The Dirty Youth – Just Move On/Atomic

The Dirty Youth Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

Reminding us of the impressive roar and contagion of their album Gold Dust which was released this past May, South Wales rockers The Dirty Youth now uncage a new double A-side single. It is confirmation of the tenacious potential and quality fuelling the band’s dynamic and virulent sound, and further evidence that The Dirty Youth is one of the bright sparks in British alternative rock.

For the new single, The Dirty Youth have united Just Move On from their aforementioned second full-length with a cover of the Blondie classic Atomic, the Americans one of the imagined inspirations of the band listening to their music. Formed in 2007, the quintet grabbed attention by the neck with acclaimed debut album Red Light Fix, it and a rousing live presence which has only grown to this day with the band sharing stages with the likes of Korn, The Rasmus, Heaven’s Basements, Fozzy, InMe, and Reckless Love along the way and making potent appearances at festivals such as Download; there numerous times. Fair to say Gold Dust opened up a new strength of spotlight and support over the past few weeks with its thrilling stomp, success which the new single can only build upon and prompt again.

The Dirty Youth Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   Just Move On moves in with a feisty nature and on a roll of rhythms from drummer Freddie Green, the sonic coaxing of guitarists Matt Bond and Luke Padfield no less a lure with their emerging cascade of riffs. Once in full view, the song settles into a robust stride lined by the throbbing bass bait of Leon Watkins, it all leading, once the superb vocals of Danni Monroe spring in, to a busy and eager roar of energy and sound. The rhythms continue to be as galvanic as the fiery delivery of Monroe, whilst sonically the track sizzles with infectious enterprise. The flowing flame of keys, also cast by Bond, only add to the warm and incendiary character and contagion of a song which alone is a powerful call to newcomers to check out The Dirty Youth further and indeed Gold Dust.

It is a brave move to cover a song like Atomic, it so well ingrained in the psyche and with a design that there is little you can do with without dissecting it down to its DNA. Nevertheless The Dirty Youth have taken it on and done a fine job. Admittedly they have simply given it their own voice rather than twist it to their own recipe, but it works well and provides a thoroughly enjoyable time.

If you have yet to join The Dirty Youth there are two very good reasons why you should via their new single, with Just Move On an especially compelling and inescapable argument.

Just Move On/Atomic is released November 13th via Transcend Music.

Pete RingMaster 13/11/2015

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Call To Arms – Invictus EP

Call To Arms_RingMaster Review

If the members of Call To Arms are as young as photos of them suggest, then it is hard not to be gripped by intrigue and excitement as to how good this band could become given the impressiveness of debut EP Invictus. Made up of five voracious and inventive metal tempests, the release hits the listeners straight between the eyes with its raw hostility cast into imaginative and confrontational anthemic persuasion.

The band began in 2013, formed by vocalist Dean Donnelly alongside original bassist Jordan Conway. Quickly the line-up was completed by guitarists Daniel Tyrell and Niall Ennis, lead and rhythm respectively, and drummer Ben Deane. Concentrating on honing their sound for the first few months, it is fair to say that the Ballymun hailing Call To Arms quickly whipped keen vocal attention and support. Making their live debut at The Academy, Dublin as part of The Blastbeat: Battle of the Bands, the band has gone on to share stages with the likes of Avatar, Fozzy, and Chelsea Grin and personnel wise seen Alex Caffrey replace Conway and recently after the recording and release of Invictus, Deane leave the band.

Produced by Joe Cleere, Invictus as suggested earlier, is an imposing and striking entrance by the band, needing very little time to make a potent impression as opener Our Salvation gets to work on ears and appetite. Featuring guest vocals from Sam Gorman of Enshrined, the track builds a thumping invitation with rhythms and spicy grooves, its lure heavy metal bred but keeping in its creative pocket for now, the subsequent rage fuelling its presence. Soon hitting a thick stride though, vocals spill antagonism and combat in their raw tone and delivery, matched in kind by the bass as the guitars spin an infectious web of hooks and abrasing riffery. It is like a mix of Biohazard and Killswitch Engage in many ways, yet has a freshness which especially hits as band and song twist in unpredictable and gripping enterprise. As it evolves and expands its imagination, a psychotic influence hits the song’s compelling bassline and vocals, their moment to stalk the psyche only leading to another ferocious assault posing as the climax.

