Crimson Star – The Olde Dawg

It might be fair to say that UK outfit Crimson Star have not yet found the widespread recognition that their previous EP, Bay View, suggested they deserved but certainly acclaim, a greater reputation, and a fresh wave of fans did follow its unveiling two years back. Now the band has its successor ready to tease and tempt and again we can only say that their voracious rock ‘n’ roll carries all the attributes to provoke richer attention.

The time between releases has seen vocalist/guitarist Jay D Shaw and bassist Roj Ash joined by new addition in drummer Chris Hopton; the Birmingham based threesome uniting to create a trio of tracks which almost prey on ears within The Olde Dawg. The new EP bears the same rousing roar of its predecessor but swiftly reveals something hungrier and more dramatic in character and presence.

Recorded with Romesh Dodangoda (Lower Than Atlantis, Bring Me The Horizon, Funeral For A Friend), as its predecessor, the new release opens with Living A Lie. Emerging on a sonic dawn, punchy rhythms are soon rupturing the air to be quickly joined by bass and guitar bringing the ripe grooves and hooks the band has already earned potent praise for. Once into its eager but controlled stride, engaging melodic enterprise wraps the muscular dynamics of the track which are especially fertile around its eruption of a chorus, dynamics emulated in the similarly potent vocals of Shaw. Groove thick, the track is a striking and stirring start to the EP revealing alone the new strength and imagination in the band’s sound.

The outstanding Norma is next up and immediately accosts ears with its own gripping grooves and rapacious rhythms. The growl of Ash’s bass instantly had ears and appetite greedy to be swiftly matched in touch and temptation by the swinging grooves of guitar and the firm flying beats of Hopton. Again Shaw’s vocals provide a similarly magnetic proposition, at times almost teasing the listener as the song twisted and turned as it got under the skin; unpredictability lining every move and creative trespass offered.

The EP’s title track closes up the release, The Olde Dawg again an insistent bordering on predacious enticement which devours the air in riffs and rhythms whilst tempting ears with melodic and contagious enterprise. Moments of harmonic imagination only adds to the track’s lure, moment s of siren charm within waves of voracity which sweep the senses.

It is a great end to an EP which left us thick in pleasure and keen to suggest all go sail upon The Olde Dawg with Crimson Star, one of the UK’s brightest rock bands.

The Olde Dawg EP is released April 3rd.

 

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Pete RingMaster 03/04/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Crimson Star – Bay View

There is something very clever about the Bay View EP and the sounds it eagerly shares. Certainly the new outing from UK rockers Crimson Star sounds rather good from the off with a blaze of rock ‘n’ roll which may not dramatically impress but leaves a definite appetite for more. But like all relentless fires, it leaves little cinders in the shape of persuasive hooks and grooves which continue to catch in the imagination even in its absence. You could say the five track encounter is a slow burner in many ways despite its sizeable impact first time around and that is a success as potent as anything in our eyes.

Hailing from Birmingham, the threesome emerged in 2012 and since then has earned a rich reputation for their live presence and weighty alternative/melodic rock sound. 2016 saw the release of the Driven EP with the line-up of vocalist/guitarist James Shaw, bassist Roger Ash, and drummer Ross Edgington together. That well-received offering was recorded with producer Romesh Dodangoda (Lower Than Atlantis, Bring Me The Horizon, Funeral For A Friend), a successful union repeated with Bay View.

The EP opens with recent single The Pragmatist and straight away riffs and vocals lure attention, the increasingly grooved invitation of the guitar aligning with the equally potent scowling tones of Edgington. As it establishes its eager stroll, the song ebbs and flows in intensity without losing its instinctively infectious nature whilst always looking to evolve as melodies and the ever captivating grooves share their imagination. More addictive than it seemingly appears at the time, the song is a masterful slice of rock ‘n’ roll setting the release off to a great heavy and rousing start.

The following La Prom carries the same intent, instantly pushing through ears with a bold touch but soon revealing an atmospheric breath around crystalline melodies. Its calm has an underlying volatility which subsequently erupts as fiery grooves and raw riffs join an already laid bait of coaxing rhythms. With great fuzz to its tone and an edge to its energy, they aligning to further melodic enterprise, the song simply hits the spot.

Desert rock grooves fire up within next up Once, their spice leading to a grunge/alternative rock scowl which again is always looking to spring an unpredictable and imaginative adventure. Like its predecessor, the track does not have the immediate sparks of the opener yet grips from start to finish sowing that earlier mentioned niggle in its own way to return at will in the memory; a trait just as successful within Euthanise Me. The muscle of its grooves and rhythmic incitement courts a fine blues rock hue, a flavouring which blossoms within the following dark lit stroll the voice and bass take the imagination on. Like a blend of Foo Fighters and Pearl Jam with a slight touch of Kyuss, the song is unbridled captivation rivalling the first for best song honours.

The release is concluded by Gimme Some, another slice of intriguing rock ‘n’ roll which like the EP just grows and impresses with every listen. Grooves need little time to wrap their persuasion around ears though, melodic shadows and radiance working away on the imagination, as it brings Bay View to a magnetic close.

With double figure listens under our belt, it is fair to say that Bay View has become a keenly devoured and praised proposal. It took its time with us despite its potent start and we can only say share some of your time with Crimson Star to discover some prime heavy rock; it is hard to imagine you will be disappointed.

Bay View is released January 19th

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Pete RingMaster 17/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Never Found – The Human Condition

Having laid down ear pleasing foundations with their debut EP, British outfit Never Found build bigger lines of attention with its successor The Human Condition. The release sees the Oxford / Bridgend hailing band take their punk infused, metal seeded sound to new throes of adventure and enterprise. It is not a proposition which exceptionally startles but certainly excites whilst whetting imagination and appetite for the future of Never Found with its rousing songs and raw energy.

With their first EP, Sorrow & Cyanide, coming in 2015 not long after the emergence of the band at the tail of the previous year, Never Found has continued to build a potent and loyal fan base and an increasingly strong reputation for a live presence which has seen them support Aiden on tour and share stages with the likes of Fearless Vampire Killers, William Control, and Annisokay among many to date.

The Human Condition is the next step in the band’s ascent through the UK rock scene, a push which quickly gets down to business as the instrumental of its title track sets an atmospheric and imposing scene. Its dangers and vocal statement pulls the listener into the waiting jaws of new single Come To Me. Comparisons to bands such as A Day To Remember, Funeral For A Friend, and Bullet For My Valentine have been placed upon Never Found but the track openly has a potent Reuben feel to it; an irritability which colludes perfectly with the melodic trails of the guitars and the harmonic lure of Daniel Barnes’ vocals. With the stabbing beats of Kieran Ivey in league with the brooding tones of James Sweeten’s bass, the song is a lure and trespass of the senses in equal measure.

The lead guitar of Samuel Redmayne continues to weave a flavoursome web in next up Favourite Mistake, the riffs of Barnes strolling invasively alongside his own vocals with raw throated and melodically nurtured tones as similarly united as the guitars. The track has the infectious instincts of its predecessor and the aggression but misses out on its richer adventure. Pleasure is still a given though and its cinematic heart provocative before The Monster Remains steps in to part steal the show. The band’s metal inspirations instantly fuel riffs and a predacious air, keen bait which only expands and blossoms as the contagious exploits of the band bound in with punk spirit and imagination. It is a great blend with Barnes heading great vocal variety within the virulent roar.

Anyone But Me brings its own catchy and tenacious strain of metal bred rock ‘n’ roll with tempting hooks amidst emotional and vocal discord. There is something openly familiar to the track but plenty to reinforce the growing individuality of the band’s sound though it is quickly eclipsed by the mighty throes of My Grave. It is the other half of the two prong pinnacle of the EP, an aggravated and mercurial trespass which manages to flirt with the passions whilst chewing on the senses with its punk metal nurtured tempest. For its dark side and temperament, the song is as irresistibly infectious as anything on the release and another easy excuse to keep Never Found under close attention ahead.

The EP closes with the equally boisterous Misanthropy (A General Hate), a track with its own crabby tone though tempered by the song’s melodic dexterity. It is a fine end to an encounter which just blossoms with every listen while suggesting that Never Found is a proposition riddled with more than just potential.

The Human Condition is out now and available @ http://www.neverfound.bigcartel.com/

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Pete RingMaster 09/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Brightlight City – Our Future’s Not Dead

Having impressed with debut EP, Adventures in 2015, British rockers Brightlight City now reveal the blossoming invention and increasing maturity in their sound with successor Our Future’s Not Dead. Hinted at by a pair of singles last year, the new release is evidence of a band building on an impressive start and potential with stylish adventure whilst nurturing a whole new promise for continued growth.

Surrey bred, Brightlight City weave in inspirations from the likes of Hundred Reasons, Million Dead, Yourcodenameis:milo, At the Drive-In, Biffy Clyro, and Jimmy Eat World into their sound; indeed sparking comparisons to the former and others such as Thursday and Hell Is For Heroes with their melody rich and harmonically honed songs. Equally there is a fresh and potent catchiness and steel to Our Future’s Not Dead which as suggested was first glimpsed within last year’s singles Gravity and Thieves. It is a growth in sound which has come with an increasing reputation and praise for their live shows through the quintet sharing stages with Max Raptor, Fizzy Blood, Bad Sign, and Blood Youth and playing alongside Rise Against and Millencolin at Envol et Macadam Festival in Canada in 2015as well as their own shows.

Recorded with Matt Hyde (Funeral For A Friend, Bullet For My Valentine, Slipknot), Our Future’s Not Dead is likely to spark another bout of attention and hunger for Brightlight City, setting out its persuasive strength with opener It Depends On You. Skittish beats alongside vocal and guitar offered temptation bring the song into focus; their low key yet agitated attitude soon a full roar as vocalist Jamie Giarraputo heads a web of melodic enterprise from guitarists Jonathan Staunton and Justin Giarraputo, the latter adding his own potent vocal expression to the mix. Anthemic in heart, imposing in rhythm as the hefty jabs of drummer Ben Bell court the brooding lines of bassist Tom Stock, the track roars with energy and passion.

With a mellower air Leave A Light On follows, wiry melodies swimming round a throaty bassline as emotive vocals entice with distinctive expression. Once again there is an instinctive catchiness at work, never wavering as fiery textures evolve and unite in a livelier blaze of sound and emotion. In some ways it is a less intricate proposition than its predecessor but only to its strength as each element is a flame of craft and drama before making way for Heart Stops. The third track comes coated in the infectiousness of the opener, its swinging body almost pop punk like and relentlessly coaxing listener involvement with its vocal harmonies and controlled but boisterous swing; a tenacious essence just as open in the calmer moments of a song taking best track honours.

The EP is brought to an end by Past/Future, a track epitomising the evolution in the Brightlight City sound with its rounded fusion of melody and energy amidst a new depth of contagiousness and invention. As all the songs within Our Future’s Not Dead it is a memorable and lingering encounter going to make a thoroughly enjoyable and impressing release. The Brightlight City sound has yet to become something truly unique but as the EP shows, it is well on the way and providing some rather tasty encounters along the way.

Our Future’s Not Dead is out now through Undead Collective Records.

https://www.brightlightcityofficial.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/brightlightcityofficial   https://twitter.com/blcband

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Elasea – Lesson Learnt

Having impressed in sound and potential with their debut EP two years back, British alternative rockers Elasea have just unveiled its successor Lesson Learnt. With a new addition to the Reading hailing band’s ranks, the EP quickly shows a new maturity and creative elegance in their songwriting and music. It is a magnetic affair for ears with plenty of reasons to suggest that Elasea are going places within the UK rock scene.

Emerging in 2013, Elasea potently poked attention with the Where I Belong EP, the release swiftly drawing praise the way of the quartet. Their growing reputation was also supported by a live presence seeing the band share stages with the likes of Funeral For A Friend, AllUsOnDrugs, Veridian, and Echoic. That time between releases has seen Elasea’s four strong line-up extended to five with the incoming Braydie Haskell adding prowess on keys. It is a notable essence certainly going some way to sparking the new rounded and inventive growth in the band’s sound but across all members, individual craft and imagination has openly blossomed.

Lesson Learnt opens up with Breathe, a sombre yet bright melody caressed by wistful keys initially coaxing ears, leading them into the waiting tide of rapacious riffs and rhythms. Their controlled but obvious urgency is accompanied by an emotive intensity which is even bolder in the strong vocal presence and expression of rhythm guitarist Andy Bradford. With bassist Liv Jones adding plenty of captivating vocal presence too, along with the muscular strains of sound, there is a Sick Puppies like essence to the song which only accentuates its appeal and imaginative character. On top, the keys are a well of emotive suggestion, a poetic glaze to the rawer texture of guitar and the meaty rhythms shaping the excellent track.

The following Time Stops is a similar fusion of metallic strength and melodic beauty; keys and the melody courting guitar of Calum Radmore weaving melancholic grace and sentiment as the lively beats of Ashley Haskell probe and incite the senses. With Jones’ bass grumble emotionally vocal, the track is a croon of shadow and open hearted yearning led by the vocal potency of Bradford again magnetically supported by Jones.

The more skittish air and intensive weight of On My Own shows another aspect to EP and the Elasea sound, the song more akin to the likes of You Me At Six and Bring Me The Horizon though still that early hint of the aforementioned Australian rockers prevails at times. They are flavours though adding to the growing uniqueness in Elasea’s music rather than shaping it, and enjoyable hues in the irritable character and tempestuous adventure of the third richly enjoyable song.

These Secrets is an instrumental interlude evocatively drifting over the imagination, its atmospheric presence maybe more pleasurable padding then essential to Walls, the final song adding infectious bounce and plaintive heart to the already impressing release. The electronic shimmer of synths cradles another great vocal union between rhythms guitarist and bassist, their harmonic contrasts and unity accentuated by the fiery ear charming nature of the sounds around them.

Elasea have made a big step in moving away from the crowd with Lesson learnt, the growth in their sound highly appetising. There is still room for true uniqueness to evolve and that is as exciting a prospect as the EP is for ears right now.

Lesson Learnt is out now through all platforms and @ https://elasea.bandcamp.com/album/lesson-learnt-ep or http://www.elasea.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/elaseauk   https://twitter.com/elaseauk

Pete RingMaster 22/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Deadset Dream – Snakes and Ladders

Photography by Elliot Young.

Photography by Elliot Young.

Following a 2015 which saw the band earn great attention, British alternative rockers Deadset Dream are keeping that same success going on stage and recently through the release of new single Snakes and Ladders. The track is a rousingly infectious slice of melody thick rock ‘n’ roll driven by the warm jangle of guitar aligned with emotively shaped vocals, and very swiftly is very satisfying.

ARTWORK_RingMasterReviewFormed on 2013, Sheffield hailing Deadset Dream has bred and honed their sound into a flavoursome proposition matched in strength by the interest it has sparked. As mentioned earlier, last year was the most potent yet for the quintet of vocalist Shiney Lingwood, guitarists Dan Burridge and Alex Hudson, bassist James Yeaman, and drummer Conor Burridge. Live, the band supported the likes of Funeral for a Friend, Roam, and Autumn Ruin as well as selling out Sheffield’s Corporation towards its end. The release of The Fall, a single taken from Battlecry, the band’s first EP in three years, only added to Deadset Dream’s success with their reputation growing in tandem.

Surging into 2016 with the same live intensity, Deadset Dream gives attention another firm nudge with Snakes and Ladders. The single initially caresses ears with a guitar jangle before Lingwood counts down to an immediately catchy and evocative flow of riffs and melodies around his following plaintive vocals. With rhythms framing all with their own infectious drama, the track croons and rumbles as it sweeps ears up in its anthemically toned adventure.

There is a feel of Mallory Knox and Bring Me The Horizon to the song, open hues which add to an overall roar which fires up the appetite for the Deadset Dream sound. Produced by James Pinder of Treehouse Studios, who lists the likes of Bullet For My Valentine and Fightstar on his CV, Snakes and Ladders suggests this year is more than capable of matching the last in the ascent of Deadset Dream.

Snakes and Ladders is out now with Deadset Dream playing the Kaya Festival in Wales August 7th.

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Pete RingMaster 04/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cardinal Bay – Answers EP

CARDINAL BAY_RingMasterReview

Making a potent introduction with their debut EP last year, UK post hardcore band Cardinal Bay have upped their game with its successor Answers. It is a five track proposal which growls as it dances on the ear, all of its tracks being as seriously catchy as they are emotively and aggressively forceful.

The strength of the band’s 2015 debut EP Way Back Home, released in their second year together, suggested that the Bridgwater quintet had the potential to make some big musical statements ahead and Answers certainly lives up to that promise in many ways. It comes after a year, since that first release, where the band undertook many UK tours, playing around the country alongside Amaryllis, Lost Atlanta, Chasing Cadence, and Breathe in the Silence and supported Funeral for a Friend before playing main stage at the UK’s biggest youth music festival, Butserfest. The early months of 2016 have been no different in business and success, the five-piece having made a recently acclaimed appearance on the main stage at Teddy Rocks. Now it is time for the Jonny Renshaw (Devil Sold His Soul) recorded Answers to lay down a marker for what many are calling the most exciting band to recently emerge in the post hardcore scene.

art_RingMasterReviewFrom its first moments, the Answers EP certainly does little to dismiss that type of claim, its title track slipping into ears with a melodic jangle as feisty sounds flirt with its background. Pretty soon rhythms and riffs are jostling for attention too as the strong harmonic cries of Josh Rogers colour the song’s air. It is not an over striking start but the song easily has attention held, especially once Roger’s strong vocals stroll with a throaty bassline from Jonny Dibble for company as beats jab and skirt their tempting. As the guitars of George Hill and Dave Small cast a web of melodic suggestiveness, the song simmers nicely with the occasion eruption of raw vocal growls matched by an increase in energy led by the lively beats of Matt Ward.

A strong start to the EP, the song is a sign of things to come with bigger and bolder things waiting to really spark the imagination starting with Out Of Sight. The second track has a far more imposing air to it straight away, swinging beats hitting with a heavier hand as again raw vocal squalls court the impressing melodic tones of Rogers. The band does have a flare with creating infectious pop seeded enterprise too and that also blossoms within the tenacious encounter, almost so well that its make the rawest hues of the track seem unnecessary.

Its feisty presence is matched and eclipsed by the outstanding roar of the following #Shotgun. Instantly it has a virulence and fiery edge which seduces and ignites the imagination and appetite to their strongest reactions yet. There is something familiar to the song, an indefinable essence which only adds to its drama and magnetism built on shadowy rhythms, melodic adventure, and a rampant catchiness more than conducted by Roger’s powerful delivery.

Masquerade makes a more tempered impact next though from its initial grouchy attack amidst a spiral of sonic enterprise, the track easily engages and increasingly pleases ears. It lacks the spark of its predecessors musically, the ear grabbing bite which chains attention but certainly makes up for it with the now expected great vocal quality of the band.

The EP comes to a close with There Are No Flames In Hell, a track which slowly burned itself into the passions. By its end though, and helped by round after round of its infection loaded chorus, it emerged as another strong and lingering favourite. The track contains every impressive element of the band and its sound, giving plenty more reasons why so many are waxing lyrical about Cardinal Bay. With the Answers EP to the fore, 2016 is looking like being a big year for the Somerset band.

The Answers EP is out now @ https://cardinalbay.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/CardinalBay   http://cardinalbayuk.tumblr.com/   https://twitter.com/CardinalBayUK

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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