Black Lilium – Dead Man’s Diary

credit_by_Andy_Gruenitz

Last year saw the digital release of Dead Man’s Diary, the debut album from progressive melodic metallers Black Lilium. To provide an injection of fuel to its ear grabbing presence, the German outfit has just unleashed it in physical form, another reminder and nudge on the rich attention its impressive exploits deserves.

You could say the seeds to the band were first sown in the school days of guitarist Marcel Wroblewski and drummer Jan Knoop, the pair friends who subsequently played together in their first band in 1987. Jumping forward to 2013 and the pair began to work together again with Black Lilium formed a year later. In time its line-up was completed by guitarist Maurice Scholz, bassist Lasse Lammert, and vocalist/keyboardist Felix Hochkeppel, a quintet swiftly showing their imagination, craft, and bold adventure within Dead Man’s Diary.

There is something familiar but more so boldly individual about the band’s sound, its melodic seduction and rousing physical roar something akin to a fusion of Malum Sky, Silent Descent, and Voyager with a potent splash of early My Chemical Romance. Album opener Beast In The Backseat quickly insists of a predominate uniqueness to the band’s sound though, the song a swiftly and persistently striking introduction to the band for ears. Keys spread an engaging mesh first, rhythms lurking in its midst before triggering a voracious stride complete with swinging beats and the instantly delicious grievous grumble of the bass. There is an instinctive catchiness to the Black Lilium sound in general which just as quickly soaks the first track even as it calms a touch for the entrance of Hochkeppel striking tones. Every note and syllable comes with an inherent swing, the imaginative dexterity of voice and sound prowling every twist and moment with the same tenacity.

COVER_credit_by_Chris_Valentine

It is a great start to the album and straightaway Paragon Of Imperfection builds on it. An electronic reflection initially hugs ears, keys a thoughtful intimation as all the while darker shadows brew around them. Drama tints every evocative caress before Hochkeppel’s throat sparks another surge of contagious agility and energy which too embraces a melodic heart already bared. The volatility at the soul of the track never truly erupts but brings extra appealing drama to the encounter before Demon In Disguise out shines both with its virulent character and almost prowl like gait. As siren-esque as the embodiment of dangerously dark temptation that is its central protagonist, the outstanding song infests as it seduces, invades as it charms; its shadow wrapped moment of calm as magnetic as the galvanic roar driving its impressive presence.

As all tracks within the release next up Start All Over effortlessly fuses light and dark emotion and intensity with rich enterprise and imagination; the nurturing of a fine line in unpredictability within a fluid landscape of infectiousness extra captivation. The rhythms of Knoop and Lammert bite as they tempt and encourage, keys and guitars weaving a just as compelling persuasion within the track’s dark serenade while both Never and Walls Around My Soul seriously aroused with their respective uninhibited creative agility and emotive brooding. The first again is the epitome of one of the band’s stirring traits which helps shapes the album, its sound physically stalking body and imagination as it manipulates both into eager engagement with organic almost pop like catchiness while its majestic melancholy lined successor teases and tempts intimate shadows whilst brewing its own singular virus of invigorating sound and emotional orchestration.

Across the likes of equally inward seeking Everything I Am and The Ones You Made Us with its bold declaration, the band’s ever varied blend of flavours and captivation adds greater depth and captivation to Dead Man’s Diary; darkness, inner light, and the melancholic beauty which pervades the whole of the release uniting with individual attention hounding craft and a combined imagination which never lets expectations settle. If not quite breaching the depth of lust as incited by earlier tracks both offerings left ears and pleasure enriched, the following My Purpose similarly nurturing quick and increasing greed for its swiftly established distinction.

The closing pair of the album’s title track and Ghosts Without A Voice ensured Dead Man’s Diary left as dramatically and powerfully as it began, the former rising from a solemn sigh on melodic guitar threads to craft an incendiary pyre of emotion and sound; Hochkeppel’s continuing to impress vocals exposing heart and intensity. The final track almost infernally nags before opening up its electro metal resourcefulness and suggestion; a continuing rich temptation as the song unfurls its aggressive metal and invasively contagious trespass. Both songs alone left a hunger for more, an appetite severely exposed and escalated with every listen of this exceptional album.

So whether preferred as files or as something firmly grasped in the hand on CD, Dead Man’s Diary should seriously be checked out and indeed with great releases like this Black Lilium are unlikely to remain in the shadows of recognition for much longer.

Dead Man’s Diary is out now across most stores.

https://www.blacklilium.de/    https://www.facebook.com/blackliliumband/   https://twitter.com/blackliliumband

Pete RingMaster 18/02/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Olymp – Self Titled EP

Raw almost primal, the sound of German metallers Olymp is as intriguing as it is rousing certainly within their new self-titled EP. With its Teutonic heavy metal breeding and hungrily driving riffery described as being traditional 80´s styled, it is a proposition which demands attention yet it only tells part of the sonic picture. There is rabidity and essence of its character which is pure punk rock and an additional multi-flavoured web of flavours and imagination which only gives richer texture to its breath. It all goes to make the EP an introduction to the band that refuses to be ignored.

Formed in 2018, the Augsburg quartet consists of Butschi (guitars, vocals), André (bass), Armin (guitars), and Dommi (drums). There is little more we can tell you about the band but it is all about their first EP and that quickly gripped ears and appetite with opener Lightning Eater. Its initial bass lure simply teased attention, the quickly joining wires of guitar just as enticing as the song rose to its threatening feet though its menace is as alluring as it is predatory. It is with Butschi’s grouchy vocals and the subsequent band hollers that that punk essence arises, a voracious scent which aligns potently with the classic metal teased skilfully woven web of grooves and riffs that fuel the excellent start to the EP.

Fire And Fury is next up and begins with its own dark, imposing invitation for ears and imagination, one proving easy to quickly devour and relish as it continues to darkly stain the weave of metal flames and sonic enterprise wrapping rhythmic agility. As with the first song, its body is perpetually galvanic and chorus anthemic cajoling as once again punk and metal unite in an almost garage bred styling of both flavours.

A Celtic hue lines the beginnings of the following Shut Down, the guitar proving a web of sonic intoxication as rhythms create a contagious shuffle. Dark shadows court both at the same time, brewing an invasive hue to the subsequent punk ‘n heavy metal dance. If you can imagine a hybrid sound from a union of the punk density of The Lurkers, the melodic endeavour of U.D.O, and the metal esurience of Destruction then maybe a hint of the song’s and Olymp’s sound becomes clearer.

The EP ends with The Messenger, it’s melodic beckoning straight away wrapping around welcoming ears before riffs and hooks collude to further and increasingly tempt. From within that potent draw a controlled thrash hued swing begins its own thick enticement. Admittedly by its close it was a track which could not quite find the impressive heights of its predecessors but had plenty to hold court in ears and appetite as imagination shaped its fascination inciting presence.

Olymp’s sound as rousing as it is feels like it is only at the beginning of its journey and evolution and a fine adventure it should be for all if they build on and push the highly enjoyable and impressive enterprise within their first release; we wait in eager anticipation.

The Olymp EP is out now with limited availability @ https://olympmetal.bandcamp.com/album/olymp-e-p

https://www.facebook.com/OlympMetal/

 Pete RingMaster 03/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mortal Infinity – In Cold Blood

Unleashing thrash metal with a similarly keen instinct for death and groove metal, German metallers Mortal Infinity unveil their third album this month. In Cold Blood is a nine track trespass of old school meets new enterprise incitement, a release which left us basking in thick satisfaction.

Hailing from Zeilarn, Mortal Infinity emerged late 2009 and swiftly set about creating and releasing in the May of the following year their first EP, Eternal War. Since then they have unleashed a pair of albums in District Destruction of 2012 and three years later Final Death Denied. Both were well-received without really breaking the band out upon major attention, a possibility which In Cold Blood makes more likely given the luck all artists need.

Presenting a collection of songs which unapologetically embrace the influence of bands such as Exodus, Testament, and Slayer, In Cold Blood swiftly reveals its rich web of flavours within opener Fellowship Of Rats. Immediately riffs urgently descend on the senses, the guitars of Sebastian Unrath and Sebastian Brunner hungrily surging forth as the swings of drummer Adrian Müller bite. It is familiar territory but no less appetising for it. The raw and earnest tones of vocalist Marc Doblinger soon enter the affray too as all the while rapacious basslines escape the strings of Alex Glaser.

It is a great if unsurprising start to the release which is taken up a notch by the following Misanthropic Collapse. From its first breath seriously appetising grooves collude with hunger bearing riffs, rhythms again an imposing attack in the contagion of it all. Once more there is plenty to recognise but there is a freshness which as with its predecessor marks it out before the quickly impressing Repulsive Messiah steps up to prowl the listener within an apocalyptic collage. Within moments it becomes a nagging addiction of guitar as Doblinger stalks the landscape with his predatory words, death metal hues adding to the drama and temptation. Subsequent threads of melodic enterprise vine the confrontation bringing bolder imagination to the band’s sound.

Dream Crusher equally hooked quick and eager attention with its burly outpouring of carnal riffs and voracious rhythms, grooved wiring increasing its compelling presence. A Lamb Of God like spicing only accentuates its potency as too the momentary calm which deceptively hints at a twist but not the one which actually emerges to add to the pleasure.

From the stalking ferocity that is Long Forgotten Gods and the sinisterly Silent Assassin (Champion Of War) to Devastator, Devastated with its voracious and dextrous siege of sound the album only captured the appetite as the specific craft of individuals unitedly caught the imagination, the melodic dexterity veining tracks alone potent persuasion and only accentuated by the shades of death, groove, and heavy metal upon their thrash bred canvases.

The album’s title track equally hit the spot from its initial thrash borne chugging to the rhythmic agility of Müller and the grooved swing of its gait. Drama soaks its every move which only added to the classic breeding it springs from and the inventive dynamics it is shaped with.

Finally Ghost Ship Sailor sails forward to complete the release; the song drifting in on its own murky waters aflame with heavy metal spirals of guitar amidst a death metal sprung climate until eventually its thrash invasion breaks out, rampaging with hostile zeal. Arguably the most adventurous of the tracks and the most imaginative it provides yet another appealing aspect to In Cold Blood, one which took longer to take to but with rich rewards.

In Cold Blood is not without moments which did not quite grab as strongly as others, certain times when its twists and turns felt unnatural yet equally it all added to the intrigue and attraction of an album we only felt full enjoyment with. Whether the release is a breaking moment for Mortal Infinity time will tell but it certainly sees them moving in the right direction.

In Cold Blood is out September 6th; available@ https://mortalinfinityofficial.bandcamp.com/album/in-cold-blood

https://www.facebook.com/MortalInfinity/   https://twitter.com/mortalinfinity

Pete RingMaster 07/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Tezura – Voices

Formed less than a year ago, Tezura is a German band which recently made a rather potent introduction to themselves with the release of their debut EP. Their demo holds four tracks of thrash bred multi-flavoured metal, songs rich in potential and strong in ear grabbing enjoyment.

Hailing from Schongau, Tezura emerged in the winter of 2018 and soon set about working on their first release. Their sound draws on its thrash instincts throughout the quartet of tracks making up Voices but is just as open in its punk and metalcore, amongst other flavours, inspirations.

Behind The Glow sets things off, a lure of guitar central to its potent invitation before the song sets off on its thrash nurtured canter. The guitars of Phil Elste and Timo Kammerer only continue to entice as the latter’s gruff tones enter the creative affray. It is an attack though with melodic dexterity strapped to its rhythmic punch, riffs and grooves casting a subtle yet bold web to the aggressive but controlled nature of drummer Lukas Mayr’s strikes and the heavy dark bassline of Max Wopinsk. There is an imagination and craft to band and song though which ultimately holds attention keenest and caps the satisfaction naturally bred by the EP’s great start.

Its title track is next, riffs immediately gnawing on the senses as the track urgently bursts through ears with punk rapacity. Anthrax spiced fuel equips its driving thrash surge, the guitars again bringing melodic and sonic enterprise to bear on familiar hues with relish as rhythms trespass the senses. Progressive essences add to the song’s infectious character and persuasion before Apotheosis uncages its rawer but no less tempting punk infused metal holler. Untamed and irritable, the song challenges as it baits but equally only gets under the skin with that aggression as well as the harmonic endeavour of vocals and the melodic twine spun by the guitars.

Completed by the predatory exploits of Sun, the track sharing another aspect to the band’s sound with more progressive metal/metalcore essences at large within its creative drama, Voices easily lured eager anticipation for the next outing with Tezura. It is early days but the signs are already there that the band has the instincts and craft to make a real mark.

Voices is available now as a name your price download @ https://tezura.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/tezuraofficial   https://twitter.com/tezuraofficial

Pete RingMaster 06/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Caustic Minds – Black Oil For A Soul

With a rather potent reputation in tow courtesy of their highly energetic live performances, alternative rock outfit Caustic Minds has a certain buzz brewing up around them and one sure to be only accelerated by the recent release of the band’s debut EP. Five tracks strong, Black Oil For A Soul is quite simply an encounter which makes you just stop and pay attention.

Formed in Germany in 2007, Berlin based Caustic Minds has a background as rich as their sound. Vocalist Laura Jiménez Alvarez comes from Mexico City, while guitarist Daniel Viseras Calvache is Granada in Spain hailing. With bassist Michiel Sybers born in Antwerpen, Belgium and drummer Chris Crabtree British/German bred, it is a cosmopolitan mix as flavoursome as the blend of hard rock and indie enticement they conjure up between them. Over time the band has had references to the likes of Queens Of The Stone Age, The Dead Weather, Arctic Monkeys, and Black Sabbath shared upon their sound though for our ears Black Oil For A Soul tantalises and captivates like a hybrid fusion of Karn8 and My Baby.

Persistently compelling in its enterprise and bold in its character, the EP immediately had ears and imagination enslaved with opener Eyes On Fire. Never relinquishing its favourite track grip from its first escapade, the song instantly harries and tempts with a stalking fusion of stabbing beats and siren scythes of guitar. Instantly magnetic, the track only escalates its lures as a swagger breaks out in a sure stroll ridden by the similarly captivating tones of Alvarez. With a groove which infests hips without invitation and an instinctive roar that demands unity, the imagination soaked track easily gripped body and appetite.

Though for personal tastes the release never quite reached those major heights again, its presence and enterprise is a lofty adventure that continues to beguile, next up Baby Doll providing a fiery blaze of punk shaped rock ‘n’ roll with progressive breath to its winds as melodic seduction fuels its great unpredictability.

Similarly Destroyer teased and taunted the imagination; its immediate launch part prowl part strut and all fascination. Intoxicating in its bluesy charm and eye balling in its attitude, the temptress of a song proved another irresistible holler which never fed expectations before Blacklist brought its own beguiling lures to the party. Rising on spirals of sonic and melodic heat, the track is another which teases as it tempts. Like flames in a fire stirring thoughts and gripping attention as its spellbinding hold sprung creative shapes the song simply flirted with the imagination as vocals and individual enterprise trapped ears.

The EP closes up with Carry On, another moment within the EP that enthralled with ease as its seductive moves and shameless grooves toyed alongside the ever compelling barracuda toned bass of Sybers. As each track and the EP as a whole, the closer is all sensuous bait and steamy endeavour honed into rock ‘n’ roll that shamelessly and skilfully entices and firmly attracts.

Black Oil For A Soul more than suggests that the boisterous murmur around Caustic Minds is sound and about to boil over beyond the German borders the band is already putting under their spell and as a bonus ‘name your own price’ release on the band’s Bandcamp site, it is one encounter no one should be ignoring.

Black Oil For A Soul is available now @ https://causticminds.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/causticminds/

Pete RingMaster 29/07/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Noseholes – Ant And End

 

 

Such the dark majesty and ravening twisted exploits of debut album Danger Dance last year, we found it hard to imagine that Noseholes could eclipse its striking character and triumph. Well with its successor the German outfit has done just that whilst taking their sound into new intrigue loaded, virally compelling devilment. Ant And End has not wiped the floor with its illustrious predecessor but built on all its dark and aberrant brilliance to forge a whole new and sensational Noseholes escapade so easy to greedily devour.

Within a sound bred from the voracious instincts of post punk, no wave, and anomalous disco, the Hamburg hailing quartet of Henk Haiti, Steve Somalia, ZooSea Cide, and TH have ventured into darker corners and brighter trespasses with Ant And End. Still the body was a puppet to the band’s fiercely manipulative antics as they sprung a creative harassment to drool for, but the imagination was taken into the crevices of a more dystopian exploration bringing new esurient peril to their compulsive dance.

The album opens with Snowsuit Ranger and instantly roams the body with devious grooves and atypical enterprise. Rhythms tease and taunt, directing song and listener with their infernal bounce as eagerly tantalising vocals and deviant electronics are embraced by a quirky web of guitar. Like a distant relative of a merger between Au Pairs and Blood Red Shoes, the track is glorious, setting the voracious tone of the album and submissive mood of its victim alike.

The following IQ Model is just as rich a tempting, its gait a calmer virulent but clothed in mysterious atmospheric smog of intimation. The similarly reserved stroll of the radiantly dour bass fuels the blossoming industrial espionage of the song, vocals the magnetic narration to its seduction before the album’s title track got under the skin and had feet, hips, and instincts abound again. Whether an inspiration or coincidence, again eighties bred post punk/new wave spices up a slice of inescapable insistence, the likes of Delta 5, ESG, and Pylon hinted at.

The pure captivation of Vacuum Flies followed, its initial teasing shadows and suggestive drama alone hooking unbridled attention, the Essential Logic-esque flame of sax ear manna across the equally compelling rhythmic saunter which riveting vocals intimately drape over. With a Bauhaus hue adding to the pleasure, the song just mesmerised before letting Glimmering Mamba infest body and spirit with its hungry contagion. Not for the first or last time, there is a Gang Of Four lining to the irresistible rhythmic pestering, a nagging matched by the often simple but skilfully woven hooks and swarm of electronic baiting, but as always for all the hints given song and sound are unapologetically uniquely Noseholes.

Casino E Vino provides its own infective canter next, breeding a pandemic of temptation which lingers far beyond its final greed soaked lure while Radio Universe links its wires to body and imagination, the body in turn dangling and dancing like a willingly submissive puppet.

The album closes out with the pair of Jackson 4 and Baked Beans. The first springs its indie pop involved post punk exploits with boisterous intent, once more hooks and chords as lively and hungry as the inimitable rhythmic shuffle infesting is persuasion. Its successor though heavier, darker, and far more sinister manages to be even more viral like in its strands of temptation and collective jeopardy. Increasingly catchier and irresistible by the second, the track is a glorious end to a simply stunning album from Noseholes.

 Ant And End provides one of those moments when music proves why it is the most addictive and vital thing in a chaos searching world; indeed the second such revelation with Noseholes.

Ant And End is out through ChuChu Records on May 17th; available @ https://noseholes.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/pg/NoseholesBand/

  Pete RingMaster 17/05/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sober Truth – Psychosis

Less than a handful of months in and 2019 is already looking like it could go down as a major year for startling releases. Adding to the growing reasons why we are suggesting that possibility is the new album from German metallers Sober Truth. It is a snarling, writhing tempest of the band’s already individual progressive groove metal but has breached a whole new expanse of varied sound driven by an imagination living a up to its title; in short Psychosis is one dramatically thrilling engagement.

Formed in 2007, Siegburg hailing Sober Truth has established themselves as one of Europe’s most intriguing propositions across a trio of previous albums starting with Riven in 2009. The quartet has grown and nurtured their presence and reputation release by release but fair to say major spotlights and recognition are set to be stirred given the required opportunity with Psychosis. The successor to their previous well-received full-length Locust ▼  Lunatic Asylum, there is no escaping a new maturity and bolder imagination to the band’s songwriting and sound within Psychosis or the richer fusion of flavours making up its boisterous canvas.

The release opens with Solitude, the song initially brewing its attack in the background before crowding ears in a rapacious but controlled swirl of riffs and rhythms. A potent coaxing, it in turn soon centres its trespass and drives across the senses as eager grooves align with hungry riffs, the vocal antagonism of guitarist Torsten Schramm soon in league with the ferocious incitement. Instantly contagious and increasingly unpredictable as melodic strands and invention entangle in the fury while variety enhances the magnetism of vocals, the song just blossoms by the second. Already hints of different styles and spicing are at play, stronger in some moments than others but all adding to the track’s potent imagination and character.

It is a stirring rousing start easily backed by the sonic tapestry that is Akardos. Classic metal lined progressive wiring initiates the temptation, a great slim but rich prowling gait emerging before those early hues inflame the melodic enterprise of Schramm and lead guitarist Aaron Vogelsberg. Darker, heavier shadows soon infest the contagion, the esurient beats of Sam Baw uniting with the magnetic pulsation and lure of Jules RoCkwell’s bass. New threads of sound and styles continue to be keenly woven into the magnetic web before Dark Valley takes over the enslaving of ears and appetite. There is a bedlamic edge to Schramm’s vocals which quickly captured the imagination, one which only escalates across the song as musically too it nurtures an anarchic pandemonium within its skilfully bred infestation; the result which is maybe something akin to Dog Fashion Disco and Mudvayne meets The New Jacobin Club but is truly unique to Sober Truth.

The brief atmospheric ally portentous instrument of Ode To Reality leads to the authoritative bait of Riven which subsequently embraces thrash metal bred enticement and blackened shadows to its creative breast. As all tracks though, it evolves and spreads into a diversity of flavours and endeavour, the song as the band’s sound, wonderfully difficult to truly pin down though there is something of a Fear Factory tint to it.

The progressively flamed, death metal flushed Horizon and the nu/groove metal webbing of Utopia only cement the album’s potency and temptation; both unforgettable escapades forged in the diverse furore of sound and imaginative craft from across the whole band before Sober (ReArranged) reveals a whole new side and character to a song previously found on the last album. As catchy in temperament and intent as the original, the song flourishes in the fresh creative winds which race through the band’s growth in sound.

Dying Dreams follows bringing tenebrific clouds over melodic and harmonic intimation before the album’s title track seduced ears with its enthralling mesh of voracious metal and gothic rock equipped with almost malevolent grooves and post punk starkness. At times the song sparks thoughts of The Mission and Sisters Of Mercy, in other moments erupts in an insatiable squall of dissonance and instability. The track is superb, and one of the album’s biggest highlights.

The album concludes with an Unplugged rendition of Collapse, it too a song first introduced on Locust ▼ Lunatic Asylum. Whether intended as a mere bonus slice of Sober Truth goodness or not it provides a wonderful conclusion to Psychosis which is very easy to be greedy over.

Sober Truth may have still been an unnoticed proposition to many but surely that will change thanks to Psychosis. Quite simply the album is a real pleasure of originality and heterogeneity which deserves all the attention and plaudits it will hopefully get.

Psychosis is available now @ https://sobertruth.bandcamp.com/album/psychosis

http://sober-truth.com/    https://www.facebook.com/sobertruthband    https://twitter.com/sobertruthband

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright