AdvenA – Realität

While the band set about writing their second album, a look at the debut full length from German metallers AdvenA does not go amiss, especially if like us you missed it upon its release a while back. Offering eleven slabs of progressive death metal with a craft and imagination unafraid to add other styles and flavours, Realität is a potent introduction to the Bad Griesbach in Bavaria hailing quintet. It is not overtly unique but has certain moments of real invention which made it stand out and an inescapable potential which made anticipation of its successor almost inevitable.

Formed in 2012 by Chris Kolias and Florian Havemann, the band’s initial instincts and sound was metalcore based but has evolved to embrace the progressive and more intensively weighted extreme metal textures as evidenced by Realität. With a line-up of vocalist Daniel Esterbauer, bassist Florian Gumpoldsberger, and drummer Dennis Stirner alongside guitarists Dominik Jagenteufel and Kolias, AdvenA nudged strong attention with the release of their first album, and is still doing so as we can attest to.

The album opens with its title track, wintery winds bringing in the scenic lures and stormy breath of Realität which soon entices the melodic coaxing of keys before fiercer more imposing textures descend with Esterbauer throat gravelled tones leading the way. In no time, the progressive imagination of the band is steering the roar, guitars weaving a tempting web as rhythms entice and pounce. It is a fascinating beginning which is as seductive as it is barbarous, unpredictability lending a weighty lure to the track’s  often familiar but boldly fresh textures,

The following Herztod immediately aligns melodic intrigue and suggestion with irritable intensity, guitars casting a magnetic drape around the bestial toned vocals as the song rises to its creative feet. Lyrically song and release has a conceptual theme but with each track sung in the band’s home language we cannot share their individual focus, yet it matters little as the sounds paint a potent enough tale as this and the following Lass es regnen! prove with their individual adventures. Whereas the first has a smouldering soundscape for the main, its successor has a far more volatile climate but one boiling with thrash nurtured intent around clean vocals, presumably provided by Jagenteufel, as well as Esterbauer’s enjoyably abrasive snarls.

Best track honours are seized by Splitter next, the rhythmic entrapment of Gumpoldsberger and Stirner inescapable from its opening strains and only intensified by the rolling attacks and belligerent grumble of drums and bass thereon in. Spice loaded grooves and a general rock ‘n’ roll swing only add to the track’s might with only the clean vocals for some reason and for once not quite connecting. Nevertheless it is a storming encounter which alone could have sparked an appetite for the band’s sound but is more than backed by the likes of Aurora and Phoenix. The first is an atmospheric tempting with alluringly portentous shadows around a rhythmic resonance, a union beguiling ears and imagination before its dark side rises up in invasive riffs and sonic trespass. That also brings a melodic and electronic enterprise which suggestive mystique setting up the adventurous rock ‘n’ roll of the second with the added attraction of female vocals and melody encased endeavours.

Am siebten Tag unleashes a blistering charge next, thrash and death instincts driving its cantankerous rock ‘n’ roll to mark another highlight within Realität before FFA matches its hellacious dexterity with its own senses withering, appetite stoking assault. Heavy metal tendrils vine the imposing roar, enticingly uniting with atmospheric winds and progressive intricacies; a stylish weave then emulated in its own individual way by Der Wille, electronic imagination lining and occasionally nurturing new twists in its design.

The album closes up with the two instrumentals in firstly the thought rousing, body firing rock ‘n’ roll of Alles was glänzt and lastly the melody rich and suggestive Wasser zu Wein. It too is a contender for best song, keys and guitars casting a beguiling tapestry of intimation and beauty with an underbelly of darker intent and volatility. Both tracks hit the spot whilst highlighting the music and creative prowess of AdvenA and though we might have questioned the success of having two instrumentals closing things up it works a treat.

Realität made a potent ear pleasing proposition from the first listen but it is an album which grows and impresses further by the listen. Ahead of its successor, it makes a timely gateway into the AdvenA sound for newcomers and a highly enjoyable reminder of their strengths and potential for all.

Realität is available now @

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Black Space Riders – Amoretum Vol. 1

It has been well over two years since German heavy rockers Black Space Riders gripped the imagination with the acclaimed Refugeeum, just short of a couple from the release of its even more experimental and equally striking extension, the Beyond Refugeeum EP. Now the Münster hailing outfit has unveiled a new quest in their atmospheric space rock adventure through Amoretum Vol. 1, a release as mesmeric and seductive as it is invasively provocative and emotionally raw.

Since the release of their self-titled debut album in 2010, Black Space Riders has persistently pushed and evolved their sound hitting an attention grabbing plateau with third album D​:​REI four years after the first. With Refugeeum the following year, Black Space Riders exposed new boldness and imagination in their enterprise, a more atmospherically evocative and fascinating tapestry of sound and craft which took their creativity towards a whole new landscape of exploration and suggestion. Amoretum Vol. 1, with Vol. 2 marked for release later this year, entangles all the attributes of the band’s already individual sound with a fresh breath of imagination. It is often startling, insistently captivating, and occasionally physically ravenous but throughout perpetually compelling.

Consisting of JE (lead vocals, guitars, keys, piano, electronics), SEB (lead vocals, keys, percussion, electronics), C.RIP (drums, percussion), SLI (guitars), and bassists SAQ (until Sept 2017)and MEI (since June 2017), Black Space Riders walks a world where “War, terror, displacement, destruction, rejection and nationalism dominate the headlines” with Amoretum Vol. 1, taking the listener into their darkest corners whilst enveloping them with the thickest trespass of shadows. The melancholy that lines each song is so thick you can almost peal it like skin but everything in word and sound comes wrapped in degrees of hope and solution, their suggested resolutions of compassion and peace as rich and inescapable as the dark they counter; the album’s made up title symbolizing “a protective garden and a germ seed of love.”

It opens up with Lovely lovelie, raw riffs and imposing rhythms in league from the first second surrounding the subsequent vocal agitation. Acidic melodies emerge to line the intensive trespass, a rhythmically driven groove invading body and appetite in no time too as the song stands over ears with almost bearish provocation while undulating spirals of cosmic light simmer and burn. There is a primal edge and urgency to the encounter too, a waking up of the senses and thoughts which by its final repetitive shimmer has attention firmly hooked.

The song slips into the waiting embrace of Another sort of homecoming, a calmer but no less dramatic climate of enterprise and adventure with its own undercurrent of volatility. As melodies soar and the song’s instinctive rock ‘n’ roll rumbles with ear gripping hooks embroiled in the theatre, vocals match their stirring unpredictability and adventure. Again ears and attention was baited and trapped, a hold soon intensified by the outstanding Soul shelter (Inside of me).With its post punk nurtured heart, like a mix of Joy Division and The Sound encased in the dark throes of the rhythms, the song is sheer captivation. Its air and touch is low-key but with that ever present tempestuousness which subsequently boils up into a blaze of emotion, intensity, and creative drama.

Its rich triumph is soon matched by the hypnotic lure and magnetism of Movements. With ripples of crystaline beauty in a well of melancholy, the song glistens in its dark; vocals again managing to echo the musical web. Menacingly meditative with a dark brooding to its rumination, the atmospheric tone of the encounter builds and builds until escaping in a composed avalanche of intensity and virulently catchy urgency. The track is superb and with its predecessor the pinnacle of Amoretum.

Not that the dramatic and volatile squall of Come and follow lingers in their shadow, the track a cyclone of rock ‘n’ roll which ebbs and flows through dissident calms and corrosive quakes within a brew of caustic punk, voracious rock, and searing psych rabidity. It all colludes in another lofty peak before Friends are falling creates its own tempest of dirty riffs, corruptive rhythms, and psyche infesting grooves. It maybe misses the spark of the previous trio for personal tastes yet nagged and insisted on greedy attention willingly given to its almost convulsive saunter.

