Old House Playground – 21st Century Glory

OHP_RingMaster Review

Having already seduced 2015 with their dark blues honed rock ‘n’ roll courtesy of The Great Escape EP, UK homed Old House Playground do it again with their new single 21st Century Glory. Continuing the compelling and fiercely alluring sound of their last release, the Manchester based trio take ears and imagination into another shadow built and gothic aired adventure, a creative escapade as seeded in “the songwriting culture of traditional Greek folk music” as it is the noir spawned recesses of modern blues rock. The result is a pair of songs which bewitch and inspire, and a single sure to add pressure on the richest spotlights to wake up to the impressive band.

Athens bred, Old House Playground relocated to Manchester in 2009, to “experiment with new musical paths and forms of expression.” Consisting then of vocalist/guitarist Tryfon Lazos, drummer Andreas Venetantes, and bassist Conor Loughran, the band drew on inspirations from the likes of Tom Waits, Django Reinhardt, Nick Cave as well as Greek artists Psarantonis and Marcos Vamvakaris as their sound’s character and voice evolved. After the departure of Loughran, the remaining pair recorded debut album God Damn That Gold with producer/musician Chris Evans, its release coming in 2013 through Evening Economies/Fat Bob Records. Well received and praised, the full-length led to a collaboration with Durutti Column, that leading to Lazos singing onstage alongside Vini Reilly. The addition of bassist Jago Furnas was made in 2014, with the threesome going on to record, and earlier this year release, The Great Escape.

21st Century Glory Artwork_RingMaster Review   Now it is the turn of 21st Century Glory to whip up ears and appetites, a success quickly in motion as the track opens with flames of brass upon strolling rhythms and fiery guitar coaxing. The distinctive tones of Lazos are soon adding to the temptation as the song itself entwines strands of blues and jazz into its emerging sultry swing within an imagination driven intent. As with their previous release, strong hints of artists like Tom Waits, Nick Cave, and The Doors collude with the scent of others like Eighties B-Line Train Disaster and Bernaccia, yet what emerges is a mischievous proposal that stands alone as an Old House Playground incitement. The virulent nature of the song continues to enslave, even as the guitar at times creates a fuzzy sizzle of persuasion; that underlying catchiness perpetual and inescapable bait throughout.

The song is bewitching; a lively shuffle of gothic intrigue and tenacious sultriness, matched in kind by the accompanying Love And Other Demons. A slower rockabilly coloured saunter, the song courts ears and imagination with the guile of The Stray Cats and the tangy noir scent of Chris Isaak, whispers of Gene Vincent and Harry Connick, Jr. also lighting its presence as it swaggers along with poise and charm. As restrained as it is in comparison to its companion, there is zeal to its persuasion and presence which seems to know it is something special as it infests the psyche.

Like a great many, Old House Playground is proving to be a band we cannot get enough of, so if you have yet to be infected by their majestic dark alchemy, we suggest 21st Century Glory is the perfect way to be first bitten by them.

21st Century Glory is out now via Horus Music.

http://www.oldhouseplayground.net/   https://www.facebook.com/oldhouseplayground  https://twitter.com/oldhouseplay

Pete RingMaster 17/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Inca Babies – The Stereo Plan

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From the days when the devil thrust his evil designs into music, dark rock ‘n’ roll has been a persistent and endearing temptation. From the leather clad hip and vocal lures of Sweet Gene Vincent to the modern psychotic seductions of Dedwardians, it is a delicious trespass of ears and imagination that continues to evolve rich adventurous psyche twisting pastures. The likes of The Doors, The Cramps, The Birthday Party, Bone Orchard, The 69 Eyes, Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, The Dropper’s Neck to name a few, have continued to expose the senses to new ravenous depths of sinister sonic exploration over the decades. One band which from their emergence in 1982 has also sculpted a perpetual warped seduction is Inca Babies. Their almost serpentine invention and dark musical incitements have continued to inspire and invigorate, even during the near on twenty years they were absent from the music scene, but since returning in 2007 you can only suggest that the UK trio must have shaken hands on a new deal with Lucifer as they have risen to truly become one of the leading lights and template setting protagonists of British rock ‘n’ roll.

The evidence is already boldly apparent in their two albums since reforming, the acclaimed Death Message Blues and Deep Dark Blue of 2010 and 2012 respectively. Both releases ignited an already ravenous gothic rock scene and duly deserved all ardour given but each in many ways was just an immense but leading appetiser for the glory of The Stereo Plan. Released towards the end of 2014, the band’s seventh studio album is a masterpiece of the dark aural arts. The third instalment of their death blues trilogy, its fourteen-track proposal twists and turns through the primal essences of post punk, surf, garage punk, trash blues, and every other dark flavour available, but bred in the imagination of Inca Babies transforms into a recipe of ingenious alchemy. It is a transfixing and slightly menacing proposition which has everything from feet to the passions ablaze.

Listening to The Stereo Plan is almost like immersing in a greatest hits collection of songs, every encounter of such irresistible and impressive invention and contagion that there is no time to take a breath and reflect until the final note of the release drifts away. It all starts with the album’s title track and its opening tangy lure of surf bred toxicity. It is an instant inescapable invitation for ears and imagination, the percussive shuffle which soon adds its bait only increasing an enticement which deepens again with the thick bass prowls of Vince Hunt. Continuing to bind ears in his guitar’s delicious spicery too, Harry Stafford pounces with his vocal and lyrical dance, as everything in the song colludes to create satanic rock ‘n’ roll majesty, especially as rhythms grow in intensity and devilment with the vocals to arouse an even lustier persuasion.

How to follow such a magnificent start would have many bands in a cold sweat but not Inca Babies as they match its majesty with a just as compelling incitement going by the name of Scatter. Stereo Plan Front 1The swinging beats of drummer Rob Haynes recruits eager attention right away, swiftly adding appetite as riffs and bass grooves unite with his anthemic beats and the incoming catchy vocal delivery. Into its stride the song expels a punk causticity around its driving rhythmic spine, the fingers of Stafford continuing to dance over the strings of his guitar to create a web of sonic addiction. The aforementioned Dewardians comes to mind as the song bounces with venomous mischief and also Eighteen Nightmares At the Lux with its scuzzy textures.

The salty smoulder of Damnation comes next, an Orson Family like countrified shimmer fuelling the temptation of guitar and rolling beats. As the opening pair of songs, psychobilly bred rapacity coats the song but also here a more garage punk tenacity emerges and grows to an even more potent persuasion in the following River To the Centre of the World. A haunting slice of upbeat balladry with a chorus which simply infests the senses, the track is dark poetic manna for ears and imagination. It also continues the mouth-watering diverse landscape of the album, each song a blossoming of individual and unique gothic theatre bred in sinistrous ideation.

The Cajun cast spell of Stand Down Lucifer keeps listener and album in lustful realms next, its sinuous shimmer and invention a creeping and inescapable seduction whilst Feast With Panthers strolls in with stalking rhythms and demonic hooks within again a fine and alluring vocal proposal. Like Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers meets The Screaming Blue Messiahs, the latter a band easy to offer varying degrees of comparison to across the album, the track swings it frame and flirtation with mischief in its eyes and a wicked lick on its melodic lips. The Stereo Plan began on a lofty pinnacle and this pair again sublimely ensures that there is no slip from such heady heights.

   Last Flight Out of Saigon with its pulsating bassline and acidic sonic veining croons suggestively in ears next, its minimalistic yet cavernous presence a mesmeric hex before the garage pop feistiness of Absolute Leader of the World leaps at the senses. Holding a great raw seventies/eighties punk essence to its contagion, the song is a sweetly caustic roar of blues rock which re-ignites body and energies after the resourceful ‘rest’ found in its predecessor.

Returning to the insidious charms which festered wonderfully in the early songs, Devilfish Anarchy stalks and romps with that gothic blues meets psychobilly predation and devilry. Beats and basslines are the instigator to lust fuelled whiplash as vocals and melodic toxins work away on thoughts and emotion. It is an exhausting pleasure whose rigorous nature is swiftly tempered and contrasted by the funereal stance and classical elegance of Still Mountain, a bewitching ballad wrapped in imposing and provocative shadows.

A dirtier yet restrained heavy rock pushes the walls of Damn Our Hides next, its persuasion not as instant as elsewhere, though swiftly a captivating companion for ears, but slowly burning away behind the scenes and repeatedly nudging thoughts after the event, as so many other songs on the album. Its enduring temptation is another striking aspect of The Stereo Plan, each twist of its design able to return at leisure and with potency, just as the heated jazziness of Ghost Ship. The track is ablaze with sultry trumpet flames, filthy basslines, and delirious sonic enterprise combining for a fiery musical sunset on an apocalyptic landscape.

The album is finished off by the excellent psyche/ surf rock stomp of Blacktop Speedway and finally the garage rock serenade of Late Night Frankie Brittle, a croon which simply grows in weight, intensity, and sonic rabidity with volcanic imagination. The pair makes a thrilling end to one irresistible encounter.

Admittedly having a soft spot for the type of sounds Inca Babies revel in went in their favour, but also it brings more demands but once again the Manchester trio stand tall over them as they again help lead British rock ‘n’ roll into new and exciting explorations.

The Stereo Plan is available now via Black Lagoon Records

http://www.incababies.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/incababies/

RingMaster 11/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Fossils – The Meating

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Released a year ago, Flesh Hammer from Danish noise alchemists Fossils has, from fusing the senses and passions on its first touch, continued to reign on our weekly playlist, and more often than not in a daily burst or two. The outstanding release from the instrumental noise rockers as their sound generally, is a primal temptation sculpted by the bass and drums of Simon Tornby and Per Silkjær respectively. In that union though, the band breeds hooks, grooves, and rhythms which are as sinister and predatory as they are contagiously all-consuming. The album was pure addiction in our ears and the band exactly one year later have done it all over again with a new release, this one coming with a thrilling twist.

With their new instrumental exploration scheduled for 2016, Fossils have filled the gap between albums and impressively fed anticipation with new EP The Meating. Where that twist comes in is in the fact that this encounter is awash with tempestuous vocals. At the time of the unleashing of Flesh Hammer, the duo enlisted various singers to interpret tracks vocally from the album at its release show. Originally planned as a one off occurrence, the band subsequently took the performers into the studio to record their additions to the original songs, and now we have the quite scintillating and compelling devilry of The Meating; seven pieces from the last album re-interpreted and ignited again vocally. Renamed and presumably re-mixed or re-tweaked musically, unless the vocals transform tracks even more potently than we thought, the EP is another irresistible and storming onslaught from Fossils.

Opener Deadringer features Jacob Bredahl of The Kandidate and once of HateSphere, and under the torrential bombardment of Silkjær’s addictive beats it instantly has ears and attention submissive. It is of course prime Fossils bait, the snarling lure of the bass and its crunching riffs aligning to voraciously swinging rhythms for immediate manna to the ears. Bredakl is soon roaring with his distinctive tones, challenging and raging with attitude and animosity within the increasingly virulent sounds. Already a pungently confronting encounter, the song is given extra causticity and rancor by the singer, and as all the songs becomes a brand new proposition.

The following Taxon is graced by the blistering industrialised contribution of Ultimate Combat Noise, the track brewed into a corrosively attractive and psyche scorching antagonist whilst next Printup Meat Lover takes on a punk crafted guise thanks to Mads Stobberup of Cola Freaks. He vocally brawls over the spicy infectiousness of the equally agitated sound; the track like his voice is not exactly looking for a fight but given a nudge will lash out with relish. It is not the last track to have an infusion of varying punk revelry and those tracks do emerge as favourites, though everything excites without reserve.

   Marie Højlund of Marybell Katastrophy gives Ridge and the Rock a siren-esque seduction next, her ethereal and seductive tones wrapping like a temptress around the wiry lures of the bass and the ravenous energy of the drums. It is a bewitching infestation of senses and lust, an increasingly rabid and psychotic enchantment matched by the punk ferocity of Speedbacon. Seb Doubinsky provides the voice to the Dead Kennedys like take on the original rasher of noise bestiality. The track is ravenous in nature, though nicely contrasted by the vocal porcine fun in a presence barely lasting a minute of length.

The final two tracks steal the show, even if by a slither. Firstly Ham Reader expels an acidic and venomous bluster over its tempest of noise through Mikko Mansikkala Jensen’s bracing throat bred squalls. It is a ferocious and wholly magnetic assault which sets the emotions up perfectly for the final devilment of Ködhabit. The track is blessed by Kim Kix, one half of psyche rock ‘n’ rollers Powersolo, who thanks to Fossils and this release have just swiftly been added to our lustful favourites list. The song as expected launches a torrent of delicious grouchy bass growls and insatiable rhythms but grows further with the deranged tones and delivery of Kix. The song we would suggest is the most startlingly evolved of the bunch from the original templates set by Flesh Hammer, a hellacious rocker which relentlessly flirts with the passions in a way which only an image of Gene Vincent being twisted inside out by and thrust on stage by Cleve Barker’s Cenobites, who then provide the backing sounds fits. We said that every track is a massive and equally thrill, and they are, but the final song of The Meating is another type of creature and looks down on all with majestic lunacy.

