Fighting Sides – Haven’t Scored Yet EP

Fighting Sides Promo_RingMasterReview

A band for less than a year, US quartet Fighting Sides has already risen to be a prominent presence within the Atlanta music scene. Now the band is looking at nudging bigger attention and recognition with the release of their captivating new EP, Haven’t Scored Yet. Offering four tracks of alternative rock meets melodic/pop punk; the EP is a lively and magnetic introduction to the band for many of us whilst potently building on the potential of its well-received predecessor.

Emerging April 2015, Fighting Sides was formed by vocalist Robbie Hiser after the “implosion” of his previous band. Calling on friends, Hiser quickly completed the band’s line-up with guitarist Alex Downtain, bassist Arafat Patwary, and drummer Sheppard Martin. That May saw the release of their debut offering, Demo MMXV, an encounter sowing the seeds and groundwork for the vivacity in the band’s sound which now fuels Haven’t Scored Yet.

Recorded with Jason Andrews (Go Radio, Holiday Parade) and mixed/mastered by Sam Pura (Basement, The Story So Far), the new EP opens with This Is Our Night. The first lure of guitar is enough to awaken ears though they really come alive as the warm tones and harmonies of Hiser and band further offer the imagination their bright prowess. Never breaking from its relatively restrained stroll, the song soon reveals its pop punk tenacity as hooks and riffs unite with robust rhythms for an infection loaded romp.

Fighting Sides Art_RingMasterReviewThe following Stand Tall is similarly bred but swiftly shows a grouchier edge to its intensity and rhythmic textures as well as richer emotive hues in its fiery melodic enterprise and vocals. As its predecessor, the song has ears and thoughts fully engaged with a nicely brewing appetite for more in tow. That gets healthily fed by the poppier exploits of One More Day, though it too has a potent line in emotional shadows within its galvanic canter. Though the song, as its companions, is not a full on roar, it has an anthemic quality which only adds to a successful persuasion and recruitment of listener involvement.

Let Me Be brings things to an equally enjoyable and convincing close; its accomplished and boisterously melodic rock ‘n’ roll a highly satisfying and engaging incitement to the wanting to know more about Fighting Sides.

Right now it is fair to say that Fighting Sides is still trying to find something majorly distinct in their music to set them apart but in providing a thoroughly enjoyable time they have hit the nail square on the head with Haven’t Scored Yet.

The Haven’t Scored Yet EP is released March 18th and available @ http://haventscoredyet.bigcartel.com/products

http://fightingsides.com    https://www.facebook.com/fightingsides  https://twitter.com/fsrockband

Pete RingMaster 18/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Larusso – Life in Static

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Immersed in a mixture of creative alternative rock and contagious pop punk, Life in Static the new album from US band Larusso is one healthily appetising proposition. Not a release to set crowds screaming from rooftops maybe but one to bring energetic life to any solitude drenched night or raging festivity, the album is a thoroughly engaging proposition with some quite tasty encounters within its vibrant walls.

Hailing from Salt Lake City, the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Aaron Condrat, drummer/backing vocalist Justin Trombetti, guitarist Nick Sasich, and bassist Tyler Grundstrom have earned and built up a potent fan base and attention through a series of self-released EPs and albums, as well as their live performances which has seen the band play with bands such as The Almost, Go Radio, Transit, The Ataris, Finch, Dance Gavin Dance, and Cartel. Also regulars at local festivals and having played the Ernie Ball stage at Warped Tour, Larusso finds itself with a lively buzz around them to which their new album will certainly do no harm.

Chase the Sun starts the album off in vivacious style, hooks and melodies an instant coating to keen riffs and jabbing rhythms. Vocally too the song shines immediately, the tones of Condrat backed by Trombetti, smooth and harmonious. It is not a startling encounter but one showing the musical strength and songwriting craft of the band as more than accomplished and seriously catchy. The track strides with ripe enterprise before making way for The Voice. As its predecessor, it too carries no real urgency in its gait and attack but makes for a catchy and captivating slice of rock pop with excellent vocal prowess and tidy hooks within a melodic breath.

Things suddenly spark more thrillingly with Drifter, a track offering irresistible hooks from its first touch and unpredictable endeavour throughout. Like a mix of Jimmy Eat World and Brand New, the song flows and strides with a Life in Static Cover Artdelicious creative appetite to the vocals and swinging grooves to the sound. The bass of Grundstrom brings a snarl too which adds to the appetite awakening potency of one of the album’s most impressive propositions. Its triumph is not quite matched by the next up Daniel with an L, but with its emotive melodies and almost melancholic air the track still captures the imagination with ease. As evidenced by it alone, there is nothing flamboyantly excessive about the band and its songs but they push do push an eager invention across increasingly persuasive and riveting exploits.

The evocative caress of Living Proof comes next with guitars casting a weave of expressive chords and melodic colour as Condrat adds an emotionally intimate lyrical narrative. The track is more a lead/intro to the current single The Recovery than a standalone prospect, its successor a crooning incitement which makes for a warm and skilful if not a passion stirring companion. Again it shows the impressive craft of the band in composing, playing, and imagination though but lacks a spark to make it more than a pleasing encounter, certainly when up against the more impacting tracks on Life In Static. Nevertheless ears are satisfied before turning to Places and Set Phasers to Fun for more adventure. The first of the two has an underlying swagger to its pop lit composure and intent, but tempers it with an evocative smoulder of emotion and sonic intrigue whilst the second shows another fun side to its sound and band with its acoustically led playful romp. In the hands of other bands, the song might feel like a filler but Larusso give it a smile and grace which makes a very worthy and enjoyable inclusion to the release.

Collision Course is another big highlight with its feisty riffs, mightily swinging rhythms, and agitated yet contagiously coaxing grooves. As across the album it is fair to say there are few real surprises, the song no exception but the band does dig out and explore essences of sound and familiar ideation which is fresh and invigorating. The superb offering is followed by the emotive balladry of Take Me Away where keys, orchestral strings, and vocals impress even if overall the track simmers rather than flames, something Dear Pandora manages to achieve with addictive tenacity. Thoughts of Amberlin edge forward as the song stomps with acidic grooves and biting hooks whilst melodies and harmonies make another inescapable lure. It is an enthralling success setting up the finale of Chemical. Also acoustically sculpted, the closer is a mesmeric piece of design and expression, and a much more potent and gripping encounter than Take Me Away which lingers and shows another corner and depth to the band which would be good to see explored more in the future.

Life In Static is a richly enjoyable and magnetic release which shows why the buzz around Larusso in their homeland; a spotlight easy to imagine broadening dramatically with the album. It is not setting new templates but for melodic rock with a pop ingenuity, band and album is well worth a long look.

The self-released Life in Static is available now @ http://larussorock.com/product-category/all/albums/

larussorock.com

8/10

RingMaster 15/08/2014

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The Oversight – Far From Gone

The Oversight-52

   The Oversight hails from Boston and through the release of a couple of singles has been gaining quite a bit of attention it seems. They now release debut EP Far From Gone and having been quite captivated by its accomplished sound and skilled mesh of alternative rock and pop punk, it is not too hard to see why people are drawn to the band.

The band consists of vocalist/bassist Lucas Edwards, guitarist/vocalist Ryan Watanabe, lead guitarist Maggie Fraser, and drummer Josh Parra, a group of students at Berklee College of Music. Taking inspirations from the likes of Mayday Parade, You Me At Six, Go Radio, Angels & Airwaves, Brand New, The Wonder Years, and Paradise Fears into their compositions, The Oversight has had references to bands such as The Gaslight Anthem and Pierce The Veil, another influence, cast over them. A pair of singles earlier in the year in the shape of When 5 AM Turns and Far From Gone made potent teasers and attention grabbing lures to the new EP. Its quintet of tracks, which includes those two songs, carries on the strong emergence of the band, all soaked in a promise and craft which suggests bright horizons ahead for the Massachusetts quartet.

The track Collective starts things off, the relatively short song an introduction to the emotional intent of the release. With a spoken narrative over a melodic weave which increases in intensity and passion, it is a decent start to the DIGITIAL theoversight_farfromgone_cover_finalencounter if not fully convincing. That reservation is soon lost with the entry of Black & White. A lone guitar and the potent voice of Edwards make the first coaxing before the song opens out with bold rhythms and a wash of melodic enterprise which lures in even closer attention. The track does not explode in action at any point but ebbs and flows in energy and intensity with a skilled touch. It continues to stroll engagingly, providing a firmer rock invention entwined with an infectious pop punk relish which never breaks free of its rein but tempts throughout the highly enjoyable song.

The following Love Is A Fiction similarly makes a low key entrance, a guitar stroking ears with a jangling persuasion as keys add their respectful reflection to the growing presence of the track. Vocally Edwards again impresses, strongly backed by the tones of Watanabe, whilst the imaginative weave of melodies and understated hooks make for a compelling enticement. As its predecessor, the song does not exactly light a flame in ears or passions but certainly has them enthralled by its intelligent design and skilful presentation, increasingly more so as it grows and impresses the more you share time with its open qualities.

When 5 AM Turns soon shows why it made a great impression with its release earlier in the year. Once more there is a slow coaxing to start things off, something the band seems to like employing, before the track erupts into an exciting stomp of crisp and muscular rhythms against stirring riffs and melodically sculpted hooks. That alone wakes up a real appetite for the encounter, a hunger enthused further by the sweep of strings which add provocative texture and adventure to the proposition. There is an invention to the song too which, less open on its predecessors, just lifts ears and satisfaction up in its persuasive arms.

The title track brings the release to a close, and yes it makes a gentle first beckoning before a rhythmic teasing leads into a blaze of raw riffs and a melody fuelled maze of enterprise. Featuring guest vocals from AJ Perdomo of The Dangerous Summer, the track virtually dances on ears; it’s at times skittish gait and thrust of passionate intensity adding to the drama and lure of the song. Though not quite matching the previous track, it shows more of the strengths of the band in songwriting and their undeniable potential to help ensure a healthy anticipation of their adventures ahead is left behind.

For pop punk with a fresh rock and emotional instinct, The Oversight is a band to watch and their first offering something worthy of spending plenty of time with. There will be good times ahead with the band you suspect.

The self-released Far From Gone EP is available now @ http://www.theoversight.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/TheOversightBand

7.5/10

RingMaster 22/07/2014

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