Lords Of Acid – Pretty In Kink

We cannot say that techno and acid house are genres we have an instinctive appetite for here but we certainly have a hunger for electro adventure with plenty of confrontation; something you certainly and persistently get with Lords Of Acid. Their new album Pretty In Kink is a riot of electronic eclecticism, twelve tracks infesting body and imagination with creative deviancy and virulent contagion and a collection which salaciously arouse the senses.

Lords Of Acid is the brainchild of Belgian musician Praga Khan, an artist releasing his first single back in 1988. The project apparently evolved from his “extensive experimentation with drugs, Crowley-ian sex magic, and esoteric paths of self-deprivation and mutilation known only to himself”, the band the vehicle for him to “further encapsulate the seductive messages and raw sex of his ever-evolving musical vision.” The new album sees Khan link up again with long-time collaborator Erhan Kurkun and the entrance of new vocalist Marieke Bresseleers.

Praga Khan

Pretty In Kink opens with Break Me, the track emerging from celestial mists with a dulled but imposing throb around which electronics flirt. The immediately striking voice of Bresseleers soon rises from its midst, her vocals openly powerful but equally devilish in their character and delivery. The track continues to pulsate and almost menacingly entice, its electronic simmer simultaneous threat and captivation with infection spilling from every note and syllable.

The compelling start continues with Ma Fille De Joie, it too laden with appealing shadows and electro temptation this time from an industrial seeding. There is a touch of Kraftwerk to the song; its seductive prowl almost predacious at times but persistently darkly flirtatious before Sex Cam Girl opens its creative legs for ears to devour its dark electro juices. With swaying grooves and raw melodic swerves to its gait, the track entices as it fingers the senses and like its predecessors left intrigue and hips consumed with eagerness.

The following EBM spiced trip hop lined Flow Juice took things and attention up another level, the track electro addiction in the making. Bresseleers is the perfect tease amongst the similarly tempting antics of the synths and beats, all getting under the skin with viral ease. As potent a start to the release that the first trio of songs make, the album really came alive for us at this point, next up Like Pablo Escobar escalating the new gear in persuasion. Pure drama from its initial shimmer and bass bred hook, the track rises up into a rousing slice of electro rock again one as imposing as it is manipulatively catchy with guitars and synths colluding in their cinematic theatre.

Neither Before the Night is Over or Androgyny leapt on the passions as instantly as those around them yet with their respective melodic Heaven 17-esque smoulder with underlying volatility and sinister synth pop seduction, each blossomed in captivation by the play as too did Goldfinger, a track borrowing from the classic Bond theme but using the essence to wrap its own techno espionage.

They were soon firmly eclipsed though by the electro punk of What the Fuck! a track with a great Senser-esque feel to its vocal attitude and electronic belligerence. It is superb; a wonderful sonic irritant always commanding an eager scratch while So Goddamn Good straight after is a song which seduces as it croons. Pop and hip hop spawned vocals unite across the track, melodic caresses and sonic blistering teasing together alongside as again Lords Of Acid simply steal attention.

My Demons Are Inside from an underwhelming start for personal tastes was another which eventually wormed into the psyche, its KMFDM like instincts and breeding nagging its way into the passions though it is soon over shadowed by the album’s best track for us. Closing up the release, We Are The Freaks was quite simply irresistible from its first breath. Drama oozes every pore as industrial confrontation rises to its deviant feet to subsequently embrace a minatory Latino taunting. It is a glorious end to an album which not for the first time sees Lords Of Acid enjoyably tainting the music scene with their rivetingly unique electronic disease.

Pretty In Kink is out now via Metropolis Records; available @ https://lordsofacidofficial.bandcamp.com/album/pretty-in-kink

http://www.lordsofacid.com   https://www.facebook.com/lordsofacid/    https://twitter.com/RealLordsOfAcid

Pete RingMaster 06/06/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Me Like Bees – There Will Be Time

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It might only be four songs, but there have been few as vigorous work-outs for neck muscles and hips than There Will Be Time, the new EP from US indie rockers Me Like Bees. Feet and voices too are easily involved and pushed to their lusty limited by the quickly addictive offering from the Joplin, Missouri quartet. The EP is quite simply a summer’s party in the ears and an excuse for the spirit to find something to smile about in any day.

Formed in 2009, Me Like Bees has devoured the American landscape over the years playing hundreds of shows across states. Equally from the release of their self-titled  EP in 2011 through their acclaimed debut album The Ides two years later, the band has had only keen attention and a lively growing fan-base for their virulent indie rock/pop proposals. That same year saw the band begin the route to winning the Ernie Ball Music Man Battle of the Bands whilst 2015 was marked by Me Like Bees playing a leg of the Van’s Warped Tour. More success and eager spotlights are sure to turn the way of the band this year with the release of There Will Be Time alone. Recorded with award-winning producer, John Feldmann (Five Seconds of Summer, The Used, Panic! at the Disco, Goldfinger, Good Charlotte, Plain White T’s), the EP just infests ears and emotions, infects the psyche and body, and takes the listener on a tenaciously contagious ride.

TWBT Large Cover _RingMasterReviewOpening with Changes, band and release instantly have a wiggly body and attentive ears on its hands, the song flirting with harmonies and melodic jangles as keys add their smiling spice to the coaxing. The engaging tones of vocalist Luke Sheafer simply add to the tempting as the darker lure of Nick Bynum’s bass prowls with mischief in its intent. The song’s swing is relatively gentle but becoming more tenacious as twists and turns grip the transfixing encounter, Timothy Cote’s beats a pungent incitement to the web of melodies and jangles cast by the guitars of Pete Burton and Luke Sheafer. Like a mix of Billy Momo, Arcade Fire, and Late Cambrian, the track simply enslaves before Tundraland slips in with voice and melody as another rich enticement.

A folk pop vivacity fuels the second song, though as with the first, the band weaves an array of flavours into their seriously catchy drama of sound and persuasion. Again vocals are as impressive and potent at whipping up attention and eager involvement as the vibrant sounds around them; a blend producing the kind of pop ‘n’ roll that given the chance will have crowded landscapes bouncing.

The EP’s title track is the next to seduce ears; vocals and an acoustic romancing the first kiss as an array of wispy and flirtatious sounds are glimpsed around them before throbbing beats bring the full creative heart of the song into full view. Even at its broadest moment the song is a bubbling smoulder but equally as infuriatingly and yes thrillingly catchy as anything on the release before drifting away for the excellent Southern twanged folk rock stomp of Hymns and Blues. Again check for a pulse if anyone listening to it is not bouncing in their seats or on their feet, the track a Class A addictive stirring up of bodies and spirit; a feel good factor does not even cover it.

It is a brilliant end to an equally invigorating and exciting proposition. There has been a few releases we suggest have the summer soundtrack written all over them, but There Will Be Time has put most if not all in the shade.

The There Will Be Time EP is released April 8th through most online stores.

http://www.melikebees.com   https://www.facebook.com/melikebees   https://twitter.com/MeLikeBees

Pete RingMaster 07/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Gone By Friday – Quarter-Life Crisis

GlamourByFriday

Having grabbed attention with debut album Noisetank in 2011, New York pop punksters Gone By Friday have taken their time with its successor, whether by choice or not, but now return with Quarter-Life Crisis and it is fair to say that the band has upped the ante in sound, adventure, and fun.

The Queen’s quartet has discovered a new vivacity and energy in songwriting and sound, and they were no slouches there anyway as their last album proved. The eight tracks making up Quarter-Life Crisis simply leap at ears with a creative and imaginative vitality yet still retain the raw touches and essences which helped the band stand out in the first place. There is a maturity to the release which translates as contagious invention and whilst the release is still pop punk in its core form it captivates with raucous charm and fevered enterprise.

Formed in 2009 and tapping inspirations from the likes of Bouncing Souls, Greenday, Lagwagon, Rancid and Blink 182, Gone By Friday soon found their feet in the New York underground scene. The FreEP, a free to get EP and their live presence soon gripped ears and appetites, as well as establishing a base for their sound which Noisetank potently built upon. Now with another leap, Quarter-Life Crisis is here to re-ignite their tempting of new and broader awareness, and it gets off to a stomping start with The Hadean. The track opens on a blaze of guitar riffs which instantly has an old school punk/seventies R&B persuasion before muscular rhythms and scythes of sonic colour add to the heavily enticing start. There is a heavy rock essence with a touch of Sum 41 to it also, though it is not long before the pop punk heart of the track is romping with melodic infectiousness. The throaty basslines of Sean Ho provide their own striking bait within the encounter, but only matched in potency by the swinging beats of drummer Chris Berardi around the guitar enterprise of Peter Berardi and Billy Kupillas, with the latter’s vocals similarly bringing rich lures.

GBFcover   The strong start is swiftly matched by the raucous revelry of It All Starts With Me, a thumping stomp of a song with grouchy basslines and addiction forging hooks galore. At only a handful of seconds past a minute in length, it is far too short but still provides a tsunami of contagion and energy to exhaust and thrill without reservation. The sigh of disappointment at its brief tenure is soon forgotten once the clunky riffs and anthemic tenacity of Poison Jam steps up to ignite ears and energies all over again. There is an open familiarity to the song yet it matters little as its catchy devilry embraces body and emotions with insatiable energy and creative appetite, a mix driving the release as a whole.

600 Miles opens on a delicious acoustic enticing next, guitar and voice an immediately engaging proposal backed by the percussive and broader sonic imagination brewing away within the energetic croon of a song. Though it does not quite generate the more heightened reactions of its predecessors, the song leaves satisfaction full and appetite greedier, wants fed with gusto by Say My Name and the album’s title track. The first of the two is another acoustically opened encounter but straight away has rawness to it, a scowl of sorts which bursts into a fiery and aggressively melodic provocation. Its successor soon outshines it though, its opening dance of once more acoustically bred riffs carrying a Latin tempting which in turn ignites a voracious and welcoming tempest of compelling hooks, anthemic vocal harmonies, and irresistible nineties inspired persuasion. The song is a glorious rampage which alone sums up all you need to know as to why Gone By Friday makes for a thoroughly fulfilling feel-good proposal.

The album closes with The Story So Forgotten, a track like the last which feels like an old friend in familiarity but a brand new acquaintance in sound and temptation. It’s increasingly building and almost volatile anthemic intensity brings Quarter Life Crisis to a mighty conclusion, followed by another sigh that it is all over before fingers twitch and submit to pressing play again.

If the likes of Goldfinger, The Bouncing Souls, and Blink 182 whet the appetite then Gone By Friday have a treat for you, but equally they offer plenty to entice and please all pop punk fans within Quarter Life Crisis, so off you trot…

Quarter Life Crisis is available now @ http://gonebyfriday.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/gonebyfriday

RingMaster 01/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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