock ‘n’ roll into power pop contagion, the track makes a gripping start with a strong coaxing which only increases as guitars slip into intriguing grooves and melodic twists whilst rhythms emerge with an unpredictable nature to make the song an enthralling and fascinating charge.

The acoustic balladry at the core of the next up Barely Believe is a decent proposition but lacks the spark of other songs, though the strings bring a great evocative croon to the song, whilst Nothing Sacred from a blaze of riffs and sonic suasion shapes another anthem of searing melodies and barbed hooks to snare thoughts and emotions. The drums roam around with agitated enterprise whilst the bass for arguably the first time finds the growl and potency which graced the first album. The vocal production does the song no favours it has to be said but cannot prevent it igniting passions with its storm of stirring sounds and impressive musicianship. As so many of the songs it is like meeting an old buddy, familiar and unsurprising but very, very welcome.

Our Movie is another which just misses heights set, but again it is that production element which defuses its sinewed driven stroll of addictive hooks and enticing riffs aligned to exhausting incendiary rhythms; a mix in a different less intensive guise which marks out the next in line, Too Far From The Truth. Featuring excellent guest backing vocals from Sam Gibson and a great sultry twang to the melodic persuasion of the guitar, the song is a striking and increasingly virulent slice of potent pop rock. Of all the songs on the album, it is the one which from a strong start just seems to get better and linger longer; simply a vivacious song to heat up the summer.

The album closes with firstly the senses cradling Promises Into Yesterday with its emotive weave of acoustic guitar and shadowed basslines within a heated web of guitar passion and synth expression, and lastly We Are We Are. The closer is the anthem of the album, vocals immediately filling ears and imagination before a gentle but energetic shuffle of devilish rhythms, roving basslines, and melodic toxicity combine for a richly pleasing conclusion.

     Dodging Bullets probably does not realise all of the potential found in Patterson’s first album but certainly it brings a potent evolution of plenty that was offered there whilst adding further exciting twists and promise to the mix. For imaginative but enjoyably undemanding pop punk, Patterson and his album is a recommended romp.

Dodging Bullets is out on the 1st July.

http://gazpatterson.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/GazPattersonMusic

8/10

RingMaster 27/06/2014

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