The Bivouac Detectives – Shooting The Breeze

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If you are looking for a mellow moment to wash away the grime and emotional trespass of the day then a date with The Bivouac Detectives is definitely in order. The British duo from Birmingham has just released debut album Shooting The Breeze, a twelve track seduction of acoustic rock ‘n’ roll providing chilled and often mischievous adventures for ears and imagination.

The band consists of vocalist/guitarist Norm Elliott, formerly of Norm and The Nightmarez and before that Micky & The Mutants, and bassist Mick Couch of psych/indie poppers The Oracle Project. Their union has emerged as Norm’s last band comes to a close and the Mick’s outfit releases their new single Shine A Light On You. The Bivouac Detectives has a distinctly different sound to both of those propositions yet equally fuses whispers of rockabilly instinctiveness and psych temptation into the songs which tantalise from within Shooting The Breeze. Recorded this past January and now released via Western Star Records, the album is a web of flavours colluding to present rock ‘n’ roll at its stripped down, expressive best.

With all songs penned by Norm and coloured by the united skills of both men, the album opens with Sant Amorai. Norm’s guitar instantly caresses ears with a melodic seduction, its tone and the song’s atmosphere sultry and melancholic simultaneously. It is a climate aided by wistful keys around tenderly plucked strings whilst the bass provides a slow croon in its own right, adding solemn hues to the tale being revealed by the distinctive vocals of Norm. The song borders dark country with psychedelic spicery and for four minutes plus has senses and thoughts transfixed.

11018871_369520576560947_6746865838487829245_n   The following Fine Memories brings a more folkish embrace, though yet again those emotive shadows show their magnetic faces again. An intimate reflection hugged by bass and guitar, the song serenades with a raw mesmeric charm before making way for the smiling enticement of Beyond the Planets and in turn the reflective/nostalgic commentary of Car Windscreen. The first of the two has that aural Englishness which no other land can emulate, a quaint and infectious devilment which has body and psyche bewitched whilst touring additional spices from further afield. Its successor has a sound which is almost Brit pop like in an acoustic scenery sparking thoughts of those sixties/early seventies visual dramas of real life from the streets.

That looking at the lives of those which came before across varied decades of Britain continues with the excellent Friends, King and Country, the tale of old soldiers and sacrifice. Melodies and bass hues cast a creative theatre which is shaped further by the striking narrative of lyrics and vocals, it all inviting ears and thoughts to be potently involved in an aural archive of life.

I’m Fallin’ In Love has the listener entranced yet again with its fifties rock ‘n’ roll croon. Vocals and melodies offer a cheeky twang to their exploits which can only be greedily devoured whilst the bass resonates with its own just as captivating tempting. The best track on the album it has the old school innocence and poetic simplicity which wrapped many a Buddy Holly proposal whilst Wilberforce Montgomery next, returns to that English folk bred persuasion of earlier songs and explores the fictional/real? tale of a soul earning his deserved attention only after a poor and unrewarded life has past.

The album’s title track lays its claim to the passions next with its blues rock temptation, again a vintage tang flavouring the thrilling stroll before the evocative romance of Under the Moonlit Tree dances with the imagination and straight after and the country blues theatre of Show Me Mercy grabs its own healthy share of the plaudits gathering thickly around the album. Like Elvis sings Tom Waits, Norm and Mick create a compelling persuasion bred from decades of musical seeding.

With a title like They Danced By the Light of the Moon you expect a lively romance of a song and the pair does not disappoint, entwining rockabilly and folk in an energetic yet smouldering embrace emulated by the song’s protagonists. It is another inescapable infection of a song, a rich continuation of the creative persuasion fuelling the album, though shaded a touch by the closing revelry of Badabadabadabada. You have seen those films and shows where the archetypal Englishman with the twisty moustache and striped smoking jacket flirt with and charm the ladies? Well this song is the musical equivalent. Once more that specific British sound pervades the imagination but in tandem with a fifties rock ‘n’ roll croon which comes so easily to the songwriting of Norm, as shown across his previous bands.

The song is a brilliant end to a tremendous release, an inspired and mouth-watering escape from the ills of the world if only for forty minutes or so. Hopefully this is the first of much more from The Bivouac Detectives, but if not, Shoot the Breeze alone has the potential to ensure the band gains and deserves a place on the weekly soundtrack of a great and increasing many. We do not want another Wilberforce Montgomery going on do we?

Shoot the Breeze is available now via The Western Star Recording Company @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/shooting-the-breeze/id973800036

https://www.facebook.com/Bivouacdetectives

RingMaster 02/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Earthist – Lightward

Earthist Official Photo

Hailing from Italy, alternative rockers Earthist have announced themselves on a wider landscape with a debut album which is full of surprises, invention, and most of all thoroughly enjoyable encounters. Lightward has moments where things are not as imposingly convincing as in other thrilling parts but from start to finish it is fair to say that the Parma quartet has presented one captivating, potential drenched introduction.

The band was formed in 2012 by young musicians whose ages (20 to23) are a deception to the maturity of their invention and sound. Drawing on a diverse array of influences and flavours to spice up their own imagination (folk, progressive, and Britpop amongst them), Earthist swiftly found eager support in their homeland for their Now. Here. Or Nowhere. EP of 2013, which in turn helped open up opportunities for the band to spread out live and subsequently play alongside numerous other emerging and better known bands from within and outside of Italy at important festivals. A critically acclaimed feature film by Emanuele Valla called Dreaming Alaska also featured some of the band’s songs, but now with the worldwide release of Lightward via Epictronic, the foursome of Federico Ronchini (lead vocals / guitar), Francesco Parrino (lead vocals, keys), Giacomo Giuffredi (guitar / backing vocals), and Alberto Tanara (drums) are knocking on broader attention, and with its unpredictable invention and smiling imagination it is easy to suspect potent success coming their way.

Opener Not Today is a swift melodic anthem in the ear, its rhythms and riffs a sturdy initial wall of tempting within which keys dangle bright temptation. A great bassline emerges from a following calm, its throaty lure in thick contrast to the just as engaging vocals which if you did not realise the band was Italian give no real hint to the band’s nationality. As the song’s shadowed but summery stroll continues, guitar and keys offers sparkles of light hooks and teasing enterprise over the stirring core drive of that bass and accompanying similarly intensive riffs. The band has been compared to the likes of Biffy Clyro and Mumford and Sons and it is easy to see why, especially in reference to the first of the two in this track alone.

Earthist _ Lightward   The following Miracle moves into view with a coaxing of jagged chords before inviting crisp beats and another dark throated and catchy bassline. Emerging as a flavoursome slice of indie rock it also has a pop punk air to its chorus and aligning vocals, whilst across its whole length the song almost teases with its busily creative nature. The same can be said of Sirens Sing within its own unique presence. Creaking wood is a suggestive start to the song before an acoustic caress of guitars and growing melodies across keys and strings snuggle provocatively upon ears and imagination, each voicing the haunted romance of some kind inside the track’s elegant presence. The song, as the album, increases its potency and appeal with every listen, blossoming from an enjoyable first encounter to another peak within the album.

A spatial atmosphere instantly engulfs the senses and next song The Astronaut, keys a celestial breeze from which the song suddenly slips into an energetic and vivacious indie pop romp. Hooks gleam as they take and sonic endeavour shines as it entwines the infection posing as a song. Like a mix of Super Happy Fun Club and Good Charlotte, nineties and more current essences collude for a fiery anthem, inciting a new flush of hunger in the appetite before Brighter Later and after it Fox When The Night show another twist in the nature of the release. The first of the two is a rock pop serenade with a feisty heart and lively tenacity whilst the second with an equally lusty energy, explores a more new wave/indie inventiveness. Neither quite lives up to the previous songs yet each provides moments of richly pleasing ideation in a constant feel good proposition, the second of the two especially engaging a smile of satisfaction.

Classically seeded keys and a great earthy bass tone make Step Out Of The Shade an especially flavoursome proposition next, though the great vocals and a Beatle-esque whiff to the chorus certainly help its appeal too, whilst Helicon straight after, is another slow to light the emotions encounter. To be honest it never quite finds the spark needed to truly excite but enjoyment is never in doubt whilst in its increasingly tempestuous company. Neither song can match up to Jolly Roger (A Pirate’s Tale) though, the track from its opening boot on wood rhythmic march gripping body and thoughts. It reinforces the opening gambit with a radiant piano coaxing and a guitar crafted seducing. Vocals again impress and add new texture and quality, their joyful swing matching the shanty like swagger of the track. Bass snarls and folk revelry only colour the full blooded adventure further, all alluring hues going to make the pinnacle of the album. Revealing yet another new facet to album and songwriting the band’s imagination shows an experimental side easy to hope they explore much more ahead.

Sealance (In My Eyes) provides a raucous flight of radiant keys and thumping rhythms within an intensive sonic embrace next whilst Time For A Fight manages to weave strains of Muse, The Doors, and Weezer into a blustery and again increasingly magnetic collusion of sixties, seventies, and a more current festivity. Their satisfying sounds make way for The Lighthouse, a more than decent close to the album with a Coldplay like croon within a lively simmering melodic landscape. Like its predecessor, the track pleases without setting fires yet each have something within their presence which is nothing short of pleasing.

The album is a treat of a first glimpse into the creative world of Earthist, a realm sure to only grow and breed new thrilling experiments and creative emprises ahead. We for one cannot wait and suggest fans of melodic contagion do not either by taking a punt on Lightward right now.

Lightward is available now via Epictronic/Plastic Head Distribution LTD @ http://www.plastichead.com/item.asp?ex=fitem&target=EPIC005 and https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/lightward/id958116679

https://www.facebook.com/Earthistmusic

RingMaster 31/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The BeauBowBelles – A Thing of Reality

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I will be honest, for the first time, other than rooting for Finland’s Lordi a few years back, there was a flicker of interest in this year’s Eurovision song contest once learning that the UK entry had a sound seeded in the ever infectious realm of swing. Any hopes and attention were defused of course once having heard the song and finding it had turned an instinctively contagious sound into something yawningly bland. It was poor old school with no adventure and modern imagination fuelling its proposal; once again the contest living up to its uninspiring reputation.

What does this have to do with the new proposition from The BeauBowBelles you are probably asking right now? Well the failure of seeing what is in and the choosing of what represents our voraciously inventive British music scene just leaves thoughts bewildered when, if we go down the swing road, the likes of the Electric Swing Circus, Molotov Jukebox, and especially The BeauBowBelles are creating irresistible and inventively magnificent propositions. Whether any of them would want to be involved in such an event is another question but each spins a web of virulently inventive escapades bred from diverse and colourful sounds, and this is where the seriously impressive A Thing of Reality, the debut album from The BeauBowBelles comes in.

The London quartet’s new melodic jaunt is a mouth-watering adventure of folk swing cast in unique sceneries of personal intimacy and expansive revelry with every track. It can stomp like a dance hall, seduce like a temptress, and reflect with emotive elegance, but whichever avenue a song escorts the imagination to it has body and attention enthralled. In many ways the delicious exploits of A Thing of Reality is no surprise having been spellbound by their first EP To The Moon in 2013 and a year later the single All Over That. They were sparkling appetisers for this first full-length dance but only a hint of its majesty too.

