King Salami & The Cumberland 3 – Kiss My Ring

There are few guarantees in life but having a raucously good time with King Salami & The Cumberland 3 is a given so it is no surprise that their new album had us bouncing around like a teenager in heat. Kiss My Ring offers thirteen slices of rhythm ‘n’ blues drenched garage rock to simplify its rich flavouring, a sound as ever inimitably unique and mischievous to the London based quartet infesting limbs and spirit with rock ‘n’ roll fever.

The successor to their acclaimed album Goin’ Back To Wurstville, though it is fair to say that to date every single and album has enticed keen support and praise, Kiss My Ring is a collection of originals and covers which have only one intent, to get the listener as animated and aroused as they are. In some ways there is little new to the album in the fact you know what you are going to get in flavour and character yet such their sound’s instinctive individuality and ever eager dexterity plus the release’s richer weaves of sound it is an encounter sharing refreshing endeavour and fresh rascality.

It takes mere seconds for the album to get into feet and appetite, its title track leaping from T. Bone Sanchez’s initial guitar chords with instant relish and energy. Eric Baconstrip’s beats eagerly drive the bursting incitement of sound, flames of sax joining his enticement as the bass of Kamikaze UT Vincent resonates with every pulled string. A full-blooded carousing of ears and spirit, King Salami centre of the band’s joint vocal hollering, the track had no difficulty pulling bodies to their feet and pushing inhibitions to the side.

Don’t Make Me Mad steps forward next, its dextrous shuffle again swiftly into limbs and feet with King Salami’s distinctly frisky tones leading the devilry. Hooks and rhythms provide encouragement throughout, each flirtatious in their enterprise with Vincent’s bass a throaty pleasure before similarly roaming The Pulpo Dance with a just as compelling swing. The song holds its energy in check compared to its predecessor but cannot hide its organic spirit and lively rock ‘n’ roll bred instincts.

A surf meets rockabilly breath escapes next up Who Do They Watch?, the immediately magnetic flavouring immersing in the song’s garage rock breeding. Everything about the track from esurient rhythm to heartily enthused voice got under the skin and had the body leaping like a puppeteer, a trait which is no newcomer when coming face to face with a King Salami & The Cumberland 3 offering it is fair to say as quickly proven by the cosmic exploits of Space Spy. With a touch of French outfit The Scaners to its predominately instrumental intrigue bound, hook wired saunter, the track too tunnelled into the nervous system to insist body and imagination do it’s biding.

Through the jangle equipped rocker, The Double Switch, and Oofty Goofty (Wild Man Of Borneo) with its anthemic call and agile rhythmic flexing, there was no escaping the band’s tenacious antics, they as ever escalated by the rhythmic and melodically hooked enterprise and vocal frolic which spring their escapades. Though we suggested at the beginning that in some ways the album was not a bundle of surprises it certainly holds an eclectic adventure of sound and flavouring which both tracks alone highlight as equally does the fifties rock ‘n’ roll hued instrumental Stormy straight after them.

Discumboober in turn turned up the bounce in album and listener, the spring in its step enough to get bums off the seat with sax and guitar philandering temptation further hooking ears and appetite while Bayou Fever turned up the heat another notch with its Cajun breath and nagging urgency. Open yet sneaky hooks and boisterous rhythms again unite in contagious enterprise and cunning for two delicious minutes plus of unapologetic high spirits.

Across the fervid garage rock shenanigans of Cut A Rug and the inflamed punk funk of (She Was An) Earthquake, a breathless body and delirious ardour was effortlessly induced with The Jellybutt Of Timbuktu only increasing both with its hip swinging, mischief casting musical manoeuvres. From start to finish Kiss My Ring is perpetual incitement on the passions but maybe no more hungrily than over this trio of unbridled goodness.

The album ends with Chaputa (part 2), a track which pretty much encapsulates everything about King Salami & The Cumberland 3 and a sound which is so rousing, refreshing, and irresistible. It brings to an end the best and most addictive outing with the band yet with plenty to suggest they are teasing even greater adventures and fun ahead.

Kiss My Ring is out now via Damaged Goods Records; also available @ https://folcrecords.bandcamp.com/album/folc115-king-salami-and-the-cumberland-three-kiss-my-ring-edici-n-espa-ola

https://www.facebook.com/KingSalamiandtheCumberland3/

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

King Salami and the Cumberland 3 – Goin’ Back To Wurstville

If there is one band in this fast paced world which gives the body an even more intensive and thorough workout it is undoubtedly King Salami and the Cumberland 3. This is a band where an Automated External Defibrillator should always be on hand at every show they play, waiting and ready to revive the inevitable wasted bodies.  Now that need has been transferred to the band’s records. When playing all three of the band’s albums back to back, apart from a danger to health, it is a hard choice to say which is best, all in their openly individual ways an equal treat, but without doubt Goin’ Back To Wurstville is the most demanding and exciting for heart and limbs yet.

The new album from the Sultan of Sausage and his fellow creative rascals is a blur of incitement, a cavalcade of irresistible temptation for feet and hips. Each of its thirteen songs teases and infests the psyche, sharing groove woven rhythm & blues punk ‘n’ roll to lose all shades of sanity to. As ever, it is a busy time for the quartet; gigs coming up at a rate of knots across the globe before and even more so after their highlight performance on the BBC show The UK’s Best Part-Time Band last year. With the outfit in the middle of a UK tour right now and featuring in Roger Corman’s movie, Death Race 2050, you can be sure that Goin’ Back To Wurstville is only going to accelerate the demand on the boys and their riotous sound.

Featuring Spencer Evoy from fellow body contorters MFC Chicken and his salacious sax, Goin’ Back To Wurstville quickly gets down to business with Pineapple Mama, the song feeding off the album’s lively Intro with an initial bass groan and flames of fiery sax, they leading to an insistent romp of riffs and rhythms led by King Salami’s inevitable energy and vocal revelry. It is party time, the song swinging from the rafters with body enslaving grooves dangling their insatiable bait to further ensnare ears and limbs. Soul, r&b, rock ‘n’ roll and more excitable flavours all get involved in the multi-flavoured proposal, King Salami and co straight away feeding greedy hopes with a fresh new adventure.

The pugilistic rascality of Nosebleed Boogie is next, guitars and sax colluding in a devilish enticement of melodic theatre as King Salami uses Ali like vocal footwork to evade the rhythmic punches, his magnetic prowess like a blend of Bo Diddley and Little Walter before offering even feistier fun in the boisterous romp of Busy Body. An infection of spicy grooves and virulent riffs, the song ensures the listener is on the end of major manipulation echoing its title before the glorious adventure of King Ghidorah rises up from its oriental bed with sixties cinematic adventure fuelling its melodies and rhythms. With King Salami a dramatic narrator, T. Bone Sanchez’s grooves are a three headed tempting of flirtatious hookery, melodic seduction, and tenacious persuasion, theatre skirted by the addictive rhythmic rumble of bassist Kamikaze UT Vincent and drummer Eric Baconstrip.

There is no escaping the frisky intent of the following King Size Love, its rockabilly nurtured stroll manhandled by addiction shaping rhythms and coloured with more of the salacious enterprise which continually and artfully springs from the guitar of Sanchez across the album. Feet and hips are swiftly lost to the song’s shuffle, lungs already gasping for breath by this point within Goin’ Back To Wurstville but managing to find plenty more air for the blues strung jungle of She Was A Mau Mau and after that, the garage punk lined surf rock lit antics of No Stoppin’. The first of the two is a sweltering near on muggy affair for the heart whilst its successor is a blaze of instrumental rock ‘n’ roll which has the body at its most frenetically subservient in the hands of the album.

The treats just keep coming too; Tiger In My Tank keeps the listener moving like a puppet on tricky strings of rhythmic pestering and melodic misbehaviour, all urged on by the saucy blasts of sax and King Salami’s inexhaustible energy and spirited character.

Stutterin’ Sue leaps around with garage rock rapacity and raw captivation next while Camel Hop after that sees roving basslines and agitated beats stir up another voracious contagion of sound and spirit rousing enterprise, sultry Arabian scented  grooves winding around ears and appetite as rock ‘n’ roll rumbles in the belly of song and listener. Both tracks are an epidemic of temptation, unrelenting creative persistence more than matched by the Johnny Kidd and The Pirates hued Shiver which follows.

Concluded by the double diablerie of firstly the album’s dirt encrusted rock ‘n’ roll road trip going under its title track moniker and lastly the carnival of Latin summer fun that is Caramba!, the sensational Goin’ Back To Wurstville is bliss for ears and soul. With each of the King Salami and the Cumberland 3 releases we seem to offer nothing but lustful praise so with their third full-length we were determined to find something which might be suggested the band could improve upon. Quite simply we failed, though you know the band will still find something fresh and bolder next time and with regards to best album question, listening it as these fingers tap, yep Goin’ Back To Wurstville wins the debate.

Goin’ Back To Wurstville is out now on Dirty Waters Records @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/King-Salami-and-the-Cumberland-Three/c/2793708/offset=9&sort=normal

https://www.facebook.com/KingSalamiandtheCumberland3/

Pete RingMaster 22/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright