Quella – Donor Fatigue

Though not their first offering, we will admit that Donor Fatigue is our introduction to UK outfit Quella and the beginning of close attention such its striking persuasion on ears. Offering four slices of the band’s progressive punk/metal which truly embraces much more than that tag suggests, the EP provides a gripping landscape of imagination and noise which demands and devours attention.

Coming out of London and Brighton, Quella have built a potent fan base through their previous releases including the Fantastischen! EP of last year and a live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of Sumer, Core of iO, In Search of Sun, Black Orchid Empire, Gold Key, and Dirty Sound Magnet. Produced, recorded, mixed and mastered by Lewis Johns (Conjurer, Rolo Tomassi, Gnarwolves, Employed to Serve), Donor Fatigue would spark no surprise if it drew even greater attention and a new horde of ears the way of the band, indeed such its riveting adventure we expect it.

The EP opens with Crown Of Flies and immediately lured intrigue with its cinematic sample and sparked eager attention with the tempest of sound which swiftly follows. It in turn breeds a punchy and lyrically pungent canter as infectious as it is barbarous. The striking tones and imaginative words of vocalist Stefano Sebastianelli stand at the core of the captivation, the voracious rhythms of drummer Adam Parker and bassist Lee Davidson predacious temptation alongside breeding the drama as the guitar of Bean sonically shapes he song’s adventure. A fusion of punk, noise rock, and metallic dexterity, the song is simply superb and more compelling by the rock induced twist and imagination flooded turn.

Though it remained our favourite moment within the EP, it is regularly challenged if not dethroned within Donor Fatigue, with Smalltown Eiderdown the first to stake its suggestive claim. Instantly accosting ears with a dirty tide of riffs and senses swiping beats, the song just as quickly reveals spiky hooks and melodic taunting within its contagious and volatile body. Southern tinged grooves only add to the appetite nagging stoner lined lure of the song, its persuasion multi-faceted and all-consuming in voice and sound.

Loyal To The Lie teases with hard rock stranded enticement initially but no surprise as a thickly and varied flavoured web of sound and imagination grows from it, the band’s progressive instincts  entangling punk and anthemic rock dexterity before its brief but potent presence makes way for the groove punk riot of Them Apples. Entering with a similar melodic involvement to that its predecessor left in, the track keenly uncages its rapacious rock ‘n’ roll wolfishness amidst a feral but composed breath. It is a galvanic mix which is likely to arouse the spirit of punk and hard rocker alike.

That last suggestion applies to Donor Fatigue as a whole, a release which has brought a new and already eagerly devoured pleasure in the shape of Quella to us at The RR

Donor Fatigue is released 22nd November with pre-ordering available now @ https://quella.bandcamp.com/album/donor-fatigue

https://www.facebook.com/quellaband/     https://twitter.com/quellaofficial

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Skies In Motion – Life Lessons

It is probably fair to say that there are a couple of metal bred flavours we are finding ourselves uninspired by at The RR right now, metalcore being one. There are plenty of good and enjoyable bands emerging within the genre but few which truly break from the familiar and creatively routine. UK outfit Skies In Motion is one which defies that thought especially with their new debut album Life Lessons now leading their persuasion.  It is a ferocious magnetic collection of songs as irritable and aggressive as they are creatively and melodically captivating. Certainly plenty of its appeal is down to striking potential but equally there is an imagination and enterprise at play which only excites.

Hailing from Derby, Skies In Motion stepped forward in 2012 and has increased their reputation year on year  with their live presence alone which has seen them share stages with the likes of Killswitch Engage, Devil Wears Prada, August Burns Red, While She Sleeps, Unearth, Slaves , Skindred, Don Broco, Our Hollow Our Home, Gnarwolves and many more. Their initial sound was more hardcore driven though still embracing melodic strains. Life Lessons merges those flavours with its metalcore instincts, resulting in an assault which at times maybe embraces familiar essences but is a relentlessly fresh and intriguing proposition.

The press release for the album suggests bands such as While She Sleeps and Architects are good comparisons and it is not too hard going along with that as opener Architect bites. It initial melodic invitation is a deceit giving no suggestion of the creative carnage to follow though it is not long before an invasion of riffs and rhythms accompany enticing throat raw vocals. Intrigue is quickly gripped and fed as the track evolves into successor Cascades where djent spice predation is followed by hardcore causticity and metal antagonism, vocalist Adam Connor tenaciously riding the tempest. It is a stirring mix which welcomingly infests ears and appetite, the rhythms of bassist Dan Wheeler and drummer Sam Gaines continuing the predatory invasion as guitarists Dave Stewart and Andy Shaw weave a carnal tempest of craft and temptation. Connor is as striking as the sounds around him, the diversity of his attack thoroughly enjoyable and as potently backed by those around him.  There is also infectiousness to the track which borders on poppy, a catchiness which never undermines the ferocity.

The following Realizationship is similarly woven if even more irritable and too a web of seduction and sonic violence which never stops twisting and turning within its storm. The song lacks the final striking essences of its predecessor yet with teasing grooves and fury loaded flames of melody it masterfully hits the spot and an imagination already submissive to the inventively evolving landscapes the band shares within songs.

Another plateau is breached by next up Happy Families, its stabbing riffs and wiry tendrils an instant trap to fall into which only tightens as steely grooves and rabid riffs join rapacious rhythms and a virulence of contagious antics. Connor impressively leads into and drives the chorus of vocal spirit, sound relaxing a touch to embrace the infectious roar though that moment of unity is surrounded by a compelling net of discord and unpredictability. The track is superb and another reason to suggest Skies in Motion is a real force in the making.

Learn The Hard Way is next, its grooved body a fiery cauldron of sound and emotion with some of the most delicious melodic and harmonic lures heard in a fair time while the following Ugly lives up to its name in tone though it too has a swing and exhaustive rigour which simultaneously incites and devours the body. Both songs reveal more of the bands craft in writing and performance, the latter simply a beast of cyclonic contagion to become increasingly greedy for even before Finding Myself Lost has the chance to stamp its intense authority over the senses. It is fair to say that some tracks, like this one, needs time to truly appreciate; to explore and discover its deep qualities beneath a surface which pleasures if not overwhelms though truthfully every song has a wealth of adventure ready to share with increasing listens.

Both the carnivorous Sword Swallower and the emotively conjured Gonvena provide a mercurial adventure of sound and imagination, the first a savage turbulence which flows into an emotionally acute oasis of calm while the second goes from poetic beauty and melodic reflection to blistering intensity. The second is especially bewitching, Connor further impressing with his melodic prowess and the band with its fluidity through extremely contrasting climates.

When Home Feels Distant (And Distance Feels Like Home) lacks some of the captivation and adventure of the previous two but still has ears gripped and pleasure lit with its Avenged Sevenfold spiced tapestry, next up Five Years finding the same success with its own heart bred tempest of sound and raw aggression. It too misses some of the keen ingredients of earlier encounters but leaves satisfaction full and a want for more, hungrier.

Concluding with Hopebringer, another track which needs time to blossom into a fascinating and invasive fury of sound and potential, Life Lessons needs no help in luring ears and attention back again and indeed again. It is a debut which more than suggests, actually declares Skies In Motion as a band able to bring a fresh breath to the hardcore/metalcore scene. Whether they can live up to its potential time will tell but we would not bet against it.

Life Lessons is out now @ http://skiesinmotionuk.bigcartel.com/product/pre-order-life-lessons-albumu

http://www.skiesinmotion.com/    https://www.facebook.com/skiesinmotion    https://twitter.com/skiesinmotion

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Various – Sea Monsters 3

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It was only a few decades ago that everywhere you turned there was a new compilation album of emerging talent, every city seemingly rife with bright fires on new invention and refreshing creativity from yet to be discovered bands and producing albums as proof. That seems to be a thing of the past now, or maybe just it is so much harder to draw them into the radar, but one series is definitely working hard to unveil the thriving local scene of Brighton and that is One Inch Badge’s Sea Monsters ‘Best of Brighton’ compilations. The late seventies/early eighties saw the excellent Vaultage compilations from the same city, a series of releases which brought to attention the likes of The Piranhas and Peter And The Test Tube Babies, and the Sea Monsters collections is bringing equally or potently even more impressive artists of today from out of the city into are eager ears. Volume 3 is the latest release and as full of quality and irresistible sounds as you could wish for.

Reviewing compilations, especially the size of the two CD/download Sea Monsters 3, is great but also difficult as it is impossible to highlight every deserving artist and on this twenty five track treat it is honest to say there is not one single lull in the depth and richness of tracks. It is an eclectic mix of sounds and artists too which would normally lead to times where you are looking forward but not with this album. We will bring to the fore favourite tracks on the album to fill this review but only on the assumption you accept that every track is worth your undivided attention, got that?

The first CD is opened by the quartet Kins and their song Top and Turn. The song is a busy and raw mix of electro and scuzzy whispering guitars around the excellent vocals of Queline Smith but there is elegance to its ambience which wraps tender arms around the quizzical tempest. It is a gripping start soon equalled and then surpassed by the brilliant sultry guitar crafted instrumental flame of Guiones de Escadrilla from trio Squadron Leaders. The song is a blaze of sixties toned psychedelic rock merged with even richer surf rock; imagine The Shadows starting out today with an indie intent to their craft and nostalgia in their heart and you get this scintillating track.

In close order both Traams and The Physics House Band light up the senses with the songs Peggy and Abraxical Solapse respectively. The first is a guitar crafted piece of garage pop and noise rock which sounds like The Strokes meets The Barracudas, the trio creating a catchy, compelling slice of punkish pop rock, whilst the second simply takes the imagination into a shadow lit piece of disorientating aura drama, the band twisting the song left right and centre and in on itself whilst creating a coherent experiment in sonic adventure. Again a trio (more than coincidence surely?), the band provides arguably the biggest highlight of the release though it is constantly challenged by the likes of Broker, yes another trio who carve out a hypnotic senses buffeting taunt of punk and post hardcore within a psyche punk confrontation with the song Pro Rata. It is a masterful encounter which lingers and teases long after the band’s departure. Coffee from Gnarwolves closes up the first disc with a caustic brawl of punk which maybe is not rife with open originality but suggests this is a band sure to find that unique voice and recognition ahead as it thrills ears and emotions with a battling intensity and persuasion … oh and need I say how many members there are?

The second disc also starts with a pinnacle in the excellent Rule Breaker from hip hop seductor Suave Debonair, not to be confused with the duo from Sacramento playing the same genre. Reminding of Honky, the track sways and swagger with attitude and intrigue, the sounds rippling with invention and the word juggling coming near to the craft and might of Dizraeli. The following Bar After Bar from Rum Committee also walks across the spitting provocation of hip hop, brewing up a swing, jazz, and dubstep chaser to its liquor lined narrative.

Stepping up soon after on the release Great Pagans with Teenage Sillouettes immediately followed by Plasticine and their song Hard Being Strange bring another feast of sound and imagination to feed the raging hunger already ignited by the release. The first band offers up a song filled with guitar led fuzzy warm pop filled within a scuzz littered rock surface, whilst the vocals lay another smouldering harmonic heat to add its glaze to proceedings. Its successor from Plasticine also takes rock music on a melodic ride though with a distinct character to its indie infection and the great slightly quirky vocals of guitarist Andrew. There is a familiarity to the track too but one which defies recognition and adds more to the pleasure.

The pop rock, slightly Green Day like, sound of Loose Lips and their track Dr Evil next bounces across the ear igniting passions and limbs into another thrilled exercise of contribution. It is an excellent piece of contagion which leaves you exhausted and with a needy urge to press play again, and for the record after a few four strong bands, the trios have returned.

The consecutive treats of Little Rope from Tigercub, a riveting stamp of grungy rock ‘n’ roll and virulent anthemic energy, and the soul romping Oh The Days from Almighty Planets stamp their exciting ingenuity permanently on thoughts and passions to demand and undoubtedly receive further investigation, though every artist on the release earns that.

Sea Monsters 3 is outstanding and just shows how much talent there is in one city alone awaiting your discovery. With the likes of 900 Spaces, Luo, Negative Pegasus, Thedealwasforthediamond, and Abi Wade adding their exciting promise and sounds to the equally intriguing offerings of DA-10 ft. Us Baby, Bear Bones, Phoria , Soccer96, Written In Waters, If Heroes Should Fail, Jacko Hooper, and Holy Vessels, this is one compilation only a fool would ignore. With something for everyone it is one of the best introductions to any band anywhere and there are twenty five of the buggers here, some not a trio too.

Stream the album @ https://soundcloud.com/oneinchbadge/sets/sea-monsters-3

Sea Monsters 3 track listing:

Top & Turn (Demo)         Kins

2. Red   Phoria

3. Fears                Luo

4. Aquarius         Soccer96

5. Guiones De Escadrilla                Squadron Leaders

6. Peggy               Traams

7. Natural Jazz   Negative Pegasus

8. Abraxical Solapse        Physics House Band

9. For My Sins    Thedealwasforthediamond

10. Ligeia              Written in Waters

11. Arras (ii)        If Heroes Should Fail

12. Pro Rata        Broker

13. Coffee           Gnarwolves

14. Rule Breaker               Suave Debonair

15. Bar After Bar               Rum Committee

16. Indigo            DA-10 featuring Us Baby Bear Bones

17. Teenage Silhouettes               Great Pagans

18. Hard Being Strange  Plasticine

19. Dr Evil             Loose Lips

20. Eleven Pairs of Wings    900 Spaces

21. Little Rope   Tigercub

22. Heavy Heart                Abi Wade

23. In Angers      Jacko Hooper

24. Fever             Holy Vessels

9/10

RingMaster 31/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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