Boudain – Way of the Hoof

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For those with a lust for the groove and the fattiest slabs of heavy rock ‘n’ roll flavoured meat, the checking out of US stoners Boudain might just be the best order of the day. The quartet has just unleashed debut album Way of the Hoof,  a ravenous swamp of stoner and sludge infested waters  which preys on the psyche whilst feeding the appetite for dirty and fiery rock ‘n’ roll. Influences to the band include the likes of Sleep, Melvins, Kyuss, and Fu Manchu which their album does not shy away from bringing to the party in flavour across its eight thumping trespasses, especially the last of the four. To that though, Boudain add their own meaty sauce for something which mighty not be breaking the banks of originality but certainly feeds the soul and appetite for imposing metal and invasive rock.

Consisting of bassist/vocalist Chris Porter, guitarists Brian Lenard and David Karakash, and drummer Stephen Jester, Boudain released their first EP in 2013. The self-titled six-track offering caught the ears and attention of a great many which Way of the Hoof is now poised to escalate, to easily assumed, broader heights. Opener Sleazy Feats swiftly has ears wrapped in almost salacious grooves as rhythms badger and bear down on the senses with a hefty hand. Riffs and vocal swipes only add to the highly agreeable introduction, a potency which continues as the song swings with zeal and enterprise across its fiery body. Surprises are not an open proposal though a freshness to the familiar landscape is, and increasingly so as Lenard and Karakash incite their grooves and toxic melodies to breed an even stronger strain of temptation.

Boudain art _RingMasterReviewSome might suggest that the album is a touch muddy but as the opener and following Neptune alone show, it is a thick smothering which adds to the swampy, at times almost delta blues like, intensity and richness of songs and release. The second track brings a bit of punk to its contagious confrontation too, clashing percussion uniting with the predation of the rhythms as the song simultaneously swings and prowls. Quickly it eclipses the impressive strength of its predecessor, continuing to impress and inflame ears with its thickening web of grooves and sonic acidity before allowing CODA to share its own imposing wares. Whereas the first pair flew at the jugular and senses, this track prowls, almost stalks the listener as its tar thick sludge breeding consumes ears. Porter’s vocals, or Lenard’s as the two apparently share duties across the release, again provide a great mix of growl and dirt encrusted infectiousness as they match the textures of the sound around them.

A cosmic ambience lines the sweltering lure of guitar as 3 Man steps up next; that sultry invitation and suggestiveness lying upon a great rhythmic rumble led by the swinging throaty infectiousness of the bass. The song soon slips into a more expected stoner blaze though drums and bass continue to cast their rhythmic hex on ears and appetite as the guitars weave an intoxicating tapestry; a knit which continues right to the end even as the song becomes more aggressively volatile.

First Class rips into ears next, it taking the listener back to the more hellacious type of assault the album opened with as tangy grooves and scything beats take their share of attention along with the brooding bass and attitude soaked vocals. Once more, a recognisable air to the track is rife but only within that welcoming Boudain character that ensures nothing is as simple as being a copy of those earlier mentioned influences or others.

Through The Mighty Turn Around and its sonically spatial exploration, and the rawer bruising stroll of Disco Jimmy, ears and album continue to be bound together. The first of the two has some of the most mouth-watering bait in its grooves and psyche infesting rock ‘n’ roll whilst its successor is a psych rock igniting of the imagination which lights the flames of thorough enjoyment if not the major excitement some of its earlier companions provoked. Nevertheless both leave ears more than content with the closing cover of Blue Oyster Cult’s Godzilla adding its enjoyable feed; the band treating the track to its prowling strain of sludge and stoner predation.

It is a fine end to an album which might have provided its major moments in its first half but from start to finish only inspires a real want for more and the idea that Boudain have the potential to sculpt major temptations luring equal attention ahead. They have plenty to get a little lustful over right now too which Way Of The Hoof offers with relish.

 Way Of The Hoof is out now @ http://boudain.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/boudainla/   https://twitter.com/boudainmusic

Pete RingMaster 21/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Killer Refrigerator – The Fridge and the Power it Holds

LukeCoffee

We all know that technology is taking us over, but an on-going war between it and man, well easy to have doubts there. That was until this computer began deciding alone when it was going to connect to the internet and my iPod began mashing up songs randomly like a manic DJ to mess with the psyche. Of course if we had all listened to Killer Refrigerator previously battle plans would be drawn up and war cries in place. Thankfully they have returned with second release The Fridge and the Power it Holds at the right time, to awaken all and help turn the conflict back into the hands of humanity.

From Ohio, Killer Refrigerator is the side-project of Cody Coon, the guitarist/vocalist of death thrashers UnKured. Recognising man’s slavery to iPhones, toasters, blenders, every appliance imaginable; a dependency seeded from the aftermath of surviving an attempt to wipe out humanity a Millennia ago by the omniscient refrigerator Lord Freezus Christ ( You may laugh but think about the panic and fever which breaks out when you lose your phone), Cody and Luke “Java” Sackenheim decided to rebel against the appliances in 2014 and formed Killer Refrigerator, releasing debut album When Fridges Rule This World as their first assault and warning soon after.

Drawing on cult movies such as Microwave Massacre, Terrorvision, and Basket Case alongside their belief that appliances want to destroy the world, the band create a bedlam of sound and psychological ferocity from a vicious tangling of every extreme flavour that they can conjure, with much more besides. The Fridge and the Power it Holds EP provides seven tracks of almost indescribable but thoroughly thrilling confrontation, and sets up the battle front perfectly for upcoming second album Refrigeration Plague.

TFATPIT_OPTIMIZED     For all the theatre behind the intent and creativity of the band, Killer Refrigerator has a skilled and inventive sound which if you can ride its unpredictable tsunami, blows ears and imagination away, with the passions in quick succession. Straight away The Fridge and the Power It Holds is rich evidence as opener Terrorvision erupts into life with a web of sonic enterprise sculpted by guitars. A muscular and skittish rhythmic accompaniment adds to the initial coaxing before it all colludes with a dark bassline and a salacious mix of senses scorching vocals for a hellacious punk lined ferocity. Not reaching a minute and a half in length, it is a searing and striking start swiftly over shadowed by the excellent Slaystation. Predatory in its first breath, almost sizing up the listener as it dangles a discord kissed bassline and sonic lures from its rhythmic spine, the track is soon driving for the jugular on a tide of thrash bred riffery and ruinous vocal incitement. Squirming around this, acidic flavoured melodies and progressive nurtured endeavour fascinates, leading ears towards an unexpected Nintendo-core interlude before exploding again into the creative and rasping sonic fury the track started with. As mentioned previously, the band’s sound is an unrelenting and evolving maelstrom defying real description but with avant-garde and mathcore tendencies as prevalent as death and grind endeavours, it is a one compelling and intoxicating assault, deranged manna for the imagination.

Shower Thrashing Death toys with folk metal influences before turning into a carnivorous rampage of thrash/death seeded lavatorial rampage announcing the coming of the “toilet gods”. The bass simply seduces within the grimy scenery whilst vocals announce the demise of all with an outstanding mix of vocal deliveries which range from hardcore angst, grind squalls, to Patton-esque crooning. One of the pinnacles of the release it is matched by Killer Refrigerator VS Godzilla, the big fight off between two merciless goliaths. The track stomps with heavyweight rhythmic feet and fiery climactic endeavour, guitars scything across the battleground with sonic rapacity whilst vocal war cries breed a warped anthemic support.

The insidiously enthralling Slave To The Easy-Bake comes next, a scourge of sonic grooving and melodic flaming spun around a simple but gripping bassline. Of course this does not tell the whole deranged psychotic story of the song, every aspect from vocals to guitars, beats to imagination a distorted intrusion to fear or greedily devour.

The EP’s title track steps up next and after battering the listener senseless through pummelling beats, goes on a brutal and feverish march of searing grooves and scarring riffery. It holds back at one point to intensify its weight and drama, before regaining momentum but with an even more destructive and imposing trespass of the psyche. Deathcore, thrash, mathcore, and psyche rock are all in there running amok with the ideation and raw adventure of the band, the outcome another mouth-watering violation.

   The Fridge And The Power It Holds closes with bonus track To Hell With Cancer, one of the most grouchy siren-esque enticements you are likely to hear this year. Ravaging air and ears around a funk bred devilry, the track is a carnival for the mosh pit and a thrilling, uncompromising call to arms.

Lyrically and musically The Fridge And The Power It Holds is so much fun but equally a serious slam of extreme incitement which might have a theme bred from a truth stretched to cultish proportions, but delivers it as a unique and irresistible tempest. It is probably not going to work for all but if it does click an explosive thrilling time is guaranteed.

The Fridge And The Power It Holds EP is available as a name your price download from April 7th @ https://killerfridge.bandcamp.com/album/the-fridge-and-the-power-it-holds

As a backstory to their origins, the band recently released a 20 minute documentary featuring the hilarious exploits of Cody and his fellow fridge warrior Luke “Java” Sackenheim. The documentary can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8m1zCBvL4EU

https://www.facebook.com/KillerFridge

RingMaster 07/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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