Strings Of Atlas – In A Better World EP

Atlas and his Nova_RingMaster Review

Strings Of Atlas is a “psychedelic urban punk band”, a labelling which presumably comes from either the band or someone pushing them and their new encounter, In A Better World EP. It is a tag which sort of fits and does not, but one label that does is simply that the El Paso bred Strings Of Atlas is one mighty fine rock ‘n’ roll incitement. The band’s sixth studio and latest offering is our introduction to the duo of singer/songwriter Atlas Cage (vocals, guitar, bass, drums) and former Archetyped bassist Ed C., and the first feeling, after being gripped by strong enjoyment, is that we have been missing out. Consisting of five tracks which whip up attention and appetite with increasing success, the EP is a thumping treat of an encounter. Not one to re-invent the boundaries of rock music but certainly one to give it a new tasty prod.

Since forming, Strings of Atlas has opened for such artists as Nick McGalis and Guitar Slim, whilst their music has graced a trio of short films and the soundtrack of the movie, The Edison Bomb. As mentioned and according to the press release for the EP, In A Better World is release number six from the band and for us potentially the one to awaken a new broad spotlight upon their stirring sound.

Strings Of Atlas - In A Better World Album Cover_RingMaster Review     The EP opens with Burning Days and a spicy web of grooves aligned to punchy beats. It is a strongly alluring start which hits another level once the striking tones of Cage join the affair. His voice reminds of Dicky Barrett from The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, and once it unites with the already potent sounds brewing up in the song, a nice whiff of Rocket From the Crypt emerges. It is an essence which only gets stronger within subsequent songs on the EP. His guitar play is just as magnetic too, riffs and hooks laying down nothing particularly spectacular yet everything comes with a craft and instinct to it which is virulently infectious. The song continues to get feet and imagination involved before making way for its equally potent successor.

The second song is the EP’s title track, and like the first it grabs instant focus, this time with a sultry blues toned coaxing complete with soulful melodies and vocal persuasion. The song’s steady and enticing stroll continues to smoulder and sizzle, and though it does not have the imposing snap of its predecessor, the track is one lingering slice of fiery enterprise.

As strong as its first two tracks are though, In A Better World kicks up another gear from The Way You Don’t Love on. The third proposal is an incendiary slab of garage and melodic rock, that RFTC whisper entwining with a great sixties spicing springing thoughts of bands like The Kinks and The Who to mind. Loaded with an additional snarl and a breed of punkish attitude which can only give an extra spark to any rock ‘n’ roll stomp, the song perfectly hits the spot, though as it outshines the previous song it is in turn eclipsed by the following Odyssey. The feisty stomp is glorious, a cauldron of rebellious riffs and rhythms wrapped in a gripping mesh of guitar and bass tenacity, each casting contagious hooks and a predacious air. Again vocally Cage has full attention, stirring things up as potently as the sounds around him with the result one outstanding rock roar.

The release is concluded by A Light In The Dark, a rousing and tantalising seduction of psych rock and melodic punk, again predominantly recalling The Mighty Mighty Bosstones and Rocket From the Crypt whilst sculpting its own distinct and irresistible romp of anthemic rock ‘n’ roll.

Co-Produced by Charles Godfrey, In A Better World sets the wheels in motion for a far keener and expansion spotlight on the band. Strings Of Atlas have certainly now caught and chained our attention and it is hard to imagine us being a lone new recruit to this potential drenched and thoroughly enjoyable band.

The In A Better World EP is available now on Amazon and iTunes or @ http://www.stringsofatlas.com/music

https://www.facebook.com/stringsofatlas

RingMaster 17/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Horse Party – What I’d Do

 

 

by Kate Wood June 2015

by Kate Wood June 2015

As well as so far impressing with every release, UK alternative rockers Horse Party have also managed to bring hefty elements of surprise as their dark sound and song writing evolves. The band’s 2014 Integrity Records released debut album Cover Your Eyes especially came stocked with unpredictable and riveting adventure, qualities emulated and twisted yet again by the Out Of Sight​/​Receiver single last December. True to form, the Bury St Edmunds has again whipped up a fresh blend and imagination to their music with new single What I’d Do, and again there is no surprise it leaves ears and imagination enthralled.

The trio of drummer Shannon Hope and vocalists/guitarists Ellie Langley and Seymour Quigley, emerged in 2012 and through singles, EPs, and of course album, have earned a strong reputation and increasingly acclaimed stature in the British underground rock scene. Fan, media, and radio attention has followed suit in growing and blossoming greater attention upon Horse Party and for regulars and newcomers alike, it is easy to see why their bluesy, often melancholic, and perpetually gripping creative adventures just capture the imagination and emotions.

Fair to say that Out Of Sight/Receiver was Horse Party’s finest moment to date, a release even managing in many ways to outshine the band’s outstanding album. It impacted that much we wondered whether the band had peaked and would struggle to match the dark majesty of the release but What I’d Do soon addresses any thoughts. Its two tracks certainly do not leave the previous encounter in the shade but with their own unique character and new whiff of flavours, they boldly stand side by side in lighting ears and sparking new hunger for the band’s hypnotic sonic devilry.

What I'd Do cover_RingMaster Review    What I’d Do comes first, strolling in on dark riffs and crisp beats with shadows dripping off the former and scything resonance spinning from the latter. The sultry tones of Langley swiftly add her distinct temptation but though the song is still as dark and invitingly solemn as ever, there is a more melodic rock toning to it and the guitars enterprise. At times the song casts its spell on attention with a Forever Still meets Stevie Nicks like persuasion and though it is not a major shift in sound from say the last single, What I’d Do comes with a more relaxed and less agitated countenance. The spikier, more discordant elements of the Horse Party sound are always greedily devoured here but with the same kind of ease, the melodic roundedness of this track slips through ears and into a hungry appetite for its mellower though no less provocatively dramatic presence.

The following Horizons sees Quigley take the vocal lead, his expressive tones filling the darker climate of the song whilst the ever enticing and incendiary rhythms of Hope guide and framing the encounter with skilled prowess. The track from another reserved landscape begins brewing an increasingly volatile breath until eventually exploding in a blaze of raw guitar and melodic intensity. Though returning to its more restrained saunter, the song has already taken a new magnetic turn proceeding to twist and writhe with invention and vocal resourcefulness. Unexpectedly an essence of The Housemartins comes to mind at times early on though across its fluid landscape, Horse Party creates bracing roars and intimate caresses wrapped in dark emotion and ferocious imagination.

What I’d Do and its companion prove once again that Horse Party is one of the most invigorating and original lights in British rock ‘n’ roll; how they are not a household name yet is baffling.

What I’d Do is available now as a free download @ http://horsepartyparty.bandcamp.com/album/what-id-do-horizons

Upcoming Horse Party Live Dates:

Fri 17th July – SAWLEY (Lancs) Beat-Herder Festival

w/Levellers & Basement Jaxx

Sat 8th August – NORWICH Owl Sanctuary

Sat 22nd August – CAMBRIDGE Junction

Fri 28th August – BURY ST EDMUNDS Homegrown Festival

https://www.facebook.com/horsepartyparty

RingMaster 13/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

A Billion Lions – Doomsday Babies

BILLION LIONS PROMO PIC1_RingMaster Review

You assume all bands unleash their best and most potent song on ears for their debut single, uncage their most virulently attractive proposal to whip up attention and appetites. The following question is always can they back it up next time. Well that query offered has been dynamically answered when it comes to British band A Billion Lions. Earlier this year, they exploded on the imagination with Torquay, a song which with contagious ease provided of one of the year’s most invigorating singles so far. Now they return with its successor Doomsday Babies, a just as fiery and tenacious riot of pop rock which sizzles on the senses and explodes in the passions. If their first single lit the fuse to inescapable attraction, prepare to have lustful thoughts with their second.

Formed in 2012, the Leeds/Bradford hailing A Billion Lions soon had the local scene to their feet with their ferociously energetic rock ‘n’ roll. A pair of demo recordings, On My Lover and I’m Free, began an introduction for the band to broader fields via YouTube, that potent tempting backed by an increasingly acclaimed live presence. This led to End Of The Trail Records paying attention and a subsequent link up between label and band, and in due course the release of the acclaimed Torquay and now Doomsday Babies. The former lured strong media and radio attention, as well as a flood of new fans, and it is hard to see any reason why their newest offering cannot emulate and push further that kind of success.

artworks-A Billion Lions - Doomsday Babies_RingMaster ReviewDoomsday Babies opens on a bait of drum persuasion which alone awakes ears with a licking of lips, the brief and singular but potent lure soon joined by sonic caresses and a moody bassline, all courted by an instinctively suggestive hook. It is a masterfully magnetic start which discovers new fiery energy and a melodic haze as again thoroughly impressive and enjoyable vocals come in. Vocally the band is as energetic and resourceful in igniting ears and imagination as anything but within the just as rousing sounds they seem to gain extra angst and zeal. The layers of the song, as its predecessor, reveal twists of garage rock, punk, pop, and numerous more spicy flavours, all woven and honed into something distinct and individual to A Billion Lions, though at times there is a feel of My Red Cell to the track; a positive in anyone’s book we would suggest.

A Billion Lions have not only followed up their tremendous opening song with one of matching quality and thrills but Doomsday Babies reveals just a little more to what seems to be an increasingly expansive sound and imagination. Ahead of debut album Let It Happen which is scheduled for September, Doomsday Babies makes the perfect teaser whilst A Billion Lions simply reinforce themselves one of the exciting new breaths in UK rock.

Doomsday Babies is available from July 13th via End Of The Trail Records.

https://www.facebook.com/billionlions   https://twitter.com/ABillionLions

RingMaster 13/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Night Dials – I’ve Done More Things/I’ll Sleep When I Die

Picture 55_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

From psych to garage rock, beat to pop; all the flavours of sixties rock ‘n’ roll are woven into the blend of nostalgia and modern invention crafted by UK band Night Dials and makes their debut single one feistily captivating proposition. A double A-sided offering from the West London based quintet, the encounter reeks of vintage influences and passions yet sits perfectly in the tapestry of modern music with a constant appetite for the old in its imagination. It might not be an entrance and release by Night Dials to set the UK music scene ablaze but with a thoroughly enjoyable presence it does insist that the band is firmly put on the radar.

Apparently leading up to the creation of the tracks making up the single, Night Dials recorded their first song I’ve Done More Things with Liam Watson at his legendary Toe Rag Studios, an environment decked out with pre-1969 equipment. A lack of money caused the recordings to be abandoned but led the band to a dingy cellar in a London pub where in a surrounding of “rattling wine bottles and kegs” they experimented, cultured, and subsequently recorded their first release. Cavernous and soaked in evocative reverb, the two songs emerging and making up the band’s first single thrust the imagination into decades past and the potent swing of current explorations and inventiveness. Recorded in the underground of London, the release is indeed pure underground rock ‘n’ roll, a proposition which captivates and lingers with organic potency.

Picture 51_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     I’ve Done More Things instantly offers a thick fuzzy persuasion as jangly guitars collude with punchy beats within fizzy smog of sonic temptation. The vocals also make a quickly convincing entrance; their mellower effect wrapped tones an eager dance on ears whipping up imagination and appetite as easily as the more raucous sounds around them. The raw and sparse production only adds to the success and character of the song, its touch as much recalling the essence of sixties music and its recordings as the psychedelic breeze encasing the minimal but dramatic rhythms and the unfussy pop fuelling infectious melodies and the endeavour of the guitars.

It is a rich lure matched by the briefer but no less stirring adventure of I’ll Sleep When I Die. It opens with a magnetic embrace of echoing vocal harmonies and slim guitar enticing, their union building into a flirtatious stroll as new textures and sound join the almost nursery rhyme like charm of the song. The surf coated imagination of the guitars soon brings a richer climate and invention, the song even more irresistibly enthralling as it brews new hues in a senses inciting persuasion which is just a devilish mix of old and new spawned from a heart for the past.

Both songs leave an urge to know more about Night Dials and explore a sound which maybe can be best described as a union of The Yardbirds, The Sonics, Jesus and Mary Chain, and 13th Floor Elevators, but in the hands of Night Dials is something fresh and different again.

I’ve Done More Things/I’ll Sleep When I Die is available from June 22nd digitally and on 7” vinyl via Ciao Ketchup Recordings @ https://ciaoketchuprecordings.bandcamp.com/album/ive-done-more-things-ill-sleep-when-i-die

http://nightdials.com/ https://www.facebook.com/nightdials

RingMaster 22/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Vienna Ditto – Circle

Vienna Ditto _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

With every song and single released, UK duo Vienna Ditto has enhanced the seductive hex they have laid on certainly our ears since being infected by the band’s Ugly EP in 2013. Now the pairing of Hatty Taylor and Nigel Firth has set free their long awaited and highly anticipated debut album, and fair to say that their melodic voodoo has just got seriously enslaving. Bringing some old fan favourites together with re-workings of older releases and brand new slices of sonic devilment, Circle is a bewitching romance of sultry atmospheres, bordering on sinister melodic beauty, and psychedelic sunspots of harmonic alchemy.

Originally meeting when Firth taught Taylor the guitar when she was 11 years old, the duo began writing and creating together in 2009 after meeting by chance again in the street. Within a week of that moment, they recorded an electronic version of the Johnny Cash classic Ring of Fire and in a matter of another seven of so days created and unveiled their own first song Long Way Down. This quickly managed to find itself played on Huw Stephens’ Radio One show, leading to Vienna Ditto playing the BBC Introducing stage at Glastonbury. 2011 saw the band’s self-titled debut EP get a well-received release, its temptation the beginning to greater attention and responses earned by a couple of singles and more so the Liar Liar and Ugly EPs two years later. With further singles only enhancing and confirming the duo’s potent emergence and increasing evolution of sound, there has been a greedy appetite brewing amongst a great many for this first album. Now here it is easy to say that no-one will be disappointed and for newcomers, well simply welcome to a new musical lust.

The encounter opens with This Is Normal, a song instantly luring ears through a minimal but potent bassy riff and the siren-esque tones and expression of Taylor’s voice. As crispy beats and additional guitar enticing joins the mix so the song’s energy also elevates, though it is quickly back into the low key gait so things continue to be potently intriguing and unpredictable. As electronic invention springs its bait next, the track eventually slips into a magnetic stroll with Morningwood like revelry but yet again things only get twisted and turned around to relentlessly excite ears and imagination.

Owly circle_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    The irresistible start is emulated and surpassed by the following Feeling Good. With garage rock hooks colluding with surf and sci-fi shimmers, the song is quickly teasing and flirting like a sixties Venusian temptress. Also though there is simultaneously a climatic and sultry air enveloping the senses whilst beneath it a smouldering Tarantino cultured landscape becomes the home for an irresistible dance of vocals and grooves. The song is pure musical and emotional drama, an infection getting under the skin and into the psyche whilst providing the first major pinnacle of the album.

A melodic calm caresses ears next through the mellow charm of Wintertime. Comparisons to Portishead have been a regular offering since Vienna Ditto began and easy to see why with the golden kiss of charm offered by the tantalising third song on the album. It has its own intimacy and individual, almost raw innocence and beauty though as it casts a lingering peace which eventually makes way for the off kilter cosmopolitan enticement of A Happy Car is a Stolen Car. With a ska shaped bassline and exotic melodic hues within a spatial atmosphere, the song is a fascinating waltz of warped imagination and enterprise. The effect hugged vocals of Taylor court the bedlamic shuffle of the song and again a sixties pop hued psyche rock twisted soundscape. It takes a couple of listens or so to fully explore and understand the wonderful turbulence of ideas and bold adventure at work but rewards patience with another major highlight within Circle.

The band takes ears back into the dusty climes of a Morricone like terrain next through Pale Horse Rider, voice and strained guitar strings a compelling lead into a continually evolving and absorbing immersion of sound and emotion. Beauty again is the keenest description to lie at its door before the first of the band’s two current singles step forward side by side. Oh Josephine which we are led to believe is a tribute to dancer and civil rights icon Josephine Baker, has a haunting and pulsating shine to its air, a glow which resonates across every aspect as rhythms and the simply catchiness of the song steal body swerves and lustful thoughts from the listener. The following Long Way Down is an epidemic of addictiveness and brilliance. Primarily garage punk and rock across its numerous strands of temptation, the song also weaves a funk and synth pop lure encased in psychedelic salaciousness. Think Chick Quest meets MGMT with a touch of Jingo for good measure and you have a closer clue to the brilliance of the song.

     Both the hypnotic almost oppressive psychedelic wash of A Wheel Within a Wheel and the bulging devilry of Hold On enthral and thrill; the first a song bordering on psychotic with its kaleidoscope of sonic colour and melodic seducing aligned to off the wall ingenuity. The second of the two is jazz/funk pop twisted out of shape and stretched on muscular rhythmic sinews, then infused with guitar jangles and electronic mania before being given to Taylor to bind in her ever alluring vocals. The result is one virulent dance of unbridled infection and enjoyment though it is soon overshadowed by the sensational Hammer and a Nail. Opening with a caress of southern guitar and the endearing tones of Taylor, the song soon spreads into again Morricone seeded scenery within a dusty hot ambience. It is a transfixing maelstrom of mystique kissed sounds and emotional drama which toys with ears and imagination. The more revealed the darker the track becomes, its rapacious throat and intensity an encroaching clouding over the open beauty and sultry resonance of voice and melodies. As a single this incitement was glorious but reshaped and re-coloured for the album it is simply majestic.

The gentle croon of Liar Liar Quietly is almost an anti-climax initially after the previous glory but soon has ears and thoughts firmly in its soft and persuasive melody soaked hands. It is a spellbinding kiss with a need to spill eighties post punk like invention from within its serenade, again the band reaping seeds from earlier decades to enrich their own scintillating invention.

The album closes with a smouldering slice of gospel bred psyche balladry; I Know His Blood Will Make Me Whole another cast in the dark country of psychedelic rock ‘n’ roll. As expected the track spins a mesh of perpetual unpredictability and off beat exploration which just gets darker, bolder, and more addictive with time and age.

There is also a bonus track on certainly the digital version of Circle called Squeaking Wheel and it too is a sensational romp, one built on a blues sound and craft wound in creative mischief and ingenuity. Whether this or I Know His Blood Will Make Me Whole completes the album, Circle is easily one of the most scintillating and invigorating thrills of the year so far. Full of surprises and originality, album and Vienna Ditto deserve all your attention with the only losers being those not taking a listen.

Circle is available now @ https://viennaditto.bandcamp.com/album/circle

http://www.viennaditto.com/ https://www.facebook.com/viennaditto

RingMaster 16/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Thirteen Shots – Black Smiles

Thirteen Shots - Promo Picture_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

With every release since they emerged in 2011 and unleashed the instantly captivating track Danzig, UK rockers Thirteen Shots has evolved their sound, each encounter seeing the Birmingham quartet infuse richer and broader flavours and styles into their core tempest of horror bred rock ‘n’ roll. Each step has also come with an increasing amount of acclaim but fair to say that Thirteen Shots have easily outdone themselves with new album Black Smiles. It is a dramatically eclectic mix of songs and genres honed into one increasingly captivating and addictive proposition, and what it might lack a touch in consistency it more than makes up in riotous contagion.

Since whipping up attention with the horror punk sculpted Danzig, Thirteen Shots has been on a creative and attention grabbing roll. Shows with the likes of Demented are Go, The Peacocks, Rezurex, Howling Wolfmen, and Graveyard Johnnys helped establish the band as one of the UK’s most exciting horror/garage punk newcomers and now a band whose shows and releases are constantly highly anticipated. Previous albums Vaudeville and Tales That Start With A Whisper certainly pushed the band’s sound and presence forward but it was last year’s White Noise which made the biggest step in bold adventure and diversity. Hindsight though shows its potent success and contents were just an early hint for bigger and more ambitious things now ripening within Black Smiles.

Recorded with Paul Hughes, Black Smiles is based on the old school movie experience of double features with each song playing part in a cinematic experience. It all starts with Cobradeer, which acts like a promotional trailer to the other tracks which are like serial episodes within the main feature of the album. The opener is an immediate rush of fiercely slapping rhythms and ferocious riffs, the song blasting ears into keen attention before relaxing into a more tempered stroll as the distinct vocals of Johnny Rose open up the narrative. The chorus kicks the adrenaline switch again with the song swinging between both attacks as it provides an increasingly spicy musical/lyrical introduction to the album.

Thirteen Shots - Black Smiles- Cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   It is a strong and enjoyable beginning quickly surpassed by the following Run and Hide. From the great initial throaty bassline cast by George Chick and the quickly joining equally predatory beats of drummer Tom Fenn, the track has imagination and appetite hooked. The surf shimmer of guitar and controlled tones of Rose only increase the potency as drama and sinister seduction blossom their tempting too. Subsequently a more hard rock enterprise is spun by guitarist Lewis Machip as the encounter’s chorus roars, contrasts swapping moments in the lengthening landscape of the excellent song. With its weave also knitted with garage and melodic rock as well as punk and blues tenacity, it is a swift unveiling of the variety and diversity destined to continue through sound and album.

Next Cupid´s Dead romps through fresh scenery too, its punk/garage rock devilry seemingly bred from a mix of The Clash and Blitzkid. At not much more than a brain munch past a minute in length, the track is a punk stomp to breed an addiction for and quickly matched in its individual way by the dirty rock ‘n’ roll revelry of Warewolf Party. A spicy groove is the first infection with the song’s raw air and fiery sound the second, it all united in a riveting and easy persuasion lorded over by the honest tones of Rose before it then makes way for the anthemic rampage of Garage Crew. Chick once again is the kindling to a feisty blaze with his opening dark bass prowl, every note a resonating treat leading ears into the brawling surge of riffs and rabid rhythms fuelling the song. That bass becomes even more bestial in tone as the song lurches from one explosive assault to another premeditated predatory stroll and back; punk, horror, and subsequently blues rock entwining in its anthemic contagion.

Night of Sin doses itself up with a big shot of blues guitar and rock ‘n’ roll next, Machips’s enterprise tangy liquor in the heavy intimidating embrace of the rhythms. The ever unpolished punk delivery of Rose ensures an alluring earthy feel is always present o the album, even here where strings reveal their most accomplished and intoxicating beauty. It is a constantly rewarding mix again in evidence, after the tantalising refreshment of the melodic and acoustic croon that is Interlude, in the psychotic Skitzo. A delta blues tang coats the guitar’s endeavour bringing the incoming stomp into view, the flavouring a persistent tempting as the song erupts and blazes with persistent blues punk tenacity.

A enticing swagger comes with Black Eyed Girl next, the song like a moonlit seductress swinging its melodic hips as the more restrained and continually impressive voice of Rose introduces the moment’s protagonist. It is a gripping danger and intrigue which retains its potency as the song expels another bluesy flame of raw energy and sound. The entwining continues until the song can contain itself no more and reveals itself as a dirty raucous rocker for a bellow of a persuasion.

The swinging hips of Punk Betty flirts in a similar vein to its predecessor, its saunter a punk infused hard rock bait but with the same catchy resourcefulness. It does not admittedly have the same spark as previous songs, that inescapable lure but with one delicious bassline and the anthemic mischief of the vocals, it only keeps appetite and satisfaction eager before passing attention over to the album’s title track. It too is missing something to set, as earlier tracks, personal tastes ablaze, a particular uniqueness to spark their lust but once more its dark hearted rock ‘n roll and lyrical enterprise, not forgetting predation bass and sonic veining, is nothing less than rousing.

Lost Soul is soon a full seduction though. Its surf and horror rock romance is a sultry incitement of ears and imagination, undiluted persuasion caressed by a garage rock smoulder and flirted with by a ska seeded tempting. To be honest there is an even richer tapestry of flavours in easily the best song on the album, plenty to be discovered as the track alone sparks real excitement and anticipation for the continual and increasing potential and growth of Thirteen Shots.

There is a final raw explosion of punk and garage hostility in the shape of Friday 13, a bracing and unpolished finale to another thoroughly enjoyable and riveting adventure with Thirteen Shots. As always with a record from the band there is a dramatic potential of even bigger and major things ahead, the foursome getting closer to their pinnacle each time but equally raising that bar with every offering too. They have a classic within them for sure and it will have its day but right now we all have the opportunity to go on a rigorously enjoyable romp in great exploits like Black Smiles.

Black Smiles is released on June 29th and can be pre-ordered via https://thirteenshots.bandcamp.com/ and https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/black-smiles/id994668019 in various options.

Http://www.thirteenshots.co.uk/     https://www.facebook.com/thirteenshotsband

RingMaster 10/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

White Manna – Pan

WM_1Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

There is something deeply irresistible about the White Manna sound, actually plenty of things, but definitely there is a primal invitation to their psyche rock induced spatial adventures which makes band and releases pure contagion. The Californians’ previous acclaimed offerings bear witness to its potency, each offering a blistering infestation of ears and imagination cultured in pungent riffs and searing grooves, whilst the band’s live presence is renowned for stripping the senses blissfully bare. Now the quintet of David Johnson, Johnny Webb, Tavan Anderson, Anthony Taibi, and Michael Dieter unleash their finest moment yet in the fiercely simmering shape of Pan.

As fans of the Humboldt hailing band will expect, the heart of Pan is poached in celestial explorations and fuzz sprung psychedelic breaths driven by garage rock tenacity. It offers broad and deep, almost supernal soundscapes inspired by the Northern Californian landscape; guitarist Johnson saying about the band’s sound that “…the trees, beaches, and open spaces where we live are all integral parts of our approach to music.” This time though there is a stronger intimacy to the earth we tread and emotions felt through Pan, as reflected in the title, and a new almost predacious creative appetite and energy to tracks which are aligned to expected rhythmic virulence and psychedelic ferocity.

The album’s title track sparks ears and imagination first, a sonic piercing the trigger to a smog of fuzz fuelled riffery and atmospheric causticity. Almost straight away within the smothering embrace though, there is an infectious garage rock swagger which infects rhythms and the scuzz grooves seeping from the magnet tempest of sound. The result is a song which is a brewing cauldron of intensity and scolding sonic heat, never erupting fully but providing a seriously engaging and bracing scorching of flesh and psyche.

It is potent and stirring start quickly outshone by Dunes I and subsequently Dunes II. The first of the two similarly emerges from a sonic kiss on the senses, rapidly turning into a blaze of seventies psyche rock laced rampancy driven by a tenacious rhythmic seduction. The garage rock lustfulness of the White Manna sound is again a loudly piquant source of irresistible persuasion as it consumes ears and emotions, the song after its great start an inevitable enslavement matched and contrasted in sound by its successor. The second of the two is a slow saunter through air and emotions. Its body is a fusion of surf and psyche rock with a shoegaze like energy to its smouldering tempting, and uncontrollably enthralling. There is still a dirty tint to its atmosphere though, the band as always challenging as they seduce, stirring up things as they embrace with imagination and sound.

Yet another lofty plateau is breached with Evil. The track is a proto-punk bred treat, a catchy stomp of garage rock and scuzz pop strolling through ears like a mix of The Stooges and The Hives with a dash of The Sonics, but ripe with the uniqueness that is the White Manna sound. There is relentless drive and incessant urgency to the song as well as a great repetitious essence at its core which simply leaves you wanting more. The track is exceptional, pop rock alchemy and instantly matched by Beta Travelers. A spatial climate hints this song initially, it soon becoming the suggestive backdrop to a masterfully alluring shuffle of drum rhythms courted by choppy riffs. Everything intensifies with each circle of the rhythmic rallies though, evolving and enlarging into a melodically fuelled flame of enslaving enterprise, vocally and musically. That reiterative element of the music is once more pure addictiveness within the sonic boil up; every riff, hook, and rhythm inescapable temptation bound in grooves which flirt like a temptress within the song’s skin and psyche permeating scuzzy air.

Pan is brought to a close by Eshra, a twelve minute sonic painting of instrumental adventure and craft. Crashing waves within a lonely climate builds the scene, a canvas slowly defined and pushed by guitar and keys. Every passing minute adds a new descriptive layer and tempestuous intensity to the broadening terrain until by around halfway, the song is a fascinating swamp of sonic droning, fiery melodic exploration, and rhythmic hypnotism, all within another sultry surf seeded space rock coloured atmosphere. It is a riveting end to a thrilling encounter, and the perfect way to leave a lingering mark on the listener.

The impression Pan itself leaves is indelible, the album simply one of the most memorable and provocative encounters this year so far.

Pan is out now digitally and on CD, both versions including the equally impressing bonus tracks Slow Dust and Master Of The Universe (Live), and on vinyl. All options are available through Cardinal Fuzz in Europe @ https://cful.bandcamp.com/album/white-manna-pan and Captcha Records Stateside via https://captcharecords.bandcamp.com/album/pan

https://www.facebook.com/whitemanna/

RingMaster 05/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net