Fire! Fire! (death of a giant) surrounds ears with psychedelic temptation within a funk kissed stroll next, an infestation of hips and feet as inevitable as that of ears and imagination as it builds up into fiery crescendos and combative expulsions of defiance. As throughout the release, the guitars cast a web of threat and seductive temptation while rhythms prowl and launch with inventively infectious antipathy; traits similarly involved in the great vocal union and balance of JE and SEB.

The album closes with Fellow peacemakers, a song which we will admit slowly burned in the psyche and passions compared to its companions but seeded real temptation from its first journey from a shadow bound reflective croon to a ferocious deluge of energy and attitude. Melancholy bred keys and vocals initially lure ears and thoughts, lively rhythms courting their company until a whisper of peace seeds an impending tempestuous stomp of incendiary rock ‘n’ roll as addictive as it is acerbic. As mentioned it took time to get under the skin but that it did with real voracity to match every other moment of potency in the exceptional encounter.

Amoretum Vol. 1 leaves a real hunger for more and an impatient anticipation for its successor whilst Black Space Riders once again leaves ears and imagination basking in adventure which just gets bolder, bigger, and better.

Amoretum Vol. 1 is out now @ or

Pete RingMaster 08/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Noseholes – Danger Dance

If you are looking to have your imagination twisted into torturous shapes matching those drawn from the body, then checking out the twisted disco of German outfit Noseholes is a must. The ticket to its no wave/post punk/noise rock devilry comes with debut album Danger Dance, an encounter living up to its title in deed and temptation.

The Hamburg hailing quartet of Henk Haiti, Steve Somalia, ZooSea Cide, and TH have already been teasing and tempting through a host of well-received tracks which now collude with equally as compelling adventures within the band’s first full-length. Danger Dance opens up with its title track, a flirtatious bassline leading the coaxing as beats stroll alongside. Soon an equally seductive melody escapes the guitar, the combination reminding of the Au Pairs even as vocals spring their web of temptation and intrigue. The suggestive spice of keys and the alternating female and male vocals all add to the captivating drama relentlessly driven by addiction stirring rhythms

A just as potent rhythmic lure fuels the following post punk shuffle of Lush Box. Spirals of guitar and flames of sax latch onto the swagger of beats and bass; the song’s jazz bred discord and post punk dance bouncing around like a Delta 5 meets Blood Red Shoes tango before Styling shares its own riveting devilment with a similar but quickly individual template of flavours. To be honest the rhythmic heart of the first trio had us trapped hook, line and sinker, all the other psyche infesting imagination icing on their inimitable cake with only the briefness of each song a frustration, a common niggle across the album.

Yelzins Affair makes a more tempered start but one with intrigue and noir lit shadows in its breath and sound from the off. Creating a tapestry of creative languages and suggestion over rapacious rhythmic pulses and lean but potent melodic tendrils the song is a mysterious fascination allowing a breath for the body and adventure for thoughts.

Tenacious endeavour and energy breaks again in Ex Driver, a track which in its sonic webbing has a definite early XTC deviousness, while Bed Smoker bounds in on a boisterous rhythmic skip and melodic manipulation which has the body and imagination eagerly bouncing like a four year old. Both are manna to any post punk/noise pop bred appetite while the closing Aspirin Nation is pure joy to jazz infested noise rock mania. Its acidic instrumental dissonance and rhythmic pounce is captivation enough but add the Essential Logic-esque squirts of sax and again attention was lustful.

Danger Dance teased, taunted, and pleasured pretty much our every personal want from music; it may very well do the same for yours. Only one way to find out…

Danger Dance is out now through ChuChuRecords / Harbinger Sound; available @

Pete RingMaster 27/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bool – Fly With Me

Frustratingly it is far too easy for things to fly under the radar in a time where nothing is secret thanks to the extensive landscape of the internet, but one proposition we insist you do take notice of is Fly With Me, the new album from Bool. The German outfit roar in ears with a strain of alternative rock which infests the appetite with its grunge character and grips the imagination with an array of nagging hooks and rousing enterprise; it all coming together here for one of the year’s most compelling moments yet.

The band’s sound is maybe best described as Bush meets Morphine harassed by Damn Vandals and Fatima Mansions but from that mix thrills with its own unique personality of sound and craft. It demands attention and rewards with every passing second of bold and impassioned rock ‘n’ roll. Formed in 2007, Bool stirred up acclaim and an already growing reputation with the My Spirit, their third release realising the potential already heard in its predecessors. Recorded with producer Jon Caffery (Die Toten Hosen), Fly With Me hits and owns a whole new plateau for the band’s sound and invention, offering a relentlessly harassing and addictively creative trespass to lust over.

It opens up with Here We Are and a flame of guitar before, and not for the last time, a swiftly compelling bassline with its growling tone entices courtesy of Marc Fröhlking. The initial blaze settles down a touch as the vocals of lead guitarist Karsten Dittberner step forward, the bass continuing to offer delicious bait alongside as the crisp beats of Jens Geilert descend. Soon the fiery adventure of Dittberner and fellow guitarist Michael Malfeito rise again, the cycle repeated throughout with increasing energy and adventure.

It is a boldly striking start quickly matched by the more composed but no less sonically seared Soul Train. Emotion drenches every note and each syllable dropping from Dittberner’s throat with a crystalline melody a glassy temper within the growing tempest. Commandingly contagious and wonderfully irritable in many ways, it too lingers in ears and thoughts just as successors Shut Up and Kick Arse do. The first of the two is even more reined in which brings a tension and drama especially to its brewing crescendos which is raw seduction. Dittberner is a magnetic vocal presence potently backed by his companions, while together the quartet unite in imagination and dexterity with that earlier Bush reference at its enjoyable strongest. The second of the two has a Nick Cave like edge to its opening Doors-esque climate, hues which caress the brooding heart of song and sound before the track slips into an almost predatory stroll of primal rock ‘n’ roll at its inventive best with a rolling energy more than living up to its title.

My Own Heaven is a melodically grilled pyre of emotion which ebbs and flows through calm and volatility, each passing moment a web of arousing catchiness and suggestive enterprise around the addictive dynamics of Geilert while the following Revolution uncages a riveting holler of punk ‘n’ roll which has the body bouncing and spirit roaring. It is testy and flirtatious, a true treat among many within Fly With Me.

Bool equally show they are adept at caressing the senses as the dark yet elegant serenade of Hey You shows, its melancholic beauty and melodic croon pure enticement before You and Me stomps in with its own tenacious rock ‘n’ roll. Again Gavin Rossdale and co feels a big inspiration to the track but one which is easily welcomed within its infectious incitement. Essences of metal and heavy rock add to its theatre, a potent incitement more than matched by the rawer edged and dramatically textured Desire where again rhythms simply grip the instincts as the guitars create a web of sonic flames to be trapped by as vocals share their plaintive heart.

Through the even tempered if again tempestuous sonic reflection of Same Mistake, a song which feels very familiar for no obvious reason, and the similarly intimate balladry of Yesterday, there is no urge to pull away from the album, each rich captivation even if not quite reaching the heights of those before them. Fair to say both easily get under the skin as too next up Love is the Answer, a theatre of sound and temptation which barely hides its tension within keys and string woven melodies. The song is certainly a slow burner but over time grows to be one of the most memorable and essential lures of the album.

The release closes up with Right or Wrong, a song which pleases immediately but also takes its time to fully persuade and ignite the passions which, if without the stirring triumphs of its companions, it surely does. It is a potent conclusion to an album which for us has become an addiction in no time.

Fly With Me is the wake up call to one exciting band in Bool, be sure you do not miss the trip.

Fly With Me is available now through Boersma Records through most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Running Death – DressAge

The new album from German thrashers Running Death is one of those encounters you just cannot help going back to and with increasing zeal. Inspirations to the band include the likes of Megadeth, Testament, and Annihilator, traits audible within DressAge but their sound has much more in its armoury ranging from eighties heavy metal and rock to similar era speed metal.  It all comes in varying degrees within a certain thrash bred stomp and all colluding in one virulently infectious and catchy slab of muscular rock ‘n’ roll.

The band’s debut album of 2015, Overdrive, ensured the Bavarian are no strangers to eager praise or a host to new waves of fans and things can only escalate with the release of DressAge.  The album wears a grin on its creative face from its first breath and carries a mischief which gives its tracks a real feel of aggressive fun. It opens up with Courageous Minds, a track swiftly involving the listener in its lively gait and nature as rhythms thump and dance upon the senses whilst the guitars of Daniel Baar and vocalist Simon Bihlmayer spin a web of enticement. It is not long before the track is rigorously strolling through ears, the beats of Jakob Weikmann swiping as the voice of Bihlmayer growls in a quickly engaging affair which if not quite gripping the imagination as firmly as subsequent tracks certainly gets things off to a rather pleasing start.

Dressage is next, surrounding ears with an almost predatory web of textures cored by the throaty bait of Andrej Ramich’s bass. The anthemically driving rhythms of Weikmann quickly have the instincts to stomp hooked, the song taking mere moments more to eclipse its predecessor and really get the album rocking. Baar’s melodic enterprise is technically and sonically impressive and never diluting the natural roar and flow of the thrash fuelled encounter before a gasp of time brings the matching strengths and incitement of Delusive Silence upon an appetite already beginning to get a touch greedy for what is on offer.  Fusing a great mix of melodic warmth and metal irritability, the track only blossoms its weave of adventure and varied sounds keeping expectations wrong-footed and the imagination hooked.

Next up Heroes Of The Hour wraps ears in a wiry weave of melody and creative snares before revealing a more predator side through jabbing beats and antagonistic bass. They are in turn aligned to swinging grooves, a revelry soon infesting the aggressive and infectious tendencies of the song as another highlight is crafted before Duty Of Beauty bounces upon ears with a catchiness which borders on poppy. Those eighties influences spice all tracks and certainly impregnate the boisterous rock ‘n’ roll of the fifth song which also has a touch of Danish rockers Grumpynators to it.

Through the bulging contagion and biceps of the Motorhead scented Numbers and the motorbilly fuelled Beneath The Surface, fresh heights are continued and pushed, both outstanding tracks as compelling in tone and character as they are in individual craft while Anthem of Madness has neck muscles working and the body romping with its voracious instrumental theatre.

The album closes with the pair of Safety Second and Refuse To Kill, the first a fiery ballad which haunts and snarls in equal measure as guitars conjure a tapestry of evocative suggestion around just as strong vocal expression. It is a song which simmers upon the passions compared to other tracks but rapidly grows to be just as persuasive with each rerun of building body of energy and adventure. Its successor has a darker edge to its air, a song close to stalking ears as it fills them with rapacious rock ‘n’ roll cored by the most crotchety slice of thrash metal upon the album.

Cloaked in the fine work of Mexican graphic artist Joel Sánchez Rosales, DressAge is a proposition which merges something familiar with something forcibly fresh, the outcome a record which inspires only enjoyment and an eager energy to get involved. We will not say it will be a regular album of the year nomination but it will be one metal roar we will be keenly joined in love for.

DressAge is out May 26th via Punishment 18 Records and @

Pete RingMaster 25/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dr. Hell – Apocalypse Boobs


Once more confronting ears with sounds suitable to voice an eager resurrection of the undead in a zealously riotous rampage, Dr. Hell unleash a new death dance of blood strewn horror punk going under the notoriety of Apocalypse Boobs. The German quartet’s mini album is a carnival of infectiously decayed punk rock and ravenous enterprise weaving familiar and individual exploits into their finest offering to date.

Since emerging from their respective North Bavarian mausoleums in 2010, though rumours are they actually formed in 1812 a secret place known as “The Bloody Islands”, Dr. Hell have released two albums of their raw and predatory horror punk, When I was just a little ghoul … in 2012 and Drunken Zombies two years later, and shared stages with the likes of The Meteors, Demented Are Go, KoffinKats, Blitzkid, The Other, and BananeMetalik to name just a few. Set to uncage their live ferocity on the UK this November, the band whets the appetite and scars the psyche in anticipation with the Undead Artists Records release of Apocalypse Boobs.

drhrll art_RingMasterReviewFrom its melodic Intro, the album leaps at the senses with Dead Girl with hungry riffs and swinging rapier like beats on the frontline. Swiftly led by the growling tones of DanDan Delirious, band and song career through ears with contagious punk/hard rock revelry and though there are no major surprises it is irrepressibly addictive and soon gaining full and eager listener involvement before Hate launches its more venomous and fiery tirade. With a touch of Frankenstein Drag Queens From Planet 13 to its irritability and raw trespass, the track binds ears with a toxic groove as again the rhythms of bassist Ina Insanity and drummer Mike Maniac growl and bite respectively.

Both tracks spark an eager appetite for the album’s assault and each is quickly eclipsed by the riotous stomp of Zombie Zoundz. With a whiff of The Sweet like seventies glam and the invasive predation of The Damned to its character, the track stalks the imagination around unbridled bouts of virulent aural voodoo resulting in a track for which lustful participation is a given.

Shrunken Heads is just as irresistible next, opening with heavy metal bred grooves around rockabilly riffs which only increase their and the song’s potency with every passing second of catchy enterprise. As in its predecessors, the song has a chorus ripe with contagion while guitarist Podo Panic entangles it in greed sparking melody sick flames throughout. As impressive as it starts, the album is at its pinnacle over the two tracks and only reinforces the point with Wasted Horror Punkrock Princess and a caustic punk brawl resembling a mix of Angelic Upstarts, Blitzkid, and Turbonegro with just a touch of Madball to its inescapable catchiness.

Completed by the anthemic incitement of Zombies in Town, another track as captivating in its antagonistic nature as its web of enterprising flavours within a rousing punk roar, Apocalypse Boobs  is primal rock ‘n’ roll to get loudly enthused over. As suggested it is not always the most unique proposal yet every track is pretty much distinct to Dr. Hell, igniting a lusty reaction and greed for much more; reason alone to stand in its bloodlust we say.

Apocalypse Boobs is out now via Undead Artists Records and @

Pete RingMaster 28/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Infectious bounds and spiky hooks: an interview with Pranx


With a clutch of videos and a potent first EP behind them, Pranx is a German outfit beginning to lure potent attention. Their rousing live presence has equally drawn high praise. So to discover more about this upcoming proposition, we seized the chance to talk with the trio about their EP, progress to date, and all things Pranx in general.

Hi guys, many thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We are PRANX, a Pop Punk band from Mosbach, Germany consisting of Marcel on drums, Rouven on bass and vocals, and Boris on guitar and vocals. We formed in February 2014. Rouven and Boris had played together in a band since 2008 but their drummer quit. Instead of just searching for a new one we decided to make a new start entirely and form a new band with a new name and new songs. We met drummer Marcel on Facebook to start PRANX in early 2014.

Being involved in other bands before, has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Like we said, Boris and Rouven had played together since 2008. Marcel was also involved in some bands before including a German hip hop band. I don’t think it affected the style we’re playing now with PRANX but it definitely had an impact on our growth as musicians in general. The good chemistry between our two vocalists regarding singing harmonies together for example has been cultivated while playing together in their former band.

What inspired the band name?

It’s a shorter version of Rouven’s and Boris’ former band Prank FanatiX. We wanted to have a name that’s easier for people to remember as it always was spelled wrong on flyers. The original Prank FanatiX name was inspired by the term ‘faith fanatics’ in Green Day’s song ‘East Jesus Nowhere’.

Pranx2_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As a band we hope to enrich some people’s life by playing music, just like all those bands we look up to did and still do to us. Music of those bands had such a massive impact on our lives over the past few years, so we hope that someday people feel the same thing about our music. That’s what we want to offer the people who listen to our music. Another idea behind starting this band is to create some kind of exit out of this daily routine. We want to achieve more in life than just working normal jobs and get stuck in boring lives like 99% of today’s society.

Do the same things still drive the band time?

Yes, we’re still driven by the same things. I think even more than when we started.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

It hasn’t evolved that much since PRANX started but it definitely has since our first days of making music in general. Our very first songs clearly had a Blink-182/Green Day stamp on them whereas now our sound is much more individual (even though you can clearly still hear the Blink influences of course). Since a few years we’re also influenced by this new wave of pop punk bands that has appeared. Bands like Neck Deep and The Story So Far are also great inspirations.

Has it been more of an organic movement in your sound or more a deliberate wanting to try new things?

A mix of both I would say. A huge part of our sound comes from us wanting to try new stuff but sometimes while writing songs something new comes up and you hadn’t planned it. If it’s not something we had in mind for our sound but still sounds cool we go along with it and try to implement it.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

That’s hard to answer. I can’t think of anyone that changed the way we create music but I’m sure it happened subconsciously anytime along the way. All in all we’re still very conservative songwriters. Take a guitar, play some chords and jam some melodies until you find something you like and go from there.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

When someone has the idea of a new song he usually likes to write the first version of it all by himself. The process is writing the whole thing, making a demo with all the instruments and arrangements and then showing it to the rest of the band. Then we look at it together and see what we can optimize and change to make it the sound great.

Where are your lyrical inspirations drawn from more often than not?

The inspiration for the lyrics comes from situations of our everyday life. Things you go through in every stage of your life or even things and problems we notice in other peoples’ life around us can make perfect inspiration for song lyrics.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?art_RingMasterReview

It’s a 4 track EP called Things On Your Mind that was released in early 2015. There are two music videos so far and the third is released very soon, but we plan on doing one for the last song as well. All the videos are directed and produced by bassist Rouven. All in all I think the album is a great mixture of catchy sing-along choruses and cool punk riffs, spreading a lot of positive energy.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Another Year and Standard are more or less love songs about girls from the past. Especially for Standard I tried to write the cheesiest lyrics and make it as cliché as possible. You could see it as a kind of a tribute to all the 90s pop punk love songs. Pogo Romance is a song about failing while promising a glimpse of hope for getting back up again at the end. Nightmare is about social isolation and forgetting to live your life in the ‘real’ world.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Since we’re a band that’s short of money like every other band and studio time is expensive we try to do as much work for the record as we can before we enter the studio. This means we have the final songs all ready to record in their final state and try to make changes in the studio only when really necessary.

Tell us about the live side to the band?

For me playing live is the best part of being in a band. It’s not only having fun and partying on stage with your friends but also the time of the night where you’re not on stage and have the chance to meet new people and other musicians. There are so many cool people we got to know just by playing shows all around Southern Germany. Always nice to connect with and to play shows for awesome people!

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it in Germany? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the want is there for new bands?

Where we come from is actually one of the worst places for bands to start. The music scene of our hometown is as good as dead and I think it always has been. We always have to travel a little bit further to play good shows. We have to rely heavily on the internet to reach people because there’s little to no interest in live bands in our region.

Pranx3_RingMasterReviewHow has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

I don’t know if PRANX would still exist if there was no internet. We probably [would not have] even found a drummer if [we had not] met Marcel on Facebook. 95% of people got to know us through Facebook or YouTube so without that I don’t think we had a chance to even reach people.

I think you can still use the internet to your advantage even when you’re a big band with greater success. But I also think it can be hard to influence whether it’s working for you or not. What works for one band does not necessarily have to work for another and sometimes the mass of people on social media is hard to predict or analyse. In my opinion, your music is what counts at the end of the day. You can do every single thing right when promoting your music through the internet but if your songs suck people still won’t like you. On the other hand you can get good exposure if your music kicks ass even if you’re not a social media pro.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks for the interview! If you like, you can check us out at to watch all our music videos and check regular updates. Watch out for our next music video for the song Pogo Romance that’s going to be released soon!

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright