Drawn to attention: exploring the fresh force that is Call To Arms

Irish metallers Call To Arms is a band we first came across with the release of their 5-track release, Invictus. It suggested band to keep close attention on with its potential and immediate enjoyment. Now the band is preparing to unveil their debut album, Fallacy, so time to catch up with the band and get to the heart of Call To Arms, look at that impending album and more….

Hello all and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We’re Call To Arms, a modern metal band from Dublin, Ireland. The band was formed in the summer of 2013 by Dean Donnelly (Vocalist) and a former bassist. Niall Ennis and Daniel Tyrell quickly joined and after our first show Alex Caffrey joined as our permanent bassist. We’ve all known each other for years, and been in bands together before. We’ve now been joined by Kevin Twomey as our drummer, who was recommended to us by a close friend.

Having been involved in other bands how have those experiences impacted on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

All of us other than Kev, have been in bands together over the years before Call To Arms formed, for the most part we have taken CTA on as our only public musical outlet. I think from previous bands we just learned how we write best; slowly developing our sound and style, and I think it mainly just inspired us to get better.

What inspired the band name?

We went through a variety of different names but never could agree on just one. We got all members to bring a name they liked and picked the one that came out. Dean had seen an Avenged Sevenfold interview where M. Shadows talked about getting inspiration from the bible, so Dean got his bible and wrote down what had stood out most to him.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As I said we had always been in bands with each other before. When forming CTA we had the ambition to just play live as much as possible and put every ounce of ourselves into our shows. We wanted to be the band you remembered/talked about on your way home after the show. We locked ourselves away and just practiced to play as tight as possible while putting on the best, most energetic shows we could do. To be honest, it’s only been in the past two years that we took a serious look at our sound, and take a serious, more mature approach to the actual musicality of the band.

Have your ambitions in that area evolved or expanded over time?

I think we are still driven for the pure love of what we do, music has always been the biggest part of all our lives, and I don’t think we’ve forgotten that.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

When the band started we were all very young, and in the midst of the metalcore trend; at the beginning we wrote a lot of metalcore style songs, but with our own twists on it. Since then, our music tastes have grown and we take influence from a lot more aspects, the biggest one being Gojira, which is a very obvious influence on our upcoming debut album. We pushed ourselves on skill and writing levels, and came out with an album that is full of influences ranging from metalcore to black or death metal, so we have definitely evolved and will continue to do so as we see fit.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

It was a mixture of both really; the biggest factor being getting to see Gojira live. It was a life changing moment for those of us who saw it, it heavily influenced us, and from that we took the decision to push our abilities and change our sound to a much darker, heavier style.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular other than the aforementioned which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

There is definitely a wide range of inspirations within the band, as I’ve said Gojira have definitely been the biggest for all of us in the past two years, they showed us a whole new way of bringing pure, brutal heaviness and mixing good melody with that, along with putting on a ridiculously amazing live show. Other than that I think we take certain aspects from bands we like into the music, but none have had the same effect on us as a whole like Gojira have.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Songwriting for us is a very long process normally, Dean is constantly writing lyrics, and myself (Niall) and Dan are constantly just writing new riffs. What normally happens is that either myself or Dan will have a few riffs we think could work together, and we will either piece them together by ourselves and bring a base of a song to everyone, or we will work with each other on piecing them together and then everyone has their input on the direction it should go, whether everything works together, and songs will normally have 3/4 variations of itself till we find something that hits us and that we’re happy with.

Where, more often than not, do you draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Lyrically we take our main inspiration from just what happens in our lives and what we see around us. We all live in fairly bad parts of Dublin, between Ballymun and Finglas, so we take inspiration from the people we deal with on a daily basis.

Could you give us some background to your new release, Fallacy?

It’s been two years writing this album and the background is this. We have all had so many things happen to us and we had to grow up. We were put in situations on a personal level that some would say are beyond our years and everything that happened left us all very angry so we wanted to write a dark record ‘cause well for the most part we are not happy people and that influences the music in such a big way. We are pissed off and lyrically the album does have a lot of finger pointing or fuck you, fuck this, fuck that but instead of saying it so literally we wanted to try and challenge ourselves with what it is we are trying to stay and how we say it. No one ever sees the behind the scenes really. This has been us giving all our time to this project. We do work day jobs but we are thinking about music constantly so even when we were tired and we wanted to sleep I can guarantee you there has been many 2am writing sessions just cause it’s what we love to do and it is our release. I could not tell you how many studios homemade or not that we have been in trying to push this monster we are trying to create.

Give us some insight to the specific themes and premise behind its songs.

Well it takes a look at humans and how we live…Our morals, beliefs and such. We live in a fucked up world where quite frankly stupidity and ignorance is the norm and there are so many that just follow that path. I (Dean) found after I left school and went to college (I dropped out, I hated it) there was almost this standard that I had to reach in order to gain acceptance by people as if a piece of paper truly dictated how my life was going to go or who I would turn out to be. I disliked the idea that if I were going to be happy that I would have to swallow my pride and spend my time doing something I did not want to do. People became vultures to me. They would say shit to try and dishearten what I was trying to do musically because it didn’t fit the idea of me sitting in an office doing 9 – 5 day in day out. That is just an example of the many things written about on the album. Another example would be how people like to play the victim even though they are the ones trying to hurt you. There is a song on the album called Futile Existence and it dwells on the topic of the rat race in life. I know a lot people who preach love, unity and respect but show none of the three just mentioned in their actions. They are only here to benefit themselves and will step over anyone even the people they “care” about to get what they want.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

With this project we were in constant pre – production from the get go and by the time we got to the studio about 95% of the music was finalised but you will always get studios ideas to make the song that bit more interesting. In terms of vocals I (Dean) had all of my melodies ready and waited for my turn in the studio to try out other ideas because we did pre – production by ourselves and I wanted to wait for Josh Robinson (our producer) to be there because he is also a vocalist so we had a lot of fun just bouncing different ideas off each other. It was at times tedious but it was worth it.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

We love to play live and quite frankly up until now we have built our reputation solely on being a live band. We released two demos (I won’t even call them EP’s and they were terrible.) Anyway we have established ourselves as one of the most energetic live bands in Ireland. We just go up and have fun if I’m being honest. We are in your face and if you’re standing there with your arms folded trying to be a “cool kid” well I can guarantee again they don’t stand there for long cause our priority is to make people move. We don’t go up to sing a warm acoustic set. We want to be loud. We want to be aggressive.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Opportunity doesn’t fall on your lap. We have to make it happen. Yes it is hard but there are ways around it. We are fortunate to be playing the Metal To The Masses competition where you try and win a slot to play on the New Blood Stage at Bloodstock. We also got announced for Aggressive Fest in the Czech Republic. We have many things to announce such as tours very soon so keep an eye out on our social media pages.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

It is a big positive if you know how to use it correctly. We are still trying to learn how to use it but so far it is doing us very good as it is easy to interact with the people who follow your band.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for reading, check us out on Spotify, YouTube, Facebook and Instagram. Hopefully we can play a show near you sometime in the near future.

https://www.facebook.com/CallToArmsIRL/    https://twitter.com/CallToArmsIRL    https://www.instagram.com/calltoarmsirl/    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3ExTFKN9NDnrYhz9noEORQ

Pete RingMaster 12/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Inferum – Modern Massacre EP

photo by Emmelie Herwegh

Making an introduction very hard to ignore are Dutch metallers Inferum through their debut release, the Modern Massacre EP. It offers four barbarous slices of, to use their press release’s term, “Mechanical Death Metal” but a trespass just as eagerly embracing groove and deathcore bred enterprise. It is a striking first listen at a band young in age and yet to reach its second year but one with the potential to make major statements within the European metal scene ahead.

The Eindhoven hailing outfit draw on inspirations found in the likes of Thy Art Is Murder, Lamb of God, Slaughter to Prevail, Meshuggah, and Gojira; a couple of which can be sensed within the EP’s opener and title track. Modern Massacre instantly wraps ears with wiry grooves as rhythms probe with forceful intent. Both continue to entice and invade as vocalist Morrison de Boer quickly shows his adventurous delivery, employing varying textures within his first assault alone. The sonic dexterity of guitarist Lars Deelman is matched by the barbarous designs cast by rhythm guitarist Ozzy Voskuilen, together creating a tempest as infectiously alluring as it is fearsomely intrusive with never a handful of seconds passing without new adventure and unpredictable twists being shared.

It is an outstanding dramatic start which alone demands repeat attention to the release and quickly backed in potency by the following Blinding Supremacy. Instantly shaped by the predatory tone of Stan Albers’ bass and the imposing swings of drummer Wouter Macare, the track is an even darker and more murderous proposition than the first but fusing a controlled lighter tempting into its inhospitable climate. Indeed it has moments which skilfully and imaginatively wrong-foot expectations and assumptions, creating a maze like proposal which simply grows more impressive with every passing minute and listen.

Rotten King slams its credentials into thoughts and appetite immediately after as rhythms scythe through the senses followed swiftly by a raw animus of sound cast by guitars and vocals. Inferum have just played with Cryptopsy at Patronaat Haarlem and there is a whiff of the Canadians to the character and technical tenacity of the third track and of Gojira too as it intrudes upon and devours the senses with relish.

Closing track, Incineration, shares its own almost kaleidoscopic whirl of barbarous invention and violent unpredictability; each second seemingly an evolution of the last but with a fluidity which breeds infectious bait for quickly ravenous ears. The groan of bass is as irresistible as the vocal enterprise of de Boer, both as compelling as the imaginative sonic netting sprung around the listener by Deelman and Voskuilen. With Macare’s merciless strikes on top, the song brings the release to a masterfully stirring conclusion.

Only further impressing with every listen, Modern Massacre is a debut demanding to be taken notice of from a band which with their already open creative adventure and fires increasingly burning are surely heading to major attention.

Modern Massacre is available now @ https://inferum.nl/product/ep-modern-massacre/

https://www.facebook.com/InferumBand/

Pete RingMaster 22/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Furyborn – Dawn Of Leviathan

Since emerging in 2010, UK outfit Furyborn seem to make a potent statement with every move they make within the British metal scene. From their live debut in 2011, they have earned support and a reputation which has only gathered momentum and is sure to again with the release of their debut album, Dawn Of Leviathan. It is a ferociously imposing and compelling affair that arouses the same senses it trespasses with the band’s increasingly distinct and adventurous style of melodic death metal.

That live side of the Poole hailing quintet has seen them become one of the most potent forces across the South of England, win the regional Metal 2 The Masses competition and play Bloodstock Open Air for only their seventh live outing. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Threat Signal, Mors Principium Est, Sylosis, The Agonist, Malefice, The Defiled, Evile, (Hed) P.E. and Ted Maul as well as release their first acclaimed EP, The Reaping Of Our Days released in 2012 through Bored Stiff Records. Fair to say the band has been nagging at national and broader attention since day one, increasingly growing both which the highly anticipated Dawn Of Leviathan can only escalate.

The album quickly shows a new strength in intensity, craft, and imagination within Furyborn; a growth in all aspects infused into a maturity which is maybe unexpected within a first full-length, even from a band in its seventh year. Dawn of Leviathan opens with the atmospheric trespass of Second Sun, a brief harass of raw sonic dissonance which leads into the album’s title track where instantly a barrage of intrusive beats from drummer Tim Coulson and ravenous riffs from rhythm guitarist Rob Walker devour ears. Just as forceful are the raw throated roars of vocalist Jut Tabor who quickly seizes attention with his grudging tones, their causticity leading to a great flame of clean endeavour; the frontman, as the sounds around him showing a new dexterity and range which only impresses. It takes little time for band and song to reveal a new lofty plateau to that of the first EP, the melodic suggestiveness of lead guitarist Nick Richardson alone a striking new adventure equipped with the broader imagination and uniqueness that flows through the veins of the track.

The Reckoning follows with the same striking creative tenacity and character, the track a tirade of biting rhythms and corrosive riffs leading the listener into a web of melodic and cleanly delivered temptation. Within the burly, ravenous tempest of bitter sonic and vocal inhospitality, it makes for a compelling mix which only intensifies its lures as the song evolves and broadens its inventive landscape before Exult in Extinction uncages its own rabid assault again led by the uncompromising swings of Coulson. Stalking the senses, the bass of Timmy Hodgson is predatory if sometimes overwhelmed by the storm of riffs and beats while again Richardson veins the cauldron of sound with tendrils of skilful melodic lava. Contrasts flare and meet within the encounter, each colluding with and countering the other in a twisting tempest matched by vocal resourcefulness across the band.

The industrial opening of A Fault in Our Design brings a bold hint of Fear Factory like hues before the track turns to stalking and intimidating the senses. There is a swing to its core presence with breeds the infectiousness soon seeping into every element, the result a blistering yet controlled incitement as predatory as it is melodically tenacious while Life Begins uncages its own mercurial invasion of sound and emotion. Though swiftly persuasive and increasingly compelling, the song does not quite reach the inventive and  gripping heights of its predecessors for these ears though individual flair is as open as the track’s animosity and melodic assurance.

The raw rabidity of I Am Heresy has the imagination and appetite magnetically hooked again straight after with its ravenous and invitingly inhospitable assault of the senses while Deep Rising provides an enthralling lure of Tabor’s striking clean side courted by a laid back but fully suggestive climate of electronically led sound. With the irresistible carnivorous tone of Hodgson’s bass to the fore, the track is superb, another stirring magnet within the release adding further aspects to the bold adventure and evolving imagination of Furyborn.

The album concludes with firstly the varied metal symphony of Wraith, an array of flavours swarming with each other before a writhing death metal causticity bursts from within their midst, and finally with the symphonically laced As We Burn. The closer revels in all the new attributes of the band’s sound and writing, its proposal as invasively seductive as it is rancorous and transfixing. Again Fear Factory-esque hues entice as more Sepultura/Gojira like elements challenge, each woven into the individual character of Furyborn’s own sound. One of its major highlights, the song ensures that Dawn of Leviathan ends on a fascinating high.

Throughout, the album tightly holds attention and fiercely pleases, increasingly so with every subsequent listen. The fact that you still feel we are listening in on one step in a journey still to unfold only adds to the impressive nature of a release which is as much about potential as it is ear exciting craft and adventure.

Dawn of Leviathan is out now through most online stores and @ http://furyborn.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/furyborn/

Pete RingMaster 11/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Triverse Massacre – Hades

Taking the listener by the throat down the five rivers encircling its underworld, Hades is the new EP from British metallers Triverse Massacre and the hellacious outpouring of the potential first bred in their previous releases. Back in 2014, the With Bared Teeth And Truths EP suggested that the band had the wares to make a potent impact on the British metal scene; Hades is that mighty trespass but one still hinting of greater things yet to come.

Bursting from the depths of Carlisle in 2010, Triverse Massacre quickly stirred up local support and in turn within the metal underground crowd with the release of debut EP In The Jaws Of Deceit. It was a growing reputation equally fuelled by their ferocious live presence which has gone on to see the band earn strong praise and share stages since with the likes of Skindred, Raging Speedhorn, Aliases, The Sun Explodes, The Colour Line, Reign Of Fury, and Anihilated and play Bloodstock Open Air last year alongside Slayer, Behemoth, Mastodon, and Gojira. With Bared Teeth and Truths provoked more concentrated attention and awareness of the band and their ravenous fusion of death, groove, and thrash metal; an incendiary mix now truly igniting within Hades.

The release opens up with Cocytus, an instrumental of imposing grandeur and looming shadows creating the climate you would expect surrounding the domain and god of the underworld. Guitars eventually encroach on the deceitful grace of the air creating a link to waiting venomous jaws as the track flows into the predacious animosity and corrosive depths of Styx. As the guitars of James Graham and Chris Kelsall gnaw and taunt the senses with riffs and grooves, vocalist Liam Stark descends and invades with his raw and potent mix of attacks, the frontman as the sound around him openly showing a growth in snarl and dexterity since that last EP. The guitars continue to weave a web of creative deceit, lures of infectious and seductive design woven to violate while the biting beats of Mike Collins and the tenebrific lines of bassist Jason McEwan have nothing in mind except merciless trespass.

It is a mighty and increasingly gripping track still slightly outshone though by next up Acheron. With grooves swinging from its first breath and contagious irritability coating every note and raw throated expulsion, the track unleashes the most virulent strain of toxic rock ‘n’ roll. The band’s sound has fully escaped any confines of extreme metal tagging, the third track epitomising its adventure and maturity and especially its rudely addictive quality forcing full submission to its rancor.

Lethe is simply bestial; a vicious harrying of the senses. Every element of its twisted body and intent is delicious harassment, grooves swarming through ears as rhythms advance with horde like barbarity. Within the tempest though, as across all tracks, there is a melodic prowess which accentuates rather than tempers the pernicious infestation but equally spotlights the instinctive craft breeding the envenomed imagination and onslaught on offer.

The EP closes with Phelegethon, arguably the biggest intrusive nagging of the senses of them all and quite possibly our favourite though that honour is consistently shared with its two predecessors. It is a stirring end though with the guitars a viperish incursion and rhythms a bold and numbing incitement as Stark crawls and lurches over the senses and psyche with vocal glands spilling malevolence in varying shades.

With Hades, Triverse Massacre has presented itself to the main table of extreme metal but as the EP thrills you still get the sense that the band is nowhere close to depleting its creative depths. That suggests very potent horizons for the quintet and for our beleaguered ears alongside them.

The Hades EP is released May 26th @ https://triversemassacre.bandcamp.com/ or http://triversemassacre.bigcartel.com/

http://www.triversemassacre.com/    https://www.facebook.com/TriverseMassacre%20/    https://twitter.com/TriverseM

Pete RingMaster 25/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Mountain Man – Bloodlust EP

TMM_RingMasterReview

Like brawling with a bear, the Bloodlust EP leaves concussive destruction and raw mayhem in its wake. It relentlessly ravages and crushes with five tracks of metal ferocity but like an unbridled storm it also leaves the senses energised and hungry for more. The release is the debut assault from Canadian band The Mountain Man; an introduction to a new primal force with potential swinging from every mighty rhythmic blow and sonic tirade.

Hailing from Vancouver,  The Mountain Man draws on inspirations from the likes of The Black Dahlia Murder, Crowbar, Gojira, Lamb of God, and Black Sabbath for their ravenous sound. They are essences easily heard within the band’s first encounter but no more so than the band’s own distinctive and carnivorous imagination and raging intensity. Since forming, the band has earned a potent reputation for a live presence which has seen them play with the likes of 88 Mile Trip, Nylithia, La Chinga, Slaughterhauser, Warrborn, Ninjaspy, Abriosis, Unbeheld, and Dead Asylum. Now it is the Matt Roach produced, Troy Glessner mastered Bloodlust EP ready to spark not only fresh homeland attention but easy to suspect far wider bred spotlights.

Virtually living up to its name from its first breath, the EP opens with the venomous Backhand of God. Its initial touch is a single captivating melody with just a hint of a rapacious edge to it. That background hunger is soon realised as the evocative groove leads into a blistering haze of raw and imposing intensity led by the bestial growl of vocalist Parker.  By now the track is prowling ears, crawling over the senses with a Lamb Of God like predation wrapped in equally intimidating tendrils of guitar enterprise cast by Tyson Tambellini and Jordan Orr. Increasingly invasive and pleasing, the track makes a formidable, attention grabbing start to Bloodlust, though it is quickly eclipsed by the EP’s title track.

Album cover_RingMasterReviewA web of primal rhythms and corrosively roaming grooves instantly ensnare ears  as Parker extends his multi-faceted vocal fury and attack to again direct the tempest. It is an exhilarating and  uncompromising tempest driven by the gloriously thunderous and dynamic beats of Ryan McCreedy, whose hellacious craft is matched in merciless kind by the psyche grinding grooves of bassist Tevyn Pacey. The track is glorious, a torrent of riffs and creative savagery bound in acute melodic enterprise which simply captures the imagination as much as the barbarousness of the track has the body gripped.

Open Graves steps forward next; it also opening with a trespass of a groove impossible to defend against. The song is a dirtier, more muggy proposal than its predecessor but still leaves its all-consuming enveloping of the senses open to ear grabbing imagination and the ever evolving hostility of the rhythms. As the song before, it is maybe hard to say that the track offer s big moments of originality yet every minute provides a collision of fresh violence and creative endeavour which leaves most extreme metal onslaughts heard so far this year, looking a touch pale and uninspired.

Showing greater diversity in their songwriting and ideation, the band opens The Great Decay with a melodic seducing which is as elegant as it is slightly melancholic and certainly laced in devilish intrigue which builds and intensifies into a maelstrom of aggravated emotions and volatile persuasion. There is restraint and unbridled animosity in the song, creative adventure and pure sonic rancor, and numerous other contrasting textures which all unite in an impressive, almost swamp like bellow of provocative suggestiveness. Ending with a brutal predatory charge employing every strain of metal viciousness possible, the track makes way for the closing ferociousness of Ghost.

It too takes to stalking the listener first, but with open barbarism in every aspect of its doom scented and blackened pestilential crawl. Breaking out stoner-esque grooves, if swung by an executioner, the band continues to prove that familiar hues does not mean predictability; the track continuing to weave recognisable yet boldly fresh textures into one mean spirited and fiercely galvanic incitement.

It did not take long to get a lusty appetite for Bloodlust, one which has only increased and got greedier with every outing. We are sure to not be alone in embracing the roar of The Mountain Man, and the recognition that things can only get bigger, better, and more brutal with the band over time. Bring it on!

The self-released Bloodlust EP is out March 25th @ http://mountainmanmetal.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/mountainmanmetal   https://twitter.com/mtnmanmetal

Pete RingMaster 23/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Carnac – The Frail Sight

carnac_band_RingMasterReview

There is little we can tell you about Turkish death metal band Carnac, except and most importantly that their recently released debut EP is well worth a concentrated moment of your time. Consisting of four highly accomplished tracks, The Frail Sight is a proposition which may not bowl you over as it treads the line of established genre traits over major originality but it is a release which instils a keen want to come back for more.

Hailing from Ankara, Carnac emerged in 2014 with a sound spawned from the inspirations of bands such as Gojira, Opeth, At the Gates, and Enslaved. As shown by their Bahadэr Sarp engineered, self-produced debut, they have come up with a refreshing incitement unafraid to entangle invasively enticing snake like grooves and uncage a feisty rhythmic agitation within a ravenous death metal landscape. We suggested it was not bereft of familiar flavours and textures yet there is no hiding away that the quartet of tracks also reveals real freshness of craft and character.

The Frail Sight opens with Hericide and a sonic breeze quickly speared by robust rhythms which in turn sparks a heavy footed and invitingly swinging canter. With the hoarse vocals of Burak Yenitepe leading the way, the track proceeds to mix up the weight of its intensity and the charge of its energy without ever relenting in its ravenous impact on ears. Throughout, the guitars of Ozan Turakine and Nurhacı Çeri unleash torrents of riffs and winding tendrils of fiercely spiced grooves to magnetic effect, wrapping round the irresistible virulence fuelling the track and driven by the rapier strikes of drummer Baybora Topaloğlu and the brooding tones of Ünal Akünal’s bass.

Carnac_RingMasterReviewIt is a superb start to the EP, a swift impact maker as predatory as it is rousing and matched in success by the following Menhirs Of Enmity. Its entrance is a kinder melodic coaxing, though it takes little time for a tempest to descend on ears again with a thrash spiced contagion of hostility and infectiousness. By this point the want and ability of the band to keep predictability at bay is forceful. It was a potent part of the first track and reveals more boisterous intent here as the band take the listener on a roller coaster of a perpetually changeable landscape of energy powered flavours and ear devouring textures.

Debaser is the next to challenge and please, it too a wall of confrontation as it builds pressure on ears. Once more the guitars cast a net of hooks and roaming grooves, all skilfully and keenly spun around brutish rhythms and the rasping vocals squalls of Yenitepe. Its body is an attention grabbing cauldron of eager activity and almost sultry invention within merciless death metal stock, and fiercely appealing even though it does lack the same incendiary spark as its predecessors.

Closing track Servant To The Void is the same, missing an indefinable but noticeable element to really stir ears and emotions yet provides a thoroughly satisfying and adventurous challenge to spend plenty of time with. The guitars just about steal the show though bass and drums provide the kind of rousing badgering you just do not want to resist whilst Yenitepe offers his own pleasing incitement of the senses, though a touch more diversity to his delivery for personal tastes would add another potent dynamic.

Carnac introduces themselves in strong style with The Frail Sight with the potential of bigger moments to come openly brewing within its increasingly enjoyable presence. This is a band to keep a close eye on we think.

The Frail Sight EP is out now via Sliptrick Records with its digital outing @ https://carnac.bandcamp.com/album/the-frail-sight

https://www.facebook.com/carnacband

Pete RingMaster 02/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/