Wax Futures – The Museum of Everything

Photo by Jonathan Dadds.

UK band Wax Futures to our mind has never fully fitted their post hardcore tag with their flavoursome sound but it has never been less applicable than with the bands new mini album The Museum of Everything. Boasting a virulent contagion of sound as indie, post punk, and new wave as it is math and punk rock, the release is a refreshing and inimitable slice of rock ‘n’ roll revelling in the new maturity and imagination fuelling the trio’s songwriting and music.

Formed in the final breaths of 2011, the Telford hailing band soon made their mark on the local live scene. With a growing support and reputation they released the Breadcrumbs EP in 2013, before tempting bigger attention with debut album A History of Things to Come; it like its successor a seven track offering with a more post hardcore heart to its enterprise. With their live presence taking in the UK, sharing stages with the likes of Limp Bizkit, Bear Makes Ninja, &U&I, Tall Ships, Alpha Male Tea Party, Castrovalva, Bad Grammar, The JCQ, and Idles along the way, the band have spent their time working on The Museum of Everything, evolving and pushing their creativity simultaneously. It was a concentrated effort now easily and swiftly heard in the album and greedily enjoyed twist by turn.

Recorded with Ryan Pinson (God Damn, Bad Grammar), produced and mastered by Tom Woodhead (ex-¡Forward, Russia!), The Museum of Everything gets down to infectious business straight away as a lone riff squirrels itself in ears, a lure soon joined by a vocal count and controlled swipes from Simon’s sticks. As they all enjoyably collude, Sandcastles in the Snow comes alive, a scuzzy hook reaching out as rhythms slip into a controlled canter while vocals further capture ears in tandem with the groove escaping Graham’s guitar. With the easy going meander of Kieran’s bass teasing feet, the song becomes busier, heading into an equally undemanding but inescapably catchy chorus. Never quite igniting but with a neat whiff of early Kaiser Chiefs to its subsequent enticement, the song is a compelling start to the album setting out an appetising canvas of invention soon taken to bigger and bolder heights.

Demographics is next and instantly with its opening melody alone, brings a Young Knives feel into play, one only accentuated by the vocals and the subsequent web of sonic intrigue and infectious collaboration across the threesome. Hooks grab attention throughout, littering the aural drama and flirtatious energy combining like a mix of At the Drive-In and Swound! but only creating its own distinct adventure. A constant nag on body and pleasure, the song makes way for the just as impressive (My Body is a) Landfill. Instantly, more boisterous in energy and just as enticing in contagious endeavour as its predecessors, the track strolls along with a knowing and inventive swagger; its hands on receptive hips and tenacious feet teasing and taunting them into action with its creative zeal. As all tracks there is also a meatier, raucous edge and air which coats it all, the band’s punk instincts adding to the increasingly tenacious and imposing treat.

From one major highlight to another and Wreck of the Hesperus. As soon as it lays down its first line of bait, the song becomes a tapestry of seductive espionage woven from deceptive hooks and devious grooves, neither seemingly as intrusive and enslaving as they really are. With every passing second, the band’s rock ‘n’ roll heart becomes bolder, closing in on a volatile, increasingly menacing psychosis of a finale to leave an appetite hungry for more.

That heavier, irritable essence is still hanging round as next up The 90s Called, It Wants Yr Misspent Youth Back rumbles in ears. It is a ravenous bordering on rabid incitement from which a smiling groove and teasing stroll breaks free. Now with its relaxed but irresistible swing wrapped ingenuity fondling the senses, the song simply traps and chains the passions with something akin to We Are The Physics meets The Futureheads.

The cosmic twittering of { } leads in the evocative pastures of closing track Brittle Bones and an epic and increasingly dense rapture of melodic suggestion and angular jangles around rhythmic trespass. Holding its own lively groove led saunter, the song sees Wax Futures push their emotive intensity and creative designing yet again; both intensifying as the song brews and boils up into a powder keg of sonic turbulence eventually sending the album off into spatial unknowns leaving the listener lingering on keen anticipation for what comes next from the band.

The Museum of Everything is Wax Futures upon a new lofty plateau in songwriting and sound. At times it might not ignite as it hints it will and maybe lacks a final bite to its most agitated moments but only announces the band as a real player within the UK rock scene and a stalwart in the passions of certainly our personal soundtracks, something hard to imagine being alone in.

The Museum of Everything is out now @ https://waxfutures.bandcamp.com/

 

https://www.facebook.com/waxfutures    https://twitter.com/waxfuturesuk

Pete RingMaster 05/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Gravves – Rattle

gravves-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

There is no foreplay involved with Rattle the debut EP of British noise inciters Gravves. It is a release which, certainly for us, careered straight to lustful instincts from its very first roar of breath and sound, thereon in proceeding to entwine us around its little creative finger. Having an already well-established love for The Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, an open inspiration to the North West hailing trio, certainly helped its persuasion but the four tracks making up Rattle soon established the band and its sound as something individual, unique, and quite irresistible.

Since forming, the threesome of bassist/vocalist Adam Hughes, guitarist/vocalist Dave Thomas, and drummer Tom Williams have persistently lured attention and a fine reputation with a stage show seeing Gravves play with bands such as Slaves, Nothing But Thieves, DZ Deathrays, God Damn, Heck, and Misty Miller, as well as impress with festival appearances at the likes of Focus Wales, Tramlines, and Threshold Festival. Radio has also eagerly embraced the band and its striking sound, a success easy to see expanding as Rattle takes the band towards a new broad tide of ears and fans.

gravves-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewRecorded with Michael Whalley (Mums, Kong, Bipolar Sunshine), Rattle simply explodes on the senses as opener My Pet Rihanna unleashes its sonic tirade. Within the clamour though, a virulent groove is forming, escaping and driving the song from thereon in as vocals clash and collude in noisy emotion while guitars and bass flare up and seductively groan respectively alongside each other. There is an inner calm in the turbulence too, a magnetic lure which breeds monotone vocals alongside the established outcry in a reflection of the dark touch of bass. There is no escaping the air of the previously mention Brighton band and at times there is a touch of fellow Brit up ‘n’ comers like The Droppers Neck and The St Pierre Snake Invasion too, but the track swiftly breeds its own identity.

Heartbeats is just as impressive as it reveals another aspect to the Gravves character. It has a controlled hand on its tempest of noise; still offering a fuzzy infestation of ears but with a dark composed gait echoed in the vocals and rhythms. Thomas’ guitar certainly sears air and flesh, its scorching touch infused with sharp hooks and abrasive grooves which trap the passions with their intrusive infection. There is a slight scent of The Birthday Party to the song and of Mclusky too in some ways while Future of the Left also comes to mind but again as its predecessor what emerges is all Gravves.

From its opening rhythmic enticement aligned to melodic acidity which has a bit of early U2 to it, Tribes storms the barricades next; subsequently sonically and vocally raging around that persistently infectious first hook and another great blend of vocal persuasion. It is a virulent blaze as catchy and imposing as anything around right now, manna for hungry senses and appetites as too the following Hollow Bones.

The closing track also has a more stable energy and storm to its heart, its body prowling almost stalking the listener as melodic vocals and keys entwine with harsher textures. Though it hints at fiercer eruptions, the song retains its control to fine effect, providing a thrilling end to a stunning release.

Rattle is an introduction to stir things up and Gravves one of those propositions which quite simply re-ignites a lust for music.

Rattle is out now across most stores through Loner Noise Records.

http://facebook.com/gravvesgravvesgravves    https://twitter.com/gravvesgravves

Pete RingMaster 21/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Falls – Cream EP

falls-promo_RingMasterReview

As its fifth month swung and revelled in the noisy, raucous, and ridiculously addictive strains of eclectic rockers Falls, so the final throes of 2016 have been ignited in the best possible way with the Welsh band’s new EP. Cream is the creatively salacious sister to the earlier acclaimed One Hundred Percent Strong EP, itself a proposition as inimitably rousing and twisted as its breath-taking successor now proves to be.

Emerging in 2013, Falls had a great many of us intrigued and hooked by following year with their debut EP Dirtbox. Self-tagging their sound as gash pop/fuck rock, it romped and enticed ears and psyche into the Flintshire quartet’s devilish bedlam of imagination and sound. Its success and the band’s swiftly growing reputation was cemented and accelerated by a live presence which saw a constant wave of new fans won and stages shared with the likes of God Damn, Blacklisters, Press To MECO, and Black Peaks around tours with others such as Allusondrugs and Shikari Sound System. As their two track single Mastiff in 2015 saw a new essence of control and imagination blossom in the band’s sound so One Hundred Percent Strong took things to another level with its bold maturity and skilled quick fire twist and turns. Cream is more of the same but at times showing an even keener touch in anthemic aggression and headstrong invention.

As its predecessors, the heart of the new EP is an unruly party clad in the insatiable hunger of a myriad of styles and flavours. Maybe best described as Asylums meets Hawk Eyes under the psychotic guidance of Jane’s Addiction, it grips ears and hips straight away as opener Berries! prowls with surly riffs and firmly kissing beats. With a touch of groove metal to its heavy harmony basted rock ‘n’ roll, the track flirts and rumbles, soon embracing the warm vocal tones of guitarists Martin Gallagher and Philip Kelsall alongside those of bassist Ben Griffiths as it erupts and calms across its virulent canter. Driven by the heftily persuasive swings of drummer Steff Jones, it quickly recruits body and appetite, rewarding them with mischievous dips into stoner and glam pop temptation.

cream-artwork_RingMasterReviewThe irresistible start to the EP is only accentuated by Daytime N U, a sweet talking romancing of the senses with warm vocals entangling a funk infested groan of bass amid energy dictating beats. Once into its fiery stride with the guitars casting spicy flames around the mellow charm of the vocals and the metronomic infection of the rhythms, the song shows itself a master of body and spirit. System Of A Down is often used as a reference to Falls, maybe not so much in its sound but the unrelenting hunger and craft at turning on the spot through a kaleidoscope of textures and twists; the second track reveals exactly why.

The punk roar of Live Delicious is next, leaping at ears with brawling energy and vocal irritability. Underlining it as ever is a funk bred contagion, reserved right now but just waiting to grab those eager hips as riffs growl and grooves sear. As carnivorous as it is inescapably infectious, the track vociferously snarls and incessantly bounces like a pissed off raptor yet still finds room for a chorus which breeds only addiction.

Cream closes with the epidemic of pleasure that is Liberator. At times as grouchy as its predecessor and as dynamically catchy as anything offered yet by the band, the track bounds through ears with the instinctive aggressive pop of Baddies aligned to the sinewy weight and attitude of Reuben, Pulled Apart By Horses like melodic flames licking their collusion as the funk psychosis of a Halfling’s Leaf plays. The result as ever is something distinct and unique to Falls providing an exhilarating end to another attention stoking triumph from one of the UK’s most exciting bands.

The Cream EP is out now via Naughty Strawberry through http://fallsband.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/fallsband/    https://twitter.com/fallsband

Pete RingMaster 06/12/2016
Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Falls – One Hundred Percent Strong

FALLS Promo_RingMasterReview

We all have bands, and no doubt many, which almost with their first creative breath spark an instinctive and lustful affair between their sound and ears. For us UK noise poppers Falls is one such union, a riotous quartet which spins webs of invention so contagious that they make the common cold seem lazy. Back in 2014, the band had us hooked with their self-tagged gash pop/fuck rock via the Dirtbox EP. Now they have unleashed its successor, One Hundred Percent Strong; a bigger, bolder, and even more devilish affair to rapture over.

Formed in 2013, Falls has been a hungry and irresistible live presence from day one, tours and shows with the likes of Allusondrugs, Shikari Sound System, God Damn, Blacklisters, Press To MECO, and Black Peaks among their own headlining conquests. The Dirtbox EP equally sparked attention upon its release, eclipsed the next year by the band’s two track single Mastiff which saw a host of radio play and support from the likes of Huw Stephens, Zane Lowe, Steve Lamacq, Alex Baker, and Sophie K. Ahead of a co-headlining tour with I Cried Wolf and an appearance at ArcTanGent in August, Falls is now uncaging One Hundred Percent Strong, a four-track stomp sure to outshine its predecessors in acclaim to match the leap in sound and invention.

There is a more mature and accomplished feel to the songs with the band’s latest offering, but without defusing the loco imagination and quick fire twist and turns which have already marked out their sound and imagination. In fact those elements have been honed with an even keener creative devilment to keep ears and the imagination as busy as the song’s instinctive rock ‘n’ roll does the body. With everything combined, Falls’ music is like a mix up in a noise infested pop factory blending early XTC with Hawk Eyes as seepage from Melvins adds a thrilling contamination.

front cover one hundred percent _RingMasterReviewIt all starts with the kinetic shuffle of Get Well Soon; a track instantly accosting ears with throbbing bass grooves and rolling beats as the guitars of Martin Gallagher and Philip Kelsall perpetually cast wiry hooks and teasing riffs. That alone is enough to infest the psyche and lift the spirit, but add the rousing vocals of the band, with one of the three string pickers leading though no idea which, and you have instant emotional arousal. The track continues to swing and thump, even as its pop fuelled chorus dances provocatively on the imagination. It is simply glorious; we all find manna for the ears in certain songs and this is ours.

Though it is quickly matched by the even more tenacious and slight psychotic Shady Nasty. Again grooves and hooks are swift bait around the lively inviting beats of Steff Jones with the band’s vocals further harmonic and mischief making fun. There is also a volatility to the encounter, at times it almost intimidating ears with the resonating snarl of Ben Griffiths’ bassline a prominent enticement though it is just as compelling in the warmly flirtatious moments too.

SWARM comes next and lives up to its name as riffs crawl incessantly through ears, though there is no particular urgency to their incitement. Instead the song writhes around with steely grooves and off-kilter exploits within a web of punk hooks and noise rock sensibility. Ultimately, it is as funky as it is ferocious, as poppy as it is cantankerously inventive and pure alchemy for the senses and at this point our very greedy appetite for the release.

There is no relaxing of the twisted tempting and addictive ingenuity with closing track Death In Disco Shoes either, the track leaping around like a hyperactive sugar fuelled teenager not knowing whether to party hard or be creatively responsible and doing both with unbridled zeal.

It is an exhilarating end to one of the year’s major propositions so far and no doubt will remain so. Falls and One Hundred Percent Strong are noisy, raucous, and prone to addictive habits; the very best kind of rock ‘n’ roll.

The One Hundred Percent Strong EP is out now via Venn Records digitally and on 7” vinyl @ https://www.vennrecords.com/shop/music/fallsvinyl/

https://www.facebook.com/fallsband   http://www.fallsband.co.uk

Pete RingMaster 13/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com