Furyborn – Dawn Of Leviathan

Since emerging in 2010, UK outfit Furyborn seem to make a potent statement with every move they make within the British metal scene. From their live debut in 2011, they have earned support and a reputation which has only gathered momentum and is sure to again with the release of their debut album, Dawn Of Leviathan. It is a ferociously imposing and compelling affair that arouses the same senses it trespasses with the band’s increasingly distinct and adventurous style of melodic death metal.

That live side of the Poole hailing quintet has seen them become one of the most potent forces across the South of England, win the regional Metal 2 The Masses competition and play Bloodstock Open Air for only their seventh live outing. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Threat Signal, Mors Principium Est, Sylosis, The Agonist, Malefice, The Defiled, Evile, (Hed) P.E. and Ted Maul as well as release their first acclaimed EP, The Reaping Of Our Days released in 2012 through Bored Stiff Records. Fair to say the band has been nagging at national and broader attention since day one, increasingly growing both which the highly anticipated Dawn Of Leviathan can only escalate.

The album quickly shows a new strength in intensity, craft, and imagination within Furyborn; a growth in all aspects infused into a maturity which is maybe unexpected within a first full-length, even from a band in its seventh year. Dawn of Leviathan opens with the atmospheric trespass of Second Sun, a brief harass of raw sonic dissonance which leads into the album’s title track where instantly a barrage of intrusive beats from drummer Tim Coulson and ravenous riffs from rhythm guitarist Rob Walker devour ears. Just as forceful are the raw throated roars of vocalist Jut Tabor who quickly seizes attention with his grudging tones, their causticity leading to a great flame of clean endeavour; the frontman, as the sounds around him showing a new dexterity and range which only impresses. It takes little time for band and song to reveal a new lofty plateau to that of the first EP, the melodic suggestiveness of lead guitarist Nick Richardson alone a striking new adventure equipped with the broader imagination and uniqueness that flows through the veins of the track.

The Reckoning follows with the same striking creative tenacity and character, the track a tirade of biting rhythms and corrosive riffs leading the listener into a web of melodic and cleanly delivered temptation. Within the burly, ravenous tempest of bitter sonic and vocal inhospitality, it makes for a compelling mix which only intensifies its lures as the song evolves and broadens its inventive landscape before Exult in Extinction uncages its own rabid assault again led by the uncompromising swings of Coulson. Stalking the senses, the bass of Timmy Hodgson is predatory if sometimes overwhelmed by the storm of riffs and beats while again Richardson veins the cauldron of sound with tendrils of skilful melodic lava. Contrasts flare and meet within the encounter, each colluding with and countering the other in a twisting tempest matched by vocal resourcefulness across the band.

The industrial opening of A Fault in Our Design brings a bold hint of Fear Factory like hues before the track turns to stalking and intimidating the senses. There is a swing to its core presence with breeds the infectiousness soon seeping into every element, the result a blistering yet controlled incitement as predatory as it is melodically tenacious while Life Begins uncages its own mercurial invasion of sound and emotion. Though swiftly persuasive and increasingly compelling, the song does not quite reach the inventive and  gripping heights of its predecessors for these ears though individual flair is as open as the track’s animosity and melodic assurance.

The raw rabidity of I Am Heresy has the imagination and appetite magnetically hooked again straight after with its ravenous and invitingly inhospitable assault of the senses while Deep Rising provides an enthralling lure of Tabor’s striking clean side courted by a laid back but fully suggestive climate of electronically led sound. With the irresistible carnivorous tone of Hodgson’s bass to the fore, the track is superb, another stirring magnet within the release adding further aspects to the bold adventure and evolving imagination of Furyborn.

The album concludes with firstly the varied metal symphony of Wraith, an array of flavours swarming with each other before a writhing death metal causticity bursts from within their midst, and finally with the symphonically laced As We Burn. The closer revels in all the new attributes of the band’s sound and writing, its proposal as invasively seductive as it is rancorous and transfixing. Again Fear Factory-esque hues entice as more Sepultura/Gojira like elements challenge, each woven into the individual character of Furyborn’s own sound. One of its major highlights, the song ensures that Dawn of Leviathan ends on a fascinating high.

Throughout, the album tightly holds attention and fiercely pleases, increasingly so with every subsequent listen. The fact that you still feel we are listening in on one step in a journey still to unfold only adds to the impressive nature of a release which is as much about potential as it is ear exciting craft and adventure.

Dawn of Leviathan is out now through most online stores and @ http://furyborn.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/furyborn/

Pete RingMaster 11/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Triverse Massacre – Hades

Taking the listener by the throat down the five rivers encircling its underworld, Hades is the new EP from British metallers Triverse Massacre and the hellacious outpouring of the potential first bred in their previous releases. Back in 2014, the With Bared Teeth And Truths EP suggested that the band had the wares to make a potent impact on the British metal scene; Hades is that mighty trespass but one still hinting of greater things yet to come.

Bursting from the depths of Carlisle in 2010, Triverse Massacre quickly stirred up local support and in turn within the metal underground crowd with the release of debut EP In The Jaws Of Deceit. It was a growing reputation equally fuelled by their ferocious live presence which has gone on to see the band earn strong praise and share stages since with the likes of Skindred, Raging Speedhorn, Aliases, The Sun Explodes, The Colour Line, Reign Of Fury, and Anihilated and play Bloodstock Open Air last year alongside Slayer, Behemoth, Mastodon, and Gojira. With Bared Teeth and Truths provoked more concentrated attention and awareness of the band and their ravenous fusion of death, groove, and thrash metal; an incendiary mix now truly igniting within Hades.

The release opens up with Cocytus, an instrumental of imposing grandeur and looming shadows creating the climate you would expect surrounding the domain and god of the underworld. Guitars eventually encroach on the deceitful grace of the air creating a link to waiting venomous jaws as the track flows into the predacious animosity and corrosive depths of Styx. As the guitars of James Graham and Chris Kelsall gnaw and taunt the senses with riffs and grooves, vocalist Liam Stark descends and invades with his raw and potent mix of attacks, the frontman as the sound around him openly showing a growth in snarl and dexterity since that last EP. The guitars continue to weave a web of creative deceit, lures of infectious and seductive design woven to violate while the biting beats of Mike Collins and the tenebrific lines of bassist Jason McEwan have nothing in mind except merciless trespass.

It is a mighty and increasingly gripping track still slightly outshone though by next up Acheron. With grooves swinging from its first breath and contagious irritability coating every note and raw throated expulsion, the track unleashes the most virulent strain of toxic rock ‘n’ roll. The band’s sound has fully escaped any confines of extreme metal tagging, the third track epitomising its adventure and maturity and especially its rudely addictive quality forcing full submission to its rancor.

Lethe is simply bestial; a vicious harrying of the senses. Every element of its twisted body and intent is delicious harassment, grooves swarming through ears as rhythms advance with horde like barbarity. Within the tempest though, as across all tracks, there is a melodic prowess which accentuates rather than tempers the pernicious infestation but equally spotlights the instinctive craft breeding the envenomed imagination and onslaught on offer.

The EP closes with Phelegethon, arguably the biggest intrusive nagging of the senses of them all and quite possibly our favourite though that honour is consistently shared with its two predecessors. It is a stirring end though with the guitars a viperish incursion and rhythms a bold and numbing incitement as Stark crawls and lurches over the senses and psyche with vocal glands spilling malevolence in varying shades.

With Hades, Triverse Massacre has presented itself to the main table of extreme metal but as the EP thrills you still get the sense that the band is nowhere close to depleting its creative depths. That suggests very potent horizons for the quintet and for our beleaguered ears alongside them.

The Hades EP is released May 26th @ https://triversemassacre.bandcamp.com/ or http://triversemassacre.bigcartel.com/

http://www.triversemassacre.com/    https://www.facebook.com/TriverseMassacre%20/    https://twitter.com/TriverseM

Pete RingMaster 25/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Mountain Man – Bloodlust EP

TMM_RingMasterReview

Like brawling with a bear, the Bloodlust EP leaves concussive destruction and raw mayhem in its wake. It relentlessly ravages and crushes with five tracks of metal ferocity but like an unbridled storm it also leaves the senses energised and hungry for more. The release is the debut assault from Canadian band The Mountain Man; an introduction to a new primal force with potential swinging from every mighty rhythmic blow and sonic tirade.

Hailing from Vancouver,  The Mountain Man draws on inspirations from the likes of The Black Dahlia Murder, Crowbar, Gojira, Lamb of God, and Black Sabbath for their ravenous sound. They are essences easily heard within the band’s first encounter but no more so than the band’s own distinctive and carnivorous imagination and raging intensity. Since forming, the band has earned a potent reputation for a live presence which has seen them play with the likes of 88 Mile Trip, Nylithia, La Chinga, Slaughterhauser, Warrborn, Ninjaspy, Abriosis, Unbeheld, and Dead Asylum. Now it is the Matt Roach produced, Troy Glessner mastered Bloodlust EP ready to spark not only fresh homeland attention but easy to suspect far wider bred spotlights.

Virtually living up to its name from its first breath, the EP opens with the venomous Backhand of God. Its initial touch is a single captivating melody with just a hint of a rapacious edge to it. That background hunger is soon realised as the evocative groove leads into a blistering haze of raw and imposing intensity led by the bestial growl of vocalist Parker.  By now the track is prowling ears, crawling over the senses with a Lamb Of God like predation wrapped in equally intimidating tendrils of guitar enterprise cast by Tyson Tambellini and Jordan Orr. Increasingly invasive and pleasing, the track makes a formidable, attention grabbing start to Bloodlust, though it is quickly eclipsed by the EP’s title track.

Album cover_RingMasterReviewA web of primal rhythms and corrosively roaming grooves instantly ensnare ears  as Parker extends his multi-faceted vocal fury and attack to again direct the tempest. It is an exhilarating and  uncompromising tempest driven by the gloriously thunderous and dynamic beats of Ryan McCreedy, whose hellacious craft is matched in merciless kind by the psyche grinding grooves of bassist Tevyn Pacey. The track is glorious, a torrent of riffs and creative savagery bound in acute melodic enterprise which simply captures the imagination as much as the barbarousness of the track has the body gripped.

Open Graves steps forward next; it also opening with a trespass of a groove impossible to defend against. The song is a dirtier, more muggy proposal than its predecessor but still leaves its all-consuming enveloping of the senses open to ear grabbing imagination and the ever evolving hostility of the rhythms. As the song before, it is maybe hard to say that the track offer s big moments of originality yet every minute provides a collision of fresh violence and creative endeavour which leaves most extreme metal onslaughts heard so far this year, looking a touch pale and uninspired.

Showing greater diversity in their songwriting and ideation, the band opens The Great Decay with a melodic seducing which is as elegant as it is slightly melancholic and certainly laced in devilish intrigue which builds and intensifies into a maelstrom of aggravated emotions and volatile persuasion. There is restraint and unbridled animosity in the song, creative adventure and pure sonic rancor, and numerous other contrasting textures which all unite in an impressive, almost swamp like bellow of provocative suggestiveness. Ending with a brutal predatory charge employing every strain of metal viciousness possible, the track makes way for the closing ferociousness of Ghost.

It too takes to stalking the listener first, but with open barbarism in every aspect of its doom scented and blackened pestilential crawl. Breaking out stoner-esque grooves, if swung by an executioner, the band continues to prove that familiar hues does not mean predictability; the track continuing to weave recognisable yet boldly fresh textures into one mean spirited and fiercely galvanic incitement.

It did not take long to get a lusty appetite for Bloodlust, one which has only increased and got greedier with every outing. We are sure to not be alone in embracing the roar of The Mountain Man, and the recognition that things can only get bigger, better, and more brutal with the band over time. Bring it on!

The self-released Bloodlust EP is out March 25th @ http://mountainmanmetal.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/mountainmanmetal   https://twitter.com/mtnmanmetal

Pete RingMaster 23/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Carnac – The Frail Sight

carnac_band_RingMasterReview

There is little we can tell you about Turkish death metal band Carnac, except and most importantly that their recently released debut EP is well worth a concentrated moment of your time. Consisting of four highly accomplished tracks, The Frail Sight is a proposition which may not bowl you over as it treads the line of established genre traits over major originality but it is a release which instils a keen want to come back for more.

Hailing from Ankara, Carnac emerged in 2014 with a sound spawned from the inspirations of bands such as Gojira, Opeth, At the Gates, and Enslaved. As shown by their Bahadэr Sarp engineered, self-produced debut, they have come up with a refreshing incitement unafraid to entangle invasively enticing snake like grooves and uncage a feisty rhythmic agitation within a ravenous death metal landscape. We suggested it was not bereft of familiar flavours and textures yet there is no hiding away that the quartet of tracks also reveals real freshness of craft and character.

The Frail Sight opens with Hericide and a sonic breeze quickly speared by robust rhythms which in turn sparks a heavy footed and invitingly swinging canter. With the hoarse vocals of Burak Yenitepe leading the way, the track proceeds to mix up the weight of its intensity and the charge of its energy without ever relenting in its ravenous impact on ears. Throughout, the guitars of Ozan Turakine and Nurhacı Çeri unleash torrents of riffs and winding tendrils of fiercely spiced grooves to magnetic effect, wrapping round the irresistible virulence fuelling the track and driven by the rapier strikes of drummer Baybora Topaloğlu and the brooding tones of Ünal Akünal’s bass.

Carnac_RingMasterReviewIt is a superb start to the EP, a swift impact maker as predatory as it is rousing and matched in success by the following Menhirs Of Enmity. Its entrance is a kinder melodic coaxing, though it takes little time for a tempest to descend on ears again with a thrash spiced contagion of hostility and infectiousness. By this point the want and ability of the band to keep predictability at bay is forceful. It was a potent part of the first track and reveals more boisterous intent here as the band take the listener on a roller coaster of a perpetually changeable landscape of energy powered flavours and ear devouring textures.

Debaser is the next to challenge and please, it too a wall of confrontation as it builds pressure on ears. Once more the guitars cast a net of hooks and roaming grooves, all skilfully and keenly spun around brutish rhythms and the rasping vocals squalls of Yenitepe. Its body is an attention grabbing cauldron of eager activity and almost sultry invention within merciless death metal stock, and fiercely appealing even though it does lack the same incendiary spark as its predecessors.

Closing track Servant To The Void is the same, missing an indefinable but noticeable element to really stir ears and emotions yet provides a thoroughly satisfying and adventurous challenge to spend plenty of time with. The guitars just about steal the show though bass and drums provide the kind of rousing badgering you just do not want to resist whilst Yenitepe offers his own pleasing incitement of the senses, though a touch more diversity to his delivery for personal tastes would add another potent dynamic.

Carnac introduces themselves in strong style with The Frail Sight with the potential of bigger moments to come openly brewing within its increasingly enjoyable presence. This is a band to keep a close eye on we think.

The Frail Sight EP is out now via Sliptrick Records with its digital outing @ https://carnac.bandcamp.com/album/the-frail-sight

https://www.facebook.com/carnacband

Pete RingMaster 02/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Erkonauts – I Did Something Bad

THE-ERKONAUTS__RingMaster Review

Having missed the release of I Did Something Bad first time around, we as so many others will be, are seriously grateful for its world-wide re-release through Kaotoxin Records. The debut outing for Geneva’s The Erkonauts, the album is a ferociously diverse and increasingly fascinating collage of genres and sound. As thick in unpredictability as it is rich in bold imagination, I Did Something Bad is one of those propositions that heavy duty recommendations swarm to. We can only join the crowd and with two additional new tracks to contemplate and devour for all, the album’s return is a not to be missed a second time treat.

Formed in 2014, The Erkonauts consists of ex-Sybreed members in bassist/vocalist Ales Campanelli and drummer Kevin Choiral, alongside guitarists Adrien Bornand and Sébastien Puiatti. Together they expel a sound which is as punk and heavy rock as it is metal, as much progressive enterprise as it is off kilter imagination. Fair to say the band made a hefty impact with the self-released outing of their debut album in 2014, the limited first and second press of I Did Something Bad greedily consumed with the band’s reputation growing in tandem through their live show and touring voracity. Produced by Drop (Samael, ex-Sybreed), the album is now poised to allow the rest of us slow coaches to dive into The Erkonauts bedlam, as mentioned with a pair of new songs recorded last year for extra rich taste.

The Great Ass Poopery opens up the tempest, a gloriously carnivorous bordering on carnal bassline infesting ears initially to be joined by the kinetic swings of Choiral. Alone it is gripping stuff but add the fiercely shimmering guitars aligned to rousing vocals and the air becomes aflame with rumbling attitude loaded rock ‘n’ roll. In some ways like Fear Factory meets Mudvayne with Suicidal Tendencies orchestrating, the punk metal assault is creative rampancy and virulent energy fired down the barrel of a dynamically hungry cannon.

art_RingMaster ReviewTony 5 swaggers in next, its body similarly spawned to that of its predecessor but swiftly sharing its own consuming tenacity. As biting rhythms and swinging grooves embrace the excellent mix of clean and aggressively rasping vocals, the song is a cantankerous affair but with a body of spiralling twists and sonic resourcefulness which makes other’s references to bands such as System Of A Down and Gojira understandable. As the first, the track is a ravenous swamping of ears with superb clarity within its smothering touch for the swarm of progressive tenacity within to equally entice and shine.

There is a greater initial hostility to the following All the Girls should Die, riffs and rhythms angrily badgering ears whilst readying them for the fluid slip into melodic pastures with emotive mellow vocals. Entwining melodic rock fire with alternative metal flirtation as other elements snarl and grumble, the song ebbs and flows in its sonic ire whilst providing a perpetually compelling persuasion. Again there is a rampant directness upon ears at times, the track managing to be simultaneously predatory and seductive before making way for the electro lit, punk fired triumph of Nola. The first invading bassline tells you all you need to know about what is to come; the track flinging hooks and rapier beats around like a dervish whilst expelling a groove infested sonic devilry around them. Vocals again are as varied and impressive as the maelstrom of delicious sound and the increasing imagination of the aural emprise.

A sultry climate comes with Dominium Mundi, its evocative air a suggestive calm for the imagination to expand upon before the heart of the storm breaks with again addictively stabbing rhythms and aggressively hued vocals. Though it brews an inferno of sound, the earlier haunting peace continues to switch and collude with the raging animosity, leaving ears ringing, emotions aflame, and the body exhausted by the persistent breakout of heavily flirtatious grooves. The latter is weaponry which increases its pull in Hamster’s Ghosthouse straight after. With irritable riffery and stalking beats, the track stalks and infests the senses. Its hardcore/nu-metal infused rock ‘n’ roll is pure temptation as it leads the listener into a following progressive garden of melodic and classic rock. As many songs, how they start is no hint to how they depart and certainly their ever intriguing journeys as superbly epitomised here.

The creeping devilment and sonic rapacity of Gog raises the greed in an already eager appetite with ease, its dark character and lively imagination awash with biting elements and imposingly suggestive textures and flavours whilst Your Wife hugs with an acoustic caress shaped by equally warm vocals. The croon does get feistier across its melody and harmony soaked captivation but never relinquishes its elegance and charm.

There is no escaping the great humour that runs through the band’s songwriting and attitude either ,with its boldest moment coming in the punk rage and fun of 9 is better than 8. It is an unbridled riot, simple as that and impossible not to get physically involved in before Machine brings its own commanding incitement to the party. The first of the new tracks exclusive to the release, it is a growling, thrashing slab of metal diversity. Hellacious in its body, infectious in its armoury of hooks, grooves, and anthemic rhythms, the track is as much punk metal as it is extreme metal toxicity and manna to the ears.

Concluded by the tempestuous Culbutos, it a merger of thunderous confrontation and seductive tempting, I Did Something Bad has all the quality and mastery to leave body and soul enraptured. As the intricately and dramatically woven final song, the album is a creative collage of sound turned into a riveting theatre of invention and fiercely arousing adventure that no one should miss out on.

Quite simply, with a new album proposed for later this year, time is ripe for all newcomers to grab your piece of The Erkonauts via I Did Something Bad.

I Did Something Bad is out via Kaotoxin Records from February 12th @ http://www.kaotoxin.com/shop/page/6/

Check out our interview with Ales Campanelli @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/03/25/exploring-the-roar-of-the-erkonauts-with-ales-campanelli/

https://www.facebook.com/theerkonauts   http://www.erkonauts.com

Pete RingMaster 12/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

91 Allstars – Retour vers la Lumière

91allstars_RingMaster Review

Not convinced by their name but having no problem breeding a healthy appetite for their ferocious sound, 91 Allstars quickly show themselves to be another voraciously rousing proposition within the French metal scene with new album Retour vers la Lumière. The first encounter from the band since a change in line-up, their second album is a thickly enticing assault of death inspired metal aligned to melodic hardcore and plenty of other ripe spices. It roars and brawls with the senses, grips the imagination, and provides plenty to get excited over as 91 Allstars show themselves ready to take on broader spotlights.

Formed in 2005, the Paris quintet has perpetually drawn praise and support with their releases and a live presence which has seen them over the years share stages with the likes of Sick of it all, Gojira, Do Or Die , 25 ta life, Born From Pain, Mass Hysteria, and Knuckledust. Their first year saw the release of a self-titled debut EP and two years later the band teamed up with Danforth for the split release Destroy The Past. Acclaim grabbed debut album Telle Est la Loi in 2010, its success though already being eclipsed by the dynamic and hellacious enterprise of Retour vers la Lumière since its recent release.

91AS_front_RingMaster Review     The atmospheric Intro starts things off, its portentous air full of drama and suggestiveness which is taken on by the tempestuous nature and body of Omniscience. Immediately grooves and hooks are swinging with zeal as raw gruff vocals incite and rhythms batter the senses from the second track. It is a rousing confrontation, one as magnetic as it is hostile with the track’s death metal canvas coated in thrash inspired animosity and hardcore cultured dexterity.

Across both Mon bien, mon mal and Opprimés, band and ears collide as tenacious and antagonistic elements collude to spring a creative animus as appealing as it is threatening. The first of the two songs lines its assault with gripping hooks and spicy grooves as snarling vocals leads its anthemic nature. There is definitely some familiarity to parts of its textures and air but that only adds to the magnetic pull whilst its successor similarly impresses as it stalks the senses with its rumbling bass cored predation and stabbing riffery. As across the album, certain essences remind of bands such as Black Dahlia Murder and Gojira whereas the hardcore spices offer up thoughts of others like Pigs and Every Time I Die, but it all gets woven into something relatively distinctive to and constantly appealing from the French quintet.

Richesse humaine provides a raw bluster of voice and virulent sound next, its body entwined in wiry grooves and viciously anthemic tendencies whilst Les ombres de la perdition stomps along spilling acidic sonic tendrils from its bulging intensity. Epitomising the whole of Retour vers la Lumière, the pair also explore catchy exploits and melodic incitements, each spinning a tapestry of inventive lures which temper yet accentuate the unbridled force of the propositions.

The impressive intent and heart of the album continues through the ravenous animus of Eclipse éternelle and escalates in the primal trespass offered by L’ère du verseau; both songs fierce contagion with plenty to defuse expectations and further ignite a hungry appetite. Their success is matched by that of L’aube des princes, an aurally rancorous intrusion again leaving a want for more by the final note of its masterful and imaginative violation. With the songs sung in French lyrically we floundered but as shown by the encounter there is no mistaking the emotion and heart of each encounter.

Completed by the incessant infiltration of the senses that is Un sombre destin and lastly the album’s rapacious imagination enveloping title track, Retour vers la lumière is a seriously accomplished and enjoyable proposal. Certainly there is a bit of a similarity between tracks at times which defuses some of its immediate potency but songs and the album as a whole only grows to be challenge which impresses again and again.

Retour vers la lumière is out now via Dooweet Records @ http://shop.season-of-mist.com/91-all-stars-retour-vers-la-lumiere-cd-digipack

https://www.facebook.com/91AllStarsOfficiel

http://www.91allstars.com

Pete RingMaster 05/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/