The Emergency Please – Remember You

Having recently chatted to The Emergency Please founder and vocalist/guitarist Karan Master (ex A Gentleman’s Film) about his band and debut release, it was only right we also leapt into the Remember You EP from the UK outfit. Released a handful of days ago, the four track encounter is a spirited stroll of pop punk and funk infused alternative rock which needs little effort to have the body and imagination swinging.

Inspired by a varied host of artists headed by Jimi Hendrix, John Mayer, and The Smashing Pumpkins, Master has linked up with bassist Michael Hartley and drummer Sam Garnett to complete The Emergency Please line-up though Remember You was recorded with the aid of Sam West (drums) and Adam Porter (bass). Southampton based, the band has a sound which is maybe still in the brewing stages but as their first EP shows, it is already a flavoursome proposition with rich stock for future adventurous recipes.

Remember You opens with its title track, a magnetic affair bursting from an initial guitar jangle with energy and spirit in sound and vocals. Boisterous beats punctuate the melodic web cast by the guitar, the bass more moody but no less keen an ingredient in a song which second by second gets under the skin. A little folk pop, plenty indie rock with a pop punk lining, it captivates from start to finish, alluring ears and hips with equal dexterity.

The following I Can’t Stop is just as energetic and eager to tempt with funk infused hooks and a rhythmic shuffle which just swings along. Speeding up its lures at certain times, it is a great nag on the appetite with more controlled moments providing a tapestry of creative suggestion. Put all together it provides a shuffle which is as bold as it is accomplished, matching the heights of its predecessor to keep the release holding rich attention before Lost casts its calmer, melodically intimate caress on the senses. Melancholic but with heart felt light to its touch, the track provides its own captivation to complement its previous companions.

The EP closes with Clark Kent Syndrome, a song which begins with a mouth-watering temptation of guitar string picking and proceeds to seduce with rhythmic bait led by the pulsating yearning of the bass. With vocals as potent as ever, it continues to dance on the ear though it does not quite live up to its early promise for personal tastes. Nevertheless it is a thickly pleasing end to a release which grows and persuades with increasing prowess, its closing expulsions of vocal angst against the funk woven shuffle of the guitar epitomising its appeal.

Remember You is an introduction which makes you take notice; a strong first step from a band with plenty to discover in their imagination and on the evidence of the EP, plenty of tenacity and craft to bring it to our anticipating ears.

Remember You is available now @ https://theemergencyplease.bandcamp.com/album/remember-you

Read our interview with Karan Master @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/05/10/leaping-to-the-front-exploring-the-emergency-please-with-founder-karan-master/

https://www.facebook.com/theemergencyplease

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Energy Alchemist – Reminder EP

Adding to the list of fascinating proposals made this very year is the new EP from US quartet Energy Alchemist. It offers three tracks which within their electronic rock tagging embrace the essences and rich strains of metal, dubstep, and heavy and progressive rock amongst numerous flavours. It ensures each song is a tapestry of style and unpredictable enterprise delivered with a craft which together ensures that the release and Mendocino County, California based band stand out.

The brainchild of vocalist/guitarist/programmer Bill Hankins, Energy Alchemist is completed by vocalist/guitarist Julian Sterling, bassist Erik Koski, and drummer Matt Heath. Earlier this year they released their well-received album Ghost in the Machine, an encounter creating dramatic weaves of sound and styles upon a rhythmic adventure as bold and captivating as the imagination wrapping it; an adventure now built upon by the Reminder EP.

It opens up with its title track and instantly Reminder entangles ears with its electronically bred almost skittish beats and the tantalising tendrils of synths. As vocals join melody casting guitars in the blossoming track, a spicing akin to The Kennedy Soundtrack reinforces its lure. It is a tempting further increased by the brooding tones of bass and a scuzzier lining to keys with beats continuing to provide their hungrily persuasive and often unpredictable touch as the song twists and turns. It is a wholly magnetic affair which impresses more and more with every listen, revealing an entanglement of new creative hues and spices with UK outfit Axis Mundi brought forth at times as a hinting comparison to its electronic trance rock exploits.

The following Way Too Late similarly has attention quickly held, the two prong vocal enticement of Hankins and Sterling a potent invitation into the brewing drama of sound where metal nurtured riffs and electronic endeavour unite with a funk lined tenacity. That steel edge continues throughout the song, often giving it a bite and intensity which its predecessor lacked to take the Energy Alchemist down a fresh avenue without losing their creative fingerprint. As the guitars and bass, keys explore a broadening canvas where progressive hues combine with rave/dubstep inspired electronica to infest the imagination and match the pleasure spawned by its companions.

It is a reward especially powerful with closing track Flush, the song an apocalyptic trespass aligning strains of industrial metal and predacious heavy rock with electronic suggestion. It is also a web of warm temptation and poetic melodies which skilfully contrasts the raw heart and frame of the song, an invention further exploited by the stringed seduction and vocal dynamics interspersed within the imaginative ventures of guitars and synths.

Taking best track honours, it brings the EP to a fine and rousing close. As the other pair, it suggests that the Energy Alchemist sound is far from being the finished article but such its potential locked into the band’s already open craft and imagination and their sublime fusion of varying styles, an appetite for the band’s music is increasingly unavoidable.

The Reminder EP is out now @ https://energyalchemist.bandcamp.com/album/reminder

https://www.energyalchemist.rocks/    https://www.facebook.com/energyalchemist1

Pete RingMaster 24/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Zedi Forder – Self Titled

Some bands and artists just click with ears and imagination from their introduction and for us one was definitely UK trio Zedi Forder. Maybe it is more accurate to say the creative force behind the band crafted the connection because previous adventures for the duo of vocalist/drummer/primary songwriter Chris Kerley and guitarist Mark Carstairs have equalled seriously enticed and stoked the passions. They are also the creators of Tricore, An Entire Legion, and Rind Skank; all distinctly individual bands releasing some of the most exciting and imaginative adventures in recent years though each being sadly missed or ignored by a tide of major attention. Zedi Forder is their latest project, with bassist Richard Tomsett alongside, creating a bold and multi-flavoured mix of alternative metal and voracious rock ‘n’ roll which fuels a self-titled debut album that quite simply deserves greed driven recognition.

In some ways because of previous seductions of our passions, Zedi Forder get a head start in a want, or should that be need, to hear its exploits and an assumption of having some level of appetite for what may be on offer. Equally though, it makes expectations much more demanding and triggers the question of can the band create something unique and fresh enough to be truly new from past endeavours as much as those around them. Many bands or musicians struggle in one guise but across a few it is a rare success. The release of an also self-titled EP in 2015 suggested the Woking hailing outfit could and would, their first album now a striking confirmation going well beyond simply bearing out that proposal though understandably it also gives delicious slithers teasing at earlier explorations which adds to rather than defuses the originality.

The Zedi Forder bio says it is a band with a split personality. “One side is driven by the musical aim of being bold and ever hopeful. The other side is fearless and judgmental, with music that reflects this.” The album certainly reflects this suggestion, its songs, sometimes within themselves, twisting from creatively free-swinging and swashbuckling to imaginatively mischievous on to proposals forceful and emotionally edgy and cutting but all crafted with an instinct for rousing sounds, manipulative rhythms, and daring diversity.

The album opens up with Killakarta and instantly consumes ears with rapacious riffs and jabbing beats as a bass growl courts a thick wiry groove. Kerley’s distinctive and ever magnetic vocals are soon in the heart of the mix, steering the song’s muscular stroll with expression and flair. That initial groove, carrying a growl far more vocal in the bass of Tomsett, winds around the imagination; it trespass enjoyably toxic and addictively refreshing. A slip into a mellow climate is just as tempting, accentuating the song’s unpredictability before being overwhelmed by a more primal expulsion of sound and intensity, reclaiming its moment as a great jazzy lilt infests the bass.

Seductive and predatory in equal measure, the track is a glorious start to an emprise of imagination and craft backed by the arguably less mercurial Machines though it is no slouch in raising its temperature and dynamics across a persistently eventful body. Kerley’s beats bite as Carstairs’ melodies spin a web of suggestion; his trap of enterprise further ignited by possibly the most virulent and catchy hook lined groove you will hear this year.

Dark Mook is a kaleidoscope of sound and texture, its opening noisy glaze slipping into a funky pop tinged stroll of melody and harmony before grungier flames escape guitars and bass as Kerley consistently croons with his never wavering melodic dexterity before I’m the one offers its own individual tempting for an already aroused and on the brink of lustful appetite. The fourth track also opens with a bracing surge of raw sound but is soon entangling the listener in a flirtatiously earthy bassline with funk in its genes and as quickly catchy vocals and beats with a sense of devilry in their gait. Carstairs’ weave of melodic teasing is a riveting net to get caught up in, ensnaring the senses before things get dirty and feisty though Kerley is still keeping the instinctive catchiness flowing in touch as the track to re-establishes its unbridled virulence. The song is another early pinnacle; an irresistible treat with a great 12 Stone Toddler meets KingBathmat scent to its revelry.

Darker shadows wrap the melodic beauty and volatile turbulence of next up My Moon, the song drawing on electronic tenacity to colour its variable and perpetually alluring atmosphere above a rugged terrain of invention. Across its roar, thoughts pluck at comparisons to the likes of Sick Puppies, Voyager, and Soundgarden; all slightly inaccurate but potent hints to the great track.

The grin loaded Nachoman comes next, the song a compelling tongue in cheek but earnest tease of social commentary. It has voice and hips hooked within its opening Red Hot Chili Peppers smoked swerve and only proceeds to tighten its vice like grip through heavier spices and inventive condiments of sound while Open Wide grabs attention with a bullish tirade of sound before flirtatiously dancing in ears with its Jane’s Addiction like funk metal meets System Of A Down seeded versatility. Melodies and emotions fluctuate in character and intensity across the song, as too vocals and rhythms with the latter an evolving torrent of enticement and aggression.

They love it more is a cyclone of sound and energy within an oasis of reflection and melody, never truly settling but always in control of its volcanic fusion of rock and metal while successor Smooch is a predator of hips and imagination with its boisterous shuffle courted by barbarous rhythms and emerging sonic hostility again spurned on by the spiky beats of Kerley and the irritable tone of Tomsett’s bass. With an infection loaded and at times psychotic groove sharing lures with an inherent catchiness, the track as its predecessor hits the spot dead centre, burrowing deeper with every listen, as quite simply does the album.

The growling Time after time leaves no stone of temptation unturned, its grunge/metal snarl maybe the most creatively untwisted track on the release but as bold and naturally infectious as any others such as the following On the run, a slab of classic metal and heavy rock with a nod to the likes of Zeppelin and Sabbath in its heart infused with the progressive and melody conjuring imagination of Zedi Forder.

Though not the actual final song, Lonely One closes things off with its melodically haunting, sonically searing, and rhythmically imposing blaze which alone shares all you need to know to hear why its creators warrant unbridled attention.

With a bonus quartet of mesmeric acoustic tracks which alone prove why we rate Kerley as a vocalist so much, each also unveiling a new drama and shade to the original’s aspects, the album is manna for body and soul and a real bargain as it seems it is being released as a name your own price download. Covering their first EP we said “it would be rude not to go off and discover its majesty “, for the album substitute ‘rude’ for ‘stupid’ because you will surely not hear anything more gripping and exciting than what Zedi Forder have in lying wait.

The Zedi Forder album is released June 10th wit pre-ordering available now @ https://tricore.bandcamp.com/album/zedi-forder-the-album-out-10th-june-pre-order-to-get-4-tracks-entire-flame-wiz-album-now

http://www.zediforder.com/     https://www.facebook.com/zediforder/   https://twitter.com/ZediForder

Pete RingMaster 02/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Leaping to the front: exploring The Emergency Please with founder Karan Master

The Emergency Please is a Southampton based band which is making a real impact on the city’s live scene with their funk and neo-soul spiced alternative rock. As a greater landscape of attention is finding the band and its creatively energetic sound we had the chance to find out more with the band’s founder/vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Karan Master, finding out about its beginnings, inspirations, and other exploits…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Hi my name’s Karan Master, I started The Emergency Please as a songwriting vehicle for music I’d been writing. Since then I’ve been working with a few drummers and bass player writing, recording, and gigging music for The Emergency Please. On the debut EP, Remember You, I worked with session players Sam West (drums) and Adam Porter (bass).

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now?

I actually moved to Southampton with my old band, A Gentleman Film. We were a prog funk alt rock trio. There’s definitely a hint of that in The Emergency Please though the newer music I’ve been writing is more influenced by pop punk, which is what I grew up on.

What inspired the band name?

My old band when I was 14 was called Emergency Please. I always really liked the name so decided to stick with it since it wasn’t being used anymore.

Was there any specific idea behind the project and in what you wanted it to offer?

I really wanted to go back to my roots so to speak. I grew up on pop punk/emo bands like Funeral For A Friend, Paramore, and Fall Out Boy but also wanted to incorporate some of the other genres I love like, funk and Neo soul.

You are still inspired by the same things or have they evolved over time?

I think so, The Emergency Please is still relatively new but the drive is just to play music that we enjoy and get it out there the best we can.

Since your first days creating, how would you say your sound has evolved?

It’s got a bit more groove to it and a little more rawness.

Are any changes more of an organic movement or you deliberately wanting to try new things?

I’d say it’s been pretty organic.

Presumably for you and across the others involved in the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Haha this could be a long list. My top three inspirations are Jimi Hendrix, John Mayer, and The Smashing Pumpkins. Honestly don’t know if I’d be doing this without them. There are a lot of others though such as Funeral For A Friend, D’Angelo, and Darwin Deez to name a few.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

I usually like to start with the guitar and lay down the music first before the vocals. Though I’ve had a few vocal ideas first that inspires me to write a song…they always seem to happen in the shower haha.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

It’s mostly about personal experiences or topics that are important to me.

Would you give us some background to your latest release?

Remember You is our debut EP. It has 4 tracks each of which is unique in its own way but still carries our sound. It’s an introduction to The Emergency Please and shows the sound we plan to build on.

How about some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

The first song is the title track of the EP and is an upbeat pop punk song about running into an ex that you weren’t quite sure why it ended. The second track, I Can’t Stop is a more grooved based song; I especially enjoyed working with Sam and Adam on this one. The following track Lost is more slow and melancholy than the others. It’s a song I had written over a year ago about the toll personal issues and baggage can have relationships. The final song Clark Kent Syndrome is groove based emo track. It’s probably my favourite track on the EP (can’t decide between it and I Can’t Stop). It’s about how people can lose themselves when they become attached to the outcome of something they want and the irony of it.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We come to studio with everything written and rehearsed but also with an open mind. It’s great to have an external input and working with the right producers makes a real difference.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

We’re pretty hectic on stage. I think live shows are where you get the full experience of a band. We really like to get into it and give it as much energy as we can.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it in what seems from the outside, a vibrant musical city?

Southampton definitely has a thriving music scene though not what it used to be; there is still plenty of love for artists. It’s actually got a great scene for jam nights which is how we all met.

How about the internet and social media, how has that helped the band to date or not? Some see it as something destined to be a negative for bands.

Social media and the internet are great ways to get out there but because they’re so widely accessed it makes most bands a drop in the ocean. It’s definitely hard but it’s something we’re working on and plan to keep working on.

I don’t see it as negative; it’s just kind of become a part of the game we all have to play.

Once again Karan, a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks for taking the time to talk to us! If anyone brings me a chocolate macaroon or any memorabilia of The Flash we will be best friends 4 lyf!

Find out more about The Emergency Please @ https://www.facebook.com/theemergencyplease/

Pete RingMaster 10/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Holly Holden y Su Banda – Tropical Soul

Putting on notice body curves and swerves, we suggest no summer will be complete without the exotically sexy and melancholically captivating Tropical Soul. Just as suitable for smouldering cold hugging nights before a flaming fire, the new EP from Holly Holden y Su Banda is a musical travelogue and emotional reflection to seduce ears and spirit. It is also one of the year’s biggest delights so far and potentially the moment an already acclaimed and eagerly followed singer songwriter comes under the biggest spotlights.

From London and with many years of her life also embracing the relative beauty and life of Cornwall, Bristol, and Berlin as well as just as inspiring travels, study, and musical collaboration within Latin America and the Caribbean, Holly Holden brings it all to her wonderfully eclectic and adventurous sound, perfectly tagged as tropical soul. Like music as a whole, it is a borderless proposition offering a worldly exploration for artist and listener.  Flavours from Cuba, Ecuador, Colombia, and Dominican Republic collude with Caribbean and European enterprise, a mix dancing and flirting round intimate and love nurtured reflections as irrepressibly evidenced by her new EP.

Already with plaudits for her 2012 formed collaborative project and album Xistence with Cuban rapper Alayo Style as X Planet, Holden linked up with guitarist Frank Clarke and drummer David Beauchamp in 2014, Holly Holden y Su Banda emerging from their combined venture. Seemingly persistently busy with her own shows and as part of female vocal group Deep Throat Choir who have just released debut album Be OK and Johnny Flynn and the Sussex Wit, things will surely become even more hectic and crazy as Tropical Soul infests bodies and imaginations.

The EP opens with the irresistible El Impulso, its inescapable temptation instantly teasing through Holden’s smiling bass throb, it courted by small but spicy sparks of guitar. Her voice is soon an energetic smile in ears too, slipping effortlessly between English and Spanish as melodies from Clarke’s guitar weave their warm coaxing. It is hard to truly give a proper reference to Holden’s music such its diverse and unique character and presence but a mix of Holly Walker, Regina Spektor, and Molotov Jukebox gives a pretty good idea of the pleasure waiting within Tropical Soul. With percussive scrapes and Beauchamp’s frisky beats, the song is manna for feet, hips, and enjoyment and still just about eclipsed by its successor.

The ska lined Run immediately has its swing emulated by flesh, its relaxed but tenacious stroll a lure of wonderful ska inspired riffs and rising flames of brass as Holden’s melodic croon contemplates aided by just as tasty harmonies. Across the release, contributions from percussionist Satin Singh, keyboardist Daniel Correa, trumpeter Will Roper, Marcos Caballero on tuba and alto saxophonist Sarah Parkes add their prowess to the trio, Clarke also a blast on sax. Who plays where I cannot say but as on the second track, it all makes for a captivating rhumba some might say addiction was invented for.

Dead Coral swings in next, its Caribbean spices and Cuban spotted grooves sharing infection as Holden effortlessly grips in voice and word. Again you know it is a proposal doing good as feet instinctively shuffle and bums bounce before bodies rise to full height and spring their lustful involvement, the proof in The RR office. To be honest such the power and potency of the sounds, the EP need a few listens before attention can delve deeper in the lyrical explorations of Holden, a just as rewarding discovery as personal and intimate thoughts are shared.

There is a definite feel of The Specials to Mellow Drama, its ska seeded keys and air carrying the lonely almost noir lit shadows of Ghost Town  yet tempered by the sultry sway and waltz of brass and guitars. The epitome of melancholic seduction and elegance, the song is a haunting bewitchment lingering long after its departure though within the release quickly replaced by the blues and reggae hued soul of the imposingly catchy Benji Muji Mau; another inescapable tempting for physical and vocal participation.

The EP is concluded by Born At The Right Time, a more low key incitement, though it is all relative, but still equipped with juicy hooks and rhythmic bait around the ever fetching tones of the lady. It also has its own blues seeded breath as guitar and trumpet align in rueful endeavour, a final imagination stroking smoulder to fly away with.

Like for so many others we suspect, Tropical Soul is our first global tour with Holly Holden y Su Banda; a thrilling escape for which no passport was needed; as her bio suggests Holly Holden’s music provides that.

Tropical Soul is released April 9th.

http://www.hollyholdenmusic.com   https://www.facebook.com/hollyholdenmusik   https://twitter.com/HHoldenmusic

Pete RingMaster 30/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Madjive – Business first

All work and no play makes…. well you know the rest though no one seems to have told French rockers Madjive. There new album suggests that it is Business first but it is a sentiment which does not stop the band taking the listener on a feverish, mischievous, and riotous rock ‘n roll romp which is all about fun, fun, fun…

Hailing from the east side of France, Madjive has been unleashing their creative devilry since 2008. As their third album reveals, theirs is a sound which evades guidelines and rules, Business first a cavalcade of various styles and textures woven into a proposition as punk as it is hard rock, as garage rock as it is funk. Across two previous albums, a trio of EPs and a split vinyl release, the band has only cemented and increased their reputation while live Madjive has stomped across the broad landscape of Europe to matching acclaim, sharing stages with the likes of Powersolo, Richie Ramone, The Phenomenauts, Fuzzy Vox, The Jancee Pornick Casino, The Inspector Cluzo, Nada Surf, Lords of Altamont, VCPS and many others along the way. Business first is the wake-up call to those yet to be infested by the outfit’s devilment, a boisterous and excitable encounter which would not surprise if it incited global attention.

Ignition program turns the album’s key, its scything riffs and tenacious beats wrapped in a vocal web before leaping into a punk rock stroll sparking the body into a blur of eager movement. The funk growl of the opener twists into the punk ‘n’ roll of I am addicted. Again guitars chop and entangle the senses with their agitated jangle whilst rhythms shuffle within the quickly established funk infested saunter of the song. Led by more lively vocals, it continues to bounce and infest ears with a persuasion causing reactions living up to its title.

Its masterful temptation is swiftly eclipsed by the salacious lures of Same bone; a feisty charge of bold rock ‘n’ roll with the growl of Rocket From The Crypt and the instinctive devilish catchiness of  The Phenomenauts. At barely a handful of breaths over a minute in length, the glorious pleasure is sadly sort lived but imposingly memorable and thrilling before A spooky bargain brings its own haunted impishness to the party. Hooks escape its imagination at will, keys and guitars alone conjuring seductive bait as vocals colour and incite proceedings with mutual dexterity. Hints of Neal Hefti, the creator of the classic Batman theme tease throughout; the adventure recalling his finest moment within creative shenanigans all Madjive.

The contagious punk rock of Kid bazooka bursts to life next, it too equipped with appetite piercing hooks and devilment before the album’s title track declares its intent with rousing vocal unity quickly joined by forcibly persuasive rock ‘n’ roll. The track feels like a prelude to the bigger picture of Draft, sketch and outlines, the meeting’s  minutes setting the tone before its successor twists and turns with forceful enterprise and garage punk meets funk rock roguery. At its final statement, a moment of jazzy rascality comes over the album and ears, its unexpected detour leading to the blues funk playfulness of I can’t complain, a track somehow managing to sound like a hybrid of Red Hot Chili Peppers, System Of A Down, and Kings Of Leon without making such influences more than a whiff of a scent.

Both the previous tracks leave pleasure full if without quite at the heights of earlier tracks or found in the heavier rock ‘n’ roll of Rigged show. The track is a muscular and gnarly yet controlled and flirtatious encounter demanding subservience to its scything beats and sonic antics. There is hint of bands like Cheap Trick and Golden Earring to the song, but small hues in a certainly seemingly familiar but distinct escapade.

If the last song was relatively composed, We’re clear let’s manic traits fuel its character as it escapes speakers and the enslaving restraints of life to stir up body and imagination ready for the stormily sultry adventure of Desert peddler. The Morricone laced climate of the song is pure western drama, suggestiveness bound in similar descriptive intensity and artfulness to which Helldorado revel in, and quite glorious.

The album concludes with the vocal and melodic chicanery of Another guidance, a track trying to be composed and refined but it just cannot keep its punk heart chained, involving ears in a thrilling burst of garage rock high jinks with more than a keen nod to old school rock ‘n’ roll.

Business first, from its first dose of addictively satisfying and enterprising misconduct, inspires a hankering to get back with it as soon as possible, even before it actually comes to an end. It is a powerful lure from a stomp any fan of rock ‘n’ roll knavery will find a lusty appetite for. Throughout it does seem to persistently nag and remind of one band in particular, though one our thoughts have still yet to pin down, but Business first only announces Madjive as a band ready to stir up the rock world with inventive capers.

Business first is out now across most stores and @ https://madjive.bandcamp.com/album/business-first

Upcoming live dates:

16.04.207 – Clou – Grünberg – Germany

22.04.2017 – Cafe Ohne – Emerkingen – Germany

12.05.2017 – La Rodia – Besançon – France w/ Imperial state electric

16.06.2017 – Festival Erbasons – Etupes – France

30.06.2017 – Atelier des Moles – Montbéliard w/ CJ Ramone

25.11.2017 – La Taverne – Nevers – France

http://www.madjive.fr/    https://www.facebook.com/Madjive/   https://twitter.com/Madjive

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Playboy Manbaby – Don’t Let It Be

 

playboymanbaby_RingMasterReview

With their recent single still inciting mischief and bad behaviour, Arizona post funk punksters Playboy Manbaby have just uncaged their new album Don’t Let It Be, eleven tracks of creatively nefarious goodness infesting body and spirit.

The union of You Can Be A Fascist Too and I’d Like To Meet Your Parents was a devilish punk riot of a single leaving greed part of appetite and anticipation awaiting the band’s third album. The Dirty Waters/Lollypops Records released Don’t Let It Be soon shows that the Playboy Manbaby sound is broader than ever, bigger than an elephant’s backside in flavour and sound. Having caught up with their previous full-lengths in Bummeritaville and Electric Babyman, both released 2014, that variety will be no surprise to fans but their successor has really gone to town in adventure and diverse fun to truly leave all before it in the shade.

The Phoenix hailing sextet of Robbie Pfeffer (vocals), Chris Hudson( bass), TJ Friga (guitar), David Cosme (trumpet), Chad Dennis (drums), and Austin Rickert (sax) have become a big deal locally and across their homeland, shows alongside the likes of  Mike Watt & The Missing Men, King Khan & BBQ Show, King Khan & The Shrines, Rocket From The Crypt, Thee Oh Sees, Cosmonauts, The Spits, Black Flag, The Descendents, The Replacements, The Slackers,  and Teenage Bottlerocket to name just a few, pushing their reputation as potently as their sounds. Now having been already tenderised by the last single, global attention is surely poised to embrace Playboy Manbaby and Don’t Let It Be. Justice is never a given of course but neither do anything to deter that expected and deserved embrace.

You Can Be a Fascist Too gets the revelry going, a surge of guitar jangle and bass throbbing swiftly joined by the slightly derange and excitable tones of Pfeffer. Spicy melodies and tenacious riffs almost barge into each other as the garage and punk essences of the track bound through ears, salacious harmonies sparking thoughts of UK band The Tuesday Club. For less obvious reason, The Tubes also come to mind a little too as the song stomps around like a belligerent pup, its raw power pop punk quite irresistible.

art_RingMasterReviewThe zeal pumped diversity quickly comes to the fore with the following Last One Standing, brass instantly flirting with ears with saucy flames as the bass swaggers with deceptive innocence. There is an agenda at play; an intent to turn the listener into a physical puppet and there is no escape for feet and hips to the virulent lures of the rhythms and grooves teasing and taunting within the ska kissed funk escapade. The earnest screwy tones of Pfeffer again are sheer magnetism as too the evolving dark bait pulsating out of Hudson’s bass.

The outstanding track is quickly matched by the even livelier dance of Bored Broke And Sober, its catchy jazz funk garage punk as loco as it is skilfully woven to lure untied bodies. Hooks are as flirtatious as rhythms, every fondling by and flash from the Friga’s guitar ear chaining rascality, and the whole song as those before slavery.

Cadillac Car saunters in next, its low slung groove temptress like as vocals dance with drooling expression of defiance and attitude in the garage punk crawl before Self-Loathing In Bright Clothing throws its post punk/punk tendencies into the ring. A few blows short of a brawl, the track springs its creative agitation with infection loaded enterprise creating a rough and ready tango of fiercely captivating Reuben meets Dead Boys like provocation.

The sultry flirtatious garage r&b of Cheap Wine and the scuzzy pop punk of Popular bring body and soul to the boil again, the latter like a raw Mighty Mighty Bosstones in some ways while I’m So Affluent slips in with a slinky grace as noir lit air hugs skittish rhythms and vocal suggestion. Jazzy with a dark indie jangle recalling The Jazz Butcher, the song quickly blossoms its dark rock ‘’n roll into another majorly bewitching moment within Don’t Let It Be, one with an increasingly tenacious bounce complete with band calls just impossible to be left out of.

That indie sound fills next up Oprichniki too though as all songs it soon shows a jumble of spices and styles in its ballsy pop with Don Knotts In A Wind Tunnel straight after  engaging in dirty rock ‘n’ roll with a certain Rocket From The Crypt fever to its irritable bawl and brass igniting flames. For us it is joy to be unable to pin a sound down, this pair alone showing Playboy Manbaby get just as big a kick from defeating any attempt whilst pleasing their own devious imaginations.

Dark rock ‘n’ roll brings the album’s closing treat of White Jesus to ears, its meandering stroll and creatively incisive accosting portrait of a certain new world leader initially Nick Cave/Tom Waits like before ending as a concussive explosion of Dead Kennedys toned ferocity and bedlam.

The last Playboy Manbaby single set up anticipation for Don’t Let It Be perfectly but barely hinted at the bold inescapable fun and adventure to be found, both which will be hard to find any better on any release across the rest of the year too we suspect.

Don’t Let It Be is out now on CD through Dirty Water Records and cassette from Lollipop Records @ https://lollipop-records.myshopify.com/products/playboy-manbaby-dont-let-it-be-cass with its digital outing available @ https://playboymanbaby.bandcamp.com/

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Pete RingMaster 03/03/2017

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