Cover_RingMaster Review     Bullet With Your Name steps up next bullying ears with vocals and ravenous sounds though yet again there is an infectious spine and adventure to the track which has you welcoming its vicious assault. As in its predecessor and songs to come, there is as much a punk/hardcore richness to the tempest as a thrash/metal breeding, though it is the latter spawning another magnetic persuasion of emerging imaginative twists and endeavour. The individual skills and resourcefulness of the band is also in open evidence as well as an eagerness to push ideas and textures with elements of discord and unpredictability.

The release continues to impress and reveal new aspect within the band’s songwriting and sound as Imprisoned Darkness unleashes its fury next. Opening with a mesh of acidic grooves which in turn spark a delicious hook which can only be described as Dead Kennedys like, the song rallies attention and emotions. Those initial lures continue to grip within a sonic and vocal abrasion unafraid to colour its animus with elements of classic metal and metalcore like hues. It is inescapable persuasion though soon outshone by the upstanding Mirrors, its opening military in rhythmic tempting and militant in attitude. Once more metal and hardcore unite in one hellacious and infectiously alluring examination veined by skilled and flavoursome grooves amidst rich sonic exploits. The track takes top honours within Invictus and if you want a teaser before braving the Call To Arms onslaught, it tells you all you need to know about band, sound, and their stirring potential.

The EP is closed by The Core, a final uncompromising anthem you just know will have venues throbbing with bodies and attitude. Thrash and punk bred, the track is an intense and incendiary end to a tremendous first look at and feel of the Call To Arms sound and presence. Invictus is pleasingly raw and shows the band still finding its unique feet but there is no doubting that we have one rather promising and exciting protagonist in our midst which can only get big, bolder, and more fearsome.

The Invictus EP is available now @

RingMaster 03/07/2015

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Dendera – Pillars Of Creation

Album line-up

Album line-up

UK metallers Dendera whipped up plenty of eager attention and acclaim with their debut album The Killing Floor two years ago and now with its successor Pillars Of Creation poised to ignite ears and appetites with its own unique character, it is easy to expect the Portsmouth band doing the same again with greater success. Embracing a fresh roar of modern rock and invention with their heavy/classic metal breeding in their new offering, Dendera has honed a more distinct sound to themselves, not one to reinvent genres but undoubtedly one to really set the band apart from the tide of likeminded bands.

Since releasing their first encounter, the We Must Fight EP in 2011, it is fair to say the band has had the attention of fans and media alike, a ready to praise spotlight elevated by the release of The Killing Floor in 2013. Live too the band has earned a potent reputation and stature, touring and sharing stages with the likes of Saxon, UFO, Fozzy, Skindred, Firewind, Alestorm, Unearth, The Sword, Orange Goblin, Grand Magus, Ill Nino, POD, Soulfly, Kobra and the Lotus and….well the list goes on. Now the quintet of vocalist Ashley Edison, guitarists Stephen Main and Tony Fuller (the latter having left the band after the album’s recording to be replaced by David Stanton), bassist Bradley Edison, and drummer Andy Finch return with a seriously mighty slab of metal and with ease the band’s finest moment yet.

Dendera cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Pillars Of Creation opens with Claim Our Throne and quickly has intrigue and imagination awake with the track’s opening melodic suggestiveness. Its entrance sets the scene, casting a rich and welcoming landscape yet one with an initial melancholic air which as its depths and scenery builds and expands, evolves into a more intimidating presence. Eventually riffs and rhythms build imposing walls whilst hooks and grooves colour the increasingly compelling emergence of the track with inescapable temptation. In full stride the song roars with the impressive vocals of Edison leading the way as guitars and bass lay down magnetic bait through riffs and enterprise. The old school essences of bands like Iron Maiden and Saxon, which heavily coloured the band’s first album, are still clear hues in song and album but more spices now in a bolder and more creatively individual proposal from Dendera. It is not ground-breaking stuff as mentioned but the band has cultured something rich in variety and resourceful in exploration, and as shown by the starter and reinforced by subsequent songs, created a sound which will send fans into bliss whilst offering plenty for those who maybe do not have an appetite for a classic form of metal to have eager interest in.

The impressive start is matched by Bloodlust, the song straight away living up to its name and exploding with a far more raw and predatory presence than that of the previous song. Thrash spiced riffs are rampaging through ears from its first breath, they and rhythms whipped up by the confrontational vocals. It is a tenacious and grouchy encounter which mellows out for its melodically fiery chorus, but is soon back stirring up air and blood with the same insatiable surges of intensity and sound which it first erupted with. Its blend of contrasts is a fluid and alluring invitation, a persuasion emulated again in the stormy nature of In High Tide. A cantankerous tempest of rock ‘n’ roll, the track aligns sonic croons with bestial snarls and rugged hostility, their fluid passage making for a fascinating and increasingly anthemic incitement on ears and emotions.

Already across three songs, Dendera has infused elements from groove and melodic thrash to varied heavy rock, an involvement never diminishing just evolving and changing across every song starting with the stalking of senses that is Disillusioned. Another song reeking attitude and carrying an almost primal swagger, it prowls ears with an intimidating air driven by the ever impressive and masterful rhythmic webs of Finch. Groove wise there is a definite Pantera edge and swing to the track’s core lure, one in many ways copied in the excellent vocal persuasion of Edison and potently backed by the band’s roars and the guitar endeavours of Main and Fuller, especially with a seriously tasty and incendiary solo.

The Daylight Ending is a sweat and spit encounter, rhythms and the delicious bass bait of Bradley Edison a barbarous proposal matched by riffs whilst guitars and vocals carry an aggressive

new line-up

new line-up

nature to their provocative and inventive craft. The song is a gallop for the main, a relentless foraging of body and imagination leaving an even hungrier appetite which The Chosen One feeds with its dark and heavy trespass of the senses. The song does not quite grip as other tracks, missing an indefinable spark to ignite personal tastes but there is no denying or not enjoying its invention and adventure, especially it’s contagious and at times brutal gait.

The explosive sonic flames and melodic passion fuelling Unholy sparks a lick of lips within a few explosive moments next, riffs and grooves almost swarming over the senses and into the passions as bass and vocals virtually prowl with their own inescapable persuasion. The beats of Finch are a bully but a welcome protagonist as again he sculpts an addictive frame and engine room for a song.

Pillars Of Creation is brought to a close by Edge Of Tomorrow, a fire of aggression and passion within a sonically tempestuous soundscape. It fiercely pleases on first touch but, as the album, just impresses and draws keener lustful reactions with every listen. The release is a must for all classic and heavy metal fans but such the new adventure and variety the band has woven into their songwriting and sound, there is much for all metallers including, us among them, those without an instinctive taste for old school roars. In fact it very likely will, as here, emerge as a favourite of the year for fans and newcomers alike.

Pillars Of Creation is available via Metalbox Recordings from June 22nd @

RingMaster 22/06/2015

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The Dirty Youth – Gold Dust

The Dirty Youth Promo

After the success of their highly acclaimed debut album Red Light Fix, The Dirty Youth have returned with a rousing stomp of a follow-up, a sophomore album to firmly establish the South Wales band as one of the dynamically refreshing and emotionally rousing bands on the British music scene. Gold Dust manages to be infectiously familiar and dramatically new simultaneously, with emphasis on the latter. It also offers a collection of angst and passion fuelled roars which impact and linger far beyond the length of the release itself. Its sound is a fiery blend of alternative/rock pop which plays like a mix of Paramore meets Fall Out Boy with healthy whispers of The Bambi Killers and My Chemical Romance. It is feisty, contagious, and sure to give the summer some irresistible anthems.

Formed in 2007, The Dirty Youth has seen an increasing arousal of support and praise since the release of their debut single Fight three years later. Already the band was earning strong and eager responses through their live presence, but the song which became an internet hit gaining over 3 million views on YouTube, was the catalyst to broader recognition. Debut album Red Light Fix which followed soon after, exploited and drove the awakening attention on in fine and persuasive style, earning potent acclaim across media and fans alike. Since then the band has toured with the likes of Korn, The Rasmus, Reckless Love, Heavens Basement, and this year Fozzy and InMe, as well as making successful appearances at the likes of Hyde Park alongside Bruce Springsteen, Getaway Rocks with Slash, and Motörhead, and Download last year.

