Redshift – Cataclysm

With influences to its breeding ranging from “70’s/80’s Rush and Genesis to more modern prog like Dream Theatre and Between the Buried and Me” it was hard to exactly imagine what the debut album from UK metallers Redshift was going to offer. It was an intrigue though rewarded with a release which was as unpredictable as it was fascinating and only increasingly enjoyable by the listen.

Their sound is tagged as progressive metal but that only gives one aspect of the Bath trio’s sound. It embraces extreme metal textures as easily and readily as melodic and classic hues, the band’s technical prowess just as ripe and open within the creative tapestry. For personal appetites there are moments which simply enthral and other times where the record merely held keen intrigue yet from start to finish Cataclysm held court on ears and attention and as mentioned with increasing success.

A concept album depicting the story of an invasion like no other around an engrossing lyrical thread based around honour, love, and a devastating apocalyptic event, the Ben Turner produced and Jamie King (Between the Buried and Me, The Contortionist) mastered Cataclysm easily lured attention with its opener, Overture: Something In The Sky. Immediately the technical craft of the band engaged; the guitar of Joshua Boniface casting a lure of intimation before showing its feral side alongside the driving rhythmic incitement of drummer Jack Camp and the rich lines of bassist/vocalist/keyboardist Liam Fear. The instrumental with its progressive suggestiveness effortlessly had the imagination weaving before the full force of Invasion descends.

The second track rises up from the formers portentous calm, almost hunting the senses and conjuring thoughts before rushing their barricades with vocal causticity amidst guitar spun wiring. The unpredictability and imagination of the band’s sound is soon properly unveiled, the song an aural kaleidoscope of flavours and sonic grains all designed to spread the tale and entice firm attention. Extreme and seductive textures continue to fluidly collude across the compelling proposition, the band’s progressive instincts seemingly honing the attributes of everything unveiled before Call to Arms stirred things up further with defiance and aggression. Yet it too brings an infectious melodic essence to its eruption, the mellower calms in between like the verbal and sonic narrator to the blossoming conflict. As the album itself both are tracks which reveal a little more by the listen, the richness of their narrative and bodies only thickened over time.

Promises provides a melodic amnesty to the friction, its unsettled piano crafted repose the calm before the storm, a tempest announced by church bell chimes and unleashed by the outstanding Fire, Smoke and Thunder. It devours the senses instantly, every angle of its attack carnivorous but equally voraciously virulent, ferocity and barbarous intent in league with dextrous progressively hued enterprise throughout. Easily our favourite track within Cataclysm, it tips a great potent release over into rousingly impressive if leaving the final pair of tracks the unenviable challenge of following its triumph.

Both May Fate Rest Upon You and The Last Stand may miss out rivalling their predecessor but both escalate the album’s appeal, the first with its classic hues over appetite nagging technical prowess and the closing track through its evocative atmosphere and expressive melodic radiance, a redolent beauty across a mercurial landscape which is never far from erupting and at times does so with rapacious agility and expectations defeating invention.

The final song also epitomises the unpredictable nature of album and sound, a core reason of its perpetual fascination and temptation and even after numerous plays we are discovering fresh things to chew on and enjoy within Cataclysm. Suggested as an album for fans of bands such as Opeth, Between the Buried and Me, and Dream Theater, Redshift has provided something well worth checking out for anyone with a taste for adventure.

Cataclysm is available now digitally and on CD @ https://redshiftband.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/RedshiftBandUK/   https://twitter.com/RedshiftBandUK   https://www.instagram.com/redshiftbanduk/?hl=en

Pete RingMaster 01/05/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Shades and glories; talking Different Light with Trevor Tabone

The history of progressive rock band Different Light comes in two parts, each seeing the band finding greater attention and plaudits to match their relentless growth in sound. Following their acclaim clad last album, the band is preparing to record its most inventive and imaginative collection of songs for a new album so we took the opportunity to explore the band to date with thanks to Trevor Tabone, a founder of Different Light.

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started; how you all together?

The band consists of: Trevor Tabone (vocals, keyboards) that’s meJ, Jirka Matousek (bass), Petr Matousek (drums), Petr Lux (guitars, backing vocals) and Petr Kania (live guitar). The band was originally formed in Malta in 1995 with 3 other members besides myself; then I reformed it with the current line-up after I moved to Prague in 2000.

Have you been involved in other bands before?

I was obviously involved in a few other bands before Different Light. The style has always been prog/classic rock, changing slightly according to the time it’s in.

What inspired the band name?

Mark (original guitarist) came up with the name when we were drinking in a bar, usually the place for the best ideas!

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Personally speaking, I see myself more of a songwriter than a musician, so I’ve always sought the best musicians I could find to help me create and record the material I’d written. Regarding the sound, it’s got to be melodic and powerful with lyrics the listener can relate to.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

I suppose the driving force is still one of wanting to move people with the music we make; I think I can speak for the rest of the band with this.

Since your early days also how would you say your sound has evolved?

We’ve obviously become technically better, plus the new members to the constantly changing (evolving?) line-up always add a new dimension to the sound.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

More organic I would say, it’s all about evolution and not intelligent design 🙂

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

What particularly inspires my writing is personal experience and real life situations, people I know or even people I just observe. I’m not into fantasy and sci fi! Of course there are the many bands that we love and have inspired us, Genesis, Supertramp, Pink Floyd, Rush, Dream Theater and quite a few others.

Is there a certain process to your songwriting?

I sometimes come up with a lyric and put a melody to it and go from there. Or I’m fooling around on my piano or guitar and come up with a chord progression and a basic melody which I develop. I sometimes just completely rip off something (joking of course :)).

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

Our last release, The Burden of Paradise, came out just over a year ago and has been received fantastically by both critics and fans. We were high in many of the prog polls for 2016 and sales were excellent too. Its success has been a great inspiration for me personally and I’ve already managed to write the next album which we hope to start recording later this year.

Can you offer some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

A lot of the themes are personal but which I hope the listener can also relate to. They deal with love, death, freedom, religion, history, delusion and a host of other subjects.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

They pretty much are in their final state when we go in to record, as we always develop and arrange them in our rehearsal sessions before. Obviously some changes are made during recording, but not too many I’d say.

Tell us about the live side to the band?

To be perfectly honest, we’re more a studio band than a live one. Having said that, we’re rehearsing to play a few gigs later this year and we promise to give a memorable show!

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

The Czech Republic isn’t exactly a hotbed for progressive rock, so we’ve found that our market is mostly around the rest of Europe, plus various other parts of the world too of course.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success?

It’s a bit of a double edged sword, in that it has helped, or even enabled us to make our mark in the music world without having to rely on a record company. It also makes the recording of an album so much easier. On the other hand though, streaming and illegal downloads have obviously cut our sales dramatically. Still, I think it’s mostly positive for bands like us.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Our next album is going to be even better than the last 🙂

 

https://www.differentlight.cz   https://www.facebook.com/differentlightsound/?fref=ts   https://www.youtube.com/c/differentlight

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 12/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Symphonies in sound and imagination: exploring Sahona with Charly Sahona

Charly Sahona_RingMasterReview

2016 received one of its early treats just a few weeks back with the release of the self-titled Sahona album. It was the debut release from the new melodic rock project of vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Charly Sahona of progressive metallers Venturia. It is a release which is, in our own words “a rousing drama of sound and imagination.” Offered the chance to find out more with Charly, we grabbed a hefty chunk of his time to explore the creation of the band and its first album, and simply the creative heart of the man…

Hi Charly, many thanks for sharing time with us. How are things in the Sahona area of the world?

Hello, thanks for the invitation. Well, things are fine here. The album is out and so far, reviews have been very positive about it . We’re about to release a new music video and shoot a new one. I’m working like crazy in order to perform these songs live as soon as possible . So, I can say I have a good life .

Before we look at your excellent debut album, would you tell us about the first days of Sahona. It was originally meant as a solo project for you?