The Meating is and feels like a brand new offering from Fossils as we await their next instrumental escapade. Flesh Hammer graced many a best of list in 2014, and we can find no reason why this new offering will not be doing the same come December.

The Meating is available from March 2nd via Indisciplinarian.

FOSSILS will be performing at the three Danish Indisciplinarian Label Nights in late March with label mates Piss Vortex and Anti Ritual at…

26/3 – Stengade, Copenhagen (DK)

27/3 – Radar, Aarhus (DK)

28/3 – 1000fryd, Aalborg (DK)

http://www.meatrush.com/   https://www.facebook.com/fossilsmusic

RingMaster 03/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Warped romances and deathly seductions: exploring the psyche theatre of Dedwardians


The recent release of AA-sided single Love Sick/ Like An Animal reinforced UK garage punk/psyche rockers Dedwardians as one irresistibly primal and infernally seductive incitement. Breeding a raw and scuzz lit infestation of the senses and imagination from the essential essences of psychobilly, garage punk, psyche rock, fifties rock ‘n’ roll and plenty more, the London quartet has emerged as one of Britain and garage punk’s most exciting and flirtatiously inventive propositions. Already carrying a lustful appetite for the band’s sound we thought it was time to learn more about the dark sonic beast that is Dedwardians, so with thanks to drummer Ben Auston we explored the band’s origins, sound, new single and much more…

Hi and thanks for sharing time to come chat with us.

Firstly can you tell us about the background to the band and how you all linked up?

Hello there. Paul (vocals) and Gaff (guitar) found me (Ben, bass) via the bands manager at the time. We met up for a few drinks in Soho and we took it from there. We went through a couple of drummers before finding the boy wonder, Dan Bridle. As for our backgrounds, I can only guess that Paul and Gaff, being men of the North, were raised listening to Venom whilst working in a shipyard or something equally manly. We’ve all grown up playing in rockabilly, punk and rock ‘n’ roll bands….so we’ve all been cut from a similar cloth. …Faux leather.

The band members I believe hail from cities like Liverpool, Leeds, and London, but now all London based for the band. Why the choice of the Capital for the band’s home and would you Dedwardians Bencontemplate living anywhere not beginning with the letter L? ;)

We wanted to move to Aleister Crowley’s old dwelling, Boleskine House on Loch Ness, but the bedroom tax malarkey ruined that, so we settled on a 6 berth caravan in South London.

Many bands seem to start with one direction or idea of sound before emerging with or evolving to their true sound, Ministry maybe the biggest named example. With Dedwardians, I get the feeling you were all born to create the music you do, so was the sounds gracing your two singles it from day one?

Kind of…We started off with a bit more of a 1950’s rock ‘n’ roll sound with our first single – almost Jerry Lee-esque, but somehow we have gone a bit darker and twisted with the newer stuff…which I guess is more true to how we actually sound live. The name was a bit of a play on the Edwardian Drape Society/Teddy Boy thing, so we’ve not strayed too far off from the original ethos.

In our review of the new AA-sided single Love Sick/ Like An Animal we drew on comparisons to the likes of The Cramps, The Dropper’s Neck, and Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, and we could have mentioned Gene Vincent, The Heartbreakers, early Misfits for example too. What are the predominate inspirations which have shaped your tastes and influenced your invention?

You’ve pretty much nailed it on the head with those, but The Cramps are the band we’d all agree on though if I had to pick one. We’re an eclectic bunch on the whole though. Glam through to Psychobilly, Garage Punk to Goth…we’ll borrow shamelessly from wherever. Might confuse some listeners, but hey ho.

As you just mentioned your sound really is a creative frenzy whipped up from essences of numerous styles. Has this diversity just come from all your varying tastes over time or always been there in the songwriting from day one?

It’s been there from the start. It’s becoming more diverse as things progress, which has been tricky in the past when it comes to picking what to play live as we’ve been worried about jumping too far from one style or genre to another. Somehow it always sounds like us nonetheless, so it can’t be too far off. I think we’ve got it down now though, so not too many perplexed looking faces in the crowd. Hopefully.

How would you describe your music to newcomers?

Errr, something along the lines of Gene Vincent, Lux Interior and Captain Sensible on a night bus home.

We love the band name, The Dedwardians speaking for itself and of course you touched on it earlier, but who came up with it?

I think it was Paul and his love for Teddy Boys…Or boys with teddies…Can’t remember. Good though.

Are both your singles Bang Bang Die/Stop Destroy and now of course Love Sick/ Like An Animal songs written around the same time or over different periods?

There was a bit of a gap, maybe a few months at the most. What delayed things was trying to find the right studio to get the sound we were after. Some studios we tried made us sound way too clean…completely not what we wanted, but then we didn’t want to sound too digital or heavy metal. We ended up picking Andy Brook to work with, who I’ve known for years. I wish we’d just gone to him in the first place. We’d have an album sorted by now…maybe.

Dedwardians2How are you seeing the evolution in your songwriting and sound as the band grows and matures together?

The songs are getting a bit more thought through and taking longer to sort out the final arrangements. I don’t mean in a Math Metal/Prog direction, we’re just trying to get the most out of the dynamics and avoiding becoming formulaic. Sometimes it’s tricky doing so with just one guitar, bass and drums. Saying that, Gaff is often louder than two guitarists…Sound men love him.

Is there a predominate inspiration to the lyrical and emotional side of your songs?

The only recurring theme I’ve managed to pick up on is DEATH. Which is odd, as Paul is generally a pretty cheerful chap.

Tell us about the recording of the new single. Did you have any particular intent with the tracks?

We wanted it to be loud; fuzzy guitars, big drums, over driven vocals and dirty bass. Andy Brook (engineer) pretty much got what we wanted straight away. He knew our influences better than the other studios we had recorded in, so that took a lot of the guess work out.

The songs have an instinctive, almost primal lo-fi breath. This edge makes them predatory and insatiably addictive, certainly for us drawing out the true heart of the tracks. Many bands seem almost afraid to tap into raw sounds, what lures you into this approach?

It’s probably the hatred for the opposite. We’re not Hi-Fi for sure. We’re really not about high end boutique guitar amps and overly compressed tracks. Our influences aren’t squeaky clean, perfectly auto-tuned performers. Raw is always better…Red raw.

It is fair to say you make music for you, sounds that you adore and then hope others feel the same?

Yep. Haha. Utterly selfish. When me and Gaff are writing together, we’re honestly not bothered about trying to please a certain scene or genre. If you go that route, you’d just end up sounding like you’re trying to suit a certain style.

Tell us about the video for Sick Of Love?

We shot it in a dark rehearsal room in a few hours, again, about as lo-fi as you can get. I shot most of it and edited it…DIY all the way. It’s not that we can’t afford something more grand though…we saved up enough cash to get Martin Scorsese interested, but we ended up blowing it on a night out in Skegness.

You have earned strong praise and acclaim for your live performances as well as the singles. Rampaging in front of the audience is where you really get a fire in the belly I am guessing?dedwardians3

Yep. We go for it on stage. Who doesn’t want to watch 4 sweaty blokes playing too loud for 25 mins?!

Where can people catch the band live next?

Butlins. No, err, The Finsbury, 18th December.

Any Christmas treats in store for fans with shows?

Yes, naturally. The venue’s ceiling will be so heavily adorned with mistletoe that it resembles stalactites. We have a list of all the naughty girls – Dan will be dressed as Santa for their pleasure. Paul will be dressed as an Elf. Me and Gaff will be head to toe in black leather, with tinsel detailing…humming Wizzard’s festive classic – I Wish It Could Be Christmas Everyday. We’re the gift that keeps on giving.

Thanks again Ben for sharing your time, anything you wish to shout out to finish off with?

A dog is for life, not just Christmas…and buy our fucking record!

Cheers Pete! Merry Crimbo!

Ben Auston

Read our review of Love Sick/ Like An Animal @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/11/22/dedwardians-love-sick-like-an-animal/


Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 11/12/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The BossHoss – Cowboys From Hell

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The first full week of November sees German rockers The BossHoss stomping with their inimitable presence and sound as support to Motorhead in a UK tour. To accompany the three date rampage and to commemorate ten years raising rock ‘n’ roll revelry, the Berlin septet has released a UK only compilation album. Cowboys From Hell is a sixteen track rabble-rouser consisting of The BossHoss classics and live staples, a selection of tracks unleashing the full uniqueness, depth, and diversity of the band’s country rock/rock ‘n’ roll voracity.

Listening to the album you are soon stirred up by the thick weave of flavours which make up the band’s propositions. Infused in the styles just mentioned, there are just as rich and healthy blazes of punk, funk, metal, and rock pop involved, and that is still only scratching the first few layers of their contagious enterprise. The band creates rock ‘n’ roll to have fun with, sounds to lose inhibitions to, and insatiable devilry to wreak mischievous havoc to. Like a mix of Volbeat, Gene Vincent, Johnny Cash, and ZZ Top in league with The Damned, Helldorado, James Brown and Faith No More, The BossHoss is an instant provocateur and best friend with songs as evidenced on Cowboys From Hell, which are somehow instantly familiar yet a brand new incitement for ears and body to romp with.

Opening with the bluesy twang and hard rock feistiness of Bullpower, the album swiftly has feet and imagination, not forgetting ears wrapped up in its impending revelling. The multiple and varied vocals of the track, as proven across the album, is a potent lure to match the sounds around them, whilst its straight forward and highly persuasive blaze of old school and modern rock ‘n’ roll united, is one infectious and muscular stomp.

It is a powerful start which never dips below full satisfaction across the release; the following Volbeat seeded contagion of new single Whatever an immediate and richer temptation for ears and passions. Brass flames heat up the busy sonic underbelly of the song whilst heavy rhythmic baiting grips ears with predatory intent. Ultimately though, the song is a party in the ears, its electro swagger and striding urgency an addictive canvassing of thoughts and passions.

Through the hypnotic and lively anthemic prowling of Liberty Of Action, with its sizzling guitars scythes and metronomic beats, and the country spiced rap breeding of the album’s title track, God Loves Cowboys continues to recruit greater submission of body and emotions, the second of the pair an irresistible calling which shares plenty with bands like Hollywood Undead. It is fair to say that The BossHoss is still a relative secret across the UK but already four tracks in they make a potent doorway into their rigorously eventful presence and sound for newcomers and vague acquaintances.

A western twang coaxes in the start of Do It next, but is only the initial spice and lead into the funk fuelled diablerie of the song, keys and brass especially saucy in the sultry Electric Six like seduction before the psychobilly teased Stallion The-BossHoss-God-Loves-CowboysBattalion charges into ears and imagination. Hooks and grooves play with a Queens Of The Stone Age colouring whilst the weighty striding of the track is part Turbonegro and part Tiger Army, and all The BossHoss. Both keep the blood racing through veins and feet locked in an inescapable carousing, the pair straight away backed up in might and infection by the R&B/fifties flavoured rocking that is Shake & Shout. As most tracks it feels as if it is already an old friend on the first play but it does not diminish any of its enticement and unpredictable hues.

As you would expect there are particular pinnacles in any collection of songs and one comes in the mighty presence of Backdoor Man. Smouldering in tone and temptation from the first breath, the song with brass sighs and low key vocals swiftly enthralling, is an instant trap from where rockabilly and heavy rock tenacity with jazzy mischief seals the deal. A heavy and fleet footed shuffle, the track is pure rock alchemy, every twist a primal temptress clad in salacious shadow and aural deviltry. Normally any following song would struggle to live up to such triumph but both the punchy funk loaded Don’t Gimme That and the energetically simmering My Personal Song make an irresistible continuation of great times and lingering seduction. There is no way anyone can avoid swinging their body and voice to the contagion of the first of the two whilst its successor is simply what would emerge if Johnny Cash did funk pop, again the blend of different voices as thrilling as the adventurous yet unfussy sounds themselves.

It is fair to say that certainly in recent times no album involves the listener’s body and voice as mercilessly and relentlessly as Cowboys From Hell, the jumpy enterprise and energy of Keep On Dancing being no different especially as the band craft another chorus which is as incendiary on the listener as it is explosive on the air. There is a spellbinding ingenuity in how the band sculpts such virulent eruptions to enslave their recipients yet never goes for the easy route into and out of what is pure creative toxicity.

Through the hard rock powered My Way with its country rascality and the punkabilly Last Day (Do Or Die) things only continue to inflame the passions whilst Break Free with its mellower fifties pop and melodic rock crooning wrapped in soothing harmonies, incites the imagination again whilst revealing yet another texture in the band’s invention. Each track leaves a licking of appetite’s lips and emotion’s lust before the release closes up with a couple of exhilarating cover songs. First the band takes on Motorhead’s Killers, a twisting of rockabilly/blues rock drama into pure infectiousness and mouth-watering temptation, before they rip up the Cameo classic Word Up, and give it the best make-over heard anywhere. It is rockabilly funk with the blood of cowpunk running through its veins, an addiction which would be topping lists in illegality if a drug.

God Loves Cowboys is The BossHoss’ first official UK album I believe and about time after ten years of tearing up Europe and the world. If the band is new to you then the album is a must, you will never hear a more delicious and devilish slab of epidemic rock ‘n’ roll anywhere.

God Loves Cowboys is available now @ http://www.recordstore.co.uk/recordstore/recordstore/God-Loves-Cowboys/3IJC0000000


RingMaster 06/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Norm And The Nightmarez – Psychobilly Infection


     “From within the thighs of hell’s most wanton temptress, a tempest of psychobilly grooves and rockabilly hooks will converge upon mankind to turn its existence into one incessant stomp of devilish predation and virulent demonic revelry.”

Obviously that is not one of the more well-known pestilences deemed suitable to be included in religious teachings but if it was, it would go under the name of Norm & The Nightmarez and debut album Psychobilly Infection. Thirteen tracks of wickedly contagious and warped rock ‘n’ roll cultured with rockabilly seeded guitar and psychotic imagination, the release is a storming slab of rapacious psychobilly which sets a new provocative and sinisterly sculpted template for emerging genre bands.

Hailing from Birmingham, Norm And The Nightmarez is the creation of vocalist/guitarist Norm Elliot. From first band The Phantom Zone in the eighties, the musician has played in a few bands, last year most notably Mickey & The Mutants where he linked up with ex-Meteors/ex-Guana Batz bassist Mick White and Sharks drummer Paul ‘Hodge’ Leigh. The trio released the outstanding album Touch The Madness, a release it was hard to see anything bettering in UK psychobilly for a long-time to come but then we did not foresee Norm & The Nightmarez preying on the passions. Completed by drummer Frank Creamer (ex- Colbert Hamilton & the Hellrazors) and double bassist Mark Bending (ex-Sgt Bilko’s Krazy Combo) for the Western Star released album, the band embraces the decades of rockabilly infusing their ripest essences into the insatiable jaws of old school bred psychobilly irreverence and invention. It is a varied and riveting incitement which steals the will of everything from feet through to emotions, taking all on a skilful and hungry romp of mischievous enterprise.

Produced by Alan Wilson, the album is straight away gnawing on the senses with opener Stompin in My Grave, its initial earth encrusted riffs immediate potent bait to which the wrist flicking rhythms of Creamer and the dark hearted slaps of Bending add even juicier lures. Unfurling around a repetitive hook led by Elliot’s guitar, his potent vocals colour the imagination with their lyrical enticement. A flame of melodic scorching also adds a rich hue before the song takes a breather, allowing the listener’s body one too before it revs up its hypnotic suasion all over again.

The addictive start is swiftly matched by The Mischief Maker, a dark hearted slice of intimidation with robust basslines and sultry grooves which enslave attentions whilst beats slowly bruise the senses. Whether unleashing a keen gait normandthenightmarezpsychobillyinfectioncdor stalking ears, the track is an incendiary protagonist to give a blissful appetite further hungry urges which are rapidly fed by the acidic twang of The Lights Went Out. There is a scorched country-esque lilt to the invigorating prowl, the guitar of Elliot entwining ears with citric melodies and pungent hooks whilst vocally he snarls with a grizzled tone which sparks perfectly off of the heated climate of the song. The track has whispers of Tiger Army and The Quakes to its rich imposing breath but as with all songs no matter the hints it stands alone as something distinct to album and Norm And The Nightmarez.

The title track, though living up to its title, is rockabilly spawned even with its slight punkish nature. The bass and guitars sculpt a weave of riff and lures which play with body and soul like a sly puppeteer, twisting and turning imagination and passions inside out for a fevered submission. Its contagion lingers far beyond its stay though both Nightmare and Ton Up ensure in their company it is a distant memory at least. The first of the two right away triggers thoughts of The Reverend Horton Heat and Matchbox with flavourings of Johnny Burnette and Hasil Adkins also spicing the fiery encounter. Rhythmically and sonically the song entrances before the adrenaline rampage of its successor rumbles across the senses. Beats descend on ears with an unrelenting coaxing whilst the bass call of Bending brings delicious dark textures to the irresistible road trip. Elliot as ever commands the scenery with his vocals and guitar exploits whilst the trio unite for another ridiculously compelling and magnetic parade of roguish rockabilly incitement.

The flirtatious Sex Kitten teases senses with a salacious sexuality next, its smouldering grooves and sensual melodic curves as infectious as they are seductive. There is no denying a certain Stray Cats swagger to the song but also a danger to its stroll which could be compared to something with the edge of Guana Batz and addictiveness of Gene Vincent. It is an inescapable persuasion though one soon left in the shadow of the wonderful instrumental Devil Girl From Mars. There is something poetic to an intensively crafted piece of psychobilly music with its primal predation and sonic toxicity, and certainly it comes with no finer shape and beauty than here. Imagine a blend of The Tornadoes and The Frantic Flintstones and you get a whiff of its virulent might.

Both Pardon Me and The Past is a Place that I Just Can’t Go have energies and passions in a raw riot of pleasure, the first with its caustic sonic grazing and thumping rhythmic enticement whilst the following track stretches a menacing bait over ears again with jagged riffs, pulsating throaty slaps, and ear crowding beats. As impressive as its predecessor was, the second of the pair is another merciless encroaching on freedom with its rhythmic slavery, melodic venom, and vocal rapacity. It is impossible to choose a track which stands out over the rest on the album but this is always a forceful contender.

The fun filled Elvis Was a Zombie keeps things stomping along nicely and though it lacks the spark of other tracks for personal tastes it is impossible to dismiss because of that mischief and its rhythmic badgering. Its paler presence is soon swamped by the brilliant closing of the album. Massacre at Devils Plain with its Native American croon and howls over a gritty stride of sonic stabs and heavy footed rhythms, sets the imagination alight next whilst final song The Man with the X-Ray Eyes, leaves Psychobilly Infection on arguably its highest pinnacle. Bursting from a sample from the film of the same name, the track is a psychobilly irritant at its most potent and brilliant. It is a predator of a track, rhythms climbing all over the senses whilst guitar and vocals stir up the imagination with rich imposing hues. It is fair to say the song has elements of The Meteors all over it; The Hills Have Eyes springing to mind, but again Norm And The Nightmarez defuse any comparisons with their distinct invention and adventure.

From start to finish there is no escaping the might and sheer glory of Psychobilly Infection and the emergence of a brand new creative devil in our midst, though whether the UK, come to that the world is ready for Norm And The Nightmarez and their hellacious tempting only time will tell.

Psychobilly Infection is available now via Western Star Recordings @ http://www.western-star.co.uk/western-star-releases—cds_36/psychobilly-infection—norm-and-the-nightmarez_146.aspx



RingMaster 29/07/2014

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The Creeping Ivies – What Would Joey Ramone Do? /Ramona Wolf

The Creeping Ivies

Continuing to provide a raw pleasure and sound which no-one else seems able to come near, Scottish garage rockers The Creeping Ivies unleash their next seductive persuasion with the double-A-sided single What Would Joey Ramone Do?/Ramona Wolf. The duo from Dundee of vocalist/guitarist Becca Bomb and drummer Duncan Destruction create a brew seeded in fifties rock ‘n’ roll, sixties garage rock, and seventies punk which they force through a scuzz lined filter of noise rock to make one of the most challenging and refreshing encounters around. This alchemy has already recruited a legion of ardour driven fans through the Ghost Train EP and debut album Stay Wild, and with the ever evolving sound and potency found on the new single The Creeping Ivies has set another deliciously scarring marker and plateau for themselves to erupt from.

What Would Joey Ramone Do? is an irresistible conjuration of Gene Vincent, The Ramones, and The Cramps with Becca a2278793946_2producing her finest Wanda Jackson strength and charm. Her guitar strokes equally spark an always eager appetite for the band into the usual hungry reaction, a want increased by her raw Cochran/ Poison Ivy Rorschach like guitar sound which rubs the senses and emotions into a delirious expulsion of emotions whilst the crisp thumping beats of Duncan lead the body into a kinetic dance. The groove of the song is out of the Road To Ruin songbook but with its caustic kisses and sonic intrusiveness it is a temptation unique to the pair.

Second song Ramona Wolf emerges from a sonic lure, its beckoning leading the ears into a glorious wall of acidic riffs, even paced punchy rhythms, and a cavernous atmosphere speared by an intermittent senses scrubbing causticity of guitar. The vocals of Becca ride the sound with the skill and toxicity of a temptress, a sorceress like enchantment washing every syllable expelled through the chilled ambience of the song. The encounter is a bewitching soundtrack to the sirenesque call of a devil witch from outer space, well the narrative to another ridiculously addictive song from The Creeping Ivies but that is pretty much the same thing right?

The Creeping Ivies just get better and better as What Would Joey Ramone Do? and Ramona Wolf both show and with the band’s second album Ghost World expected early next year anticipation and excitement are already showing some impatience in the wait.



RingMaster 14/11/2013

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