Calling All Astronauts – Anti-Social Network

Calling All Astronauts Promo Picture_RingMasterReview

It is easy to have an on-going appetite for a band but not always as simple to keep the fervour of the enthusiasm for their work burning just as brightly, especially as they evolve and move away from the things which first beguiled ears and imagination. With British electro rockers Calling All Astronauts no such problem has existed to date; with each release as they have grown and experimented, they seem to have sparked even more vivacious praise and greed; a success which will only continue with their new album Anti-Social Network.

The eleven track incitement is the CAA sound at its most rounded and mature yet and equally at its most adventurous and diverse. Recently talking about Anti-Social Network, band vocalist and album producer David Bury revealed, “We wanted to make an album we would buy ourselves, that pays homage to our heroes and many influences whilst still sounding like us. I think we’ve just about got there” Get there they did with tracks with harken back to seventies/eighties gothic and electro pop influences whilst uncaging a modern snarl of rock ‘n’ roll with a political and emotional bite as forceful as the virulence which ensures feet and hips are as eager and voracious as ears.

The successor to heavily acclaimed debut album Post Modern Conspiracy, and in turn the singles and EP which followed it, the band’s eagerly awaited second album is the outcome of “20 months of insane creativity that saw the guys locked in their studio for days on end as they wrote, engineered and produced an album that stretched their creativity like never before.” Straight away it makes a potent impact, Living the Dream bringing the album to ears with a poppy yet shadow kissed invitation. Within it, the dark bass lure cast by Paul McCrudden almost prowls ears as a melodic and infectious swing brightly entices around the distinctive stony vocals of Bury. Feet are tapping within the first round of electronic beats whilst hips soon get involved with J Browning’s spicy grooves, the body seduced by the lively contagion which is slightly reminiscent of bands like Modern English and B-Movie.

art_RingMasterReviewIt is a great start quickly eclipsed by the even more addictive Empire. Released as a greedily devoured single towards the end of last year, it immediately runs its tempting fingers across the senses with the moody bait of McCrudden bass and the mouth-watering hooks of Browning, all within an equally captivating electronic climate. Punkish with an alluring irritability to its twists and a scent of aggravation to Bury’s expressive vocals, Empire beguiles body and thoughts, inciting thick involvement from each before making way for the spiky electro punk defiance of Time to Fight Back. With the additional agitated tenacity to spark any dance-floor, the song has the body bouncing as emotions raise a middle-finger to surrounding ills, a touch of Sigue Sigue Sputnik meets Pop Will Eat Itself doing its successful persuasion no harm.

The already familiar Hands Up Who Wants To Die? is the provider of more energetic and contagious exploits, ripe hooks and flaming guitar enterprise lighting ears as rhythms back the punch of vocals and words with skittish boisterousness. It too has an imposing charm and vivacious resourcefulness hard to resist, as too Life as We Know It which follows with a mellower but no less fascinating and arresting romancing of hips and ears. CAA might take swipes at establishments and worldly corruptions but barely a song goes by without the trio leading the listener into physical collusion with its inescapable dance-ability.

Through the heavier air and rock ‘n’ roll of The American Dream, a track which gives a hint to what Iggy Pop would sound like it he went down the electro/industrial route, and the fiery God Is Dead with its bubbly scathing, attention and thick enjoyment is again firmly taken care of, even if neither quite live up to those before them, whilst Always Be True hugs ears with a synth pop laced reflection. It too might miss the last spark of other tracks for our ears but with Bury adding a great Tom Waits like texture to his enticing tones as the electronic atmospherics of the song come loaded with their own suggestiveness, the Fad Gadget tinged track is a compelling and increasingly potent proposal.

The outstanding Look in Your Eye has ardour blazing again with its conspicuous gothic punk and post punk imagination. Touches of bands like Play Dead and March Violets emerge across the thrilling encounter, but as everywhere, familiar essences and textures are mere strands in something unmistakably Calling All Astronauts. As mentioned earlier, the band wanted to pay homage to their inspirations without losing their own individuality, this track on its own proving their success.

Anti-Social Network is completed by firstly the predacious and again insatiably alluring Black World where a Sister Of Mercy/The Mission like courtship of ears and imagination instantly beguiles and only becomes more intoxicating over time. Finally the band unleashes Divisive upon the passions; its attitude loaded presence spawned from electro punk/metal irritability and infested with devious and rebellious strains of funk and electronic devilment.

It is a mighty close to another powerful and galvanic release from Calling all Astronauts, and the sign that the band is ready to step out of the underground scene and stir up the biggest attention.

Anti-Social Network is released March 11th via Supersonic Media across most online stores.

http://www.callingallastronauts.com   https://www.facebook.com/CallingAllAstronauts/    https://twitter.com/CAA_Official

Pete RingMaster 11/03/2016

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CALLING ALL ASTRONAUTS UNVEIL THEIR “ANTI-SOCIAL NETWORK”

art_RingMasterReview

UK goth punks ‘Calling All Astronauts’ have just released their hotly tipped second album ‘Anti-Social Network’ through Supersonic Media.

Calling All Astronauts are a London based, politically charged three-piece who rose from the ashes of ‘US:UK’. Featuring vocalist/programmer/producer David B, ex-Caffeine guitarist J Browning and Marionettes bassist Paul McCrudden, Calling All Astronauts blend electro, rock, post-punk and even dubstep to a sound that ignites and engulfs.

Since their incarnation in 2012, the trio have racked up a slew of accolades including four Number One’s in the Twitter Music Charts (knocking Adele from the top spot), having their latest single “Empire” notch up a three-month stint in the ‘Official European Indie Chart’ peeking at Number 2, and sharing stages with the likes of Echo & The Bunnymen, PWEI, Sigue Sigue Sputnik and A Place To Bury Strangers. The band have also headlined and sold out ‘Alan Magee’s Death2Disco’ at Notting Hill Arts Club.

The electro punks have a prolific output, releasing seven singles to date; this has helped the band pick up a swell of support from all four corners of the globe with numerous rock and alternative radio shows taking the band into their hearts by putting them on heavy rotation. The threesome have been featured on BBC Introducing, and were invited into the studio by Tom Robinson for his BBC 6 Music show. Their underground attitude to video production has also received great praise from many, including Irvine Welsh, who, after viewing the video for ‘What’s So Good About’, proclaimed it as ‘Brilliant’.

Calling All Astronauts now press on with the release of their blistering new second album ‘Anti-Social Network’, which is out now in stores via Supersonic Media and rammed with eleven killer cuts. Look out for festival and summer shows later this year.

www.twitter.com/CAA_Official  www.facebook.com/callingallastronauts  www.youtube.com/+callingallastronauts

Miss Vincent – Creepy

Miss Vincent pic

After getting over the disappointment that Miss Vincent was not a psychobilly band, their debut EP’s cover and title as well as the band name all the clues adding up to that deceitful assumption, the UK pop goth punk band turned out to be a rather enjoyable proposition which in Creepy they have a release which is more than a decent ride of melodic persuasion and feisty energy. Emerging as a hybrid of Alkaline Trio and Fall Out Boy with some healthy genes of NOFX, AFI, and Social Distortion spliced in for extra flavour, the Guildford quartet have introduced themselves with a release which without lighting fires leaves  a wash of satisfaction and promise behind which cannot be ignored.

Formed in 2012, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Alex Marshall, guitarist Lawrie Pattison, bassist Owain Mainwaring, and drummer Jack Donnelly has earned themselves a solid reputation and potent fan base around the southeast of the country. The Creepy EP has all the charm and infectious persuasion to send the band into passions much further afield. It will not be lighting new pyres of adventure for pop punk certainly but should place Miss Vincent in the watch closely column of the media and future fans alike.

The release opens with Deadlock, a firm and well-crafted invitation but one which leaves the passions a little underwhelmed. From the 998130_579896398741788_2057771635_nstrong vocals to incisive web of riffs and sonic invention, the song makes an appealing companion with hints of unique imagination whispering from within, but ultimately it lacks the spark to ignite anything more than a passing interest and respect for its predictable but accomplished offering. The following I Don’t Want This has no such problem, the temptation from its opening charge of jagged riffs and contagious groove is an instant awakening for ear and thoughts. True there is little new to devour but the song has the fuse and fuel to grip full attention and breed an equally keen appetite. With a strong whisper of Green Day and slighter spice of Against Me! to its stomp, the encounter is a vibrant and energetic persuasion, the bass of Mainwaring a prowling throaty shadow which seduces whilst the great harmonies of the bassist and Pattison make a great backdrop to the delivery of Marshall.

Planning To Fail, with the rhythms of Donnelly crafting out a sinew framed cage for the song to wrap around, lies somewhere between the opening pair, at times leaving a lack of fulfilment on the taste buds and in other moments showing an invention and imagination which adds a hearty confidence to their promise and future creativity. It has more than enough to light a deeper intrigue over their horizons though as does its successor Carry On, a track which surges from the start with a magnetic fire of riffs merging into virulently infectious melodies and hooks. It is an excellent romp which takes best track honours on Creepy and leaves the emotions keener and greedier than before.

The closing Testing Times is bred from the same seed box as its predecessor, the opening riot of rapacious melodic flames and taunting riffs veined by crisp rhythms is irresistible as it leads the ears into the again impressive vocals of Marshall. There is a sense of Billy Talent to the construction of the song, hooks and sonic barbs littering its passage to ensure no one escapes the song’s addictive claws and adventurous enterprise, which actually leaves the previous tracks seem lacking. It is a great conclusion to a release which sets down an opening marker for Miss Vincent that should see them as they evolve take to loftier plateaus and recognition.

It may not provide anything to get your teeth of originality into but as the ground floor of something with all the possibilities of major things rising from within, Creepy is well worth a slice of your time and enjoyment.

Grab the Creepy EP as a buy now name your price release at www.missvincent.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/missvincentband

7.5/10

RingMaster 25/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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