Oh thanks, I’m glad you like it !!! Sure, you’re right , at first, the album was meant to be a solo project and more precisely, the follow-up of Naked thoughts from a silent chaos released in 2010 but the songs are quite different and so are the musical arrangements and the line-up. So, the first days of Sahona as a full band are recent but the writing of the songs began in 2013. Oh It actually took a lot of time before we recorded and released it .

What sparked the creation of the project; what was it you wanted to explore different to your music in progressive metallers Venturia

I really wanted to do something different with this one. I like my musical-making to be in a constant motion. At the same time It’s necessary to stand back with the last thing you released and start something new with fresh ideas and enthusiasm. For this project, I wanted to write something without any heavy riff played on a 7-string and focus on different musical textures, guitar sounds and new grooves.

You touched on it earlier, so you had a collection of ideas and songs already in the works before you invited fellow musicians to help out?

Yes, after I finished the first 4 demo-songs, things were clear in my mind and I knew who I wanted to work with. I like to make music with talented people of course but it’s always better when you do it with your friends. So I first asked drummer Stéphane Cavanez to join me , I’ve known him for a long time, he’s a brilliant musician, very enthusiastic about things. After hearing the demo version of On this winter night , he said he would agree to play on all the songs . Same thing with my long-time friends Fabien Paraillac and Cédric Artaxet; I don’t remember exactly if I sent them the first four demos before asking them to join me but anyway, both of them agreed. I was very glad and happy they all said yes to join me for this project. I knew they would sound great together and that my songs would have been transcended thanks to them .

sahona_RingMasterReviewSo what was the catalyst to changing the idea of guest musicians to a full band?

It was something I had in mind for a while , as the songs have a different sound compared to the things I did before. As we were recording, there was an obvious musical chemistry going on and it reinforced me to think about having a band name for this project. So I talked about it with Chris from Dooweet agency and to my buddies. We all thought that the idea of the band was obvious and as the name Sahona sounds cool for a band too, the choice was done, easy to make and I didn’t have to scratch my head during days in order to find a new name . The other thing is: as the musicians are my friends, the idea of having a band together was something natural. More, I really like to immortalize music with talented friends.

Was it an easy to decision to ‘share’ your songs with I am guessing musicians with their own adventurous ideas when creating music?

Sure, it was very easy as we’re all professional musicians . There was no ego thing that could have been hard to deal with . I wanted a more organic sound and a sophisticated modern rock approach and I knew what my band mates were able to do .

For example, the drums I programmed were done in a prog-metal style and Stéphane brought a more refined  rock groove, I let him do his stuff as everything was matching .

As I’m the lead singer and as there are many guitar layers on these songs it was obvious to ask for help and some back-up . I couldn’t imagine another guy than Fabien to play the guitar with me on this album.  We have the same guitar approach but he’s more rock than me.

We recorded a lot of different guitar takes and during the mix, we chose what was best for the song no matter if it was him or me playing….

He did an amazing job on the mix too. Just like his guitar sound, all the songs sound powerful and organic.

Regarding the bass, there was a couple of things I asked Cédric to play the exact same way I did on the demos. But as my bass programming was voluntary basic most of the time, he added his own personality and groove that matched perfectly Stéphane’s drumming . He even changed some root notes that at first surprised me, and the more I listened to it, the more I liked it.

In the end, everything felt easy and natural.

Did their input mean your songs changed or evolved from their original characters once the band was a full involvement of all?

No, not really but I guess things will evolve when we’ll perform live. It’s a natural process and it’s important for us to make slightly different things when we play the same songs over and over.

When writing songs, do you come at them from different angles or have a general way of bringing them to life from idea to sound?Album cover_RingMasterReview

I usually have a precise idea of how the album or a song will sound like even though the root of all songs is based on a guitar or keyboard chords progression and a simple hummed melody . Then, I’ll program a midi file of what I just did. If the melody sounds good with a bad flute midi sound and a midi bass line, I keep the idea and will have a clearer vision of how it will sound like with all the instruments. Then I’m thinking about what kind of drum beat, bass line, guitar riff, and keyboards texture would fit with the idea of the song and at this moment, the creative process is growing fast. Or, not that fast actually because getting the right keyboard sounds or guitar effects takes me a while very often. When I’m programming , I have in mind how my band mates would play it and that’s the reason why I’m never really surprised (although I’m always amazed) when they bring the songs to life with their style and their sound. It sounds obvious to my ears and at the same time I’m so excited to hear what they bring to a song and to discover how it takes the song to a higher level.

Tell us about the lyrical themes behind the album.

Sure ! I decided to do something I never really done in the past.  I wrote about the most widely expected subject in the world: Love !!! But not the way girls like it though (no offence intended girls, I’m just kidding !!!) .

Reading and writing romantic and soppy stuff are not my thing at all as I’m a cynical and rational guy . So the majority of these lyrics are about love and its frustrations and turbulences . It’s way more interesting, true and realistic in my opinion. But when I say “love”, It doesn’t only mean the feelings you have for your girlfriend or your boyfriend,  I use it for the passion you have for your art or whatever that excites you too, it can be painting, sport, your beliefs and then we’re slightly get into the spiritual aspect and themes I like to write about as well.

Most of my lyrics are not explicit, this way people can identify with them and make their own story.

I usually prefer to describe impressions than reality.

What about the recording of your self-titled debut? How long was it in the making?

It’s funny because it took a long time to finish it (something like two years !!!) but the writing and the recording were actually very fast and easy to do. As we’re used to record in studio, we know how it works and we’re getting more and more efficient and good at it. But as we didn’t have any deadline or expectations,  we took our time to record it. The rule was to get together when we were able to do it only. It was: job, touring with cover bands, tasks and family priorities first. This way, we were in a very relaxed state of mind and every time we forgathered, it was for fun.

Ok, the album was supposed to be released in late 2015 but for commercial and administrative reasons it got more delayed .

Did you approach its recording differently to creating releases with your other projects?

Yes and no … As it’s the 5th album I’m producing , I’ve learned through the years with amazing people and  I’ve also learned from my mistakes. Today, I know the importance for everybody of being prepared and how to record the best way possible taking into consideration the people you work with as every musician has his own preferences and personality. And that’s how a recording session can be different from the ones you experienced in the past: it depends on your line-up as well. So I asked my band mates about the way they wanted to record and I just let them do it their way as it’s extremely important for artists to work the more relaxed and efficient way possible.

But the thing that changed a lot for me was to share the guitar parts with Fabien but it was so exciting to hear him play with a different strumming and sound than mine and then mixing our guitar tracks together. I really enjoyed it .

Oh, and there was another great thing : My vocal takes were recorded home with a very cool equipment a friend of mine lend me.

This way, I took my time…I was recording one full song a day and the day after, if something was not exactly the way I wanted to be, I just had to press the « rec » button again and it was done. I don’t like the feeling of recording in a studio with time passing, all the money you know you’ll have to spend, the people around you even if it’s your friends. I did it many times in the past and I can tell you how relieved I am to work and to record alone at home, it gives me so more freedom and offers you more possibilities.

sahona_RingMasterReviewHave you found there has been an instinctive urge to do things with Sahona and the album differently to your other ventures elsewhere, just out of the want to try different things?

Yes, as I told you, I wanted to have a different musical approach, a different sound, a different line-up. But on the top of that I really wanted to express myself to another level, and the best way possible as a singer and I’ve been working hard to achieve that. Maybe, being the singer of your own songs reinforces the introspection aspect of the creation. This is not to say that this album sounds more like “me” than the previous ones I did with another lead singer, it’s just different . But as you give more of yourself as a performer, it makes the thing more introspective and maybe more intense and that’s what I wanted to achieve too.

I always imagine a debut album breeds new ideas and opportunities to try and explore further in its successors. Elements not imagined and expected when composing that first encounter. Were there any which arose for you in the making of Sahona’s debut?

I’m always excited to explore new territories, new sounds, new chords progression, new ways of making music. Having a more or less precise idea will always push you to go further in order to create something new and interesting. Listening to different music, going to the theatres, reading books, talking with people, playing with musicians…All this things are inspiring and maybe it if it’s not always a conscious thing, it will incite you to evolve as a human being and inexorably in your art and in your life indeed. This is something I like to be aware of and thankful to.

What comes next for Sahona and its individuals?

We have to play live as soon as possible and we have to work hard for that. We intend to begin a tour in our country in September. Then we will focus on the next album as we’re all really happy about this debut one.

My thanks again Charly for talking with us; Anything you would like to add?

Thanks for having me !!! Congrats to the readers for reading this interview so far and thank you Pete for spreading the word about the music you like whether it’s mainstream or underground .

And finally, give us an insight into the records and artists which could be claimed to have most inspired your own life and creativity.

Oh my god, they are so many . But let’s try to do it fast. I’ve always been a fan of classical music but the one from the early 1900 with composers like Ravel, Bartok, Debussy, Prokofiev, Rachmaninoff. As a guitar player I’m a huge fan of guitar heroes like Steve Vaï, Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal, John Petrucci. I’ve always been into progressive music with bands like Genesis, Rush, Yes, Dream Theater, Frost, Opeth and I’m really into their contemporaries with the young prog underground scene like Destiny Potato, Disperse and especially with the metal djent scenes with bands like Periphery, Tesseract, Monuments who took progressive music to a new level. I like rock and pop music too with bands like Muse, Radiohead, Keane, Dead Letter Circus.

All these bands and musicians have inspired me in many ways indeed.

Check out our review of the Sahona album @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/03/02/sahona-self-titled/

https://www.facebook.com/sahonamusic/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 21/03/2016

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Illustrial: Eloquently Violent

Fuelled by emotional shadows and darkened energy the new album from UK electronic/darkwave project Illustrial brings forth a reflective journey born of its creator whilst being the inspirer of personal involvement and feelings. Eloquently Violent is an album which offers a journey through heartbreak, inner loneliness, and slightly destructive dark essences of life. It is vibrant though bringing as much hope as resignation to evoke thoughts and feelings which all can interpret to their own struggles and blistered highlights.

Formed in 2006, Illustrial is the solo electronic project of Baz Badrock (aka Neformore). Early EP Discipline the Devil’s Country drew good responses to the project though it was with the link up with London-based artist Strobegirl a more concentrated attention came their way through songs Don’t Look Back and a cover of California Dreaming. 2010 saw the Genesis EP to be followed a year later by third EP Darkness Falls and a returning full collaboration with Strobegirl on the enthusiastically received album Glitter and Twisted. The same year also saw Badrock team up with another vocalist on two songs Lost City Ghosts and Dream again to very favourable responses. Eloquently Violent is the first full length solo release from Illustrial and easily marks itself from the outstanding sleeve artwork from OneTwoTree Designs through to the sounds within as the best individual and mature work the artist has produced.

The album opens with Xciter, a pulsating electro pop dazzle upon the ear. It has a definite early Fad Gadget feel to its air without arguably the pop infectiousness but is still a satisfying treat. As with the majority of his songs Badrock brings a minimalistic presence to the track allowing its ambient whispers and atmosphere to give service to the passion and emotive heart. The original intent for the album was for guest vocalists on some of the songs but as the release developed Badrock fell into an ease and rapport with the music and his own style to end up taking on the role himself. The opener shows it was not a bad move and again offers up the Frank Tovey comparison here and at varied times during the album.

Heartbeat follows and is a more reserved manipulation of electronic weaves. It brings splintered pulses and fractured melodic twists and only really finds a full appeal when it raises its temperature through an eager and driven energetic surge. It is still a strong and appealing song though showing the variety to the album as well as a firm yet rippling consistency which never leaves one drifting elsewhere in attention.

The title track has a similar feel and intent as its predecessor though seemingly carries a more personal heart for more intensity which ignites further the searchlights of melodic enterprise. It is quite mesmeric as it envelopes the year and continues the strong start commendably. Coming in its wake though is Tribal Dance which did not failed to inspire similar responses though it is as much down to expectations from the title than the composition itself. Expecting something primitive in energy and raw the track is a quiet and one means quiet, measure of beats and electronic whispers. It feels like an interlude to be honest but with a beefier production would probably have made a bigger impression.

From here on in the album brings a fine mix of ideas, textures, and sounds, from the sultry Gothic Fantasy and wonderfully distressing aural violation of My Distortion on to the likes of the New Order influenced The Silence and the haunting darkness that is Dark Night Of The Soul. The release consistently treats the senses to invention and imagination and though at times this exploration does not always quite come off as well as in other parts but it is never less than intriguing.

The latter half of the album unveils further thoughtful and evocative songs as the sinister Horrorgasm alongside the melodic caress of Breeze which inspire responsive feelings to the aural triggers. Eloquently Violent is an album which graces with expressive and satisfying sonic tapestries for the ear to immerse within. It maybe is lacking a raw edge and anger at times to break up the unerring shadowed smooth fondling of the ear but it is a release which effortlessly leaves one in thought and reflection.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Illustrial/104161896358

Check out tracks from Eloquently Violent on The Reputation Radio Show

RingMaster 02/07/2012

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Destroy The Evidence – Phantasm

Writing about and reviewing different releases and bands offers up many treats but it is always special when something unexpected and startlingly different comes into view. Such is the case with Phantasm from Destroy The Evidence, a release that offers something new, slightly unexpected and is just wonderfully different from the bulk of things that grace and at times accost the ear.

Destroy the Evidence is the solo project of US experimental electronic gothic rock band Dimension Zero frontman Monty Singleton. The band found success and acclaim with singles ‘Live In Excess (Excess Is Best)’ and ‘RePLiCa’, their 2007 album Scythe, plus remixes of artists such as Public Enemy and Nine Inch Nails. Singleton started up Destroy The Evidence as a project to focus on writing music for film, TV, and video games or as the official website states music that is “Industrial rock dressed in tuxedos attending the symphony while the world is being invaded by Martians. Somewhere between Nine Inch Nails, Hans Zimmer, Danny Elfman, and mid-1900s SciFi.” That just about sums it up; it just forgets to say how vibrant and refreshing it is.

Phantasm is the follow up to Genesis from 2009 and is a dazzling array of striking sounds. Whether staying around for mere seconds or multiple minutes each track leaves a mark and inspires images and emotions which is one of the impressive things about the album. Opening track ‘Elite’ strikes for eighteen seconds whilst its successor ‘Wildcat’ a scant seven  but both grab attention to announce the album’s intent, to trigger a sense of drama, and lead into the brilliant hustling theatre of ‘Renegade’. Like a rampant beast rampaging along scorched paths it is a predatory impending force that even with its moments of quiet beauty has full control and intimidating strength. To bring in a film reference it bristles with the independent thought and determination of a Mad Max or Logan’s Run

The pieces are clear and definite compositions that would work cinematically or within games but also as distinct tracks as the album shows. They are wonderfully varied, well crafted and without exception the inspiration for emotions and provoked visual thoughts. Many instrumental albums weave soundscapes and aural worlds from their creations but Singleton’s compositions work with emotions and feelings, touching upon and provoking responses and ideas individual to the listener but within his intended theme.

The dazzling and unsteadying ‘ACiD’ with crystalline melodies and sinister menace, the edgy and intense fusion of beauty and dark energy of ‘Oblivion2’, plus the complexities and senses stretching provocative flow of ‘Vision-X’, and the cold and over bearing walled stark mystery of ‘Citadel’, all impress deeply and engage the senses long after they depart the ear. It is the stunning ‘USSR’ that takes top acclaim though on the album. It’s incessant repetition of keys, bass, rhythms and vox is a completely hypnotic and irresistible manipulation and pleasuring of the listener. The song offers siren like melodies and an insistent charge that is fuelled by a combative and militant might.

Phantasm is an excellent release that offers siren like sounds, delicious ideas and inspiring imagery that makes frequent returns a different experience each time, though always a thoroughly pleasurable one. Whether Destroy The Evidence’s creations will find their way onto soundtracks time will tell but as an addition to anyone’s personal soundtrack they are a definite success and joy.

Grab your free copy of the album @ http://www.destroytheevidence.com/

RingMaster 03/02/2012

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