Deville – Pigs with Gods

With their fifth album Swedish outfit Deville has bred their heaviest, most intensive offering yet but without diminishing any of the instinctive grooving which has already earned the band a potent reputation amidst ever growing acclaim across its predecessors. The result, an encounter which demands attention whilst taking the band’s rousing sound to a whole new level.

Hailing from Malmö, the quartet was formed in 2004 casting a stoner bred sound initially which has gradually evolved over time. Certainly with the band’s last album, Make it belong to us, Deville moved towards a more metal meets heavy rock nurtured exploration which now Pigs with Gods has taken by the throat by clearly embracing their new metal inspired inclinations. The band prior to release admitted that “When we first started writing music for a new album it became evident to all of us that we were quite tired of the traditional doom/stoner genre…It soon became clear that more Metal was what we all wanted! Thus the album was given a very metal feeling…” That deliberate move though has come with an organic evolution, nothing about the tracks within Pigs with Gods feeling forced or manufactured.

The foursome of Andreas Bengtsson, Martin Fässberg, Andreas Wulkan, and Martin Nobel immediately reveal their muscular prowess with the opening throes of Lost Grounds, the album’s first track rubbing the senses with a sonic abrasion before erupting in a thunderous stroll driven by big scything rhythms. Just as powerful and magnetic, a vocal roar accentuates the captivation with the raw edge of riffs and scuzzy grooves only adding to the thick and infectious tempest of sound as a Torche like hue adds to the richness of the song.

The album’s title track follows, striding in on a rhythmic march with sonic nostrils flared and vocal potency to the fore as flaming grooves light the invasive trespass of sound. Scything beats continue to harry and bruise as grooves share their melodic liquor though wiry veins, it all adding up to a rousing roar sprung from all quarters before Gold Sealed Tomb uncages its own particular creative squall as melodically enthralling as it is virulently imposing. As with those around it, the song grows and twists without feeding expectations, unpredictability as rampant as the gale of enterprise at its heart.

For us the album’s best track is next, Cut It Loose an insatiable temptation of grooves and swinging rhythms loaded with viral contagion and rapacious endeavour. Like all songs it nags at ears whilst feeding them a cyclone of grooved enticement as heavy rock and groove metal meet in a bold collusion, a mixture just as ripe within the just as striking Lightbringer straight after. Less forceful than its predecessors, the track still makes for a towering encounter as its thick air smoulders and sonic cinders burn on the senses around melodic calms which simply seduce before track finds its tempestuousness once more.

Through the almost grungy tones and seriously catchy dynamics of the excellent Hell in the Water and the verging on barbarous but again openly infectious exploits of Wrecked, the album only strengthened its grip on ears and appetite while Acid Meadows provides a relative melodic calm in the storm moment which equally added to the compelling stature of Pigs with Gods. Though it is fair to say that each of their songs has a united sound which is pretty much specific to Deville, the trio of tracks alone show it comes with a strong palette of flavouring and imagination.

Dead Goon also has a less intrusive nature with its blues rock kissed sultriness, the track an instrumental intimation easy for ears to feast upon and the imagination to conjure from before Came For Nothing flexes its creative biceps and the following Medicated on a Concrete Road weaves a tapestry of melodic and fibrous dexterity. Both tracks build their temptations on opulent grooves and boldly spirited but precisely swung rhythms, exploring fresh ideas and imagination from their energetic cores.

Closing track In Reverse emerges from the orchestral close of its predecessor, its sonic radiance luring intrigue into the harmonic caress of vocals. It is a haunting shimmer which eventually breaks into a prowling cyclone of sound and ferocity as snappy as it is invasive before subsequently leaving on that sonic scintillation which brought it into view.

It is a riveting end to an album which increases its impressiveness by the play, declaring itself Deville’s finest moment yet with real ease.

Pigs with Gods is out now digitally and on CD and Ltd Ed vinyl via Fuzzorama Records @ https://eu.fuzzoramastore.com/en/cd-s/deville-pigs-with-gods-cd.html

https://www.facebook.com/devilleband/   http://deville.nu   https://twitter.com/Devilleband

Pete RingMaster 15/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Valley Of The Sun – Volume Rock

VOTS_RingMasterReview:

If a title ever reflected its contents then it is Volume Rock, the new album from Cincinnati stompers Valley Of The Sun. The release is a mighty roar of rousing rock ‘n’ roll which never takes a breath and demands to be played with the dial locked on maximum. In many ways it carries on where their acclaimed debut album Electric Talons Of The Thunderhawk left off but with even more resourcefully honed and fiery exploits on board to fire up ears and rich enjoyment.

With the two well-received EPs, Two Thousand Ten and The Sayings of the Seers in 2010 and 2011 respectively, under their belt, Valley Of The Sun really caught attention and a new wealth of eager appetites with Electric Talons Of The Thunderhawk in 2014. It took their inflamed mix of stoner, hard, and desert rock to new heights with just rewards in responses and acclaim. It is easy to feel though that all of its success was just the appetiser to bigger things and reactions around the uncaging of Volume Rock and its step up in sound, songwriting, and the band’s ability to get all rocking like a bone starved hound.

The album opens on the instantly masterful and rousing swagger of Eternal Forever, ears clipped by sticks on rims as a bluesy invitation swings away alongside. In another handful of seconds, the song hits a rampant stroll with its riff loaded chest out and rhythmic hips swinging. The vocals of guitarist Ryan Ferrier quickly impress as they light ears and song whilst his riffs find quick unity with the catchy grooves of Adam Flaig, the contagious start becoming a full on anthemic enticement driven by the potent jabs of drummer Aaron Boyer and the brooding bassline of Ringo Jones.

It is an exhilarating start backed within moments by the following Wants and Needs. Slightly less urgent but no less commandingly infectious, the track has a spicy Queens Of The Stone Age feel to its melodic and vocal persuasion though equally, and not for the last time across the album, there is also a grungy essence which hints at Alice In Chains. A blaze of spirit raising rock ‘n’ roll, its success is matched and eclipse by the thick and sultry charms of The Hunt. Badgering the senses and body from start to finish, the track is an inflamed shuffle with imposing rhythms and citric grooves bound in the outstanding tones of Ferrier, his presence backed just as potently by the band in voice and enterprise.

Volumerock_FrontCover_RingMasterReviewNext up Land of Fools has enjoyment and limbs in full involvement too; it’s more reserved but seriously addictive entrance, with rhythms and riffs insatiable bait, the lead into a virulent epidemic of lean keen hooks and beats which continue the track’s initial magnetic work as sonic flames cast by the guitar of Flaig and Ferrier’s harmonic throat flare. There is no escaping a Josh Homme and co feel again to the outstanding encounter, a flavour only adding to its triumph before making way for I Breathe the Earth and its delicious bass grumble. That leading lure brings ears into t smouldering sighs of fiery guitar and in turn concussive beats and beguiling harmonies, all colluding in another aural swelter with psych and blues rock imagination.

The heavier and thicker textures of Speaketh the Shaman steps forward next, Ferrier crooning with purpose and heart within the smokier fire of the song’s sizzling climate and sound. As in a few other tracks, bands like The Sword and Torche come to mind a little, though generally a fleeting essence within Valley Of The Sun’s own creative flame. Certainly the band skilfully employs familiar hues in their own sonic designs, but as different colours in something maybe not boldly unique but undoubtedly distinct in style and character.

If previous tracks were fires, Beneath the Veil is a volcano of grooves and melodic lava, enveloping and treating ears to a white hot invasion of infectious blues rock ‘n’ roll. It roars and stomps in its groove woven waltz, springing the listener into an exhaustive dance and revelry for which no escape is possible or wanted until its last note blisters on the ears.

A chance to grab a breath is allowed momentarily by Solstice before it too is a thumping hard rock scented canter with a punkish snarl pulling tired bodies back to their soon revitalised feet. Its departure lets Empty Visions bring the album to memorable close, the track a hot bed of sonic fuzz and melodic tinder setting fire to ears and spirit under the catchy guidance and temptation of the ever impressing vocals.

It is a fine end to a thrilling encounter which just leaves you wanting more and with real greed. If Valley Of The Sun impressed before, they will blow a great many more away with Volume Rock and its incendiary rock ‘n’ roll.

Volume Rock is released April 29th via Fuzzorama Records @ http://www.fuzzoramastore.com/en/ and https://fuzzoramarecords1.bandcamp.com/album/volume-rock

https://www.facebook.com/valleyofthesun    https://twitter.com/centaur_rodeo

Pete RingMaster 28/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Witchrider – Unmountable Stairs

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With a sound somewhere between Queens of The Stone Age and a pact between Nirvana and Soundgarden, nodding to the former more often than not, Austrian rockers Witchrider are poised to present their debut album Unmountable Stairs. It is a fiery and rigorously captivating proposition which merges familiarity with raw invention, culminating in a release which does not leave a blaze in its wake but definitely a smouldering and lingering temptation which persistently increases to leave appetite and satisfaction bloated.

Hailing from Graz, Witchrider began in the November of 2012 with initially the name Desert Mountain but soon decided the current name was a better fit for their music, the title taken from “riding the witch”, a another term for sleep paralysis. The band wear their inspirations from the likes of QOTSA and Eagles Of Death Metal openly but employ them in their own scuzzy recipe as evidenced on the new album and the band’s previous self-titled EP of last year. Initially a trio of vocalist Daniel Dorninger, guitarist Hans-Peter Leitner, and drummer Michael Hirschmugl, the band enlisted bassist Bernhard Weigl for their live shows who subsequently became a full-time member and makes up the quartet unleashing the colourful treats upon the Fuzzorama Records released Unmountable Stairs.

OCD starts things off, looming up on ears from a distance with sultry fuzz lit riffs and caustic melodies. A loud breath of Josh Homme and co is unmissable but it only adds to the intrigue and drama which comes with the song. Firm beats and a bass rumble brings shadows whilst the vocals of Dorninger, as the music, are not that far removed from a Homme like delivery and texture. The raw air to the song equally brings an imagination awakening aspect whilst the scorched slightly warped grooves and hooks throughout the opener, just hold ears and passions in their grip. It is a tasty contagion that has hunger for more bordering on lustful, so it is good that the following 1 For 5 is just as raucously compelling and virulently infectious. A bulging bassline matched by resonating beats provide an irresistible skeleton to the fusion of noise and stoner rock, swiftly hints of the likes of Melvins and Kyuss converging on thoughts as the song spreads its flames of sonic enterprise. Bedlamic at times, the track provides another twist and aspect to the sound and invention of the band, the two ridiculously addictive opening songs closely related in structure but individually striking.

The pair of Black and new single I’m Outta Breath keeps things boiling nicely, the first sending sonic shards through ears and across a feisty mesh of again heavily QOTSA influenced rhythms and riffs, before acidic scythes of sound aligned to potent vocal harmonies and melodic exploration express their tantalising narratives. It is a fascinating if less than explosive encounter which still easily grips attention before its successor strides in with an instant creative and addictive devilry. Riffs and hooks need little time to start reeling in the imagination and passions, whilst soaring blazes of guitar light the insatiable temptation of the song. Though it is one of the songs seemingly more intent on being catchy and enslaving its recipients it is also one of the most original and unique in sound, and if any comparison can be raised it is that of Australian band Voyager.

Its infection whets the appetite all over again ready for the scuzzy tempting of Far From You, a proposition cored by a pungent throaty bassline and a Nirvana-esque sonic scowl. With an additional hue of blues causticity, the track hits the spot without sparking additional lust before the melodic climate of SP immerses ears in its enticing graze of sound courted by mellow vocals. It also lacks the something extra which ignites the single but matches it on being something more uniquely different to Witchrider in sound, whilst both tracks parade encounters which still only add to the increasing potency of the album.

   The Cabin strolls in next with a dramatic air to its persuasion and wonderfully toxic sound, bass and riffs stalking ears with lustful intent for another helping of addictive pleasure. It is a sinister outing with a portentous breath to even its melodic fire whilst its predatory nature is a giveaway even under the erosive atmosphere of the excellent track. It’s almost theatrical narrative in word and sound is emulated by The Fog, the song also employing a gait which prowls with a devilish glint in its manner but with an even slower and heavier lumber. Additional attention reveals the real difference to the two songs which a casual listen misses, and both tracks create a haunting psychedelic landscape of intrigue and creativity which apart or together sparks imagination and pleasure.

Next the album’s title track strides through a Sabbath-esque terrain with Black Tusk like structures, across which spicy harmonies and wiry grooves lay out their mystery and incendiary temptation. As the album it is a slow burning but undeniable grower which makes the fullest seduction over time unlike Witch-Hunt which steals ardour and acclaim on the first examination of its tenacious enterprise over a sinew boned canvas. Marked by rutting riffs and beats inside a caustic wash of sonic enticing, the track flirts with the same spicery that flavours most songs but turns it into its own, not necessarily unique but definitely riveting trap.

The album is completed by the bluesy Styx, a track which as enjoyable as it is never quite convinces to the same depths as others songs upon Unmountable Stairs. Nevertheless with a presence which to these ears would be like Josh Homme plays the Kinks, it is a fine end to an increasingly impressing and fun release. The album as a whole announces that Witchrider is a band with all the invention and imagination to make a big impact, especially if they can or want to evolve a truly unique sound, the one thing reining in Unmountable Stairs from being a startling debut.

Unmountable Stairs is available from November 14th via Fuzzorama Records @ http://www.fuzzoramastore.com/en/cd-s/witchrider-the-unmountable-stairs.html

http://www.witchrider.com/

November sees Witchrider on tour with Truckfighters, with dates at…

Nov 10 – Brudenell LEEDS; Nov 11 – Sound Control MANCHESTER; Nov 12 – King Tuts Wah Wah Hut GLASGOW; Nov 13 – The Basement NOTTINGHAM; Nov 14 – O2 Academy Islington LONDON; Nov 15 Hard Rock Hell – PWLLHELI; Nov 16 – Oobleck BIRMINGHAM.

RingMaster 03/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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