Circle Of Reason – Faith Or Theory

COR_RingMasterReview

On the back of a collection of releases which have taken ears and enjoyment on an adventurous ride, anticipation for the debut album from British alternative rock band Circle Of Reason has been rife and ripe for quite a while. The wait is now almost over and a new creative escapade from the Southampton quartet waiting to be greedily devoured; a reaction hard to see Faith Or Theory missing out on.

Emerging in 2011, Circle Of Reason was soon stirring up their local scene before poking at broader recognition a year later with their excellent debut EP, A Favour For A Stranger. Led by outstanding single Silver Scene, the three-track introduction lit the ears and spirit whilst revealing the potential of bigger and bolder things to come. And so they did with a big leap in the These Hands & This Mind EP of 2013/14. With their music inspired by the likes of Mastodon, Deftones, Biffy Clyro, Muse, and Queens Of The Stone Age, the second EP showed the band developing their own distinct and eventful sound. There was a new imagination fuelled character to it without defusing the already established fire and creative enterprise in their sound and an increasingly renowned live presence seeing Circle Of Reason share stages with bands such as Feed The Rhino, Marmozets, Neck Deep, Inme, Mallory Knox, Heck, Allusondrugs, Freeze The Atlantic, Breed 77, Zico Chain and many more over the years.

The past months has seen a slight line-up change and the creation of Faith Or Theory. It too is an open step on from past triumphs; bringing a bolder maturity and imaginative zeal with its fascinating body that demands attention. Opening with the band’s new upcoming video/single, Never Enough, the album has ears gripped within its first sound bulging seconds. Instantly a barrage of thumping beats and hungry riffs collude to envelop the senses, spicy grooves emerging from the inviting tempest to entice an already eager appetite. Straight away there is something unique to the band’s proposal from the start but also their recognisable hunger and energy to take ears on a new adventure.  As the song expands into a web of melodic enterprise and rhythmic tenacity, the tones of vocalist/guitarist Simon Osman quickly hit the mark, reminding of his already established quality and emotive expression. The same applies throughout the band, in the evocative strains of Gary Slade’s guitar inventive bait and the growly hues of bass from its  newest member, he only going by the name of Rob so far, which add an almost bestial edge to the enjoyably raw air and roar of the track’s fiery escapade.

circle-of-reason_RingMasterReview The great start is soon eclipsed by Questions, it too holding a heavier and enjoyably intimidating essence to its virulent proposal. The versatile swinging beats of Andy Milwain leave no spot unmarked whilst the hooks of Osman and addictive grooves of Slade swiftly get under the skin with their melodic colour and varied flavouring. At times there is a touch of Reuben to the song, other moments of bands like Freeze The Atlantic, and persistently a tapestry of rock and alternative spicing keeping things inventively unpredictable whilst making it easy to be caught up in the contagion.

My Emergency steps up next with a less intrusive and imposing nature yet it too has a tempestuousness to its energy and emotion which intrigues as it whips up another increasingly robust and catchy affair. Backing harmonies court Osman’s ever impressing delivery whilst guitar and bass almost entwine like lovers in their infectious and dramatic endeavours around Milwain’s potently jabbing beats. Leaving body and spirit bouncing, the track makes way for Clarity. It also has a less forceful attitude to its persuasion but a host of ear seizing and imagination sparking twists and turns within its slowly and increasingly anthemic arousing of sound and pleasure cored by a rhythmic spine and nagging riffery which worms into the psyche.

Every song makes an immediate impact but maybe none as striking as In Other Words. It opens on a seductive and slightly melancholic melody with an almost theatrical feel to it; the coaxing continuing to keep ears hooked as the song opens up with voice and additional vines of poetic melodies matched in imagination by the evocative lures of bass. As it builds up in intensity, emotion, and creative fire, there is a definite Muse like quality to the song but only enough to add colour to the band’s own sonic and inventive drama.

The following Tie Up The Sky uncages its enthralling and volatile tempest from the first breath, again rhythms a prowling network of enticement within the sonic and melodic theatre captivating ears and thoughts around Osman’s plaintive and dynamic croon. Circle Of Reason has the great knack of being aggressive, almost fearsome at times, and ridiculously infectious and vibrantly inviting; this compelling offering epitomising that potent quality in rousing style.

Completed by latest video single Colours, a track which climbs over the senses and into the passion with exotically hued grooves and a thick drama of sound and emotional suggestiveness, Faith Or Theory rumbles and blazes with heart bred fervour amidst an invasive quality. It feels like the Circle Of Reason sound has come of age yet something still says there is plenty more yet to come, which can only be very good for the UK rock scene.

Faith Or Theory is released 27th May via Freefall Records.

https://www.facebook.com/circleofreason   https://twitter.com/Circleofreason

Pete RingMaster 09/05/2016

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Hot Moth – Small Fires EP

hot moth_RingMasterReview

Just passing their first year as band, UK rockers Hot Moth have just released debut EP Small Fires. It is an introduction which simply demands attention, three slices of alternative rock woven with just as potent essences of math and punk rock. A further progressive intent does songs and release no harm either, another vibrant texture in a sound which is yet to find its true individuality but has little problem, on the evidence of Small Fires, in making a memorable impression on ears and enjoyment.

Hailing from Brighton, Hot Moth is made up of vocalist/bassist Matt Sparkes also of The Farrah Joy Quartet, guitarist Matt Metcalfe, and drummer Freddie Hills who also hits the skins for another great band from the town, The Slytones. Formed March 2015, Hot Moth has drawn comparisons to the likes of Biffy Clyro, Oceansize, Reuben, and Mars Volta, which listening to Small Fires is often easily understandable. Creating captivating roars equipped with hungry riffs, anthemic rhythms, and strong vocal enticement, the band also has a subtlety to their sound which sees them able to almost serenade the imagination one moment and creatively bully it in the next.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe release opens with Rhino and an initial scaly lure of riffs which soon opens up into a formidable but inviting collusion of rowdy rhythms and sonic enterprise. The entrance of Sparkes’ excellent vocals and expression brings a momentary mellowing which quickly builds again into the same feisty proposal the song leaped in on. Ebbs and flows in intensity skilfully continue as the track provokes and entices with increasing prowess. There is a touch of Freeze the Atlantic to the song, a grittier snarl which works well with the melodically fiery textures that combine with Hills’ dynamic and addictive rhythms.

The impressive start continues with I Miss The Missed, a slightly less energetic proposal in many ways yet makes up for it with the emotive suggestiveness of vocals and melodies. There are plenty of dynamic crescendos involved in the track’s landscape though, evocative eruptions around the tenacious and agile enterprise of Hills and the melancholic tone of Sparkes’ bass. As with the first, there is an instinctive catchiness which permeates everything from the growly swing of the bass to the crisp beats and the potent weave of imagination shared by Metcalfe’s strings. Closing on a boisterous finale, the excellent track leaves a want for more as it makes way for EP closer Levelling The Tales.

A funk infested slice of metal aggravation and melodic infectiousness, the final track is a fiercely beguiling adventure playing like a blend of Reuben and I Plead Irony with the progressive touch of Porcupine Tree. Once more contagion soaks every unpredictable twist and rousing turn with a tapestry of flavours and energies in tow. It is a union of imagination and resourcefulness creating the EP’s best track as it completes a thrilling first listen to a band with the potential to make great strides within the UK rock scene. Available as a name your price download, Small Fires is one extremely easy proposition to recommend.

The Small Fires EP is out now @ https://hotmothmusic.bandcamp.com/album/small-fires-ep

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Pete RingMaster 13/04/2016

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The LaFontaines – Class

The LaFontaines_ Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Tagged as Scotland’s biggest independent band, there is no doubting that anticipation for The LaFontaines’ debut album has been in full swing on the back of acclaimed releases and a live presence seeing the band headline shows in New York, tour the UK and Europe with Watsky, and play their biggest headline sold out show to date at Glasgow’s ABC amongst numerous successes. The majority of that happened in a triumphant 2014 for the band but it is easy to expect bigger, more forceful spotlights upon the band in this with the release of the thrilling and fascinating Class.

static1.squarespace.com_ Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   Formed in 2010, the Motherwell hailing quintet first snatched attention with the All She Knows EP in 2013, following its success the following year with the similarly eagerly received Under The Storm EP. The absorbing diversity and sounds of the Matt O’Grady (You Me At Six/Don Broco) produced Class now blends the qualities of those previous releases with a new adventure of invention and enterprise. It is at times a startling release, persistently a striking one, and even when its persuasive energy slips a touch, album and indeed band just enthral as they brew up an impassioned and tenacious incitement. The words of frontman Kerr Okan probably describes it best when he says, “We’ve spent the past 3 to 4 years leading up to this point. Everything we’ve seen on the road or experienced together as a band has finally made its way onto record. It’s guaranteed to shock those who assume we’re simply just the best live band in Scotland. There’s so much depth to these songs, a load of pain and struggle, but underlying throughout all of the writing, is some real grit and determination.

There can be few albums this year with as rousing a start as Class offers through Slow Elvis. From a distance the song looms on ears, hitting them on arrival with pungent anthemic rhythms and fiery riffs. It is not particularly aggressive or explosive yet within seconds the opener has ears and appetite seriously aroused and hanging onto its swing. Spatial sonic endeavour fills air quickly too, surrounding the swaggering vocal rap of Okan as bass and drums intensify their bait with a snarl and punchy attitude. Additional vocal calls and melodic revelry only adds to the incendiary brew, the track evolving into a Rage Against The Machine meets Lazy Habits encounter wrapped in the sultry hues of Muse.

The sensational start is quickly backed by the similarly electrifying Under The Storm, a burst of guitar sparking handclaps and melodic vocals with fire in their breath. The track is soon shrugging off any restraint and with sinews flexing, it strides resourcefully through ears behind scythes of guitar and bass which in turn are led by the stirring mix of clean and rap cast vocals from bassist John Gerard and Okan respectively. Though openly unique compared to its predecessor, that description of references again applies, and like the first song is twisted into something unique to The LaFontaines. Unpredictability also is a ripe asset to both songs, and indeed the album, that and the great Scottish lilt fuelling the jabbing potency of the rapping.

     The album’s title track comes next, a gentle caress of melodic temptation crooning over the senses as rhythms fling their enticement around in a robust dance. Once more the mix of vocals is a magnetic tempting in the indie seeded and lively serenade of the song, the melodic lure of Gerard as potent as the creative jangle of guitar from Iain Findlay and Darren McCaughey. Revealing more of the depth and imagination in the band’s songwriting and sound alone, it is replaced and emulated by Castles. This too has a reserved touch yet its heart is a blaze of sonic expression and evocative intensity. A sizzling start slips into a mellower embrace around Okan’s delivery, both taking ears and thoughts by the hand and leading them into new eruptions of emotional drama. Without quite matching the plateau of the first few tracks, the song easily steals full attention with its Biffy Clyro meets The Kennedy Soundtrack like canvas evolved into something distinct to this new breed of Scottish rock ‘n roll.

King steps up next, its great bluesy guitar twang an immediate tasty enticing to which a throaty bass groan from Gerard and the punchy spits of Okan bring their own irresistible tempting. Featuring guests Luke Prebble and Michael Sparks, the song whilst wrapped in the tangy keys of McCaughey and vocal harmonies prowls rhythmically and emotionally. Gospel like in ambience, mischievous in imagination, the track has ears and appetite hungry, their need fulfilled by Junior Dragon. Not for the first or last time, drummer Jamie Keenan stirs up body and emotions with his skilled incitement from which the song exposes an even grittier and volatile side to the band’s sound. Arctic Monkeys like in devilry, Freeze The Atlantic like in energy, and Able Archer like in creative grandeur, the track grows into a rich bellow of voice and sound for another major highlight of Class.

A fiercely shimmering persuasion comes with All Gone next, another with a predacious edge to its rhythms and character backed by a great rapping stroll from Okan but maybe for the only time on the album a strong impact slips as the melodic and harmonic side of the song flows. Nevertheless the track captivates and solidly pleases if without finding the spark which ignited earlier songs, an ingredient the outstanding Window Seat has in strength. A more smouldering persuasion, it takes time to reveal all its rich levels and qualities but over time becomes a mighty peak of the album. It is an intense slice of emotional balladry built on a muscular frame, this draped in quite superb and mesmeric vocal strengths. It might be ballad like but there is a tempest at its heart which makes the song a volcanic croon and just irresistible.

Enjoyable but less dramatically engrossing is All She Knows, an easy going and arguably formula song in respect to the band’s songwriting. It is relatively unique to outside references but finds it difficult to stand out in the richness around it, though again to be fair the track is only enjoyment for ears, something which again applies to Paper Chase. Its eighties indie pop essences definitely add something fresh but once more the track struggles to linger like the insatiable successes elsewhere upon Class.

The album closes with the thick and shadow enriched caress of Pull Me Back, keys a melancholic but dramatic expression against the anthemic beats of McCaughey. They are a mere moment in the ever evolving landscape of the excellent song of course, every second, note, and syllable from across the band just inventive theatre.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly exciting release. Certainly there are moments when Class slips from its loftiest perch but it is generally down to the brilliance of some songs in comparison than the failures of others. As suggested, the first album from The LaFontaines has been long and greedily awaited and now here it undoubtedly lets no one down.

Class is available now via 889 Records from most online stores

http://www.thelafontaines.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/thelafontainesmusic

Ringmaster 17/06/2015

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Rhoda May – Sessions

Rhoda May Online Promo Shot

    The info sheet accompanying the promo for Sessions, the debut EP from UK progressive rock instrumentalists Rhoda May, waxes lyrical about band and it has to be said that after being washed over by its absorbing potency and imaginative aural narratives the release offers, you can only agree with rather than doubt the claims made. The six track release is a magnetic slice of sonic majesty, a sextet of songs which tease and ignite the imagination without ever over doing anything. The tracks tempt and hint rather than paint exact pictures and with an uncluttered sinewed beauty only seduce the imagination and passions to a full acceptance and hunger for EP and band.

    The Surrey trio of guitarist Will Pain, bassist Andy Page, and drummer Mark Sanger originally conceived the idea of Rhoda May mid-2012 but it was not until last year that the long-time friends officially formed the band after a local venue promoter who happened to overhear the band rehearsing asked them to support UK hip hop/metal pioneers Senser. From that debut show the threesome has gone on to support the likes of Heights, Freeze The Atlantic, and Three Trapped Tigers, all the time increasing their emerging presence. Their first release consists of the 347 and 589 live sessions recorded with producer Jason Wilson (We Are The Ocean, Reuben, Dinosaur Pile Up) and James Kirk respectively. All tracks were recorded as live takes for a series of live videos filmed & directed by Emma Dalesman and now get their appearance together as an EP release, six songs which cast a mouth-watering adventure of modern rock.

     All the tracks upon Sessions are simply numbered which allows the listener to interpret the songs without any prompting or Rhoda May - Cover Artworknudging which even a song title can do; the slices of absorbing creative invention the only persuasion  upon thoughts and emotions. As opener #3 strolls into view with the guitar of Pain jangling seductively around the ear as the gentle rhythmic incitement of Sanger coaxes equal attention, there is an instantaneous connection as a familiarity and mesmeric bait washes the senses. The bass of Page offers a no less potent lure, again with an initial reserve and provocative tone which sparks attention. There is a surf rock essence to the melodic guitar sculpting throughout which is an easy appetiser but it is merely one spice in the melodic rock enticement emerging tantalisingly. Overall the track is a flight through rugged yet radiant climes and textures, never so thick in sounds and structures to threaten or slow its fluidity and riveting adventure but using the simplicity that a mere three instruments can produce to transfix and almost belie the undoubted craft and intensively shaped enterprise.

    It is a masterful start soon equalled by the scorched sonic landscape of #4, a track which smoulders with heavy rock rapaciousness whilst conjuring a melodic luminance which sways and bewitches like a fire bred temptress. As with its predecessor the piece is unafraid to slow its muscular power to offer tender superbly crafted enticements or once comfortable licking and teasing the passions to rile things up and open the gates to another surge of sonically forging metallic endeavour.

     Both #7 and #5 continue the powerfully impressive entrance of release and band, the first an evocative melodically poetic piece of predacious rock which delivers a slight eighties goth rock breath to the guitar whilst the latter is a scuzz kissed fuzz rock persuasion to eagerly indulge in and imaginatively contemplate. As mentioned earlier there is at times a familiarity which coats elements and passages of tracks, this pair being no exception, but it only adds to the strength and colour of the tracks as they spark mind and passions with their delicious bait and rigorous creative charm.

      #8 takes the listener by the hand and leads them into a compelling soar through weather battered rocky terrain lit by melodic beauty and invention which again simply ignites the senses and imagination with sublime ease. Rhoda May perform musical alchemy at times across the EP and especially within this engrossing and mentally invigorating venture. Its triumph is almost shaded by the excellent closing track #9. From its mischievously nagging entrance of jagged riffs and alluring sixties bred guitar enchantment the track expands to build an emotionally textured soundscape, drums and bass crafting heavy dark infused skies beneath which emotive and provocative mastery urges thoughts to build their own adventure. It is a scintillating end to an outstanding debut.

     It is fair to say that Pain primarily grabs attention with his guitar skill and invention but do not assume that Page and Sanger are part players, the trio converging as Rhoda May to create something which needs and exploits every element to create an impressive stunning sound. With thoughts of bands such as Deftones, KingBathmat, Palms, and early Cure amongst others showing their prompts throughout but never to overwhelm something that is original and fascinating, Sessions gives evidence of Rhoda May’s PR claim that they could be “the next band to nationally break.”

www.rhodamay.com

 www.facebook.com/rhodamayband

9/10

RingMaster 06/01/2014

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The RHODA MAY ‘Sessions’, out 6th January

Rhoda May Online Promo Shot
UK PROGRESSIVE NEWCOMERS RHODA MAY RELEASE STUNNING DEBUT EP!
 
Coming at you from Surrey (home to Hundred Reasons, Reuben, Vex Red, Foe and Godsized) hugely promising instrumental rock outfit ‘Rhoda May’ are primed to be the next band to nationally break. Pulling from everyone from Rush and Led Zeppelin, to Deftones and Tool, Rhoda May set loose ‘Sessions’ on Monday 6th January.
Although originally conceived during the middle part of 2012 by long time friends Will Pain (Guitar), Mark Sanger (Drums) and Andy Page (Bass), it wasn’t until this year that the band were officially spawned. Ignited by an impromptu knock on the rehearsal room door by a local venue promoter who happened to overhear the band rehearsing, the guys were instantly asked to support popular London rockers Senser. Duly obliging, the trio were swiftly spurred into action and Rhoda May were formed.
From their debut show with Senser, Rhoda May’s climb has been vastly encouraging and recent supports with Heights, Freeze The Atlantic and Three Trapped Tigers have further cemented the band’s fledging reputation. The enterprising three-some have also been working on a series of live videos with Emma Dalesman (Stagecoach, Tommy Reilly), which can be viewed here – www.rhodamay.com/video/ .
The videos were also recorded by producer Jason Wilson (We Are The Ocean, Reuben, Dinosaur Pile Up) who handled their first ‘347 sessions’; the band also recorded a later session titled ‘589 live session’. Both recordings were put down live and in their entirety. Due to the quality and the glowing early feedback for the live sessions, the band decided to release both recordings as a stand alone record. Aptly entitled ‘Sessions’, the EP is an immensely impressive collection of six absorbing cuts of modern rock. From the opening guitar scapes and twisting rhythms of ‘#3’, to the engaging post-rock bite of ‘#4”, on to the fuzzed-up melodic appeal of ‘#5’ and to the majestic groove-laden journey titled ‘#8’, the band illustrate their genuine creative craft, which displays true imagination and the nimble ability to take the listener on an engrossing musical voyage.
Rhoda May - Cover Artwork

Glass City Vice – Waves EP

GCV - Promo

There has been a certain swell of excited murmurs and a keen buzz about UK alternative rockers Glass City Vice since their first appearance through debut EP No Direction in 2011, a year after the band formed. The Waves EP is our first introduction to the band and as its trio of tracks tantalise the ears and thoughts it is not too hard to see why they have excitedly caught the imagination of so many. There is an enterprise and distinct voice to its sound which instantly grabs attention but also a lure which less openly seduces the senses so that at any time the songs making up the EP can return in thoughts as a welcome reprise. Big things are suggested for the Brighton quartet and taking Waves as evidence it is hard to raise any real disagreement.

The foursome of vocalist/lead guitarist Josh Oliver, guitarist/backing vocalist Ed Lytton Cobbold, bassist Dudley Powell, and drummer Lawrie Miller as well as with their first release has equally built a strong reputation for their live performances which has seen them play alongside the likes Lawson, The Audition, The Xcerts, and Freeze The Atlantic during over 200 shows across the UK they have played over the past three years. The Waves EP is the next step in their rise, a major step one suspects, and a trigger which will recruit waves of new recruits to their already fervour driven fan base.

Recorded with Mercury nominee producer Jag Jago (The Maccabees, The Xcerts), the release opens with its title track and takes a mere Artworkmoment to draw in full attention and appetite as the guitars stroke the ear whilst rhythms create a firm web for them to play within. As the vocals of Oliver enters into the brewing mix of energy and passion there is a definite Reuben feel calling out thoughts and emotions. From a bright melodic blaze for its chorus the song settles into an energetic but restrained stroll which easily recruits feet and focus to its imaginative cause. Infectious and strikingly composed to merge elegance and a feisty breath, the song is a stirring and potent start to the release though soon eclipsed by the new single.

Have To Say also finds a catchy depth which makes it impossible to turn away from, the opening rhythmic dance covered by the acidic guitar kisses and vocal expression a contagious start which is built upon and accelerated in effect by thrilling guitar work and invention courted by equally accomplished drum and bass persuasion. Sabre strikes of guitar crash across the almost predatory grizzled bass line and caging drum taunts which mark a twist in the song bringing even greater temptation whilst the fiery climax is seeded in a passion and energy which leaves senses and thoughts subservient to its call.

The closing Just A Position ensures the release ends as impressively as it began; the song an undemanding yet fully engaging wash of melodic and enthusiastic enterprise which impresses more and more with each listen even if it does pale slightly against its predecessors.

The Waves EP accompanied by a great video for the single filmed at Knebworth House with upcoming director Dean Sherwood, is the clear marker for a band on a definite rise musically and in recognition. Glass Vice City could very well soon be a name on the lips of the country or certainly a sound in their ears.

Get the Waves EP as a Name Your Own Price @ http://glasscityvice.bandcamp.com/

http://www.glasscityvice.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 26/08/2013

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Circle Of Reason: A Favour For A Stranger EP

Circle Of Reason Promo shot

From just the initial listens of A Favour For A Stranger, the new EP from alternative rockers Circle Of Reason you can feel this is a band with all the promise and ingredients to be a big force certainly in the UK rock scene ahead. The three track release is a compulsive slice of well-crafted melodic rock and boisterous energy honed with a fine progressive intent. The band has been compared to the likes of Smashing Pumpkins, Silverchair, Muse, and Queens of The Stone Age, in varying ways to which you can easily add Biffy Clyro and Inme. Circle Of Reason have their own template of sound though which sets them apart from the majority of similarly gaited bands and leaves a sense of excitement for their future whilst giving plenty of pleasure in the now.

The Southampton band was formed in 2009 and has made a steady progress building a strong presence in the South West of England also reaching further afield. Renowned for their live shows which has seen them alongside bands such as Girlschool, Fighting with Wire, Freeze the Atlantic, Landscapes, Idiom, Rumer, and The Smoking Hearts across the UK, the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Simon Osman, guitarist Gary Slade, bassist Sam Cogher, and drummer Andy Milwain, have now set down a marker with the new release which has to be the platform for them to go forth and seize major recognition. It is an impressive aural base camp to venture forward with further invention from, exploration of headier heights in their own evolving creative hands.

The release consists of two previous video singles, which have garnered good play and attention from the likes of Kerrang! TV, Circle Of Reason Cover ArtworkScuzz, and Lava TV, and a third track which is their new video single released to coincide with the EP. Chasing the Sun starts things off with big riffs and dazzling guitar play, a major feature of all three songs. Into its stride the song relaxes into a slightly reserved air as vocalist Osman joins the already intriguing song. He is a strong vocalist who especially excels when raising his vocal energies, though less striking when keeping it low key. He was also the cause of ignoring the majority of the song and release during the first couple of plays, as concentration could only be focused on who he sounded like. It is one of those frustrations which have to be alleviated with an answer before moving on, and thankfully, eventually it revealed itself. I have read him compared to Kurt Cobain (?) but actually he is a dead ringer for Paul Marsh from eighties band The Mighty Lemon Drops; of course that will mean nothing to most but just had to bring relief and closure to the ‘problem’. The song fires up throughout into strong melodic flames musically and in mass harmonies which leave the senses smouldering with contentment and glowing from the outstanding and precise guitar invention. Arguably still the weakness track on the release the excellent song is a deeply engaging piece of enterprise.

     Sea Of Voices is a feistier proposition, striking sinewy riffs grabbing eager attention whilst Osman sweeps through the song vocally nicely backed up by the rest of the band with group harmonies. The song is a thumping stomp with the rhythms of Milwain forming a formidable frame for the basslines of Cogher to badger and guitars of Osman and Slade to incite and dazzle. The progressive intent of the band is at its creative fullness on the track with a wonderful though brief magnetically whispering aside of peaceful melodic grandeur stepping forward before the fiery climax. Everything is in perfect proportion in the songs, the riotous riffs, impacting rhythms, and emotive melodic beauty finding a seamless place in the overall impressive energetic contagion without bleeding into or overwhelming their companions, this song the thrilling example.

The release is completed by the latest single Silver Scene, a track which alone shows why the band is being talked so highly of. Again blending the sturdiest rock and metal riffs with a bruising intensity and infectious melodic invention all brought with unmistakable skill, the song is an irresistible weave of imagination and thoughtful songwriting. From first note to last it is an inventive lure for the passions and inciter of emotions, a mischievous conveyor of barbed hooks and impossible to refuse rock n roll. Other than an opening few seconds where the levels feel smothered compared to the rest of the song, it is a near perfect treat and like the other songs the basis for great anticipation of big things ahead for the band.

A Favour For A Stranger is an excellent EP which just gets better and better with every listen whilst raising hopes that Circle Of Reason has an album in the works for the near future. This is a band you should treat yourselves too very soon.

https://www.facebook.com/circleofreason

RingMaster 01/12/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright