Horse Party – Out Of Sight/Receiver

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The exciting thing about UK band Horse Party is as much as they have openly grown in songwriting and sound, they have lost none of the instinctively raw and organic essences which made them strikingly leap out with debut single Back To Mono almost two years ago. Their new single is bound in majestic raunchy charms as both Out Of Sight and Receiver show new striking steps in craft, sound, and sheer creative adventure, but each still seduces with that primal spice which brought the trio to life.

Hailing from Bury St Edmunds, the threesome of vocalist/guitarists Ellie Langley and Seymour Quigley, alongside drummer Shannon Hope, have persistently garnered acclaim and an increasingly growing and devoted fan base with their gripping and at times sinisterly devilish sounds. From the Scarlet & Blue EP to last year’s debut album Cover Your Eyes, released through Integrity Records, Horse Party has gripped attention and increasingly greedier appetites, including those of 6music’s Lauren Laverne and Steve Lamacq, Shell Zenner at Absolute Radio and XFM’s John Kennedy. Live too the band is no stranger to eager responses, last year seeing the band successfully playing Latitude Festival’s Lake Stage at the invitation of Radio One’s Huw Stephens and BBC Suffolk Introducing. Now Out Of Sight/Receiver is poised to push the band on again, and as it is without doubt their finest hour to date, it is hard to see it failing to tempt the broadest spotlights upon the band.

Out Of Sight starts things off and is instantly prowling ears with thoughtful yet predatory riffs from the guitars matched by crisp beats. The darkly seducing tones of Langley queens over the 10847766_768484469911623_4136520996259037093_nentrance, her delivery sure and intense yet wholly seductive from the first breath. Widening its expression without leaving its shadowed scenery, the track proceeds to tease with small burst of melodic light and anthemic vocal unity whilst steely hooks only add to the addictive bait of the song. Fizzing up further into its presence with psychedelic lit sultriness and smouldering emotion, the adventure continues to be unpredictable and inescapably addictive with a chorus which similarly becomes more virulent and entrancing over the length of the outstanding song.

It is a glorious temptation but even with its might cannot help being surpassed by the delicious alchemy of Receiver. More energetic from the first second, the track is also an even darker and more sinister provocation, riding in on an irresistible post punk rhythmic baiting of ears and imagination. It is wonderfully repetitive from hereon in, riffs and hooks recycled with compelling effect as the dual tones of Langley and Quigley croon with sobering yet magnetic persuasion. That post punk essence is a constant treat within the song too, essences of bands like Au Pairs and Joy Division merging with the darker side of a Morningwood or Yeah Yeah Yeahs, but coming out as something ingeniously unique to Horse Party.

The song as the single is outstanding, both songs easily the best things to emerge from the imagination of the trio and they have some treats already under their creative belts. Horse Party is a band ready to join the frontline of the UK garage rock/rock scene and with releases like this drive it to new heights.

Out Of Sight/Receiver is available from February 23rd on limited edition 7” black vinyl as a co-release by R*E*P*E*A*T Records and the band’s own Pure Deadly imprint @ https://horsepartyparty.bandcamp.com/album/out-of-sight-receiver-7-single

Horse Party are also on tour right now with upcoming dates at…

Friday 27th February – Ipswich Steamboat Tavern

Friday 27th March – London The Garage

Saturday 2nd May – Bury St Edmunds Fringe Festival

Friday 15th May – Cambridge Junction

Saturday 13th June – Norwich Open

https://www.facebook.com/horsepartyparty

RingMaster 22/02/2015

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Damn Vandals – Mad As Hell

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The British rock scene is not short on some rather exciting prospects and artists right now, bands which are stripping away its current landscape to create new primal and instinctively imaginative adventures. To the front of these propositions for the past few years, certainly since the release of their debut album Done For Desire in 2012 is Londoners Damn Vandals. They are the source of raw and aggressively inventive rock ‘n’ roll which seems to increase in virulence and creative rigour across every release, a success proven and reinforced once again by the band’s new single Mad As Hell. It is trade mark Damn Vandals yet again finds the band pushing new twists of sound and enterprise whilst providing another heady temptation into their warped sonic world for all newcomers.

Mad As Hell and its B-side, This Music Blows My Tiny Mind, both come from the band’s second album Rocket Out Of London, which as its predecessor was no stranger to widespread acclaim. In fact all Damn Vandal releases earn eager praise and it is hard not to suspect Mad As Hell doing the same. From an opening muscle bound grouchy bassline, the song has ears and attention firmly gripped ready for the distinctive and highly expressive tones of vocalist Jack Kansas. Just as swiftly his and Frank Pick’s guitars are weaving their flaming sonic seducing, a temptation ripe with spicy blues flavouring within a climate which shimmers and sizzles with melodic drama and fiery enterprise. Right away impressive on the album, the song has grown in stature and persuasive weight over time and now as a single, Mad As Hell sets the imagination and emotions sparking with pleasure. Within the embrace of the whole stunning full-length, its potency as a single initially might have been questioned but any doubts are soon tossed aside as the song revels in its spotlight proving that Rocket Out Of London in many ways is nothing but potential singles and essential slabs of rock ‘n’ roll.

The irresistible rhythmic frame of the single, cast by bassist Adam Kilemore Gardens and drummer Chris Christianson, is emulated in the equally contagious success of This Music Blows My Tiny Mind. Stretched sinews drive an even paced gait loaded with thick drum swipes and throaty bass riffs as vocals and guitars flirt with their caustic swagger. Littered with abrasing hooks and dirty melodies, the song is soon immersing ears into a unique tapestry of garage punk, psyche and raw punk with a stoner-esque tang, and swiftly infesting senses and psyche like a sonic virus. Charmingly psychotic and addictively feverish, the song is a creative brawl which again is only the strongest enticement into the ingenuity of Damn Vandals.

If you have yet to discover the quartet either Mad As Hell or This Music Blows My Tiny Mind provide a doorway to a theatre of original rock ‘n’ roll, and together make an inescapable sonic tempest. Though not labelled as such, the Julian Simmons (Midlake, Ed Sheeran, Guillemots, Goldheart Assembly) produced single is really a double A-sided offering in quality and striking impact, and proof that Damn Vandals still lead the current march of real rock ‘n’ roll.

Mad As Hell is released on 23rd February

http://www.damnvandals.co.uk/

RingMaster 22/02/2015

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Rathborne – Soft

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If you have not come across Luke Rathborne, or indeed Rathbone the band surrounding his songwriting skills, do not worry as the healthy buzz around both back in the US is sure to brew up a similar excitement over this side of the pond thanks to the release of new album Soft. An energetic package of tenaciously varied rock ‘n’ roll, the release shows itself to be as at home and accomplished exploring punk, garage rock and indie pop as it is reaping the essences of alternative and seventies American rock. It is a compelling and more often than not an irresistible stomp which will warm up any playlist given the chance.

Hailing from Brunswick in Maine and New York based, man and band make light work of enticing and exciting ears upon the Albert Hammond Jnr of The Strokes, co-produced Soft. Its title track is the first persuasion and swiftly surrounds ears with a dirty but melodically washed sonic temptation. It is raw and wonderfully distorted pop over a scuzzy slow prowl; the union almost Beck meets The Strokes like in its volatile and fiery enterprise. Immediately imagination and appetite are aroused, and given another incendiary spark with the following What More. Cleaner in its energetic pop revelry but still harbouring a great raw edge, the track is a mix of The Cars and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and swift example of the diversity rife within the album.

I’m So Tired steps up next, its Americana like colouring blending with the seventies pop spiced infectiousness coursing through its lively balladry. Though the song does not quite match up to those before or right after, it leaves ears and attention engrossed ready for the outstanding Eno which steps up with its Tom Verlaine and Television like vocal and musical endeavour. A lively romp with addictive qualities, the track reinforces the already thick variety to songs, yet despite their seriously individual characters, each sits perfectly alongside the next as proven once again by the punk lined Low! which soon has feet and emotions bouncing around as if on a power pop trampoline. As many of the tracks, it is a short and insatiable provocateur which almost revels in mischievous intent as it lures, incites, and then runs before the listener can reach the pinnacle of its physical and emotional involvement.

A country breath embraces Little Moment which comes next, the song a radiant encounter hugging a great additional female vocal. It does not spark the same reactions as its companions but that is down to a personal dislike of country flavours and not any real issue with the agreeably crafted song. Particular tastes are soon back on board with the punchy Wanna Be You with its strong throaty bassline and melodic winery, and even more so after the Dylan-esque bluesy tang of Deal, with the rampant catchiness of Why. The track flirts with a bounding rhythmic gait and grungy sonic teasing from the guitars whilst vocally too there is a Nirvana like graze to the delivery. It is another inescapable treat within Soft leaving the garage/hard rock stroll of So Long NYC to close things out in highly satisfying style.

It is fair to say that Soft is one of those albums which are very hard to get out of the head. It might not elevate to being a heart embraced favourite but it definitely gets under the skin and stays with thoughts and emotions, returning whenever it pleases with certain hooks and melodies.

Soft is available now via True Believer and @ http://lukerathborne.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/lukerathborne

RingMaster 16/02/2015

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Los Trasgos Muertos – Eponymous EP

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Creating garage rock with a psyche rock aspiratory system, or is it psyche rock with garage rock blood…however you wish to describe it, UK rockers Los Trasgos Muertos have woven a seriously compelling encounter with their self-titled debut EP. Consisting of four-tracks which simply whisk the imagination away into a kaleidoscope of seventies seeded adventure whilst immersing ears into a web of bluesy sonic curiosity, the band’s first offering is quite simply a delicious introduction.

Los Trasgos Muertos hails from Manchester and consists of Captain Reed (bass/vocals/organ), Von Beek (guitar/vocals), and Il Fleishe (drums), three protagonists no strangers to each other from their individual time and experiences in varied bands over the years in their city’s music scene. Once united, the band whilst taking inspirations from the likes of Billy Childish, Thee Oh Sees, Hi Ho, and Ty Segall into their own invention was soon clutching a horde of songs ready for recording, which they did at Eve Studios in Bredbury. Now the sultrily flamed first encounter is upon us all and what a treat it really is.

It all kicks off with Fire In The Sky, a song swiftly binding ears in a spicy blues crafted groove and bass grumbles as beats flash their sinews across the senses. It is soon striding with tenacious energy and creative enthusiasm, hooks and the ever increasing lure of the grooves as tangy and contagious as the lively vocals and melodic endeavour. There is an earthiness to the song which easily grabs ears whilst equally there is a drama to every psychedelic clothed note and anthemic swing. The track continues to bluster like an autumn wind, warming the bones whilst offering haunting shadows and pagan like unpredictability.

The following Step One makes a less spectacular entrance but soon has senses and thoughts wrapped in its opening mesmeric melodic shimmer and vocal embrace. Soon a sixties beat feel adds Picture 84it’s tempting to the garage rock stomp as the song hits the ground with a lively gait. As its predecessor the virulently catchy encounter swiftly ignites an even greater appetite and satisfaction whilst being relentlessly fascinating though its expectations defeating adventure, a quality which is even more exploited by It Rises!

The third track makes the best entrance of all, its initial slap of beats the trigger to a winy blues rock bred groove which coincidently is almost straight out of the major seduction that is the Karn8’s song Sick. It was an essence extraordinary there and just as irresistible here with its particular haunting colouring. Around it the smouldering tapestry of the song flows like sonic honey, sticky and flavoursome melodies gluing their lures to ears and emotions as the increasingly impressive vocals add their distinct spice to the brilliant proposition. Sometimes there is no escape from the touch of a song no matter what and here is one of the most stirring examples.

The release closes with the dark romance of Roll With The Punches, a track merging the garage punk of The Orson Family and the fuzzabilly styling of Eighteen Nightmares At The Lux with the garage rock styling of The Electric Eels and the psyche temptation of The Doors. It is an enthralling almost intrusive embrace of body and thought, a mouth-watering and riveting end to an outstanding debut.

The Los Trasgos Muertos conjure their own world and psychological adventure with their strangely familiar but openly unique sound; one already ears and appetite are impatiently waiting for more of.

The Los Trasgos Muertos EP is available from February 2nd

http://lostrasgosmuertos.com/

RingMaster 02/02/2015

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Witching Waves – Fear Of Falling Down

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Having been hooked by the band with their limited edition cassette single Concrete/Chain Of Command earlier this year, there was a fair few tingles running through anticipation with the announcement of the debut album from Witching Waves. Those urges have grown to lustful proportions now that Fear Of Falling Down has infested ears and psyche, the release confirming all the promise and thrills experienced before whilst showing a broader adventure and creative resourcefulness in songwriting and sound.

Hailing from London and formed in 2013 as the brainchild of duo Emma Wigham and Mark Jasper (Sound Savers Recording Studio), Witching Waves through their unrelenting appetite for performing live and songs swiftly drew keen attention their way. Fusing as many essences of punk as you can imagine in a noise and discord sculpted garage pop incitement, the band bridges the DIY essence of the late seventies and the voracious causticity of modern invention; kind of like Swell Maps meets The White Stripes but for a truly unique and tenaciously addictive proposition.

Released via Soft Power Records, Fear Of Falling Down sees the duo now a threesome with the addition of a bassist, though we cannot tell you the name. The band’s fourth release, after Witching Waves LP Cover Artthree cassette singles, is a master class in raw sonic temptation and primal rhythmic slavery; each song united by a certain anthemic swing and creative tenacity yet alone in warped character and discordant agitation. Recorded on to 8 track tape, the album is a minimalistic yet inventively involved incitement, a cavernously toned but intimately delivered protagonist to excite ears and imagination with ease.

The album’s title track is the first to get the juices flowing, the opening jangle of guitar just the prelude to a rhythmically driven slice of agitated pop. The excellent vocals of Wigham soon join the rampancy of drums and the scrub of guitar before Jasper takes over with his equally captivating tones. Virulently catchy with a bounce to match, the track dances with ears and emotions from start to finish; every note, beat, and vocal enterprise simple but expertly creative seduction.

The post punk kissed Cold Out comes next, the contrast of the harmonic elegance and rawer expression of Wigham and Jasper respectively, alone a gripping enticement. In some ways there is an early Siouxsie and the Banshees feel to the song but also the flowing melodic quaintness of a Morningwood, the combination an addictive proposition, though soon surpassed by the poppy endeavour of Better Run. A slight spring of surf rock runs through the garage rock bred song whilst again vocals are as broadly bewitching as the slim but pungent sounds around them. As most tracks on the album, it is hard for feet taps and vocal participation to restrain from joining the band during the progress of its gently cacophonous croon before it makes way for the post punk infused stroll of Counterpoint. With repetitious riffs and infectious rhythmic bait, the song is a more challenging persuasion with its soaking of acidic discord and off key dynamics, but another to leave ears and passions basking.

The raw charm of Concrete comes next, its opening Buzzcocks spiced hook an instant attention grabber whilst a courting stride of rhythms draw their own submissive response. The plain almost disillusioned monotone vocals of Jasper contrast perfectly with the fluid melodies of Wigham, whilst the throaty melancholic bass prowl simply adds an addictive icing to the enthralling coaxing of body and mind. Like an unhinged blend of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and The Cramps, the song is an aurally dishevelled but controlled temptress, and the perfect appetiser for the brilliance of the following Creeping. Stalking ears with rhythmic eagerness, the song stomps with muscular and concussive beats as riffs and basslines flirt with their own rowdy enterprise. There is for not the first or last time, a similarity to Scottish duo The Creeping Ivies about the band’s sound across the album, here being a potent comparison though again Witching Waves emerge as individual and original in every sonic aspect.

Both the outstanding News, with its hypnotic rhythmic baiting and spicy garage rock keys around a creative drama, and the intrigue drenched Wait Around keeps the adventure of Fear Of Falling Down on its highest plateau. The first of the two is a web of colour rich discordance and imaginative confrontation honed into a ridiculously infectious trap which simply leaves ears, thoughts, and emotions grinning whilst its successor juggles sonic abrasion with warm pop harmonies for another song which takes longer to reach the peaks of others, but only adds to the unpredictable and captivating climate of the release.

Fear Of Falling Down closes with the excellent Barber where garage punk and eighties post punk meet for a contagion filled stamp of punchy beats and wiry hooks aligned to velvety heavy bass lures. It all of course infused with the wonderfully clashing and superbly united vocal attack of Wigham and Jasper.

If Witching Waves have impressed before with their early appetisers then the album offers a fuller and more flavoursome meal of dissonant and melody bred noise. For those new to one of the UK’s most thrilling propositions, Fear Of Falling Down is a sonic lust in the making.

Fear Of Falling Down is available via Soft Power Records as a Limited Edition Vinyl LP (250 Copies) and digital download @ http://softpowerrecords.bandcamp.com/album/fear-of-falling-down

http://witchingwaves.tumblr.com/

RingMaster 08/12/2014

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Thirteen Shots – White Noise EP

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Ever since the release of the single Danzig in 2011, UK rockers Thirteen Shots have been evolving a sound which seemingly chooses its own direction through each release. It is an organic journey which constantly surprises fans and at times maybe even the band itself. The predecessor to the band’s new EP hinted at one potent and striking shift which the White Noise EP now confirms whilst also suggesting more and that it too is just a sign post towards a yet to be reached destination. Early tracks and debut album Vaudeville offered rock ‘n’ roll with a voracious psychobilly/ punk ‘n’ roll devilment but the unleashing of last year’s Tales That Start With A Whisper seven-track brawl explored rich strains of horror and garage punk in its varied adventures. Now White Noise has stepped forward to push those essences further, the result a diversely flavoured slab of rock which is as at ease employing blues and classic rock as it is garage punk and rock, the result a mouth-watering blaze of raw and dirty rock ‘n roll.

Formed in 2011, the Johnny Rose led Thirteen Shots was swiftly firing up attention, especially after the release of the acclaimed Danzig which was backed up by a live presence which had also garnered equally potent recognition, the band sharing stages with bands such as Demented are Go, The Peacocks, Rezurex, Howling Wolfmen, Graveyard Johnnys and many more these past few years. Their following releases only reinforced their emerging presence whilst relishing the movement in the band’s sound, a journey continued with captivating ferocity through White Noise. The beginnings of the Birmingham quartet when Rose linked up with co-founder guitarist Joe Public, saw the pair move away from a hard rock breeding but with the new release it almost feels as if Rose is drawing on the best essences of that earlier time and flavour to add another flame and spice to the next twist in the ascent of Thirteen Shots.

The new release also sees the introduction of drummer Tom Fenn, who replaced the departing and also band original Chelsea McCammon, and opens with the imposing turbulence and attitude Thirteen Shots- White Noise- Coverof Doom. From its first breath, intense and corrosive riffs graze the senses whilst a bulky bassline joins crisp rhythmic punches in accosting ears. It is a formidable wall of sound, almost Sabbath-esque in tone and predation as fiery grooves wind around the distinctive tones of vocalist Rose. Lyrically the band is still spinning great tales from b-movie and horror inspirations but in sound the track instantly reveals a fiercer and more intimidating air, though it is just one aspect in the varied character of the release.

Next up is the first of two recorded tracks taken from last encounter Tales That Start With A Whisper, and in some ways reveals the most about the shift in sound as you compare versions. Nekrosexual whips up an immediate rich garage blues fuelling to the southern kissed garage punk encounter. There is admittedly not a major change in the song’s textures and sonic winery but everything has a new flood of intensity and incendiary colour to it, a rawer rock ‘n’ roll clarity which just gets the juices dribbling.

The following Blue Lagoon features Silpha, the vocalist from German horror punks Silpha & The Corpseboners and label mates on Rose’s own label Undead artists. The track roars from its first second, a bracing horror punk causticity scarring the air around the expressive and magnetic tones of Rose and Silpha. The track is a contagious stomp, the guitar of Lewis Manchip an uncompromising squall and the pulsating throaty bass lures uncaged by George Chick inescapable bait as they collude with the wicked swings of Fenn. The track is punk rock at its finest at its core and a lingering treat even after making way Psycho Jukebox, the other song re-recorded from the EP’s predecessor. A firm favourite of ours from Tales That Start With A Whisper, the new version is a little less convincing yet with its new roar and bluster turning the swagger loaded rocker into a ferociously compelling provocation, the track only adds bruising drama and incendiary enterprise to the release.

Inspired by the romance of the silent film star and film icon Mary Pickford, First American Sweetheart is the EP’s pinnacle, its infectious gait and rockabilly temptation wrapped in hard rock grooves and garage punk contagion. The song is outstanding; another in a line of underground classics sculpted by the band and the deserving of a wider spotlight. It plays with a Turbonegro and The Damned meets Rezurex type stomp and alone does enough to confirm that the new generation of their sound’s evolution is a step in the right and thrilling direction for the band.

Final song Padded Cell Blues is exactly as it says on the tin, a feisty blues drenched slice of deranged rock ‘n’ roll which shuffles and rampages across its sultry confinement with captivating tenacity and invention. Adding another open colour to the canvas of the EP, the song is a thickly satisfying close to another fascinating and exciting release from Thirteen Shots. Playing as a taster of the band’s continuing journey and an anticipation triggering teaser to a new album out next year, White Noise is a treat for all Thirteen Shots’ fans but also a rigorously enticing invitation for all appetites of unpolished, unclean, and masterfully invigorating rock ‘n’ roll.

The White Noise EP is available now via Undead Artists digitally and as a limited CD @ http://thirteenshots.bandcamp.com/album/white-noise

http://thirteenshots.com

http://undeadartistsbooki.wix.com

RingMaster 03/12/2014

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Mobbs – Garage Punk For Boys

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Ever wondered what would happen when you mixed ’77 bred punk rock with garage rock? UK rockers The Mobbs obviously did and with additional doses of sixties beat and R&B have crafted a sound which insatiably infests body and soul. In the mischievous shape of their third album Garage Punk For Boys, this adventure it is fair to say also provides one of the releases of the year. The accompanying promo sheet for the album suggests that “The Mobbs play a Wilko Johnson infused Billy Childish explosion”, an accurately pungent description of their sound but to that we would add the unreserved devilry of Radio Stars, the raw charm of Television Personalities, and the bracing fever of Thee Exciters in its armoury. The concoction is a riveting and exhilarating stomp with a hunger as shown by Garage Punk For Boys, which infects the listener from head to toe.

Formed in 2008, the trio from Northampton has persistently lit up stages, earning a rich reputation for energy strewn live performances, a stirring presence backed up and spread further by their greedily received full-length It’s… The Mobbs of 2011 and its acclaimed successor Stiff Upper Lip & Trousers To Match last year. With a couple of singles equally stirring the passions, the band has been a live spark in the European garage rock scene, though it is easy to expect Garage Punk For Boys being the trigger to a far more ferocious spotlight upon the inimitable uniqueness of The Mobbs.

The trio of vocalist/guitarist Joe B. Humbled, drummer Cheadle, and bassist The Bishop, who is making his recording debut with the band on the album, unleash an instantly grabbing eighteen second punk brawl through Gpfb to set GPFB-FRONT-COVERthings off, following it with the magnetic grooving of Get Your Hair Cut. Bass and guitar cast the first spicy lure on the second track, before snipping scissors unlock a feisty stomp littered with a wholly seductive bassline and similarly alluring hooks. Matching the devilment of the sounds, Humbled incites ears and imagination with his raw and unfussy delivery, a boisterous and infectious enticing to misbehave or conform depending how you want to take the exceptional track.

Its bewitching bounce is followed by the tangy presence of I Am the Anticlimax, clanging riffs an easy enslavement from the first breath. With The Bishop adding another delicious velvety tempting on the bass within the crisp rhythms of Cheadle, the track entwines beat and vintage punk rock, kind of like The Rockin’ Vickers meets Leyton Buzzards. Striding with attitude and sonic enterprise, the song is an instant anthem, as so much of the album, an almost concussive and certainly inescapable treat whipped up by scything guitar and punchy rhythmic enterprise, everything lorded over by the compelling tones of Humbled.

Do the Bishop! comes next and is just the wickedest instrumental baiting possible. The skills of The Bishop seduce and rumble throughout whilst Humbled’s guitar launches its own virulent seducing as Cheadle smashes anything in arms-length resourcefully. With a tang of blues sweetness to its epidemic waltz, the song sets up further hunger in the appetite for the album before making way for the melodic causticity and intriguing narrative of Demobbed. The track is primarily garage rock but at times you can almost swear there is an element of The Undertones in its slim but impossibly potent sonic endeavour.

The hungrily vivacious ride of the album is taken to another level with We Don’t Need a God, a brilliant furnace of searing grooves and greedy hooks ridden by the punk honesty of the vocals. It is pure addictiveness, every twist and tenacious slither of bait soaked in infectiousness and anthemic irreverence, leaving feet, body, and soul blissfully exhausted and thoughts rebellious. Imagine The Masonics flirting voraciously with The Adicts and you get not only the heart of the song but arguably of the whole release.

The title track is next, romping with ears and nostalgia through jabbing beats and jangly hooks, its title summing up song, sound, and the whole garage premise which fuelled punk and garage rock at their outsets. It also has thrilling melodic warmth to its gentle uprising, everything aligning for an irresistible rousing of pleasure, taken on again by the blink and you miss shortness of second instrumental Chicken Run. Its enticing strut is swiftly pushed aside by the exceptional sonic commentary of Where’s the Punk Rock!?, angst and fury as much a part of its gripping clang and garage punk fever as creative relish.

Photo 1   It is not exaggerating to say that every song on Garage Punk for Boys is devious rascality, all instinctively and simultaneously appealing to the styles it weaves its propositions from, One Erotic Thought another fine example with its sixties spawned beat infused garage rock tromp. As here, they all keep feet and limbs as busy as ears and imagination, and whilst thoughts may not be erotic as the song reveals of itself, they are nevertheless keen to indulge in knavish practices after each encounter.

Put It in Your Pipe clunks and swings in next, riffs bulky lures courted by compelling bass craft and vocal devilment, everything framed by precise and eagerly wicked beats. Stepping out with a punk seeded swagger, the track also wears the mischief breeding charm and adventure of King Salami and the Cumberland 3 and the aforementioned Billy Childish, drawing out more lust for the album from the passions.

The final stretch sees the blues rock induced R&B stamp of Just as Bad as You light up air and ears first before the exotic swing of Mk II immerses senses and imagination in a sultry dance of the seven salacious temptresses, well in my dreams anyway. Both songs leave appetite as greedy as ever whilst closing riot of Mad! is an aggressively spirited and ferociously contagious garage punk assault, and oh so scintillating.

It is impossible not to drool from start to finish over Garage Punk for Boys, a release which if anything from punk to garage rock, beat to flirty rock ‘n’ roll gets the juices flowing, is a must. The thing with The Mobbs is they not only create sensational stomps but do it with a presence and flavour like no other, this simply makes them one of the UKs seriously exciting and innovative bands.

Garage Punk for Boys is available digitally and on CD now via Cravat Records @ http://themobbsuk.bandcamp.com/album/garage-punk-for-boys

http://www.themobbs.co.uk/

RingMaster 21/11/2014

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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