The Dirty Youth - Gold Dust Cover Artwork   Now the band uncages their second album and Gold Dust takes little time to stir up attention and appetite with its presence. Opener I’m Not Listening To You is an instantly eager protagonist just as quickly capturing the imagination with a stabbing tirade of beats from drummer Freddie Green matched by raw strikes of guitar wrapped in expressive melodies courtesy of Matt Bond’s keys. Hitting a magnetic stride straight after, the song becomes an enticing web of riffs and melodies spread by the guitars of Luke Padfield and Bond and courted by the great throaty bass lures provided by Leon Watkins and the equally dramatic swings of Green. Within its first minute the song shows that predictability has no place in the music of The Dirty Youth, every moment adding new twists ensuring the verse chorus verse etc. passage is never the same second time around. Vocally Danni Monroe, also showing great diversity in her delivery, is a rich flame to the song, a focal point around which surrounding sounds lick to earn their rightful share of praise.

Alive comes next and similarly has ears and imagination enthralled with its vocally charged and impassioned croon. Encased in a cage of rhythmic agitation and a sweltering key bred atmosphere, the song has a more restrained embrace to its energy compared to the all-out stomp of the first, yet is just as creatively and emotionally tempestuous as keys, guitars and voice entangle to create a dramatic character.

Its successor Just Move On, explodes on a rolling temptation of again galvanic rhythms, expanding its bright and alluring adventure with a host of inescapable hooks and a melodic breeze of invigorating enterprise. Like the songs before it is a busy encounter in its own distinct way ensuring, as the album, every listen has a fresh feel to ears as more is discovered with the song’s depths.

The great electro fuzz opening to The One sets up the infectiousness of its revelry up perfectly, the song going on to dance with inescapable virulence across its lusty body as vocals and keys spin an insatiable weave of imagination backed by striking rhythmic and guitar endeavour. The track manages at times to be as predatory as it is vivaciously catchy, The Dirty Youth again showing from songwriting to presentation, no assumptions can be made as the track stalks ears with its attitude shaped invention.

Darkest Wedding opens with a darker almost gothic air to its presence, a theatrical essence reminding of MCR colliding enjoyably with the melodic and harmonic fire of the song, which in turn has a feel of Forever Still to it. Fair to say the track does not impact as potently as its predecessors on its first few showings but instead smoulders and almost burns away at thoughts to emerge as a rich tempting over time.

Both Invincible and Bury Me Next To Elvis have body and emotions fully involved, the first again maybe needing a few more listens to complete its persuasion compared to earlier songs, but with a rip-roaring essence to its rich melodic breezes and a potent drama to the keys matched by the ever tempting vocals of Monroe, the song only wins the day. The second of the two shows its thick seductive hand early before bursting into an exhilarating tango of thumping beats, seductive grooves, and enflamed melodies matched by the siren tones Monroe. The song is glorious, sheer intoxication.

The poppier enticing of Don’t Feel Right is just as endowed with rhythmic muscle and sparkling invention as anything on the album whilst the evocative roar of Who I Am provides a conflagrant wind of emotion and creative drama. Both only impress, but get outshone by the immersive depths and kicky exploits of Bedroom Karate, the song a huge bracing bluster with an intricate invention at its heart.

The closing reflective hug of Holding On has the album leaving on another energetically imposing and captivating high, its rugged balladry a final voracious kiss on ears and pleasure. As that song, Gold Dust is an illustrious and majestic offering as at ease getting its rock hands dirty as it is in powerfully seducing the listener. Certainly some tracks out-perform others but from start to finish album and The Dirty Youth leave a smile on lips and a spring in the step.

Gold Dust is available from May 11th @ and most online stores.

RingMaster 11/05/2015

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Furyon – Lost Salvation


Anticipation for the successor to 2012 debut album Gravitas has been pretty much in top gear from almost the release day of that acclaimed success, and even more so after a four track cover mounted CD on Classic Rock Magazine UK last year, gave a very potent teaser for Furyon’s sophomore full-length. Now that Lost Salvation is upon us, it is fair to say that an already impressive and skilfully accomplished band has come of age, in sound, craft, and songwriting. Furyon is ready to stand with the big boys of classic rock and heavy metal, and show a few of them just how exciting rock ‘n’ roll is done.

Not being an instinctive fan of either heavy metal or classic rock, certainly of the more old-school styled offerings, we have demanding and probably unfair requirements and needs in order to be really impressed and even more so truly excited by a release but Furyon, as they did with their first album, succeed with ease. Again their songs upon Lost Salvation come with no excess baggage and are as hungry and at ease either forging big epic anthems or more intimately nurtured and designed propositions. This time though they feel like they come with more personal connections and inventiveness behind them; a new maturity to an already mature enterprise which is unafraid to explore broader essences of rock music within its core seeding. Produced by Rick Beato (Shinedown, Fozzy), Lost Salvation is Furyon’s aural masterpiece, but it still feels like just one more step in a continuing ascent; damn that anticipation is already kicking in again.

The album grips attention immediately, the tasty electronic infused opening of All That I Have inciting intrigue and appetite, especially once it blooms into a coaxing of riffs and firm rhythms with a delicious rich groove right through the middle. Relaxing a little as vocalist Matt Mitchell brings his fine delivery back to ears, the song seems to grow in weight and height with every subsequent chord and new flush of sound. It never explodes though, even in the chorus, just raising its temperature and intensity enough to enthral as the guitars of Luca Faraone, Tiago Rosado, and Chris Green, weave inventive designs. The song is the first anthem of the release, one as pungent and gripping as any peddle to the metal charge.

That kind of stampede comes with the album’s title track, the following Lost Salvation emerging as a thumping and contagious stomp which seamlessly blends vocal and sonic roars with predatory incitements, as well as a mystique woven solo which leaves lips licked and imagination lit. The dark tones of Alex Bowen’s bass go a long way to adding that sinister and intimidating edge to the song, backed by the sinew swung beats of Lee Farmery and a heavier growl of riffs from the guitars. This is anthem two and swiftly followed by the third in These Four Walls. To be FuryonLostSalvationhonest every song can be talked of in that way, even the more involved and exploratory tracks still holding that inescapable bait which has feet, neck muscles, and voice enlisted. The song is also partly a prowling croon, musically and vocally leaning heavily on the senses and emotions around more expressive crescendos. Maybe not as instant a persuasion as its predecessors, the song immerses ears and impresses more with every listen, leaving satisfaction brimming with pleasure.

The already in full flow invention and diversity makes another strong bow with the outstanding Scapegoat next, the track almost grouchy with heavy rock influences and grunge bred enterprise as it roams the psyche with its menacing rhythms and antagonistic riffs. Tempering its dark side though psychedelic rock like colours which ignite around the impressive tones of Mitchell, the song is a creative blaze to get happily lost within before Resurrect Me leads the listener into familiar Furyon territory with the kind of grooves and sonic adventure the band is renowned for. Flames of guitar invention are a persistent temptation to the band’s songs too and once more light up a not exactly startling, but definitely a thoroughly compelling slab of fiery rock ‘n ‘roll.

Left It with the Gods is another which maybe does not torch boundaries but definitely leaves ears and pleasure afire with its bellowing mixture of rock and metal whilst Good Sky calls in dark clouds and tempestuous intensity to leave thick pleasure in its wake. Epic in presence and tone, the track reaps some power metal tenacity with classic rock enterprise, as well as a slither of seventies metal spicing, moulding them in a potent roar which sets the appetite up for the excellent Dematerialize which casts its own dramatic shadows next. A far more intimate offering compared to its predecessor but also able to spread into a more expansive presence, the song bewitches with its blending of dark invention and sonic fire.

Lost Salvation is brought to a fine end by firstly the slowly strolling and richly grooved What You Need, a song suggesting an energy and anthemic potency to unite crowds in a live setting, and lastly the outstanding Wiseman. Again grooves and virulent riffs align to powerfully inciting rhythms and diversely delivered vocals, ensuring the album goes out on not only a bang but in a thought provoking tempest of invention.

The last growl of Lost Salvation is another of its loftier peaks, whilst the album itself is destined to be one of the classic rock pinnacles of 2015. It will take some special offerings to surpass it and convince our testing demands that is for sure.

Lost Salvation is available now on CD and digitally via Dream Records/Cargo Records

RingMaster 25/02/2015

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Sister – Disguised Vultures


    It is easy to declare that on Disguised Vultures, the new album from Swedish metallers Sister, there is very little new going on but you can just as comfortably announce that the album is a refreshing and imagination teasing slab of sleaze punk inspired metal which for the main thrills and ignites satisfying urges within feet and emotions. Raw and contagious, seducing like Frankenstein Drag Queens from Planet 13 meets Crashdiet in a glam cast pit of degenerate rioting, band and album create a provocative brawl where wantonness and salacious attitudes are encouraged and sonic bruising recommended.

    The ten track release follows debut album Hated which like its successor was unleashed on Metal Blade Records. Since forming in 2006, Sister’s sound has certainly evolved, if not dramatically, since first EP Deadboys Making Noise in 2009. Even more so their craft and adventure has spread from just horror punk type scenarios to maturer enterprises taking on greater conciseness and potency on the way as evidenced enjoyably by Disguised Vultures. Tours and shows with the likes of Hardcore Superstar, Wednesday 13, Crashdiet, Fozzy, and U.D.O. as well as festival appearances between albums has only strengthened the stature and awareness for the Stockholm based quartet’s sound whilst earning them a reputation as one impressive irrepressible live encounter but you feel that Disguised Vultures just might be the key to turn the lock of greater recognition even if it leaves expectations fed rather than starved predominantly.

    The band go straight for the jugular with opener My Enemy, its first breath a roaring blaze of punk infested scuzz which Coverthough immediately hitting full on between the eyes suddenly steps into what could have been its intro. A sudden chilled ambience littered with samples intercepts the imagination at this point whilst a ravenous heavy bass tone prowls inviting in rampant predatory rhythms which soon add their menace to the emprise. It is an intriguing and inspired start which arguably song and album never replicates again preferring to reinvent and twist existing flames of invention. As bass and rhythms enslave the ears and a sonic wind from the guitar shapes the landscape as the song hits full gear again, vocals and sounds slip into a more regular and predictable encounter. Nevertheless it is a rousing and compelling confrontation which uncages the same antagonistic belligerence and contagion found in Murderdolls and even more so the early and solo work of Wednesday 13.

    The impressive start makes way for the first single from the album Sick. With heavy metal melodic taunting and sinew driven rhythmic barracking leading to one of those anthemic choruses which you fight but always succumb, the song is an easily accessible and pleasing stomp offering nothing to be slack jawed over but providing a full and tasty meal for the appetite to eagerly embrace. Combined with its predecessor the album has already taken a tight grip which is sustained by both the title track and the next up Arise. The first of the two lacks the spark of the first two but romps with a juicy groove coring fiery riffs and melodic enticement whilst more restrained rhythms frame good group vocals and the rasping lead of Jamie. It is a decent enough track to settle down with but soon surpassed by its successor. Loaded with addictive barbed hooks which dig deeply and an infection soaked chorus driven home by again vocalised anthemic temptation, the song is three minutes of insatiable horror punk wrapped in sleaze rock, not ground breaking but quite irresistible.

     Another pinnacle of the album arrives with We Salute ‘Em, a heavy duty rapacious brute of a song which from its intensive weighty entrance steers the senses through a volcanic and quarrelsome tempest of scarring riffs and spiteful rhythms under a melodically cast sonic sky. Adding little twists and sparks of imagination to its absorbing body of sound, the track is another to seize and hold the imagination long past the departure of the album, something not all songs such as Naked and DMN can boast. Before them though Sister sets free Slay Yourself, a punk infused treat with a causticity which is as inciting and magnetic as the sonic storm around it. The next up Naked is a power ballad which though well-crafted just does not spark any hunger for itself unlike other songs. It is strong and skilfully presented though making a break from the rioting but soon has thoughts looking at what is next.

   From the again okay DMN, a predictable yet enthused growling fury, (Stop the) Revolution pulls the album back to its earlier heights. A rhythmic enticement opens up the persuasion and instantly has focus glued to its bait, a trap which never relents right through the whole of the song. A gnarly carnivorous bass predation is equally as seductive, combining with the drums for a dramatic canvas upon which sonic endeavour and melodic flames provide more potent adventure. The best track on the album it is punk metal at its best and the perfect lure into the band.

    The album closes with Please Kill Me, a song which feels like a filler more than anything. Certainly it does not live up to the strengths and exciting toxicity which marks the rest of the release but it cannot deter Disguised Vultures from being a fun album to play with. It is not going to provide you with anything startlingly new but for strong, pleasing, and enduring anthems of horror punk sleaze you could do a lot worse than Sister’s new tease.

Disguised Vultures is available now in North America and on the 24th of January in Europe.


RingMaster 21/01/2014

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Until Dawn – Horizon

Until Dawn 2013 promo-1

Containing a fury of passion, aggression, and sheer unbridled power, Horizon the new album from Canadian metallers Until Dawn, is a thrilling riotous introduction of a band with certain craft and unbridled creative energy. Not that the band itself is new on certainly their home metal scene, their debut self-titled album capturing the imagination of a great many in their homeland upon release in 2011, but for most of us on the outside their second full length is the first time the quintet has stepped upon the radar. Going by the quality and strength of the album it will not be the last time either and as they develop into a more distinctly unique presence ahead, you can only feel that Until Dawn will become a potent force of the future.

Hailing from Fort McMurray, Alberta, the line-up of brothers Deke (guitar) and Luke Worrell (drums), Adam Macleod (vocals), Steve White (guitar), and Darren Ehler (bass), forge a tight and hungry mix of melodic and intensive metal with the flames of heavy rock, the result an often bruising and always thoroughly compelling brawl of a sound with fiery depths which has led the band to be compared to the likes of Killswitch Engage, In Flames, and Trivium. The years since forming has seen the band shares stages impressively alongside the likes of Kiss, Korn, Volbeat, Billy Talent, Kiss, A Day To Remember, Hell Yeah, All Else Fails, Fozzy, Ill Scarlett, 3 Inches of Blood and many more, but as their new album steps into view with a flare and confident swagger which oozes promise and maturity you sense the widest recognition is beginning to stir. Their sound, one suspects, is still in evolution as they look to create a distinct space within metal and though the release has not achieved that it suggests it is on the way.

The self-released album stands face to face with the ear from its opening seconds as Roamers And Lurkers prods the senses into Horizon Booklet Coveralertness with scythes of resonating guitar punches cutting across a niggling beckoning of riffs. With bass and drums casting their sinew woven net around the invitation the track charges into an attention grabbing blaze of energy and feisty sound, the excellent vocals of Macleod which fall somewhere between gravelly and clean, offering an expressive rage of narrative and urgency to the equally energetic sound now in full flow. Though those references earlier mentioned are understandable the bands that immediately make an suggestive comparison are Bloodsimple and UK band I-Def-I, the expertly blended mix of styles and imposing intensity a familiar and potent weapon between all three impressive artists.

The following Strings Of The Dammed is less stressful in its attack though no less fierce of heart and presence, the guitars carving out a provocative sonic strewed wash of enterprise aligned to the again tempting varied vocal enticement. It is a formidable slice of inventive persuasion, a virulent contagion to its adventure and cultivated skill to its presentation securing the hunger of the passions early on and only gripping tighter across the expanse of the track, the same attribute you can lie at the feet of both The Red Sun Rises This Day and Third Knee, two lethally addictive tracks which only add greater irresistible toxicity to the release as their compelling barbed offerings continue their creative persistence. It is fair to say that there is a surface similarity which has its say at times, especially between the first two of this trio, but it is never a strong issue though maybe in the future the band will be picked up on it.

The towering This Fallen Fortress ignites further depths of pleasure next; the opening bass crawl over pungent imagination a spark to the unleashing of the most savage premise of the album yet, though equally it merges it with a smouldering melodic entrapment rife with allurement and intrigue. This certain pinnacle of the album seemingly plays like a trigger as Horizon unveils a new wealth of striking and explosively evocative songs to match its opening. The fervent passion of A Conjurer Of Cheap Tricks and the exceptional predatory Time Tested Fortune snatch greater hunger and lust from the body whilst The Trial continues the rapacious greed with another stirring expulsion of uncompromising creative sway and bait to cement the album’s place in the passions, even if amongst them DNR is a weak link in the inspired aural slavery.

Completed by Polar Parallels and its title track, two more fertile canvases for thoughts and passions to immerse within, plus the bonus tracks WM3 and Richard, the first of the two another self-asserting treat on the release, Horizon is a thrilling and imperious assault from a band with a tremendous future. It may not be the most original album this year but with its fire and distinct craft it is undoubtedly one of the most enjoyable and refreshing.


RingMaster 06/08/2013

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