Goodbye Mr MacKenzie – Good Deeds and Dirty Rags

Brandenburg photo by Martin Becker

Maybe like for many others, Goodbye Mr MacKenzie is a band which we did not pay enough attention to back when they were a potent part of a Scottish indie/rock scene lauded for the presence of bands such as The Jesus and Mary Chain, The Fire Engines, Simple Minds, The Waterboys, The Cocteau Twins and many others. The fair share of acclaim they earned was impossible to miss and a few familiar tracks, and more than we knew we knew it turns out, left a rich vein of pleasure in our personal musical journey. Funnily enough it was not the recent reforming of one of Scotland’s most iconic rock bands which has most strongly drawn us to the upcoming re-reissuing of their seminal album Good Deeds and Dirty Rags but the fact that one of our current favourite bands, The Filthy Tongues, consists of three of Goodbye Mr MacKenzie’s founders; that and the welcome urging of Shauna McLarnon of Canadian duo Ummagma.

Due for release this coming November and inspired by the massive success of their recent 30-year anniversary tour, Good Deeds & Dirty Rags has been re-mastered and comes with 3 additional tracks from those early years not previously included on the original edition. The band’s line-up at the time consisted of vocalist Martin Metcalfe, bassist Fin Wilson, and drummer Derek Kelly, the trio who have inflamed ears and the passions with their two albums as the aforementioned Filthy Tongues. Alongside them was guitarist John Duncan, previously of The Exploited, the future Garbage vocalist Shirley Manson, and Rona Scobie both providing keys and backing vocals. For the rest of the band’s potent history we will let you go search but there will be no finer way to set it off then through Good Deeds and Dirty Rags.

The album opens up with Open Your Arms, a track which swiftly hooks ears with its sweeping breath and magnetic jangle. Metcalfe’s vocals resonate with the expression and character which we are more familiar with within his current creative adventure as melodies, harmonies, and sharp hooks are woven into a slice of indie contagion. There is a Big Country like grandeur to the song at times and a gnarly edge to the bass which just hit a personal appetite, again something since keenly devoured with Wilson’s presence in The Filthy Tongues.

Wake It Up follows bringing a rousing roar to its composed stroll, every aspect fuelling an unapologetic catchiness which easily swept up eager attention. In some ways there is a larger than life hue to the song which reminds of The Associates but whether familiar with or new to the band through the album there is no denying Goodbye Mr Mackenzie had a distinct individuality.

The electronic hug of the especially enthralling His Masters Voice is just a big warm smile upon the ears but another track with a certain rock ‘n’ roll edge to it which erupts with vociferous voice throughout while Goodwill City is a drama soaked slice of anthemic temptation. It is a song set in climatic layers, each small but tenacious crescendo a rich incitement on spirit and involvement with its creative intrigue and emprise. One of their less familiar tracks before this release the song soon proved a firm favourite even as the riveting Candlestick Park swung its own shadow wrapped, melancholically spun seduction upon ears and imagination. The truth is the song easily matches anything on the release, its mesmeric and indeed haunting presence a siren of craft and sound.

The song, Goodbye Mr Mackenzie, is another which simply infests ears and appetite with its melodic audacity and fertile imagination. The earthy threads of guitar perfectly collude with the celestial breeze of keys and sighs of harmonies as marching rhythms firmly leave their galvanic imprint on the senses; another highlight re-introduced to ears before the band’s most famous track, The Rattler shares its masterful indie pop contagion.

Through the infectious creative animation of Dust and the glorious sonic theatre of You Generous Thing grinning pleasure only rises up, both tracks pure adventure for ears and imagination on

Goodbye Mr MacKenzie 2019 – photo by Karen Lamond

both sides of the speakers; both traits a persistent thrill across the release and echoed again within the equally superb Good Deeds. Straight away rhythmically it had us enslaved; Kelly’s agility and lures reminding of King Trigger before the rest of the band bring their own eager inventive exploits to the fascination of sound.

Good Deeds and Dirty Rags is completed by three demo tracks of Open Your Arms, Diamonds, and You Generous Thing; all from 1987 and each their own portion of thick temptation.

Though listening to the album inspires annoyance at not having embraced it well before now, it is a real treat to discover and you know what? It is not out of place or time within the current indie rock scene at all.

Good Deeds and Dirty Rags is released 2nd November via Neon Tetra Records.

https://www.facebook.com/GoodbyeMrMackenzie   https://twitter.com/gbmrmackenzie   http://www.goodbyemrmackenzie.com/

Pete RingMaster 27/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Neverlanded – F.u.U

Voracious in breath, bold in imagination, and a touch irritable in character the sound fuelling the debut EP from UK trio Neverlanded makes no concessions to expectations as they provide one of the more exciting and intriguing introductions heard over recent months. A feisty and uncompromising mix of grunge, alternative rock, and punk rock with an appetite for stoner hues, it is within the F.u.U EP, a striking confrontation as belligerent as it is brazenly adventurous.

Roaring out of North London, Neverlanded consists of vocalist/guitarist Pete Bloom, bassist/guitarist Niki Jester, and drummer Jaca Freer. Initially formed as an online project in 2017, the band has since released a trio of singles to stir up some attention which F.u.U, its full title being the Fluffy Unicorns United EP, can only forcibly escalate. Inspirations to the EP’s sound include the likes of Placebo, L7, Silverchair, Garbage, Nirvana, Cranberries, Pixies and Refused; a selection which gives you a good inkling of its breeding and heart if not its open individuality to those influences.

Neverlanded are giving the Margo Broom (Arrows of Love, Yassassin, Calva Louise) recorded EP available free to anyone who donates money to Mermaids UK, a charity the band eagerly and effortlessly supports in its work supporting children, young people, and their families to achieve a happier life in the face of great adversity including raising awareness about gender nonconformity in children and young people amongst the general public.

F.u.U pounces from the speakers with Brainsane first up, an initial melodic lure enough of a coaxing to set the senses in the face of a swift wall of noise though that too is a quick trespass as sonic calm and vocal prowess bridges another raw surge. Within it all Jester’s bass immediately proven manna to personal tastes but was as resourcefully matched by the biting swings of Freer and the fuzzy exploits of Bloom’s guitar. There is a definite Nirvana meets Pixies spicing to the song but that only added to its imposing magnetism and tempting snarl.

The following MesS.O.S. bursts from the speakers with punk ferocity but soon bounced along with appetite gripping unpredictability and noise rock infused grunge bred self-appraisal. That initial punk causticity still persists though fuelling the track’s rousing antics and agitated frenzy; the result a brief and severely appetising slice of punk ‘n’ roll before This Friend of Mine soothed an inflamed spirit with its invitingly crawling melodic stroll. It is a track where you can see those Placebo and Pixies references seeded but again flavours embraced and mutated into Neverlanded’s own inimitable sonic concoction. A blend of the feral and seductive, the track simply added to the compelling persuasion of the EP.

Scream4icecream completes the quartet of incitements, a song from its first bass amidst crispy beats burrowing under the skin and increasing its slavery through vocal snares and sonic wiring. The track is superb as are all enticements within an EP which had us quickly hooked and greedy thereon in.

How Neverlanded evolve from this impressive moment we will see but anticipation of that adventure is as ripe as the enjoyment with F.u.U was rich; so go explore and remember you can support a great cause at the same time.

The F.u.U EP is released April 1st, for more info go to https://www.neverlanded.com/home  and https://www.facebook.com/neverlandedband/

Pete RingMaster 02/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Filthy Tongues – Jacob’s Ladder

FilthyTongues Press Pic Jan2016_RingMasterReview

Seriously beguiling and theatrically suggestive, Jacob’s Ladder is the highly anticipated debut album from Scottish trio The Filthy Tongues, and a glorious adventure into the dark and magnetic underbelly of the band’s home and imagination. Consisting of eight slices of dark rock ‘n’ roll woven from an evocative tapestry of caliginous flavours and textures, tracks further infused with poetic lyrical drama, the album is an immersion into gothic cloaked and intimately alluring portraits of, in the words of the band, “a dark neo-feudal Edinburgh.”

The Filthy Tongues consists of vocalist/guitarist Martin Metcalfe, bassist Fin Wilson, and drummer Derek Kelly, a threesome who were the core-members of eighties/nineties band Goodbye Mr Mackenzie. The band, which also featured Shirley Manson as keyboardist and backing singer, evolved into Angelfish and recorded a well-received album with Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth of Talking Heads, whose manager Gary Kurfirst gave a helping hand to the Scottish band. Subsequently Manson was lured to front a new project called Garbage whilst Metcalfe, Wilson, and Kelly became Isa & the Filthy Tongues and released a pair of albums with American-born Stacey Chavis as vocalist. Now the trio have stepped forward as The Filthy Tongues and uncaged a creative incitement which must rank up there with the finest offering to come from their creative minds and talent.

The album opens with its title track and a melancholic caress of strings which soon part for a vibrant stroll of dark bass and nagging riffs around distinctive vocals. A ripple of keys adds to the instant expressive character of the track, backing vocal lures just as potent as the track strolls along with a sinister yet mesmeric swagger. Like a mix of The Monochrome Set and Milton Star with a healthy scent of Nick Cave to it, the opener alone gives Jacob’s Ladder all the bait needed to tempt ears and appetite, whilst setting up an already eager imagination with the lust to delve into what is to come and enslave.

album_RingMasterReviewThe brilliant start continues with the rhythmically tenacious High. As the bass aligns it’s ominous yet invitingly throaty suggestiveness to the anthemic pull of beats, Metcalfe’s tones bring the narrative to pungent life like a lyrical Pied Piper within the post punk seeded and dramatic ambience of the sounds around him. It is gripping, irresistible stuff that demands increasing attention with consummate ease, much as the album and songs surrounding it, including the following Holy Brothers. Rhythms again create a bold canvas for keys and strings to share their provocative and melodic suggestiveness which in turn creates an aural sketch for vocals and words to captivate within. There is a slight feel of Fatima Mansions to that lyrical and indeed emotional prowess cast, a sharing of the descriptive and virulently compelling art of offering the imagination a fully equipped landscape to play with.

Long Time Dead brings a steely edge and attitude to its guitar crafted opening and subsequent body next, providing a dark country spiced proposal bred in the dirty back streets of life whilst Bowhead Saint swings and seduces with a delta blues kissed romancing of the imagination. Both tracks enthral and tantalise from within their individual creative skins and darkly lit hearts before Violent Sorrow shares its intimate and, as throughout the album, lyrically raw croon. Each of the trio leaves a lingering mark in their varied ways, all offering a long term flirtation with the psyche and passions.

A more physically agitated piece of rock ‘n’ roll, Children Of The Filthy keeps enjoyment and excitement as high as ever. Once more rhythms provide the irritable yet anthemic side of the song, vocals the dark scenic persuasion, and melodic and sonic imagination a bewitching poetic majesty which here is surf rock infused. The track is glorious, with Metcalfe vocally continuing to be like a Vaudevillian Poe sharing a dark tale to embrace and be inspired by. Its success is swiftly matched by the sultry exploration of Kingdom Of Ice, a song as enchanting as it is emotionally intimidating. Carrying a sound brewed with volatility, the closer is a firmly arresting proposal with as much suggestive depth and persuasion as the words it merges with, and a superb end to a similarly impressive release.

Jacob’s Ladder is destined to be one of the most acclaimed debuts of 2016, if it can truly be called a first release or simply another proposal in a long term evolution of three artists. More than that though, the record is a blend of fantasy and reality which ignites ears and emotions like a sonic poet; so being destined to emerge as one of the most acclaimed albums of the year might be the better suggestion.

Jacob’s Ladder is out now via Blokshok and available in varied formats and packages @ http://www.filthytongues.com

https://www.facebook.com/Isa-the-Filthy-Tongues-144934250476   https://twitter.com/filthytongues

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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BLiNDNESS – Wrapped In Plastic

BLiNDNESS2015_RingMaster Review

It may have been a long time coming but the debut album from BLiNDNESS makes time immaterial as it sizzles on the senses from start to finish spreading a dark wave electro pop seduction which is just as likely to snarl and explode with attitude as it is to smoulder and caress. Wrapped In Plastic is a sonically and imaginatively charged incitement, an adrenaline driven helter-skelter of sound and energy that ears and thoughts quickly bask in. The accompanying press release to the album calls it a “rollercoaster ride of beautiful chaos” and that about says it all.

Formed in 2008, BLiNDNESS consists of Beth Rettig (vocals, programming, noise), Emma Quick (bass, noise), and Debbie Smith (guitar, feedback, noise) previously of Curve, Echobelly, and Snowpony. Since emerging the London based band has persistently been an explosive proposition on the Capital’s live scene and beyond. Now it is the turn of Wrapped In Plastic to set the fuse to fresh and major attention, and from its opening proposal it easily leaves ears and appetite seriously engaged.

Serves Me Right is the first protagonist and from an opening sonic lure which has the senses flinching whilst anticipation licks its lips, begins a perpetual transfixing swiftly enhanced by a grizzly bassline. With pulsating electro beats and a scuzzy air to the guitars lining up soon after, the song resonates and enthrals as it broadens its landscape, the warm but steely vocal tones of Rettig riding its thick melodic mesh of sound and intensity to further stretch the captivating start.

Blindness-Wrapped-_RingMaster Review   The guitar sculpted Deserving keeps the strong potency going with immediate effect next, fiery flames from the strings of Smith igniting the air as the dark tones of bass and gripping tones of Rettig bring contrast and balance. Pungent beats spark a meaty stride to the slice of fuzzy rock ‘n’ roll, the song emerging like a mix of Garbage and Breeders dug for extra spicing into the originality of BLiNDNESS. Contagious and bracing, the track pushes the album up another gear to a stirring level matched as magnetically and forcibly by Last One Dies. Tenaciously simmering with electronic imagination and brewing a sturdy and bewitching tapestry of melodic and psych rock, the third song simply rumbles and flirts with increasing energy across its vibrant body.

A gentler croon emerges with No One Counts, though as all tracks there is a volatile edge to sound and invention which means unpredictability is as ripe as melodic and fuzz soaked enterprise. The bass of Quick once more adds a delicious shadow rich twang to proceedings whilst melodically and in creative crescendos there is an air of Muse to the fiery encounter, though just one whisper in a few to something ultimately individual to the band.

Both Sunday Morning and Humming Song wrap ears to pleasing effect, the first vocally and melodically with a mellow tone and reflective shimmer. Its rhythmic shuffle adds a kinetic energy and catchiness to its mesmeric busyness whilst its successor initially slips into an even slower and elegant serenade, swimming over the senses and around evocative rhythms, before brewing a dramatic blaze of sonic and emotive intensity then repeating the cycle once again. The theatre and vocal drama of the song is bewitching, and though neither inflames the passions as powerfully as those before them, each leaves a want for more.

It is a hunger quickly fed by the dark textures and atmosphere of Broken. There is an open shoegaze glow to certainly vocal delivery and melodies throughout the album but probably at its most vivacious here, though that is beautifully tempered by the underlying growl of bass and character of the track, and indeed its almost acrid swamp of sonic imagination and ferocity. Hypnotic until its final parting breath, the track is a meditative, almost carnal incitement.

All In One raises the temperature of the album next, its physical presence as mercurial as its invention. BLiNDNESS entangles seventies psychedelic rock and nineties alternative/ electro rock into its resourceful scorching fire, feedback and celestial acidity as always an ever potent presence. The track ignites ears with ease before Confessions ensures a blistering close to the album with its bluesy inferno of intoxicating rock ‘n’ roll. It is an intense and thrilling end to Wrapped In Plastic, a release finishing on a high and sparking the want to go again.

To be particularly picky there is a similarity in certain areas of some songs which threatens to smother the invention and creative adventure specific to each track but close and constant attention covers that, Wrapped In Plastic a release you need to spend time with to reap all its strengths and qualities. BLiNDNESS definitely rewards such focus though with an encounter which leaves ears ringing, bodies sweaty, and satisfaction bloated.

Wrapped In Plastic is available now via Saint Marie Records @ http://saintmarierecords.limitedrun.com/products/553220-blindness-wrapped-in-plastic

http://www.weareblindness.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/weareblindness

RingMaster 08/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

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Zen Juddhism – Private Banks (So Cold) Feat. Opkar Hans

Zen Juddhism -Pic (2)

Ensuring an incitement for feet and emotions, Zen Juddhism release new single Private Banks (So Cold) this week, a contagiously rowdy slice of punk ‘n’ roll with a healthy feel of Fountains Of Wayne to it. Taken from the band’s self-titled debut album, the song is an openly familiar and virulently catchy proposition, not trying to bend boundaries or reinvent the wheel, but delivering what always goes down a treat, honest rock ‘n’ roll.

Zen Juddhism is the new music project from Southampton based guitarist /songwriter Jude Ωne Eight, formerly of Cold Forge and better known as part of HYBRID 6.0. Drawing on a lifetime of influences which shaped his personal tastes, from rock and metal to soul, folk, and pop acts, the guitarist wrote a host of songs inspired by the artists most prominent on his playlist in the past year, including Metric, Led Zeppelin, Garbage, Fountains Of Wayne, and TV On The Radio. Enlisting the assistance of friends such as Lord Lav, Andy Thomas, Marlene Rodriguez, Naomi Terry and many more, Jude recorded the previously mentioned self-titled album at the renowned River Studios with its subsequent release on his own Loosh Rote Records. Now Private Banks (So Cold) which features Opkar Hans is here to make an inescapable invitation to check out the album and indeed Zen Juddhism.

A raw caress of guitar with percussive enticing makes the first bait, its lure a mere moment before a blaze of grungy toned punk ‘n’ roll aggression and virulence takes over. Riffs blaze and hooks swing within the rowdy encounter, all adding further captivating bait to the infectious stomp. Its chorus takes ears into a more pop bred persuasion, that Fountains Of Wayne reference a loud whisper but equally you can sense a Ramones like essence equally fuelling the addictive nature and lure of that particular aspect of the song.

As mentioned Private Banks (So Cold) flirts with a familiar and energetic tempting, not really caring about creating new templates but eager to provide a boisterous and anthemic roar of voracious rock; an aim realised with enjoyable results for all.

Private Banks (So Cold) is out now via Loosh Rote Records with the Zen Juddhism also available @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/zen-juddhism/id943656548?ign-mpt=uo%3D4

http://zenjuddhism.com/   https://www.facebook.com/ZenJuddhism

RingMaster 31/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The Capsules – The Long Goodbye

the capsules pic

Having been seduced by US electro pop band The Capsules through their previous album Northern Lights & Southern Skies, anticipation for its successor The Long Goodbye has been excitable and at times impatient especially when having the honour of a sneak preview a short while ago, and the album does not let any expectations and hopes down now that it is finally ready to immerse the world into its mesmeric embrace. Its predecessor was an enthralling proposition which did not ignite a fire in the passions though it had them bubbling nicely with its enchanting charm and qualities; The Long Goodbye though does both. At times it has emotions and satisfaction simmering vivaciously but more often than not it leads them to raging flames of pleasure and rapture whilst revealing a thrilling evolution in the band’s sound, craft, and songwriting maturity.

Originally from Kansas but now Dallas based, The Capsules’ seeds began in high school with Julie and Jason Shields. Coming together to write music, it subsequently led to romance, marriage, and first band Shallow as well as the first bloom of their breath-takingly textured sounds. Next the pair enlisted drummer Kevin Trevino as they looked to expand and further refine their sound, a potent move resulting in the emergence of The Capsules. As the trio grew in sound and presence so did attention towards them, debut album Reverser sparking a focus upon them followed by two more increasingly captivating full-lengths before Northern Lights & Southern Skies brought in all into a much greater spotlight. Along the way the band has also grabbed an increasingly growing legion of fans including SpongeBob SquarePants creator Steven Hillenburg who asked them to write a song for the show. Understandable comparisons to the likes of Cocteau Twins, Blonde Redhead, Metric, Phantasmogram, and My Bloody Valentine have graced the band over releases and their performances with bands such as The Flaming Lips, Garbage, Mercury Rev, and Low, but it is honest to say that The Long Goodbye places the band into their own unique centre of attraction with its invigorating electronic caresses and seductive vocal temptations. Released via Saint Marie Records, the album quite simply is one ridiculously potent siren.

The entrancing flight of the album starts with The Beginning and its initial jangling enticement, guitars offering more tangible bait in 10364099_10152403884081346_7913373131760722158_nan increasingly immersive ambience bred by the keys. Instantly there is a whisper of drama to the song, a colourful essence which erupts into an eager breath to a lively and in comparison to its start, urgent stroll to the song. The crisp beats of Kevin bring a coaxing spine to the song as the increasingly mesmeric tones of Julie wrap and envelope the senses but it is the teasing melody crafted by Jason which lays down the strongest trap, its Altered Images intrigue, simulated by haunted yet warm harmonies, simply delicious. It is a rousing anthemic start to the album, a scenic evocative contagion which takes the imagination and passions into bright aural views.

Super Symmetry takes over and just as quickly has ears and thoughts transfixed with its expressive electro courting, its breath a mix of melancholy and elation. Julie’s voice smoulders as she glides over the minimalistic yet fully hued landscape of the song, noir kissed shadows and lapping incitements of melodies filling the unfussy and infectious premise. There is a hazy light which soaks the song, one which flirts as it soaks every note and syllable to help create a presence which simply absorbs mind and soul before making way for the thicker narrative of Monsters. Like the opener it has an eighties synth pop like spice to its cloudy wash of acidic guitar enterprise and smothering melodies, but truly comes alive when the band opens up its chorus with a rhythmic crescendo matched by elevated sonic flames.

Both the title track and Death Of A Comet steer the senses into a spatial climate, the first soaring with rapturous vocal flumes and magnetic rhythmic enticement within expansive and emotionally invasive weaves of keys laced together by the intricate guitar sewing of Jason. The second provides an initial emotional dawning which slowly spreads its colour and aural heart until finding itself casting a gentle stroll beneath a moonlit smile. Both tracks light up ears and air, bulging melodies aligned to soaring beauty and a spellbinding croon respectively showing just two more twists in the diversity seeding the songwriting and album, an aspect pushed again by the outstanding Hollywood. With a thick and glorious dark bass prowl stealing attention as the song radiates its entrancing suasion whilst again celestial flavouring breeds sonic fascination, the track is an impossibly beguiling and infectious flight into shadowed climes and compelling sunspots, much like its namesake.

The brooding grandeur of You Are A Metaphor keenly kisses ears next, again layers of dark and light converging into an enriching provocative ambience sculpted in reflection and thought, before being put in the shade just a little by Signals, a song where from its first scattering of Numan-esque trappings steals undiluted attention especially when it brings a heavier and no less welcome OMD expression to its electro stirring. Gripping and mouthwatering the song is itself just a very tasty appetiser for the highlight of the album, The Lonely End. The song is just majestic pop alchemy which stands as one of the best song unveiled this year. From its first strands of electro infection aligned to loudly vocal melodic emotion, the track swarms around seducing senses and imagination like a dark temptress, one needing no assistance but getting it with a just as potent sultriness from the fabulous tones of Julie. Robust but as finely crafted as porcelain, the spellbinding encounter with its earthy bass sound and scorched sonic guitar bred flames aligned to breath-taking melodies is simply stunning.

The height of its glory leaves songs like With Every Hour and Don’t Look Down which follow a thankless task but both without truthfully coming near still enrol the listener in a masterclass of picturesque melodies and imagination painting keys embraced in possessive harmonies and vocals. Neither song admittedly takes the bull by the horns either, both in distinct ways exploring their own independent emotional investigations without the same contagious toxins found elsewhere, though that virulence is soon rediscovered by the almost imposingly dramatic The Forgotten Days. There is a nagging essence and potency to the song which like a dog with a pig’s ear never relinquishes the instant hook it places in the passions early on. With guitars and drums steering the encounter as powerfully as the vocals, the track is a formidable provocateur, one which never truly explodes as expected but still provides a gem of an incitement.

The Long Goodbye closes with the excellent version of I Will Survive, a slowly awakening temptation which once more prefers to croon than romp but still finds a level of energy and enticement which leaves breath gasping. The song is one which has never found favour here but in the hand of The Capsules has become a firm favourite. The Long Goodbye is easily one of the special treats of the year so far suggesting that from being compared to many others The Capsules from this point on will be who others are compared to.

The Long Goodbye is available via Saint Marie Records now!

http://www.thecapsules.com/

9.5/10

RingMaster 20/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Argonaut: Self Titled

Argonaut

    From its first gentle kiss the self-titled album from UK indie band Argonaut never relinquishes its spell on thoughts and emotions not to forget holding an unbreakable grip on the ear. A shimmering sun of evocative ambiences and provocative warmth, the album immerses the listener in ethereal elegance and persuasive imagination whilst quietly enslaving the passions.

The quintet from London state influences as the likes of Sonic Youth, Garbage, Hole, The Pixies and many more, essences which whisper loudly from within the ten track release. To those you can also add the likes of Propaganda and The Sundays as a strong eighties wind blows from within their invention, as well as from the now The Mouth Of Ghosts. Argonaut holds their own distinct stance though despite the rich spices and over recent months has begun to truly catch the imagination of a widening awareness awaking to their creative sound. The band were signed up by Criminal Records for the release of their recent single and album, the band gaining interest on the London ‘toilet circuit’ whatever that means but surely nothing as seedy as imagination dares think up.

The album begins with the single Monet, a song which invites the listener into its arms with a brewing resonance with glowing bass 3517_483921028334663_2008247918_ncaresses drawing in fiery guitar sonics and the golden voice of Lorna Lyons, her voice a temptation impossible to refuse. Guitar spires light the magnetic ambience of the song whilst the infectious chorus seductively nuzzles the senses, the track itself working under the skin and submerging the emotions in a sunset of aural colour to reap the fullest ardour from its recipient.

The following Touch Electric opens up its sinews, the bass a grumbling prowl around the ear whilst electro cascades light the way for the guitars to flash and graze across the heart of the song. Occasionally a B-52s flicker winks in the pop tease of the song whilst within its scintillating coarse surface and almost childlike vocal tones the likes of Daisy Chainsaw mischievously peer out. With a grunge feistiness to its encounter the song instantly shows a depth to the songwriting and invention of the band and a continuation of their skill to enchant and enthral.

More Life and 2 Lights continue to show a variety and skilled invention from the band, the first a smouldering stroll through a weave of sonic beauty and melodic grace steered with raw energy and blistered intensity whilst the second works on the passions with a persistent bass lure and niggling guitar barbs. The vocals scorch the heart with their lush allure and all combined with creeping shadows skirting the finesse of the song, there is a Breeders/Belly enticement.

The latter part of the album immerses into an even deeper dreaminess with enveloping sounds which arguably elude reaching earlier set heights on the album or sparking raging fires inside but the likes of the delicious They Can Bury You, the haunting Spectres where Lyons is at her most Clare Grogan-esque, and the alluring Chemistry never fail to leave an eager thirst for more quenched.

Amongst these songs there awaits the further triumphs of Vintage Dress and the closing track Sleep Tight. The first is an entrancing sway which takes no time in offering influences of The Cure through the bassline which has cheekily been cloned from A Forest but is just irresistible so all is forgiven. The song itself saunters with beacons of melodic grandeur pervaded by encroaching shadows, the result a pulsating bewitching that holds the listener lovingly whilst gently passing over dark emotive tinges. The final song is also a darker companion but one which fuses shaded emotions with a compelling luminance. Like the most rewarding enchanting dusk that any day could offer the song allows the album to leave on a warm breeze which beckons an immediate return.

Argonaut with their album confirms that the buzz around them is more than justified whilst suggesting the band will reach greater more impressive heights over the near horizon. This is simply an album not to be missed.

https://www.facebook.com/argonautband

http://argonaut.info/

8/20

RingMaster 14/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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