Dog Tired – The Electric Abyss

The metal world has never been majorly short of striking and often influential bands from Scotland and adding to that list of potent protagonists is Dog Tired. They are not newcomers as such having emerged in 2004 and have earned a strong reputation and loyal fan base for their riff driven metal but with new album, The Electric Abyss, they have revealed themselves ready to step into a far larger spotlight.

Hailing from Edinburgh, Dog Tired are described as “Merging the relentless brutality of Gojira and Entombed with the riff orientated assault of Pantera and Metallica.” It is a fair description for the band’s multi-flavoured metal but only hints at its voracious sound and presence. At times across their quartet’s latest release, it is a proposition which involves the familiar with their own imagination but persistently comes through speakers with a character and freshness individual to Dog Tired.

The Electric Abyss opens with its title track, the song looming out of sonic electronic mists with dark ominous shadows behind a foreboding breath. In swift time heavy ravenous riffs laid down their claim on an already eager attention, as quickly erupting in a predacious contagious stroll as rhythms equip the emerging track with their own imposing bait. The grouchily throated vocals of Chris Thomson in turn make for a vociferous incitement, growling across the wiry exploits of guitarist Luke James and the virulent rhythmic trespass of bassist Barry Buchanan and drummer Keef Blaikie. It is a persistent and rousing nagging which only proves more persuasive as imagination brings greater twists and richer atmospheric intimation.

It is an outstanding and impressive beginning to the album and never relinquished favourite track honours but harried for that positioned across The Electric Abyss and quickly proven by the following Flesh Church. Its visceral trespass is bred on a mix of death and groove voracity, everything slightly less urgent than within its predecessor but just as predatory and even more sinisterly emotive. There are moments when the track uncages its vigour but still there is a dark restraint which only helps thicken its lure before Dagoth’s Nine accosts the senses with its creative animus. Grooves and indeed vocals in part have a harmonious toning which escalates the inherent catchiness of the pugnacious assail escaping the craft and invention of the band.

Beyond The Grave provides the best beginning to any track within the release, its rhythmic incitement within almost perniciously alluring waves of sonic intimation pure temptation and only escalated as the bass unfurls its bestial and virulent provocation. The track’s expanding prowl continued to seduce from under the skin; its addictive lures and feral snares quickly and insistently compulsive as Thompson’s barbarous tones prey on song and senses alike as another major moment within the album is discharged,

The melodic elegance and calm of Aeon provides a magnetic respite and seduction from the voracious darkness before and after it, the instrumental a beacon in the surrounding storm which returns with almost carnal relish within Lord Of The Vile. From its deception of atmospheric tranquillity if one embracing dark whispers and portentous intimation, Slayer-esque riffs erupt as rhythms venomously pummel. Immediately a viral contagiousness invades ears and appetite, the outstanding track swinging and savaging with insatiable intent and zeal; as throughout the release individual craft uniting with collective imagination and invention.

Both 1968, with its carnivorous stalking of the senses amidst a blackened hue as crawling riffs court ravenous grooves and vocals, and the primal gait and breath of Hunter’s Moon left little for ears and pleasure to want for, the first of the two especially inspiriting with its successor a full and riveting adventure all on its own as its instrumental landscape, lined with a slight Celtic lit intimation, twists and turns with rousing and potent effect.

Kingdom brings the record to a close, the final track another slab of animated and invigorating skill and enterprise leaving this listener welcomingly harassed and aroused. It is a song summing up the craft and invention of Dog Tired and the thick textures and varied nature of their sound within a recognisable yet individual extreme metal tempest.

As much as The Electric Abyss made a potent mark first time around it was with subsequent plays that it truly blossomed into one of our favourite metal onslaughts of the year; give it time and it could be yours too.

The Electric Abyss is out now; available@ https://dogtired.bandcamp.com/album/the-electric-abyss

http://www.dogtiredmetal.com/   https://www.facebook.com/dogtiredmetal   https://twitter.com/dogtiredmetal

Pete RingMaster 27/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

RingMaster Review Interviews – Death Tribe

For those who may not know who you are, introduce yourselves quickly.

Hello this is Anthony Kaoteon talking to you about my new project Death Tribe as we have released the new album in 22nd of February https://deathtribeofficial.bandcamp.com/releases

Describe your sound in as few words as possible.

It is big. It is intense. It is diverse. It is metal.

Who are your three biggest influences as a band?

Life, Nature and injustice

What’s the meaning behind your band name?

I wake up every day grateful that I am still breathing, and this has given me the motivation to do the best with my time as our time might come at any moment. This is why I decided to create a tribe that reminds themselves of death and how fragile humans are so that we celebrate every single breath.

How did you approach the new album in terms of writing and recording?

I wanted this record to sound diverse and enjoyable from beginning till end instead of having one static genre. This is why you can find tracks from black ’n’ roll, death metal to groove metal and they still stick together like a solid unit which makes it really interesting.

Do you have any personal favourite songs on the release?

Every now and then my favourite changes depending on the mood.

Explain the meaning behind the album title, ‘Beyond Pain and Pleasure: A Desert Experiment’.

Relative to the idea that we might die any second and when you have death on your mind at every choice you realize that there is no pain or pleasure just experiences. Hence the first part of the album title and the second part is paying homage to an event that happened in Dubai where various talents from the region got together to play music regardless of their cultural differences which was an influence for me to have multiple artists on the album.

Do you have a current video in support of its release? Describe the concept of the video.

The video concept is derived from the lyrics and how hollow and shallow life can be. I went for an animated video to best deliver the message.

Do you have any live dates lined up at present?

No.

What are your favourite songs to perform live?

‘Hollow’ and ‘Beyond Pain and Pleasure’

If you could open for anyone, who would it be?

Today it would be great to open for the likes of Behemoth, Gojira and Slayer on their last tour.

Any comical stories from your time as a band you can share with us?

Not that I can think of

Any closing comments?

More music, more metal, releasing KAOTEON third album with Adrian from At The Gates on drums and Linus from Obscura on bass.

Find out more about and from Death Tribe @ https://www.facebook.com/DeathTribe.Official/

Questions by Elliot Leaver

Down To The Bunker – Misery

A growling, snarling beast of a release, Misery is the debut album from Swiss quintet Down To The Bunker and an encounter which marks them out as one richly promising, indeed already impressive proposition. Offering up nine tracks of alt metal predation merged with heavy rock contagion and hardcore dissonance it all delivered with potent technical prowess and an uncaged heart, the release is one wake-up call to and declaration of intent from one rather exciting outfit.

Formed in 2012, the Genève hailing band has worked through years of line-up instability as it searched for the right personnel. It is a time though the band equally used to explore and hone a sound which is as unpredictable as it is varied and adventurous. A self-titled EP in 2015 drew keen attention though its support live was a struggle with again a changing line-up trespassing the next steps for Down To The Bunker. Now though things seem to have settled and with the band’s strongest line-up to date, the stability relishing result being the striking Misery.

Embracing a sound which sees the likes of Tool, Korn, Rage Against The Machine, Meshuggah, Gojira, Promethee, and Code Orange amongst its inspirations, Misery is an album which arouses as it challenges. Almost every moment has attention glued to its lures, the thrill of the unexpected rearing its head throughout an encounter which twists the familiar into its own pattern of fresh imagination and invention. Certainly there are moments where it ebbs and flows in the intensity of its temptation but there are few if any moments where it allows the listener to impulsively drift off elsewhere.

From the opening bait of first track Mother, the album was burrowing under the skin; sonic lures straining against the speakers urgently wanting out. The guitars of Matt and Jerem continue to bait the senses as heavier and darker strands join them, the bass of Arnaud a predatory taunt alongside the considered but imposing swings of drummer Léo. Completed by the fine tones of vocalist Jo, the track swiftly grows into a formidable and compelling incitement, imagination and unpredictability increasingly fuelling its enterprise and inescapable persuasion.

The increasingly magnetic and impressive start is easily continued by the album’s title track. It too springs from a seductive sonic lure if one which lances the senses rather than caresses them. The emerging web of guitars ensnared ears with swiftly nagging and devious intent; a strength of coercion matched in voice and rhythm. There is a touch of Mudvayne to the track at times which does it no harm or indeed the atmospheric winds which bring haunting melodies amid seemingly calm but dark aural intimation.

With the twisted canvas of The Asylum a refreshing bedlam of sound and individual craft shaped into another tantalising captivation come threat and the, at times, even more creatively unhinged and similarly fascinating Chrysalis, there is no let up on attention and enjoyment. Each track lured and trapped both with a creative greed which alone marks Down To The Bunker out, a dexterity in thought, songwriting and adventure which equally infests next up Ethics. As with all songs, it is a writhing collusion of sonic vines and metallic dissonance matched in vocal and lyrical dispute, and like each a blend of the barbarous and seductive as a cast of styles and flavours join up to ignite the band’s imagination and sound. There are moments of deceptive and corrupted calm which maybe disrupt the flow and impact of the track but it is that unexpected ideation which also makes it as potent as anything within Misery.

Through the intimately reflective and melodically evocative Waves, a quest with its own underlying snarl, and the sonically invasive and haunting Lost In The Desert, there was no let up on bold enterprise and striking intimation. The latter is like a senses suffocating limbo which slowly but surely reveals it’s waiting demons and distortions resulting in an experience which gloriously tests and provokes.

a final pair of bonus tracks in Machine and Alive brings the album to a dramatic and imposing close. The first and another major highlight of the release openly wears familiarity in its holler yet it would be hard to say it is anything other than a Down To The Bunker creative clamour while its successor prowls, pretty much crawls through ears with a great mix of heavy grunge and rapacious metal bound in melodic volatility.

It is a great end to an album which just pleasures and grows more impressive over time. In their seventh year Down To The Bunker will be making their first introduction to a great many with Misery but it is easy to believe they will be no strangers to them and major spotlights hereon in.

Misery is released February 22nd via Tenacity Music; available @ https://tenacity-music.bandcamp.com/album/misery

https://www.facebook.com/DownToTheBunker

Pete RingMaster 20/02/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Khaidian – Penumbra

The release of the debut album from UK metallers Khaidian has been long time coming, seemingly expected and all geared up to be unleashed in 2016. But as ears and the passions are finally being infested, those patient many will feel it has been more than worth the wait and can assume they will soon be joined by tides of new hungrily impressed and lustful hearts. Penumbra is quite simply superb; a cauldron of imagination and intensity wrapped in a rainbow of melodic enterprise amidst a tempest of technical and multi-flavoured dexterity.

Listening to Penumbra, there is no surprise at the rising reputation and stature of the London based outfit; both recently given boost by a trio of lead tracks to the album. Weaving a web of rich intrigue and thick persuasion bred from a fusion of progressive and technical metal, the band’s sound is just as inventive and tempting with its alignment to eager strains of electronic cunning. It is something akin to a fusion of the voracious flavours and touch of Gojira, Sikth and The Browning with the ravenous/melodic adventuring of Tricore/An Entire Legion; even so Khaidian pull it all to a proposition which is as unapologetically unique as it is greedily captivating as Penumbra forcibly proves.

Founded in 2010 by guitarist/programmer John Tyrell (ex-Interlock), Khaidian found its first few years as much a difficult journey to find the right mix and line-up of people as an adventure in nurturing and breeding their vision and sound. In fact, the perfect mix of personnel only really appeared once drummer Paul Fowler (ex Dragnerve) was enlisted to join Tyrell, vocalist Andy Hutton (ex-Stoopi/Dragnerve), and bassist Joseph Perumal (Mortad/ex-Almamorta). It was Fowlers departure leading up to the original release date of Penumbra which he plays upon which played a big part in its delay it seems but the band has since found the equally striking and agile percussionist in Kris Perrin (Gravil, ex-One Fell Down, Faux Fighters), he completing the current line-up last year.

Now with everything firmly in place Penumbra has been unveiled and we for one can only suggest it is the first leap in a massive and surely certain ascent for the band into the broadest spotlights. The album opens with Pearls Before Swine and immediately had ears pricked and appetite keenly intrigued as sonic and electronic enticement colluded with already stirring rhythmic lures. Just as swiftly the equally potent and enticing vocals of Hutton step forward; his clean, calm yet emotive tones an alluring bridge between the band’s sides of physical trespass and suggestive melody, their indeed their technical hunger and electronic intimation. The track continues to stomp and dance with the senses, a mix of the familiar and boldly fresh creating a whole new vehicle for ears and imagination to ride with.

The striking start is only reinforced by the band’s outstanding new video/single Dominion. Its entrance is even more rapacious but almost instantly wears a portentous calm before its predacious instincts unite with inventive and somatic catchiness. Pure persuasion with increasing enslavement of the senses, the track embraces further hues resembling those cast by Voyager and Fear Factory as it twists and turns with relish but never breaking its fluidity or charm carrying rapacity.

The following Trigger The Landslide glides in on electronic shadows around a slim but copious melodic insinuation; all the while its air brewing an intensity and threat which turns into a senses harrying stroll. Still the menace is part anger, part seduction; the song never choosing sides even as its body and imagination boils across another devilish landscape of thought, emotion, and craft. As with all tracks some kind of participation is inevitable with the increasingly blossoming and thrilling encounter, a manipulation just as potent within next up Thrive and in turn Sense Of The Spherical. A Korn-esque scent pervades the first of the outstanding two, its carnivorous breath colluding with the skittish flirtation and bite of rhythms and the tantalising yet voracious almost rabid lures of guitars. Hutton again is a matching magnet in its midst as the track creatively and vocally writhes while its successor similarly draws dark and esurient strains of sound and intent with melodic and flirtatious enterprise to tempt, seduce, and infest ears and imagination in tandem with the body.

The album concludes with the pair of Evasion and Dramatic Professions Of Martyrdom, the band getting under the skin with relish in the first where again whiffs of Korn meets Fear Factory share its own inescapable  individuality, and through the second’s musical irritability, melodic and electronic espionage, and simply unique prowess. Both tracks enslaved as heartily and strenuously as those before, the bounce of bodies enough to suggest eager submission, the following lust unbridled confirmation.

No release is going to win over all but with its thick mix of flavours including at times spices of grunge, alternative metal and more alongside sheer invention, Penumbra is one which is going to conquer far more than most and with ease we suggest. Though in theory three years late it is one of the freshest most thrilling things heard here in a long time and Khaidian one of the most exciting propositions.

Penumbra is out now through Armalyte Industries; available @ https://armalyte.bandcamp.com/album/khaidian-penumbra

http://www.khaidian.com/   https://www.facebook.com/khaidianmusic/   https://twitter.com/khaidian

Pete RingMaster 30/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Drawn to attention: exploring the fresh force that is Call To Arms

Irish metallers Call To Arms is a band we first came across with the release of their 5-track release, Invictus. It suggested band to keep close attention on with its potential and immediate enjoyment. Now the band is preparing to unveil their debut album, Fallacy, so time to catch up with the band and get to the heart of Call To Arms, look at that impending album and more….

Hello all and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We’re Call To Arms, a modern metal band from Dublin, Ireland. The band was formed in the summer of 2013 by Dean Donnelly (Vocalist) and a former bassist. Niall Ennis and Daniel Tyrell quickly joined and after our first show Alex Caffrey joined as our permanent bassist. We’ve all known each other for years, and been in bands together before. We’ve now been joined by Kevin Twomey as our drummer, who was recommended to us by a close friend.

Having been involved in other bands how have those experiences impacted on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

All of us other than Kev, have been in bands together over the years before Call To Arms formed, for the most part we have taken CTA on as our only public musical outlet. I think from previous bands we just learned how we write best; slowly developing our sound and style, and I think it mainly just inspired us to get better.

What inspired the band name?

We went through a variety of different names but never could agree on just one. We got all members to bring a name they liked and picked the one that came out. Dean had seen an Avenged Sevenfold interview where M. Shadows talked about getting inspiration from the bible, so Dean got his bible and wrote down what had stood out most to him.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As I said we had always been in bands with each other before. When forming CTA we had the ambition to just play live as much as possible and put every ounce of ourselves into our shows. We wanted to be the band you remembered/talked about on your way home after the show. We locked ourselves away and just practiced to play as tight as possible while putting on the best, most energetic shows we could do. To be honest, it’s only been in the past two years that we took a serious look at our sound, and take a serious, more mature approach to the actual musicality of the band.

Have your ambitions in that area evolved or expanded over time?

I think we are still driven for the pure love of what we do, music has always been the biggest part of all our lives, and I don’t think we’ve forgotten that.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

When the band started we were all very young, and in the midst of the metalcore trend; at the beginning we wrote a lot of metalcore style songs, but with our own twists on it. Since then, our music tastes have grown and we take influence from a lot more aspects, the biggest one being Gojira, which is a very obvious influence on our upcoming debut album. We pushed ourselves on skill and writing levels, and came out with an album that is full of influences ranging from metalcore to black or death metal, so we have definitely evolved and will continue to do so as we see fit.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

It was a mixture of both really; the biggest factor being getting to see Gojira live. It was a life changing moment for those of us who saw it, it heavily influenced us, and from that we took the decision to push our abilities and change our sound to a much darker, heavier style.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular other than the aforementioned which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

There is definitely a wide range of inspirations within the band, as I’ve said Gojira have definitely been the biggest for all of us in the past two years, they showed us a whole new way of bringing pure, brutal heaviness and mixing good melody with that, along with putting on a ridiculously amazing live show. Other than that I think we take certain aspects from bands we like into the music, but none have had the same effect on us as a whole like Gojira have.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Songwriting for us is a very long process normally, Dean is constantly writing lyrics, and myself (Niall) and Dan are constantly just writing new riffs. What normally happens is that either myself or Dan will have a few riffs we think could work together, and we will either piece them together by ourselves and bring a base of a song to everyone, or we will work with each other on piecing them together and then everyone has their input on the direction it should go, whether everything works together, and songs will normally have 3/4 variations of itself till we find something that hits us and that we’re happy with.

Where, more often than not, do you draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Lyrically we take our main inspiration from just what happens in our lives and what we see around us. We all live in fairly bad parts of Dublin, between Ballymun and Finglas, so we take inspiration from the people we deal with on a daily basis.

Could you give us some background to your new release, Fallacy?

It’s been two years writing this album and the background is this. We have all had so many things happen to us and we had to grow up. We were put in situations on a personal level that some would say are beyond our years and everything that happened left us all very angry so we wanted to write a dark record ‘cause well for the most part we are not happy people and that influences the music in such a big way. We are pissed off and lyrically the album does have a lot of finger pointing or fuck you, fuck this, fuck that but instead of saying it so literally we wanted to try and challenge ourselves with what it is we are trying to stay and how we say it. No one ever sees the behind the scenes really. This has been us giving all our time to this project. We do work day jobs but we are thinking about music constantly so even when we were tired and we wanted to sleep I can guarantee you there has been many 2am writing sessions just cause it’s what we love to do and it is our release. I could not tell you how many studios homemade or not that we have been in trying to push this monster we are trying to create.

Give us some insight to the specific themes and premise behind its songs.

Well it takes a look at humans and how we live…Our morals, beliefs and such. We live in a fucked up world where quite frankly stupidity and ignorance is the norm and there are so many that just follow that path. I (Dean) found after I left school and went to college (I dropped out, I hated it) there was almost this standard that I had to reach in order to gain acceptance by people as if a piece of paper truly dictated how my life was going to go or who I would turn out to be. I disliked the idea that if I were going to be happy that I would have to swallow my pride and spend my time doing something I did not want to do. People became vultures to me. They would say shit to try and dishearten what I was trying to do musically because it didn’t fit the idea of me sitting in an office doing 9 – 5 day in day out. That is just an example of the many things written about on the album. Another example would be how people like to play the victim even though they are the ones trying to hurt you. There is a song on the album called Futile Existence and it dwells on the topic of the rat race in life. I know a lot people who preach love, unity and respect but show none of the three just mentioned in their actions. They are only here to benefit themselves and will step over anyone even the people they “care” about to get what they want.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

With this project we were in constant pre – production from the get go and by the time we got to the studio about 95% of the music was finalised but you will always get studios ideas to make the song that bit more interesting. In terms of vocals I (Dean) had all of my melodies ready and waited for my turn in the studio to try out other ideas because we did pre – production by ourselves and I wanted to wait for Josh Robinson (our producer) to be there because he is also a vocalist so we had a lot of fun just bouncing different ideas off each other. It was at times tedious but it was worth it.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

We love to play live and quite frankly up until now we have built our reputation solely on being a live band. We released two demos (I won’t even call them EP’s and they were terrible.) Anyway we have established ourselves as one of the most energetic live bands in Ireland. We just go up and have fun if I’m being honest. We are in your face and if you’re standing there with your arms folded trying to be a “cool kid” well I can guarantee again they don’t stand there for long cause our priority is to make people move. We don’t go up to sing a warm acoustic set. We want to be loud. We want to be aggressive.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Opportunity doesn’t fall on your lap. We have to make it happen. Yes it is hard but there are ways around it. We are fortunate to be playing the Metal To The Masses competition where you try and win a slot to play on the New Blood Stage at Bloodstock. We also got announced for Aggressive Fest in the Czech Republic. We have many things to announce such as tours very soon so keep an eye out on our social media pages.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

It is a big positive if you know how to use it correctly. We are still trying to learn how to use it but so far it is doing us very good as it is easy to interact with the people who follow your band.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for reading, check us out on Spotify, YouTube, Facebook and Instagram. Hopefully we can play a show near you sometime in the near future.

https://www.facebook.com/CallToArmsIRL/    https://twitter.com/CallToArmsIRL    https://www.instagram.com/calltoarmsirl/    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3ExTFKN9NDnrYhz9noEORQ

Pete RingMaster 12/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Inferum – Modern Massacre EP

photo by Emmelie Herwegh

Making an introduction very hard to ignore are Dutch metallers Inferum through their debut release, the Modern Massacre EP. It offers four barbarous slices of, to use their press release’s term, “Mechanical Death Metal” but a trespass just as eagerly embracing groove and deathcore bred enterprise. It is a striking first listen at a band young in age and yet to reach its second year but one with the potential to make major statements within the European metal scene ahead.

The Eindhoven hailing outfit draw on inspirations found in the likes of Thy Art Is Murder, Lamb of God, Slaughter to Prevail, Meshuggah, and Gojira; a couple of which can be sensed within the EP’s opener and title track. Modern Massacre instantly wraps ears with wiry grooves as rhythms probe with forceful intent. Both continue to entice and invade as vocalist Morrison de Boer quickly shows his adventurous delivery, employing varying textures within his first assault alone. The sonic dexterity of guitarist Lars Deelman is matched by the barbarous designs cast by rhythm guitarist Ozzy Voskuilen, together creating a tempest as infectiously alluring as it is fearsomely intrusive with never a handful of seconds passing without new adventure and unpredictable twists being shared.

It is an outstanding dramatic start which alone demands repeat attention to the release and quickly backed in potency by the following Blinding Supremacy. Instantly shaped by the predatory tone of Stan Albers’ bass and the imposing swings of drummer Wouter Macare, the track is an even darker and more murderous proposition than the first but fusing a controlled lighter tempting into its inhospitable climate. Indeed it has moments which skilfully and imaginatively wrong-foot expectations and assumptions, creating a maze like proposal which simply grows more impressive with every passing minute and listen.

Rotten King slams its credentials into thoughts and appetite immediately after as rhythms scythe through the senses followed swiftly by a raw animus of sound cast by guitars and vocals. Inferum have just played with Cryptopsy at Patronaat Haarlem and there is a whiff of the Canadians to the character and technical tenacity of the third track and of Gojira too as it intrudes upon and devours the senses with relish.

Closing track, Incineration, shares its own almost kaleidoscopic whirl of barbarous invention and violent unpredictability; each second seemingly an evolution of the last but with a fluidity which breeds infectious bait for quickly ravenous ears. The groan of bass is as irresistible as the vocal enterprise of de Boer, both as compelling as the imaginative sonic netting sprung around the listener by Deelman and Voskuilen. With Macare’s merciless strikes on top, the song brings the release to a masterfully stirring conclusion.

Only further impressing with every listen, Modern Massacre is a debut demanding to be taken notice of from a band which with their already open creative adventure and fires increasingly burning are surely heading to major attention.

Modern Massacre is available now @ https://inferum.nl/product/ep-modern-massacre/

https://www.facebook.com/InferumBand/

Pete RingMaster 22/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Furyborn – Dawn Of Leviathan

Since emerging in 2010, UK outfit Furyborn seem to make a potent statement with every move they make within the British metal scene. From their live debut in 2011, they have earned support and a reputation which has only gathered momentum and is sure to again with the release of their debut album, Dawn Of Leviathan. It is a ferociously imposing and compelling affair that arouses the same senses it trespasses with the band’s increasingly distinct and adventurous style of melodic death metal.

That live side of the Poole hailing quintet has seen them become one of the most potent forces across the South of England, win the regional Metal 2 The Masses competition and play Bloodstock Open Air for only their seventh live outing. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Threat Signal, Mors Principium Est, Sylosis, The Agonist, Malefice, The Defiled, Evile, (Hed) P.E. and Ted Maul as well as release their first acclaimed EP, The Reaping Of Our Days released in 2012 through Bored Stiff Records. Fair to say the band has been nagging at national and broader attention since day one, increasingly growing both which the highly anticipated Dawn Of Leviathan can only escalate.

The album quickly shows a new strength in intensity, craft, and imagination within Furyborn; a growth in all aspects infused into a maturity which is maybe unexpected within a first full-length, even from a band in its seventh year. Dawn of Leviathan opens with the atmospheric trespass of Second Sun, a brief harass of raw sonic dissonance which leads into the album’s title track where instantly a barrage of intrusive beats from drummer Tim Coulson and ravenous riffs from rhythm guitarist Rob Walker devour ears. Just as forceful are the raw throated roars of vocalist Jut Tabor who quickly seizes attention with his grudging tones, their causticity leading to a great flame of clean endeavour; the frontman, as the sounds around him showing a new dexterity and range which only impresses. It takes little time for band and song to reveal a new lofty plateau to that of the first EP, the melodic suggestiveness of lead guitarist Nick Richardson alone a striking new adventure equipped with the broader imagination and uniqueness that flows through the veins of the track.

The Reckoning follows with the same striking creative tenacity and character, the track a tirade of biting rhythms and corrosive riffs leading the listener into a web of melodic and cleanly delivered temptation. Within the burly, ravenous tempest of bitter sonic and vocal inhospitality, it makes for a compelling mix which only intensifies its lures as the song evolves and broadens its inventive landscape before Exult in Extinction uncages its own rabid assault again led by the uncompromising swings of Coulson. Stalking the senses, the bass of Timmy Hodgson is predatory if sometimes overwhelmed by the storm of riffs and beats while again Richardson veins the cauldron of sound with tendrils of skilful melodic lava. Contrasts flare and meet within the encounter, each colluding with and countering the other in a twisting tempest matched by vocal resourcefulness across the band.

The industrial opening of A Fault in Our Design brings a bold hint of Fear Factory like hues before the track turns to stalking and intimidating the senses. There is a swing to its core presence with breeds the infectiousness soon seeping into every element, the result a blistering yet controlled incitement as predatory as it is melodically tenacious while Life Begins uncages its own mercurial invasion of sound and emotion. Though swiftly persuasive and increasingly compelling, the song does not quite reach the inventive and  gripping heights of its predecessors for these ears though individual flair is as open as the track’s animosity and melodic assurance.

The raw rabidity of I Am Heresy has the imagination and appetite magnetically hooked again straight after with its ravenous and invitingly inhospitable assault of the senses while Deep Rising provides an enthralling lure of Tabor’s striking clean side courted by a laid back but fully suggestive climate of electronically led sound. With the irresistible carnivorous tone of Hodgson’s bass to the fore, the track is superb, another stirring magnet within the release adding further aspects to the bold adventure and evolving imagination of Furyborn.

The album concludes with firstly the varied metal symphony of Wraith, an array of flavours swarming with each other before a writhing death metal causticity bursts from within their midst, and finally with the symphonically laced As We Burn. The closer revels in all the new attributes of the band’s sound and writing, its proposal as invasively seductive as it is rancorous and transfixing. Again Fear Factory-esque hues entice as more Sepultura/Gojira like elements challenge, each woven into the individual character of Furyborn’s own sound. One of its major highlights, the song ensures that Dawn of Leviathan ends on a fascinating high.

Throughout, the album tightly holds attention and fiercely pleases, increasingly so with every subsequent listen. The fact that you still feel we are listening in on one step in a journey still to unfold only adds to the impressive nature of a release which is as much about potential as it is ear exciting craft and adventure.

Dawn of Leviathan is out now through most online stores and @ http://furyborn.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/furyborn/

Pete RingMaster 11/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright