Scorching Winter – Victim

scorching-winter_RingMasterReview

They may have started out with a hard rock sound and be tagged as such still but Australian band Scorching Winter confirm on new album Victim that their music works from a much broader palette of flavours. Strands from progressive and heavy rock to gothic and melodic metal are woven into a sound and release which may not always be the most unique but is persistently fresh and marks the Melbourne quintet out from the female-fronted rock crowd.

Formed in 2012, Scorching Winter released their first pair of singles, Leap and One You Left Behind the following year building on their awareness earning success with subsequent single The Change. 2015 saw the release of the band’s first EP Peripheral and the first signs of a broader body and imagination to the Scorching Winter sound, an evolution in full swing within Victim.

Victim is an eight track concept album about “a girl who is raped and beaten by a group of men but was saved by a demon who gives her powers to get revenge. However, nothing ever comes for free as she would later find out.” Divided into eight chapters, it opens up with The Six Headed Beast and an innocence graced keys cast melody. A portentous atmosphere brews around it, perpetually growing as the narrative unfolds and rhythms bring their predatory threat. In full flow as the chase is on, riffs and beats impose and trespass the senses, venomous melodic strands of guitar adding to the fear carrying drama led by those rapacious rhythms amidst which, a bass threateningly grumbles. The swiftly impressing tones of Konstantina Papadimitriou temper the darkness but act as a uncomfortable spotlight on the transgression within the song. Ending as gently as it starts but this time soaked in angelic melancholy and pain, the track is an excellent start to the album, a lingering moment which sets the atmosphere for the whole release.

art_RingMasterReviewOn Hands and Knees follows bringing demonic support as the guitar of Rafael Katigbak casts another suggestive web over ears backed by the dramatic touch and beauty of Natalie Bellio’s keys. The bass of Glenn Treasure adds its heavy emotion to the emerging song as the beats of Nick James land with firm restraint, Papadimitriou’s voice and words echoing the despondency and also the hint of a fight back beginning to be nurtured within the girl. With rising crescendos of rigour and inner anger, the track blossoms into a tapestry of melodic and emotive enterprise, its varied textures bringing new essences to spark the imagination before From the Ashes realises that hinted at defiant heart with tenacious grooves and senses resonating rhythms. The infectious melodic prowess of voice and guitar make an easy recruitment of ears as keys imaginatively sigh and the bass prowls. Light and dark, submissive and aggressive, the track is a snare of creative drama providing a new high point for the album.

Through the predacious cinematic fight back of The Hunt and the reflective repose of Hiding in the Shadows, album and story continues to entice ears and inspire the imagination; the array of inventive textures and flavours involved in the two songs alone as potent and impressing as the instrumentation involved in bringing powerful songwriting to life. The second of the two is especially impressive, almost majestic in its character and composition to eclipse those around it.

Wrath follows, demonic tones opening the piece within another dark climate before the track uncages a consuming surf of riffs and rhythms; venom seeping from every texture within the metal bred tempest as the melodic beauty of Papadimitriou incites the senses. As its protagonist is nagged by the devil, so the senses are by the surging body of the song with its constant tide skilfully ebbing and flowing with variable intensity. As its predecessor, the track is creative theatre as lyrically enthralling as it is musically striking.

The album is completed by firstly Devil in the Mirror, another suggestively cinematic piece with Bond/cold war espionage spiced melodies sold with acoustic beauty, and finally My Gift, My Curse, where acceptance of the girl’s two faced fate is potently cast by keys and guitar alone. With a Celtic touch to its already enthralling character, the song is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable encounter.

Though it is a striking proposition on the first couple of listens, Victim only grows and blossoms overtime. It is not the perfect release, what is, but any issues soon pale against its open qualities and an imagination within the band as ripe as the sounds it inspires. Victim is a formidably promising debut album from a band which can only ascend to bigger and bolder heights.

