Jargon Party – Self Titled

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The debut album from US band Jargon Party is an encounter which equally tests and tempts the senses, a proposition which concerns and spellbinds simultaneously. It is a release which maybe will not find a welcome with everybody though at its heart there is a seductive revelry and potency which refuses to relinquish its magnetic hold. The solo project and release of Zach Lewis, the album challenges and stimulates from start to finish, its sound heavily influenced by The Beatles and sixties pop whilst fusing plenty of invention and tasty flavours from indie to punk, surf to garage rock. Its biggest lure is the wonderful continuous drift of discord which soaks every aspect of the songs but its main and really only issue are the vocals of Lewis. Though successful at times his voice struggles with notes or vice versa, to defuse enough of the undoubted qualities of the songwriting and the generally thrilling sounds, something you can see putting many off before giving the release a chance. As it stands the album is an engaging and imagination feeding satisfaction but with a more accomplished singer it is easy to suggest the release would be stirring up passions and being talked about loudly.

Originally from Brooklyn and recently based on an Island off of Portland, Maine to record his new album, Lewis creates a lo-fi, garage feel to his sound which easily grabs ears and an healthy appetite. Jargon Party began around two years ago after Lewis moved to New York City aged 22 after years of playing in different live bands in Richmond, Virginia. The band was initially a six strong proposition before other projects and personal interests saw members leaving and the band dwindled down to a duo and subsequently just Lewis. A multi-instrumentalist, having learnt as many instruments as he could since a child, Lewis recorded his debut in his apartment and that of drummer Dave Charboneau who contributes to the album also. Released last year but still drawing in attention, as ours, the album parades openly the inspirations of the man, the likes of The Kinks, Arctic Monkeys, Of Montreal, Radiohead, Wolf Parade, and David Bowie adding to the loudest soak of the previously mentioned Liverpudlians.

Exploring ‘the ups and downs of life and love’, the album opens with Isabella a masterful romp of garage rock; sultry guitars entwining fab four like vocals whilst rhythms romp with a lively smile and mischievous suasion. The sixties lilt to the melodic stroll of the song and psyche teasing revelry to its touch makes an absorbing and exciting  start to the album, like a feisty mix of The Kingsmen, Thee Headcoats, and The Youth. Everything about the song is a contagious incitement bridging nostalgia and modern imagination to set the release and anticipation off in fine style. That heady expectation is soon well fed by the intriguing Internal Clock. The bass and guitar coax thoughts and emotions from the first second whilst delicious washes of discord providing unpredictable bait to devour eagerly. The effected wrapped vocals also add to the lure of the song, their touch shading the first signs that the vocals may be a weakness on the release. The wrong footing twang of the sonic designs continues to ignite a hunger towards the release, its confident and carefree provocation on ears and assumptions a very pleasing toxicity. With guest keys from Lydia Velichkovski adding to the mesmeric mayhem, Jargon Party keeps its initial grip firmly in place.

The following Lucy Melanie unveils a fifties rock ‘n’ roll swagger to its romp, vocals again cloaked in effects for the sixties pop bred dance though their hold on notes and harmonies begin to show signs of wear. Like the opener, the track slips easily through the ear musically offering garage rock seeded pop to breed very willing participation whilst the twists of discord and direction succeed with thoughts and satisfaction. The lo-fi, DIY touch of the production and recording also adds to the potency of this and all songs, its rawness hiding some of the sins and accentuating the nostalgia spawned voice of songs.

The smouldering croon of I Want to so Much embraces with appealing tempting, especially with the celestial twinkling of the keys though Lewis gives it too much to overcome with his delivery to match the previous tracks; it much the same with Surf Rock Anthem 7 though its opening provocation of dark moody basslines, crisp rhythms and punk guitar sets up an infectious incitement which persists across the whole of the undiluted garage punk dance.

The slow psychedelic pop of Giraffe fails to capture any real hold on the emotions, mainly because of those vocals again, though it takes corners and flavoursome turns which again shows the strong promise of Lewis and the project, whilst next up Under the Sun with its bluesy guitar flames and thick climactic melodic heat proves the enjoyable variety to the sounds bred in the album.

The release is completed by Will You Space Tonight and Sky Pilot, two tracks distinctly different to the others with further spatial investigation within psychedelically toned atmospheres and dream pop embraces. The first of the two is a decent enough flight whilst its successor thrills more with its evolving landscape which takes in scenery from progressive and psychedelic pop through to noise rock and eighties indie rock. It is a great end to a release which ultimately captivates with its excitable invention.

Vocally Lewis should reassess his options for greater success but musically Jargon Party, project and album, shows plenty to warrant being given proper attention.

https://www.facebook.com/JargonParty

http://jargonparty.bandcamp.com/album/jargon-party

7/10

RingMaster 04/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Teamsters – Play Along With…The Teamsters

Photo by Mark Shackleton ©

Photo by Mark Shackleton ©

    A blend of sixties pop, indie, beat rock, and punk rock sounds an intriguing concept just on paper alone but in the hands of a band like British rockers The Teamsters it emerges as a frighteningly compelling recipe. The proof comes with the North London hailing trio’s new EP Play Along With…The Teamsters, a four track riotous encounter which enslaves feet and emotions to do its devilish bidding. The release is a tremendous party of precise yet organically bred sounds driven by imagination and unbridled passion, a mix which transfers its energy and incitement easily into its recipient. Simply it is one of the most exciting introductions to come along over recent years.

    Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Tom H. Wing, drummer/vocalist Bret Bolton, and bassist David Peter Jorgensen for the EP, The Teamsters grabbed the attention of Hamburg based label Moody Monkey who leapt in to release their debut. Play Along With… needs only a few seconds to steal attention and maybe a minute to fully ignite imagination and passions. From start to finish it has a wealth of enterprise to satisfy and excite fans of punk, mod, R’n’B, garage rock and plenty more. It is an excitable and insatiable stomp but one with a control which ensures it has a simultaneously clean and raucous impact.

     Diggin´ An Early Grave starts things off with a hefty roll of drums triggering a stroll through dramatically jangling riffs, a 1607057_233699483469843_267368660_nswaggering bassline, and instantly enticing vocals. The track dances across the senses with an unrelenting spring to its keen gait and near on wanton adventure to its guitar sculpted persuasion. There is a familiarity to the song too bringing forward the catchiness of sixties pop but just as strongly the track holds a modern raw causticity which only intensifies the stirring prowess of the song.

   From the excellent start, the similarly impressive Girl (How Could Ya?) takes things up a notch, its initial stabbing rhythms and guitar scythes an immediate incendiary fire for body and emotions. Like its predecessor the song has a contagiousness which flirts with the senses like a brewing epidemic, stroking and imposing upon them through two minutes of sixties beat meets rock pop, in a way like the Kinks meets Supergrass.

    The second half of the EP is even more invigorating and emotionally inflammatory. Don´t Come Back Home leaps at the ears with beats and guitars creating a magnetic web of lustful endeavour ridden by the vocals and harmonies. It is a spicy ball of voracious energy and senses searing sonic rowdiness bound to a tempest of flailing rebellion and eye balling contention. As mighty as it is, the track is surpassed by the closing A Girl Named Linda, the best song on the release. Imagine the R&B revelry of Bo Diddley in league with the garage punk rascality of The Hives aligned to that of Thee Exciters. Add a little Rocket From The Crypt in there and you edge even closer to the unique romp but still leave plenty of ingenious adventure to be imagined and discovered in song and ultimately the EP.

     Ensuring feet never have a moment to relax or emotions to settle into mere appreciation for its scintillating celebration the track is an irresistible infection on psyche and passions, a final triumph of a sensational debut. Expect to hear a lot more of and from The Teamsters, as shown by Play Along With…The Teamsters, one of the most exciting and ridiculously addictive bands to emerge so far this decade.

https://www.facebook.com/TeamstersMusic

10/10

RingMaster 18/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Teamsters – Digging An Early Grave

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The Thanes – Dishin’ The Dirt

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     We always have a healthy appetite for raw and fuzz bred sounds here and they do not come any more appealing than Dishin’ The Dirt, the new single from Scottish garage rock pioneers The Thanes. Consisting of two tracks which simply snarl at and rile up against the senses whilst treating them to a tasty blend of sonic acidity and melodic rapaciousness, the single is an infection soaked romp which ignites passions and commands feet.

    The Thanes began in 1980 under the name The Green Telescope. From day one their sound was sixties reaped, a seeding which has never faltered as the band created and expanded their distinctive sound. The band name changed to The Thanes (of Cawdor) in 1986 with their debut album, self-titled with the new moniker, arising a year later. Its success led to the Edinburgh quartet starting to support and play with the likes of The Soup Dragons, Primal Scream, The Remains, The Sonics, and ? & the Mysterians across the following years. With numerous well-received releases, including another three albums, uncaged over the past decades, the line-up of vocalist/lead guitarist Lenny Helsing, bassist Mark Hunter, drummer Mike Goodwin, and guitarist/organist Angus McPake, recently entered the studio to lay down two new songs, tracks making up the new Dirty Water Records release.

    Dishin’ The Dirt is an instant temptation of provocative beats and the delicious organ sound which always provides the heart of the band’s endeavours. As the deep velvety presence of the bass enters the scene soon followed by the eager tease of guitar, the song takes a tight and colourful grip on the imagination, a hold only strengthened with the nasally expressive tones of Helsing. There is a belligerence and disdain to his delivery, an attitude which sparks against the melodic enterprise but equally fuels its immersive fingers. The track is soon well under the skin, infecting the passions with its flaming waltz.

    The excellent provocation is quickly matched by second song I Don’t Want You. The track is the cover of the classic stomp recorded by The Anteeks and Traffic Jam (who became Status Quo). The song stalks the senses with energy and mischief within a sturdy framework to provide another exciting and inciting proposition. It perfectly shows the sixties passions of The Thranes brought through with a feisty and fuzz clad modern vivaciousness.

     Dishin’ The Dirt is a mouthwatering and richly satisfying slice of garage rock which reminds with ease that The Thranes is still an encounter to lead the genre to new inspirational benchmarks. They may be in their third decade but the fire inside still burns rather voraciously it seems.

https://myspace.com/thethanes

8.5/10

RingMaster 18/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Thanes: Dishin’ The Dirt/I Don’t Want You

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The Youth – Fancy You

 

The Youth

    Merging a raw and hungry sound with an assured swagger, Danish band The Youth provides one of those refreshing adventures which merges nostalgia and modern endeavour into a one vivacious party. Crafting beat music with a fired up appetite to stomp all over the senses, the Copenhagen quartet thrusts eagerly and appealing through the ears with new single Fancy You. The two track release is a magnetic and contagious slice of energetic revelry, an engagingly abrasive seduction which infects feet and imagination with insatiable ease.

    Formed in 2012 by guitarists Jesper Jensen and Lasse Tarp, bassist David Peter Jørgensen, and drummer Sune Christian Thomsen, The Youth emerged from the quartet’s mutual passion for blues, garage punk, R’n’B and beat music. Their live performances and thrashy sound has seen the band a hot proposition not only in their own shows but across a wealth of festivals and clubs taking in England, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Norway, Italy, and Spain. With their debut album on the horizon, the band impressively teases and tempts before it’s uncaging, with the limited edition 7” single Fancy You.

     The lead song leaps from a countdown into a hip swerving body of flaming acidic melodies and crisp rhythms aligned to a The Youth - Fancy You coverthrobbing throaty bassline. It is an instant infection which envelops senses and thoughts, enslaving them ready for the expressive vocals. As the guitars dance around the ears, twisting their hunger into an almost rapturous greed, the song continues to prowl and bounce with a fevered energy and unpolished touch. It is the groove from which everything hangs though that provides the richest enticement, a call equalled in potency by another similar sculpted by the bass. At times Fancy You raises essences of The Fuzztones and The Yardbirds within the inspiring sound but only as whispers in something individual to The Youth.

   The release is completed by Your Love, a similarly bred track but one with a sturdier punch to its rhythmic stomping and a hotter surface to its melodic causticity. The vocals as in the first impress, singularly and as a dual suasion, whilst the guitar craft is a maze of sonic tendrils which tease and intrigue as much as they excite. At not much more than two minutes in length it departs far too early for the only moan, but still reassures and confirms that The Youth is a band that anyone with a taste for beat music, garage rock, and sixties punk needs to pay close attention to.

     Fancy You also ensures that anticipation for the band’s upcoming debut album, on Dirty Water Records, is going to be eager and impatient, though the single provides plenty of fun and pleasure to fill the time and pull in more enthused hearts.

https://www.facebook.com/youthdk

8.5/10

RingMaster 18/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Clouder- Sister Raygun

 

Clouder

     It is fair to say that 2013 was a big year for the re-emerging Clouder, the US band finding a spark to reignite their appetite and adventure after a hiatus which left the future of the band in doubt. With the release of their second album Sister Raygun, they and we can expect this year to not only follow the last in success but push the band into greater wider spotlights. Pulsating and brawling with the band’s unique mix of garage and psyche rock driven by punk/power pop energy, the band‘s new release offers a tantalising bait which is contagiously irresistible and irrepressibly belligerent, a glorious mix in the hands of sonic devils like Clouder.

        The Brooklyn quintet took little time to provoke passions from their coming together in 2011, playing over 100 shows around New York City in their first year building and earning a reputation for their fiery live performances. Debut album Freakin’ Out the Squares was uncaged the following year, again to strong praise and reactions from fans and media alike. Then came the eight month hiatus full of personal trials and tribulations for some members which almost brought the band to an end and saw vocalist Eric Gilstrap move to North Carolina. Thankfully the band resumed to writing new songs and spending months sending back and forth rough demos to each other as a new release became flesh. Uniting with producer Jeff Berner (Psychic TV, Heliotropes, Dead Stars) in his Brooklyn studio, the band emerged with Sister Raygun, a release which worries, solicits, and pleasures the imagination like a demonic temptress.

     Released via Fleeting Youth Records, Sister Raygun lays an initial stroke of guitar upon the ear as opener Dancing in the Album CoverProving Grounds moves into view. Its reserved first touch is aided by a rhythmic tempting before the band explodes into a potent stomp of guitar sculpted enterprise guided by the distinct cause yet magnetic vocal tones of Gilstrap. With a sixties punk throat to the voice of the guitars and a raw edge to the sonic suasion, the track provides an enticing entrance into the release, a compelling doorway which is impossible to resist crossing the threshold of.

    The following Lost in Reverie equally shows no restraint in opening up its broad rhythmic shoulders and energetic stroll. There is a swagger to the song from the off, one which soon welcomes the darker delivery of Gilstrap within the acidic invention of guitarists Steve Spinella and Matt Revie. Into its dramatic stride with further deliciously teasing imagination from the guitars and a moody tempting from bassist Max Goransson, the song intimidates and seduces with equal potency. The sound of Clouder is certainly distinct to themselves but imagine a mix of Damn Vandals and early The Horrors with at times the irreverence and haunting howls of Pil and you get an inkling of the menace and beauty on offer.

    The excellent feisty pop call of Lady Retrograde unveils an infectious vivacity and magnetic garage rock canter to continue the impressive and appetite raising stomp of the album, whilst its successors Psychic Cities and The Ballad of Sister Raygun provide further individual bait to bring a greedy hunger to. The first of the pair rides in on another highly persuasive enslaving of the emotions by drummer Jim Wood, his thumping rolling rhythms the prelude to a melancholic but lively web of melodic and sonic endeavour beneath the John Lydon reminding effect wrapped vocals of Gilstrap. There is a mystique and scuzziness to the track which equally lures in the imagination, a psychotic edge which only accentuates the bait of the song whilst its successor slowly walks openly and hauntingly through a shadowed inventive balladry, both songs leaving a lingering inventive suasion.

    Phantom Girl unleashes a new level of addiction forging contagion next, the punk bred garage rocker brewing up essences of past decades into a politely dirty schizophrenic drama. Again The Horrors meets Pil come to mind within the fresh and original character of the sonic storm with just a touch of Spizzenergi to the vocal squall and insatiable hooks. Its glory is swiftly succeeded by All the Royal Years Are Gone, another unpolished treat of dirt clad rock ‘n’ roll with the snarl and honesty to antagonise and ignite the senses.

   The mesmeric black toned Damaged Sun comes next, its sonic acridity aligned to a shadow spawned, discord filtered atmosphere. There is a Mary & Jesus Chain glaze to the track whilst an Inspiral Carpets/Birdland blend seems to infect the melodic and vocal traits of the song; a feel which less openly also spices up the transfixing and enthralling Western Wastelands. Though neither song stands out as forcibly as others on Sister Raygun both engage and satisfy thoroughly though they are not helped by standing right next to the brilliant overpowering closing song, Doldrums. Armed with a groove which simply steals attention and passions from its opening lure upon the ears, the track romps and commands with a swagger and relish that cannot fail to overwhelm the imagination like an epidemic, the repetitive hook an irresistible focus of all the craft and energy at play within band and song.

     Sister Raygun is one of those shot in the arm releases which may not come to be called a classic but has the ability to inspire a genre to explore itself further, though Clouder will be during that anyway if they can hopefully avoid any more breaks in their conquering of garage and psyche rock.

www.facebook.com/ClouderNY

http://fleetingyouthrecords.bandcamp.com/album/clouder-sister-raygun

9/10

RingMaster 05/03/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Passenger Peru- Self Titled

     Passenger Peru

    Startlingly immersive with the craft and ability to turn the listener into a castaway lost in an expansive seduction of suggestive pop majesty within a dreamy soundscape in its rawest breath, the debut album from Passenger Peru is an experience you cannot help licking your lips over before each and every encounter. It is a mouthwatering collection of warm and elegant persuasions bred in an exploration which is bold and bravely adventurous. The self-titled album is as mentioned pop in its rawest most potent form but with an inspiring scourge of creative devilry and melodic mesmerism twisted into a hypnotic and at times wonderfully demonic dance.

    Passenger Peru comes from the creative minds and passions of Justin Stivers (vocals, guitar, bass, synth, drums, drum machines) and Justin Gonzales (vocals, guitar, synth, piano, samples), the former one time bassist with The Antlers for their Hospice album. The seeds for the Brooklyn based project are said to have started four years ago when the two musicians met and evolved into the Stivers led band Pet Ghost Project. A year in preparation, Passenger Peru is mouthwatering sonic scenery composed into something unique from essences of garage rock and shoegaze, psychedelic, alternative rock and more. With plenty of peaks and very minimal lows, if any at all, the lo-fi, hi-quality flight is raucous spellbinding pop brought in its most primal and beauteous magnificence.

     The album immediately takes the listener to a scintillating pinnacle with its opening pair of songs, a height the album never passperucoverquite emulates again though it thrills consistently trying. First song Your Hunger emerges from a cinematic melodic swoon and following studio doodling launches one of the most exciting and impressively tempting starts to a song heard in a long time. Guitar and bass instantly secure the fullest attention as they virtually gnaw on the ears with the latter offering an almost carnivorous tone to its dark enticement. With mutually attractive rhythmic teasing alongside, the rapacious sound conjured by the pair continue to coax and lure in the strongest lustful reaction and hunger, a post punk essence bringing thoughts of Joy Division and Gang Of Four to mind prowling the imagination whilst framing the excellent mellow and soothing vocals. It is delicious mix with sinister spirals of cold sound amid glorious flames of melodic tenderness colliding and uniting for a quite stunning provocation. Complete with an irresistible repetitious gait to bass and rhythms alongside a quite saucy groove which also hardly veers from its prime intent, the song sets the highest plateau for the album to keep up.

    In the Absence of Snow steps up next to stroll that pedestal with ease, its opening acoustically sculpted guitar tantalising and the again snarling throaty bass tempting exceptionally addictive and successful in igniting even greater rapture in the imagination and emotions. Best described as the Jesus and Mary Chain meets House Of Love whilst the revelry of Ok Go! is at play, the bait laid down for the ears and emotions to partake in, is again virulently impossible to refuse or not find a greedy need for. Rock pop at its finest with a fiery solo and another spine of repetition kissed captivation, the track continues the album’s unassailable submission of the passions. With an impressive lyrical craft and insight also at work, which admittedly comes second best to the sound in attention taking over the first couple of plays, Passenger Peru at this point has already ignited an ardour which only a total car crash of a remaining body of songs could deflate.

    Pollen Season takes no time in showing no such disaster is on the cards though as mentioned before, the album never treads the same lofty levels again. To put that into context though the following tracks prey on and build their own benchmark which most bands would swap their grannies for, the third song on the release a beguiling proposition of organic beauty around once more a bass treat you can only enthuse over with a tendency to drool, and a percussive enterprise which does not steal focus but would leave a major whole with its absence. Seriously magnetic, the song departs the now raging appetite for the album for the epidemically engaging pop absorptions of Tiger Lilly and Heavy Drugs to take over. The first of the two has a swagger and melodic grin which teases and charms but an equally solicitous sonic and rhythmic bruising to its latter swing whilst the second is a sultry summer breeze of radiant melodies within an increasingly dark and unsettling premise.

     The second half of the album starts with Weak Numbers, again a track which ensnares thoughts and appreciation but marks a slightly less potent stretch for the album. The front five tracks leave the latter quintet in their shadow though once more in a context where Passenger Peru is on another realm with their artistry at the start of the album and a still immensely impressive level thereafter. A gentle and smouldering embrace, the song is a melancholic incitement with celestial elegance aligned to a tempestuous but contained emotive brawl. It is a transfixing companion immediately supported by the exotically imagined Memory Garden and the enthralling, intensive fascination of Health System, a song which merges heavy and light melodic and intimidating textures into a weave of emotion entangling beauty with XTC like alchemy.

     The new single from the album Dirt Nap comes next, emerging with a slight Celtic lilt to its sonic beckoning before a predominately acoustic caressing ensues with a sense of The Wonder Stuff to its snare. Initially thoughts were not over excited by the song but over time it works its way under the skin to seduce though personally not the right choice as the single to lure people into the outstanding album, a record holding back another major treat for its closing offering. Life and Death of a Band is a rowdy and antagonistic romp but equally a ridiculously endearing and alluring temptress from a maelstrom of invention and creative intrigue and a quite brilliant finale to a breath-taking slab of pop excellence.

    Passenger Peru will be massive at some point with all the evidence resting and burning away in their debut, a journey as unique and awe inspiring as their name hints at.

http://www.passengerperuband.com/

http://passengerperu.bandcamp.com/

9/10

RingMaster 05/02/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Pink Mexico – Pnik Mxeico

Pink Mexico

More magnetic than Charlize Theron skinny dipping and as radiantly shimmering as the waters lapping around the lady’s body, Pnik Mxeico the debut album from Pink Mexico is simply an enthralling sonic glaze upon the senses. A vibrant brew of garage rock and indie pop with healthy essences of grunge, punk, and shoegaze kissed alternative rock, the release is a seductive hug which refreshes the senses and awakens the passions. It falls short of being a classic debut but hits the target dead centre with a thrilling and imagination igniting presence which tantalises and caresses with passion and adventure.

Pink Mexico is the solo project of former Anything But Animals drummer/vocalist Robert Preston, though recently and post album the band has grown in number with the addition of John Chambers. Attempting to “individually capture the sound he had been eager to achieve since pre-puberty”, Preston entered a Brooklyn ‘booze-drenched party basement studio’ with producer/musician Jon Granoff who engineered and mixed the subsequent recordings to emerge as Pnik Mxeico. Self-released by the Los Angeles hailing Preston earlier this year the album now gets its re-appearance through Fleeting Youth Records to charm all those who missed its first sonic caress of the world.

The album opens with Seabird and a sweet haranguing of riffs under soaring falsetto led vocals from Preston. Like a delicious mix of My Bloody Valentine, Jesus and Mary Chain, and Jane’s Addiction with loud whispers of Jan and Dean plus the Strokes, the song immediately taunts the passions to come out and play, which they do with eagerness as the song romps on with a scuzz lilted breath and riveting imagination. There is a familiarity to the song which subsequently pervades the whole release; a feeling of a previously met friend adorned with new melodic and sonic endeavour. The track is garage punk at its most contagious and diverse, a cloak of persuasion the following A Head Full of Slime is as happy with and as inventive in using. With a smaller stride than the opener but just as keen in its appetite to please, the song roams the senses with a mischievous air and vocal attraction which is irresistible.

Both Daisyface and Shrub Fuse continue the impressive start, the first parading a Nirvana like groove from the guitar aside effect clad, harmony kissed vocals and an anthemic rhythmic coaxing whilst the second adds extra garage punk causticity and a rhythmic battering to its sultry stomp of punk pop and shoegaze unity. With teasing keys adding extra devilry and temptation, the song romps with an elegant rabidity recruiting just as hungry reception from ears and heart. By this point on the album though all tracks have individual characters and presences there is a similarly bred and cast essence to their suasion which asks for that extra focus at times which songs and album undoubtedly reward richly for the effort with a full infectiousness to bask in.

The likes of Paperclip Toothpick with its smouldering heat and emotion, and the grunge spawned senses grazing Mold continue the album’s addiction sculpting lure, both almost insidious in their tempting suggesting the devil’s hand or promised souls are involved whilst Hussy Woofer parades a sixties pop flavouring which is often hinted at in previous tracks but has a full flame going here to again excite and inspire the imagination. Thoughts of a union of 13th Floor Elevators and the Everly Brothers comes to mind as the song dances rigorously within the ears as well as at times Black Rebel Motorcycle Club but for all the references sparked, Pink Mexico has a sound which stands uniquely to the band.

The closing acoustic and vocal kiss on the ear Not Alone brings the outstanding release to a potent close, its melodic caressing mesmeric and provocative. Pnik Mxeico is a luscious express of vocal and musical beauty with a raw breath and caustic edge which simply seduces the passions. Simply a must investigate release to end the year.

http://www.pinkmexico.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/flamingpinkmexico/

9/10

RingMaster 18/12/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Monster Jaw – Get A Tattoo EP

Monster Jaw  @ Neil Chapman (www.unholyracket.co.uk).jpg

Monster Jaw @ Neil Chapman (www.unholyracket.co.uk).jpg

Three tracks of scuzz kissed, punk bred garage rock, Get A Tattoo is a thoroughly captivating introduction to its creators Monster Jaw, a trio hailing from Leeds and Bradford. The band since forming has already been brewing a keen buzz around themselves and it is not hard to see why using their debut EP as evidence. Drenched in promise and an intriguing raw pleasure, the UK band have made an impressive and tempting start to what suspicions suggest will be a potent ascent through UK indie rock.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Mik Davis (ex-New York Alcoholic Anxiety Attack), bassist Neil Short (ex- Down the Machine), and drummer John Bradford (ex-Utopian Love Revival), and formed in February of this year, Monster Jaw soon found themselves under attention for their live performances and mix of grunge, indie, and punk rock. Since announcing their arrival the trio has supported Stiff Little Fingers and New Model Army on their UK tours as well as having a track from the EP recently featured on the BBC Introducing Alan Raw Show. The release of Get A Tattoo takes it all up another gear as the Wes Maybe (The Libertines, Roger Waters, Robert Plant) produced EP produces a potential spark to a much fuller recognition.

Get A Tattoo opens with its title track, a smouldering enticement which takes time to burn its lingering mark but leaves an 1405_214930308680679_340717591_nappetite for its almost caustic charm. From a coaxing electronic whisper the guitar starts winding out its sonic bait around the ear as rhythms slowly walk the perimeter of the emerging design. A prowling encounter with Davis’ falsetto touched vocals a simmering lure, The Barracudas meets The Libertines with an infusion of The Boo Bradleys like track does not ignite major flames within its presence or the passions but certainly makes an infection leaden starter to a release which only gets stronger as it unveils its other two thirds.

We Don’t Care About Anything is the next to strike and makes an instant recruitment of the imagination and emotions. With striding rhythms guiding the song as the bass of Short stomps its own path through the garage punk bred adventure, a contagion is soon rioting with the passions as choppy riffs tease the ears whilst sonic enterprise strokes them with tempered rascality, the distinctive croon of Davis melting over the stirring concoction. Not reaching two minutes in length, the track is a simple but gripping romp of punk rock designed to enslave.

The closing Summer Girl is nagging at the senses with its persistent riffs from its first breath whilst the bass intimidatingly roams the intrigue being woven over thoughts. The open Pixies like enticement is accentuated by the great vocal mix, Davis leading with a dour hypnotic delivery whilst harmonies add their appealing vibrancy light the shadows and dance with the melodic hook which like the riffs has a repetitive toxicity which is quite delicious. The best song of the three, it brings an exciting release to a thrilling close.

Whether the production fully exploits the depths and temptress like potency of the songs can be debated, only the last really striking a flint to enflame the passions as all the songs deserve, but Get A Tattoo is fuelled by a potential which is mouth-watering and surely will be furthered and fully realised over future time and releases. Anticipation for that is already clouded with impatience.

https://www.facebook.com/MonsterJawOfficial

8/10

RingMaster 13/12/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Vitamins – El Santo Vs. Los Vitaminas / Look After Me

The Vitamins pic

With the release of debut single Keys To The Limousine, UK rockers The Vitamins introduced themselves in fine style and as one rather boisterously potent emerging force. The two track release was an eager and feisty blaze of primal rock ‘n’ roll, a pair of songs which brewed a heady exciting mix of blues, garage rock, and muscle. Proving it was no flash in the pan the Bury St. Edmunds trio return with the AA sided single El Santo Vs. Los Vitaminas / Look After Me, a pair of riots sure to accelerate the growing fanbase seeded by its predecessor.

Formed in 2011 and consisting of vocalist/guitarist Dick Phillips, bassist Ollie Swift, and drummer Neil Baldwin, The Vitamins continue their enterprising arrival on British rock with another couple of heavyweight and flame driven sonic endeavours. The 

644114_474853499280476_448366875_nsingle takes little prompting to seize ears and attention as El Santo Vs. Los Vitaminas flies at the imagination with its Mexican wrestling tale and challenge, the bruising intensive bass of Swift instantly pressurising the senses alongside the coarse and acidic riffs of Phillips. It is an incendiary engagement from the first note spiked by the punchy raps of Baldwin which has little difficulty in exciting ears and emotions. The vocals of Phillips backed by great band garage punk harmonies are as equally discord and scuzz coated as the sounds around them , the result a song which has a Stooges like punk blaze to its breath and Led Zeppelin seeded sinew to its hunger.

Look After Me is a different beast from the same inventive litter of thought and intent. It opens with a stomping keys crafted incitement soon joined by a glorious glam rock like burst of guitar. It offers a seventies rock spice which lingers throughout the track as the vocals jog keenly with their narrative and persistent rhythms forge an almost metronomic heartbeat and lure for the song. The guitar of Phillips also fires up its imagination across the expanding stroll of the song whilst the ridiculously infectious presence of the track provides slavery for the passions. It is a delicious stomp of pop rock and blues kissed garage punk and the best thing the band has conjured yet.

You sense there is no stopping The Vitamins as both El Santo Vs. Los Vitaminas and Look After Me make a compelling and irresistible persuasion and that it is just the appetiser to greater things ahead. Anticipation is already breeding impatience…

http://www.thevitaminsband.co.uk

9/10

RingMaster 21/11/2013

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The Creeping Ivies – What Would Joey Ramone Do? /Ramona Wolf

The Creeping Ivies

Continuing to provide a raw pleasure and sound which no-one else seems able to come near, Scottish garage rockers The Creeping Ivies unleash their next seductive persuasion with the double-A-sided single What Would Joey Ramone Do?/Ramona Wolf. The duo from Dundee of vocalist/guitarist Becca Bomb and drummer Duncan Destruction create a brew seeded in fifties rock ‘n’ roll, sixties garage rock, and seventies punk which they force through a scuzz lined filter of noise rock to make one of the most challenging and refreshing encounters around. This alchemy has already recruited a legion of ardour driven fans through the Ghost Train EP and debut album Stay Wild, and with the ever evolving sound and potency found on the new single The Creeping Ivies has set another deliciously scarring marker and plateau for themselves to erupt from.

What Would Joey Ramone Do? is an irresistible conjuration of Gene Vincent, The Ramones, and The Cramps with Becca a2278793946_2producing her finest Wanda Jackson strength and charm. Her guitar strokes equally spark an always eager appetite for the band into the usual hungry reaction, a want increased by her raw Cochran/ Poison Ivy Rorschach like guitar sound which rubs the senses and emotions into a delirious expulsion of emotions whilst the crisp thumping beats of Duncan lead the body into a kinetic dance. The groove of the song is out of the Road To Ruin songbook but with its caustic kisses and sonic intrusiveness it is a temptation unique to the pair.

Second song Ramona Wolf emerges from a sonic lure, its beckoning leading the ears into a glorious wall of acidic riffs, even paced punchy rhythms, and a cavernous atmosphere speared by an intermittent senses scrubbing causticity of guitar. The vocals of Becca ride the sound with the skill and toxicity of a temptress, a sorceress like enchantment washing every syllable expelled through the chilled ambience of the song. The encounter is a bewitching soundtrack to the sirenesque call of a devil witch from outer space, well the narrative to another ridiculously addictive song from The Creeping Ivies but that is pretty much the same thing right?

The Creeping Ivies just get better and better as What Would Joey Ramone Do? and Ramona Wolf both show and with the band’s second album Ghost World expected early next year anticipation and excitement are already showing some impatience in the wait.

http://thecreepingivies.com/

10/10

RingMaster 14/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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