Victim is out now across most online stores and @ https://scorchingwinter.bandcamp.com/album/victim-2

https://www.facebook.com/ScorchingWinter/   http://www.scorchingwinter.com/

Check out our interview with guitarist @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/10/14/beauty-and-the-thorn-exploring-scorching-winter/

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Great Adventure – Pretty Lies

The Great Adventure_RingMaster Review

Pretty Lies is the new single from Russian gothic metallers The Great Adventure, a band which maybe is unknown to you right now but taking their new offering alone as a suggestion, has the real potential to become a much broadly known and devoured proposition.

Hailing from Omsk and formed in the January of 2014, The Great Adventure consists of vocalist/keyboardist Christina Engels, guitarist Kesha Larionov, and bassist Alexey Danilov. Their sound fuses gothic and symphonic metal in a captivating, if not yet majorly unique, tapestry of resourceful aggression and melodic imagination. Aligned to that is the feistily alluring voice of Engels, a siren-esque tempting which coaxes the theatre and emotion at the heart of lyrics and song into a tempestuous roar of sound equipped with harsher backing vocal incitement. It is a mix which has seen previous singles and the To Begin To See The Truth EP well received; a success sure to be eclipsed by Pretty Lies, the band’s finest offering to date.

Featuring Ilya Sinitski, the vocalist of post-hardcore band Island Of Skylines, Pretty Lies needs mere seconds to stir ears with its swift wall of thick riffs and muscularly swung beats. Keys are a just as early and potent coaxing as they lay a melodic haze upon the attention sparking entrance. With the mellow and rich tones of Engels’ voice matching the lure of her increasingly inventive and resourceful keys, the song poetically swarms over the senses embracing hues of inspirations of bands like Dream Theater and Within Temptation to its creative breast. It is a skilled and potent persuasion which gets bolder and more voracious as it blossoms, the raw tones of Sinitski spilling causticity across the engaging scenery and the guitar of Larionov spinning lattices of sonic craft and enterprise.

Pretty Lies is the maturest songwriting and weave of sound and textures from the band yet and even if major originality is still in the waiting, the thoroughly enjoyable song shows that The Great Adventure is heading in the right impressive direction.

Pretty Lies is available now.

RingMaster 26/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more independent exploration check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Rusty Pacemaker – Ruins

Rusty Hessell_RingMaster Review

The first listen of Ruins, the new album from Austrian project Rusty Pacemaker, definitely caught ears and thoughts by surprise but laid the seeds to an increasing understanding and appetite for the artist and release’s particular uniqueness. It has grown with time into a compelling and fascinating proposition, one with aspects which still challenge slightly the success of the release, but an encounter which never lacks the ability to intrigue and thickly satisfy.

The band is the solo project of the Lanzenkirchen hailing Rusty Hessel, a musician who began making his own music in 2003. Heavily influenced by Quorthon of Bathory, Rusty enlisted drummer Franz Löchinger to play on his first album Blackness and White Light which was released in the October of 2010 on his own Solanum Records, a union which is repeated on the new album. Within a few months of its release, Rusty was writing new tracks for its successor and with preproduction finished in 2012, the Markus Stock mixed and mastered Ruins began emerging; its recording completed last year and release coming a few short weeks back. It is an encounter which commands attention and sparks the imagination, and even with a ‘flaw ‘or two, only leaves a contented appetite and certain captivation in its wake.

Rusty Pacemaker Ruins_RingMaster Review   Ruin’s title track is the first engagement on ears and thoughts, opening with a tantalising melodic caress of guitar. It is melancholic yet vibrant and already from that stroking of strings, a gothic air kisses the senses. That whisper only increases as sounds and invention develop, and indeed once the striking vocals of Rusty join the tempting. His delivery is as distinctive and individual as the sounds cradling his monotone stance but also more of a challenge as they conflict organically and purposefully with the dark beauty of the music. At times across the album his voice simply flows with the tide of the emotion and tone of the music but in others, as here, wrong-foot and test song and listener alike. It has to be said though when working well or even not quite agreeing with personal tastes, his vocal presence, as the album’s, is a riveting texture and incitement. The song itself continues to evolve and explore fresh strains of gothic and dark metal, its atmosphere stark and intimately provocative simultaneously.

The following Made Of Lies is a more rugged and furious blaze of metal, rhythms and riffs a swiftly enticing confrontation breeding even greater endeavour and persuasion as it embraces sonic and vocal enterprise. Though predominantly a metal and heavy rock seeded offering, the track reveals a great eighties and nineties gothic/post punk nature to its shifting character, bands like Leitmotiv and Type O Negative coming to mind. The rousing encounter departs to be replaced by the opening lapping waves of Ocean of Life, a song growing into an evocative and poetically harmonious croon within dark and predacious shadows. It also features the siren-esque vocal charm of Lady K, her alluring presence perfect company to the more dour but resonance wrapped tones of Rusty. Musically as in the previous songs, the Austrian creates an enthralling landscape of ideas and flavours skilfully woven into passages which only lure the firmest attention.

The steely air and textures of The Game come next, its imposing death seeded tones the lead into an infectious shuffle within a fiery web of classic and melodic metal. The song feistily simmers in intensity and attitude, often unveiling a raw snarl to disrupt and complement the more restrained but piercing sonic tenacity entangling ears. Vocals ebb and flow in potency and note, but their element of discord so often only aligns to a similarly striking flirtation in sound.

Both Night Angel and Candlemass push the album to another level, the first a sorrowful piano and melodic seducing which perfectly suits the slow and plain dynamic style of Rusty’s vocals whilst again welcoming the bewitching voice of Lady K. Her appearance so lights air and song that it is easy to wish she was a more regularly hue to the album, it being no coincidence that many of the pinnacles within Ruins involve her presence. The folkish hue and serene elegance of the song’s sound is as mesmeric, potency emulated in its successor for different reasons. The excellent track is a haunting and imposing proposal, its darkly clouded sky and doomy breath invading cavernous like depths whilst colluding with sinister shadows. Yet half way in, a bright light expels XTC like revelry, a wispy charm sparking a fresh turn and endeavour to the tempestuous landscape of the song.

The swift acoustic enticing of Forever reveals the strengths and weaknesses of Ruins in its one minute plus before Matter Over Mind unveils its own creative bellow of imagination and inventive sound. Again thoughts are nudged by bands of the past, March Violets and Fields of the Nephilim whispering in ears as the song takes the listener on its own diverse and absorbing journey, but equally, as across the whole of the album, there is plenty more original ideation and sound going on.

Knowing is another where Rusty’s voice takes attention away from the gentle stroll of music, yet there is no thought of tearing away from his almost mischievous presence, which is good as the song is soon breeding muscle and drama with hungry snarling riffs and quaint melodies. Fair to say it is a song taking time to persuade, winning out by the time Pillow of Silence comes forward to complete the album. It also opens with a mellower air but is persistently brewing up a raw volatile climate which never actually explodes to consume song and senses but ensures even in its closing kiss of beauty, the track has a dark and menacing edge to it.

It is probably fair to say that Ruins will split opinions, mainly when it comes to the vocals. Acclimatising to their peculiar ‘oddity’ is worth the attention though as many songs use them as bold textures to the undoubtedly skilled atmospheres and sounds woven into the album. It is a magnetic and charismatic release making another potent step in the emergence of Rusty Pacemaker. Just one request to the man though, please use Lady K more, and if we dare suggest as the lead as there feels a potential show stopper with her tones leading Rusty’s striking songwriting and sounds.

Ruins is out now via Solanum Records

https://www.facebook.com/rustypacemaker   http://www.rustypacemaker.com/

Ringmaster 21/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Paradise Lost – The Plague Within

Pic Ester Segarra

Pic Ester Segarra

Whether a fan or not, there is no escaping or denying the impact Paradise Lost have had on the doom/gothic and indeed metal scene in general since emerging back in the late eighties. They have also shown and revelled in the seduction of melancholy and beauty of pain through propositions which emotionally and sonically have ravaged senses and devoured the rawest corners of themselves and listeners alike. The UK band has been one of the most pungent forces in dark metal across their thirteen studio albums and as an explosive live incitement; an unrelenting inspiration continuing to ignite ears and spark imaginations with no sign of diminishing as evidenced by new album The Plague Within. Where the album sits in the landscape of the band’s inventive history we will leave for others to discuss, but fair to say that Paradise Lost have unleashed one of their and metal’s most emotionally and physically dark, musically voracious and compelling recent proposals with their fourteenth protagonist.

The album is an evolving predator and seductress from start to finish with songs that provide the fiercest intimidation and warmest enticement within their own investigations of sound and human condition inspired turmoil. It is also startlingly diverse and unpredictable, not to say previous albums lacked such qualities but virtually every twist and narrative within The Plague Within throws a curve ball to certainly expectations and assumptions of the Paradise Lost sound.

It starts straight away with opener No Hope In Sight, its cloud of shadows enriched by immediately spicy guitar enterprise from lead guitarist Greg Mackintosh. Vocal scowls from Nick Holmes infuse the air soon after as the song eventually settles into its melancholic and predatory stroll, the thick rhythms of drummer Adrian Erlandsson and throaty lures cast by bassist Steve Edmondson aligning with the steady tempting of rhythm guitarist Aaron Aedy and Mackintosh. A Type O Negative croon emerges as the always impressive clean delivery of Holmes entices over the jagged riffery nagging ears, though subsequently the early tempestuous air returns to immerse the enthralling nature and persuasion of warmer hues.

Press_Cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    The riveting start leads to the far more caustic and ravenous presence of Terminal. There is a militant feel to the rhythms right away, their heavy swipes belligerent against the rasping vocals and sonically acrid air around them, whilst the guitars have a corrosive edge to their riffs and melodic entwining of ears. It is a solid and tightly gripping encounter, a blackened examination of emotions but does miss the spark of the first track and the following An Eternity Of Lies. The third song opens with keys and an instantly captivating orchestral caress, with a guitar quickly joining the tempting with its own melodic hues. Keys continue to brew and expel a gothic hug on the imagination as the song blossoms, an aural portrait invigorated by the drama of guitars and the diverse delivery of Holmes. It is a bewitching encounter, a melodic fascination infusing a heavier rapacious tempting across its rich and volatile dark dance, and quite irresistible.

Already the potent diversity of songs and album is apparent and highly persuasive, continuing in the contagion that is Punishment Through Time. The song is a thick and ferocious rocker of a track, but controlled in its assault and dirty in its rock ‘n’ roll. Fair to say it was a track not expected, the song almost welcoming even with its lyrical despair and predacious character, and almost arguing with the earlier claim that The Plague Within is one the band’s most intensive and darkly suffocating offerings yet. There is a black heart to it though that is emulated and shown in its fullest rancor in Beneath Broken Earth. The track prowls with emotionally leaden jaws and an oppressive animus of tone and intent led by the bitter guttural growls of Holmes. A tsunami of slow hate and erosive doom ferocity, the song almost draws a death rattle from the senses with its weight and enmity.

Both Sacrifice The Flame and Victim Of The Past enthral with individual uniqueness, the first a hymn of melodic and vocal beauty within a funereally paced and cancerous stalking of the senses whilst its successor with a similarly sedated energy, certainly initially, blossoms from a mellow seducing of vocal and melodic charm into a creative and emotional turbulence. With a storm bred atmosphere, the song ebbs and flows between the two climates as it reveals and explores its morose yet enticing landscape; again Paradise Lost crafting a sublime collusion of extreme and contrasting textures in one inescapable seducing.

The epic like heralding of Flesh From Bone at its start is one irresistible essence backed up swiftly by a saunter through blackened and cavernous symphonic terrain before exploding in a venomous spewing of rabid rhythms, scarring riffs, and voracity soaked vocal animosity. Fearsomely enchanting in its full hostility, the song makes way for another imposing slab of rock ‘n’ roll posing as Cry Out where blues rock grooves and acidic ingenuity infiltrates inventive bad blood. It is another, as so many encounters within The Plague Within, which has a host of turns and detours of sound that there are almost songs within songs. The blackest, ravenous anthem is soon a passing memory in that precise moment in time though as the colossal Return To The Sun brings the album to a mighty and climatic close. As brutal as it is melodically immersive, the track is an intensive exclamation mark to The Plague Within, a final creative swipe to emphasise what is one masterful and threateningly majestic proposal.

Fourteen albums in and into their third decade, we can safely say that Paradise Lost still provides one of the benchmarks for aspiring metal bands to contemplate, the proof is all there in The Plague Within.

The Plague Within is available now via https://www.bandstores.co.uk/shop/paradiselost/

https://www.facebook.com/paradiselostofficial   http://www.paradiselost.co.uk/

RingMaster 05/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Silpha and The Corpseboners – Cirque De Nuit

Bandfoto

To be honest Silpha and The Corpseboners already had us half hooked from the band name, but soon completed the job with the body chilling sounds of new EP Cirque De Nuit. Consisting of six tracks with a horror punk breeding sure to have the dead look as concerned as the living, the release growls and snarls with punk hostility whilst stomping with blood raw rock ‘n’ roll. Equally it is unafraid, without warning, to slip into something deranged, unpredictable, and uniquely adventurous. It is not the perfect offering but certainly right up there as one of the most exciting and irresistible horror punk ravages of recent times.

Emerging from under, we suspect, dank and cold carnival canvases in the shadowlands of Germany in 2012, Silpha and The Corpseboners were soon parading their visceral and musical charms around their home cemeteries of Stein/ Nürnberg. It was a rising of the quartet swiftly backed by an early demo EP, De Morte, and pushed to wider attention by 2013 debut full-length Agony And Ecstasy. Exploring an infusion of everything from punk and gothic vaudeville to metal in the band’s distinct style of horror punk, the album was a potent step in luring new corrupted hearts; a success sure to be matched and to be fair already being exceeded by the release of Cirque De Nuit on UK indie label Dead Artists. A year in the making, the EP is an inescapable and addictively insidious charmer and the next step in the emergence of one compelling band.

The EP’s title track courts the imagination first, a lone guitar the spicy temptation which soon has ears and appetite awake. It is strong bait but nothing compared to the eruption of punk rock led by the Siouxsie Sioux like vocals of Silpha Obscura follows. An instantly dramatic and gripping bassline from Dr. Horion romps with the passions whilst the raw blazes of Manfred Von Körperteil only add a flavoursome caustic glaze to the predatory stride of the song. Driven by the punchy beats of Bastille Amnesie, it explodes yet again with greater tenacity and energy dropping only OnlineCover_CirqueDeNuit_Biganthemic bait along the way. All the time though a dark theatre is brewing in the heart of the encounter, a gothic cabaret which having shown a glimpse of its circus seduction within the rampages of aggression, is given centre stage halfway through the song. A harpsichord weaves its quaint marquee seeded revelry as the track twists in character and grasps the dark tones of we suspect Von Körperteil. Bringing visions of broken corpses and ravenous souls dancing in the warped caress of a graveyard bone band, a vision aided by a tuba tempting provided by guest Simon Theil, the song swings and dances itself to a standstill before filling up on sonic toxicity and converging on the world with metal and punk voracity.

Cirque De Nuit is the immediate pinnacle of the EP but seriously challenged by the likes of the following surf rock haunting of Gargoyles. It smooches with ears through a slow lurking bassline amidst evocative scythes of guitar as Silpha croons with the emerging narrative. It is a gentle seducing littered with great reggae spawned beats and percussion, but a proposition losing its restraint and soon searing and challenging the senses with a tempestuous assault of heavy metal coloured punk ferocity.

Both Stolen By The Night and Hurricane surge with a similarly cast merger of sounds but each provide individual personalities with antagonistic attitudes and in the case of the first, a chug fest of riffs. It does not quite live up to the heights of the first pair of songs but with imagination in its landscape and hunger to its intensity, as well as a great vocal only anthemic passage, it keeps enjoyment full. It successor strides with a rock ‘n roll gait and bluesy melodic toxicity which plays like a mix of Thirteen Shots and Troxin Cherry at times. A serenade of sax from Dr. Horion only adds to the increasingly alluring presence of the song before it slips away for the sinister drama of Mr Underworld. Breathing an exotic melodic climate as it prowls the ears, the song is a sultry temptress soon to show her bruising weight and ferocious metal soaked charms in a forceful brawl of sound. The harpsichord returns towards the finale of the song to intrigue and thrill, as well as change the song’s imaginative scenery once again.

The closing Rewind The Tape is another punk ‘n’ roll stomp growling and abrasing ears with uncompromising hostility tempered by a clutch of contagion soaked hooks and winy grooves. It is a tremendous end to a passions arousing and thoroughly enjoyable rampage from a band with the potential and imagination to push horror punk to new exciting levels.

Cirque De Nuit is available now via Undead Artists and @ http://corpseboners.bandcamp.com/album/cirque-de-nuit

https://www.facebook.com/Corpseboners

RingMaster 16/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Aevum – Impressions

10644214_10152808919426019_1473314669840903045_o

Listening to Impressions, the debut album from Italian gothic metallers Aevum is pure theatre, every track an adventure which at times has ears and emotions in bliss and in other moments seriously challenged and unsure. For all its undulating triumph and uncertainties though, the album is one seriously compelling proposition which persistently ignites the imagination.

The seeds of the band began with the meeting of vocalist Evelyn Moon and pianist Richard around the changing of 2007 into the following year. The first twelve months saw the release of Celestial Angels EP and the first showing of the band’s fusion of diverse sounds. Though tagged as gothic metal, Aevum transcend a multitude of styles with their creativity as proven with Impressions and its expansive diversity. Various changes in personnel came with subsequent years before a stable line-up emerged around two years ago. 2012 also saw the released of the Nova Vita EP, again as the previous offering a self-released encounter earning good attention. Last year the band signed with Wall Records for the release of acclaimed single My Vampire before the Turin quintet converged on the studio to create Impressions. Mixed and mastered by Ettore Rigotti (Disarmonia Mundi) and released via Fuel Records, the album is a tapestry of sound and shadow fuelled emotions; the exploration of opposites using a perpetual weave of startling flavours and provocative invention upon a neo-classical and gothic metal bred symphonic canvas.

As soon as the ghostly wails and electro tempting of opener Il palcoscenico della mente grasps ears, imagination and intrigue is yanked from their slumber, the brief instrumental a haunting of sinister and captivating potency. Building a portentous air through rising harmonies and symphonic seduction, the piece soon grows into an epic and imposing electronic provocation, slipping into the mellower yet still intimidatingly textured lure of Blade’s Kiss next. The second song in no time is striding with combative rhythms and shadow cloaked sonic colour, the entrancing play of Richard against the more expansive soak of synth enterprise cast by Ian magnetic. The formidable rhythmic antagonism of drummer Matt and bassist Violet are soon laying down their thick bait too as the operatic squalls of Moon pierce the landscape, joined soon after by the potent tones of Hydra. In no time it is a maelstrom of fascinating drama and unpredictable turbulence, spoken tones from Violet and rapacious growls uniting in the eventful and resourceful bluster of individual flavours. It is a challenging proposition, more vocally than musically, but one becoming more persuasive given time and attention. The electronicore and industrial elements of the song provide further transfixing and exhilarating temptation, adding to a song, which as the album, has plenty to excite and enthral but a few moments which worry personal tastes, which maybe something as varied and experimentally imaginative as this was always going to come up against.

Intermezzo is another bewitching instrumental, its melancholic flame of brass sounding keys dour but spicy bait before The Battle takes over with a sorrowful caress of piano cast melodic a0417005191_2emotion embraced by an evocative synth crafted atmosphere. Hydra adds his croon to the poetic landscape next and is almost immediately joined by the rich throated narrative of Moon. As the music is ever evolving across songs, the band presents each narrative in a web of primarily English and Italian presentation, both languages interlocking seamlessly. Bulging rhythms push the walls of the track outwards as a great vocal mix almost toys with the listener whilst the guitar of Lord Of Destruction sculpts its own gripping adventure into the engrossing soundscape. A spellbinding song which just gets better the further into its virulent thirteen minutes you go, it sets a fine plateau for the album which the classical beauty of Il lamento della ninfa cannot match but certainly adds a fresh vein of masterful exploration to the release.

The swift shadow lit kiss of Impressioni leads to the outstanding Lost Soul, an imposing and voracious roar of a track which charges through ears like an adrenaline fuelled lover equipped with an armoury of the folkish vivacity and death bred savagery and undertaking a do or die mission. It is a blistering predator of a track, every second either musically or vocally an experiment of tenacious invention and sonic experimentation. The song leaves ears and passions bruised and blissful as it forges the album’s pinnacle.

To Be or…to Be in its smouldering individual way is another track which brings new surprises with every twist and melodic swing within in its creative emprise. Irresistible classical and jazz seeded persuasions settle easily in ears just as the ruggedly melodic textures and more blackened metal essences seducing from within the bold drama. As the album, it is a track which takes a few listens to reveal its majesty but rewards relentlessly once understanding is found, much as after the dark menacing skies of the album’s instrumental title track, the mighty Monsters. Dark clouds instantly smother ears as the soaring tones of Moon scythe through their intimidating ambience, but within the tempestuous climate the band continually switch from a forceful stride to a ravenous charge unleashing a kaleidoscope of almost salacious sounds and fiery ingenuity which colours the explosive theatre of it all.

Finishing on Adieu à la scène with its music box like waltz, Impressions is not going to be for everyone and definitely needs proper attention and time given to it. Its first touch left us rigorously unsure but compelled and it was only over numerous plays that the songs and Aevum’s imagination found clarity in thoughts and emotions. There are still parts which fail to convince but for the main Impressions is a thrilling and hypnotic adventure all gothic, symphonic, and avant-garde metal fans should have a go at.

Impressions is available now via Fuel Records http://www.fuelrecords.it/?wp_releases=impressions and digitally @ http://aevumopera.bandcamp.com/album/impressions

http://www.aevumband.com/

RingMaster 11/12/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

Radium Valley – Tales From The Apocalypse

10527806_342818709207640_1327173137094794963_n

Standing impressively tall with an album and sound which plays like a mix of Rammstein, Poets Of the Fall, and Type O Negative yet emerges as something richly flavoursome in its originality; French metallers Radium Valley provide a seriously compelling and fascinating proposition. Debut album Tales From The Apocalypse is a full immersion for ears and imagination into an apocalyptic lyrical and emotional landscape coloured by a tempestuous yet fluid blend of industrial, gothic, and melodic metal. It is a masterful darkwave fuelled incitement which just grows and flourishes the more time and attention it is given.

Formed in 2012, the Limoges hailing band takes inspirations from the likes of Rammstein, Paradise Lost, Ghost Brigade, and Katatonia into their sound, as well as lyrically for certainly their first full-length an eighties background embracing its current events and culture. The combination paints a wasted world stopped by the Chernobyl disaster and littered with radiation embraced survivors. It makes for a vivid and intriguing canvas to which Radium Valley casts similarly dark and turbulent sounds. Produced by Alexandre Granvaud and Romain Janvier, with its mastering done by Logan Mader (Machine Head, Soulfly, Fear Factory, Gojira), the Pavement Entertainment released Tales From The Apocalypse is a riveting and often haunting proposition.

The nine-strong band instantly awakens the imagination with Song of rain, a vintage sample discussing the first nuclear bomb luring in attention against a sonic croon and distortion kissed ambience. It is not long before the musical weight and prowess of the band is seizing ears, melodies from guitars and keys laying down thick enticing smog which is littered with jabbing beats and dark throated bass temptation. A slight relaxation then brings in the impressive vocals and further expressive hues from the keys, their electro seeding a dulled yet mesmeric radiance in the imposing heart of the song. It is a seamless and impressive mix of textures, dark and light extremes as enthralling as the dramatic narrative presented by the increasingly impressing clean vocal delivery.

As the album proves itself to be, the opener seems to get bigger and better with time, something emulated by the following Sweet infection. The second song emerges from a cyber-sculpted darkness with melancholic keys which equally image003have a bold statement to their presence, before flowing into an electronic glaze and synth rock infectiousness. Finding a presence which is somewhere between Depeche Mode, Nine Inch Nails, and Poets Of The Fall, the song soars over the senses with a sultry caress and fiery temperament. It is a bewitching song which seduces more than grips but to the same successful end before the Numan-esque start of For all of us takes over. Raw abrasing riffs stand perfectly against the electronic sizzle of the synths whilst vocals once more gently but powerfully spark thoughts with their theme. There is rich drama to the song which comes in waves without ever departing, the strikes of guitar and inventive bass designs alongside them creating much of that gripping lure.

Both Darkest hours and Behind me create their own slice of intimidating but welcoming persuasion, the first an almost brawling proposition which switches between urgent rampages and slower crawls of predation without losing any of its fluency, despite the turbulence of sound and passions explored. It is an intrusive treat of a track allowing no rest to take in the sights yet leaves no sense of dissatisfaction, just hunger to go back to explore more. Its successor merges electro elegance with a voracious metal appetite to produce a captivating adventure calling on sparks of Rammstein, Fear Factory, and Paradise Lost. There is also a seeming intimacy to the touch and heart of the song which only fires up the vocals and rhythmic punch of its striking exploration.

Next comes Le terrain vague à l’âme, the first of two interludes with the second, Une charogne coming before the final track. With each being predominantly a French spoken vocal piece they do not really add much for us language handicapped souls so it is hard to evaluate their presence, something much easier to do with the excellent instrumental Radium Valley. It is a rigorously descriptive piece of composing which takes the imagination through its provocative soundscape into a rugged and violently hued terrain, the skills of the band providing a threatening and contagious journey.

Through the melodic tempest of Into the undergrounds and the hostile yet theatrical Last resort, the album ventures into new aspects of its starkly bred and adventurously expressive character. Each provides a memorable creative emprise, darkly poetic proposals which leave a lingering and inviting mark on emotions. Their unique offerings lead, after the other interlude, into album closer Wings of disease. It is possibly the least gripping track on the album but still a thoroughly engaging and unpredictable pleasure with the band no less impressive in sculpting its structure and temptation.

It completes an outstanding release in Tales From The Apocalypse, an album needing time to truly show its depths but rewarding with a blistering and exciting encounter. Radium Valley is a band destined to grab your attention at some point and their debut album definitely makes a potent suggestion that the time is now.

Tales From The Apocalypse is available now on CD via Pavement Entertainment and in a slimmer digital version via http://radiumvalley.bandcamp.com/album/tales-from-the-apocalypse

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Radium-Valley/167565643399615

RingMaster 25/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/