An album version of that last single opens up A Thing of Reality, and again as the first time around, All Over That easily captures the imagination with its opening embrace of melancholic yet smiling strings within seconds. No matter the number of times heard, the entrance of the song casts a spell, which the quartet of Bertie Anderson (vocals, violin), Emma Price (vocals, flutes, accordion, bells), Ros Wilks (vocals, violin, keytar), and Marcus Daborn (guitar, kickdrum), proceed to turn into a blaze of swirling devilry. That is a little down the line though, as guitar and a sultry kiss of brass light ears next, their coaxing the perfect company to the tantalising vocals. It is like an emotive waltz, a rising dance which is soon quick stepping with flirty riffs and mesmeric coverharmonies. Then the romp truly begins as thick basslines and vivacious energies descend on the senses, awakening an even more wanton appetite for its offerings. A gentle relaxation breaks the surge momentarily before the devilment swiftly returns for another whirl of rhythmic hips aligned to tenacious gypsy punk curves, all aligning for one infectious melodic shuffle.

The brilliant start is matched straight away by the following Lo Ho Down. Again a slow temptation brings the track into view, a reflective shanty of sound the initial invitation. It is also just an introduction to livelier things, a folk emprise with Celtic breath showing its light feet and keen moves soon after before drawing on even broader spices as a country and jazz persuasion adds their hues to the continually evolving canvas and gait of the contagion.

The summery charm of Blue Tree floats in next; it’s almost whimsical spots of melodic colour a smile on the ear within which voice and strings paint an increasingly colourful and vivid picture. There is a sixties pop air to the heart of the song and a classical elegance to the narrative of the violins and horns, both sparking up the imagination for the emerging anthemic stroll of the excellent encounter. Three tracks in and the album is as varied and creatively expansive as anyone could wish for and continuing to move into new pastures as the warm deceptive balladry of Sleep and the delicate flirtation of Fly Away seduce and serenade the senses. The first gentle strokes ears with its calm melodies and evocative textures yet has a mischief in its heart as it brews up a stirring chorus with invigorating rhythms and similarly gripping theatre. From a calm start the track turns into a chest beating, rattling romp of a croon and again has emotions and body lustfully involved. Its successor remains the serene host of bright melodies and magnetic adventure it initial portrays, though it too breeds a drama which adds an anthemic edge to it all.

A fifties rock ‘n’ roll revelry aligns to the insatiable energy of swing for Lotions, its rousing body and temptation a feisty waltz for feet and energies. The track makes for another mighty pinnacle on the album, from voices to percussion, strings to keys, and the rest, inescapable bait in a creative emprise stealing the passions. It is exhausting fun after which a breath can be taken with The Boy with a Boater on his Head, though it too is a transfixing sway. There is that particular English uniqueness to its music which no one else outside our shores can emulate but equally a country-esque whine and pop swagger makes rich spices in the fascinating mixture.

The graceful Sophie is a celestial kiss of harmonies and emotional intimacy, a resourceful ballad which as previous songs climbs from mere riveting hugs into almost riotously melodic dramas, keys especially poignant here. Its alluring smooch is subsequently followed by the vaudeville delights of Fools & Fairytales. The track ebbs and flows with cinematic essences and stage like performance from the sounds. It is like a soundtrack to a play wrapped in folk lore and personal exploration, and again aural theatre is the best way to describe the song and its spellbinding fantasy, that and ingenious majesty.

The smouldering seduction of Make Up brings the album to a close; its seventies psychedelic pop and classical grace an absorbing end to one irresistible and thrilling release. Certain songs overwhelm body and soul whilst the rest like an epidemic relentlessly seduce every pore; the result an irrepressible gest to light any and every day.

A Thing of Reality is available now digitally and on CD via Woodster Records @ http://thebeaubowbelles.bandcamp.com/album/a-thing-of-reality

http://www.thebeaubowbelles.com/

RingMaster 10/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Sara Lowes – The Joy Of Waiting

Photo Credit Emily Dennison

Photo Credit Emily Dennison

There is no other way of saying it, the voice of Sara Lowes is sheer mesmerism, an inescapable siren drawing the listener into adventures which musically transfixes ears and imagination just as potently. Her new album The Joy Of Waiting, is complete evidence of the fact, basking in these bewitching elements and in turn immersing the listener in charming and imaginatively charmed embraces. The successor to her acclaimed debut Back To Creation of 2011, The Joy Of Waiting is a quite simply a soul mate for anyone with a taste of melodic and harmonic alchemy.

Based in Manchester and North East bred, Lowes is the keyboardist in The Earlies and has working with the likes of Daniel Johnston, King Creosote, Jens Lakeman, Jim Noir, Jesca Hoop, and Dawn Landes on her CV. Her music draws on a diverse maze of flavours and styles, classically bred arrangements entwining and invigorating essences from progressive rock to pop, jazz to seventies psychedelia, and more besides. First album Back To Creation, as mentioned drew potent praise and support which The Joy Of Waiting can only emulate and reap greater rewards upon itself. Inspired by J.B Priestley, with a track using his name as a title, and looking at “observations on our perplexing relationships with time”, the lady’s new full-length is a spell of beauty and evocative reflections, and quite breath-taking.

The album’s title track starts things off and immediately is flirting with gypsy folk like strings which swirl provocatively around ears and emotions, their colourful expression joined by just as picturesque keys and melodies. There is a baroque like scent to the piece of music too, an older drama which wraps around the more fiery and sultry climate which emerges as the song continues revealing its heated landscape. Eventually the song drifts away and within a swift taking of a breath, the album swings straight back as Most Things and a riveting pop contagion which is soon dancing with the compelling tones of Lowes its puppeteer. The track is a ridiculously infectious kiss, a quite magnificent encounter courting sixties beat pop vivacity as fizzy tendrils of carnival-esque keys sport a creativity which reminds of The Stranglers Dave Greenfield.

Lowes has a voice which is hard to compare to another, though on the first songs and a few others tracks, she bears a resemblance to Brighton singer songwriter Cate Ferris, the following new saralowes2single I Find You another blissful example. The song is a smoulder of thickly simmering melodies and enchanting harmonies over a great distortion kissed rhythmic tempting. Keys again bring psyche spinning enterprise to spice up the song’s enthralling canvas, whilst the ethereal radiance of voice and surrounding sweltering sounds merge like a mix of Solar Halos and The Capsules. It is pure creative majesty and has ears and appetite enslaved by the time it makes way for the courtly hug of JB Priestley. Lowes straight away has ears and pleasure cupped as orchestral spices back her sunny presence, the opening gentle lure a passage into a feistier but no less radiant stroll of warm jazz seeded pop catchiness. As across all songs, there is a tapestry of different flavours and styles colluding in their support of the vocals, each song as here, as unpredictable as it is immediately accessible and magnetic.

The intimate balladry of Bright Day smooches with the senses next, its refined texture and voice a warm glaze over ears, even if not quite igniting them as its predecessors do. That success, is sublimely achieved by Chapman Of Rimes, a seventies bloomed pop rock flight with celestial harmonies and bold hooks under a blaze of brass seduction, and even more so right after by the excellent With A Mirror. The opening lure of bass and keys with rolling rhythms is enough to seduce unbridled attention for the new song, helped all the more by the vocal hints which whisper within the sultry enticement and rays of brass bred sunshine which light up ears. Like being lost in your lover’s arms, the song strokes and infuses body and thoughts with a romancing croon of voice and sound. That alone would be enough to wax lyrical about the song but with unpredictable and superbly infused twists of ideation amidst wrong-footing turns, the song is a master-class in songwriting and aural theatre.

Given the hard task to follow such a triumph is Little Fishy, and it makes easy work of keeping enjoyment clasped. From a celestial yet intimate soundscape cast by wistful keys and harmonies, the song emerges as something akin to progressive rock and lounge/electro pop, weaving its own virulent aural carnival.

The quiet reflection of For The Seasons calms things down next, the captivation a haunting ballad with a 10CC breeze to its air, before Cutting Room Floor slips into ears and simply radiates elegance and beauty whilst adding further fascinating diversity and invention to The Joy Of Waiting. The song is a gorgeous soar of melodic enterprise setting up the listener enthusiastically for the final pair of songs which are seemingly placed in different order on the physical and digital copy of the album.

The Clock Plays It’s Game provides a melancholic temptation which blossoms with the dark and light suggestiveness of strings against the just as potent call of Lowes’ voice and classically dramatic keys. Maybe not as immediately impacting as other songs, it is a lingering kiss increasing its stature with every listen, whilst Horizons is a track which just lifts emotions and spirit with sublime craft and open relish. Its swirl of hooks and melodies is a gala of folk pop smiles and sixties pop merry making and quite sensational. Whether the last song on the album or not, we suggest you make it that anyway as you leave its company with a song in the heart and melodic manna in the ears, a remedy sure to cure all ills and chase away dark shadows, much like The Joy Of Waiting as a whole really.

The Joy Of Waiting is available now via Railings Records, digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/the-joy-of-waiting/id963782296 and physically @ http://www.saralowes.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/SaraLowesMusic

RingMaster 25/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

The Permanent Smilers – One Real Big Identity Crisis

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One Real Big Identity Crisis, the new album from UK band The Permanent Smilers, is a release with no apparent direction or framework to its intent and enterprise; a release which basically lives up to its title but boy is it a slab of irresistible fun. Through thirteen songs, band and album take on a torrent of different styles and nostalgic flavours which really should not work alongside each other as coherently as they do, and all come with a humour and mischief which adds to rather than overrides the adventure of the individual characters. It is slightly deranged but not chaotic and thoroughly unpredictable yet not messy considering the vast sounds employed from song to song. Most of all though it is simply a compelling proposition which comes from left-field, keeps its heart there, and leaves the most enjoyable experience in its wake.

There is little we can tell you about the band itself, though The Permanent Smilers is fronted by Richard Lemongrower who was the songwriter behind Norwich band The Lemongrowers, a band releasing two albums on Noisebox at some point in time. Produced with Jonny Cole and mixed by David Pye, One Real Big Identity Crisis takes little time in lighting ears and imagination, though it opens with maybe its weakest song. That is a little misleading as it takes a song to get a handle, or try to, on the release anyway but certainly Identity Crisis did not really grip attention as much as elsewhere and left thoughts with a slight wondering of what have we got ourselves into. Strongly swung rhythms and similarly intensive riffs clasp ears within the first breath of the song, their bait a jabbing lure against the unpolished yet engaging tones of Richard. It is an easily flowing and energetic slice of rock ‘n’ roll with the bass of Jonny Cole pungent bait at the centre of the stomp. Truthfully there is little wrong with the song but it lacks a spark in its presence which evades the reaction it probably deserves and is easy to imagine being found with others.

The good if unsure start is soon a thing of the past as Uh-Oh takes over with its festive folk swagger and emerging carnival like devilment. Sporting a splash of Tankus The Henge to its relaxed but vibrant stroll, the song is a constant swing of melodic hips as it moves towards an unexpected and mouth-watering slip into a Dukes of Stratosphear like ethereal psychedelic charm and climate, returning back into festive mood soon after as if it had just emerged from a dip in the sea. The song is fascinating and bewitching, and just the first of numerous adventures into different landscapes, as shown next by the punk pop devilry of You Know Where To Go. Bred from seventies power pop and carrying a mix of The Flys and The Lurkers to its hookery, the song just hits the sweet spot with its insatiable energy and mischief, before making way for the more relaxed melodic embrace of Elastic. The keys and guitars of Richard weave another enthralling web of sound here, this time with a sniff of sixties pop to it which is punctuated by the crisp beats of drummer Pete Fraser and dark bass lures of Cole. By its close, the song somehow becomes a thumping anthem without losing any of its melodic and gentle elegance, a potent feat for any song to offer.

Both Just No Good and It Doesn’t Work Anymore keep album and ears bouncing with energy and pleasure, the first using a garage rock spicing again teased by a sixties almost Doors like toxicity, whilst the second again spawning from the same kind of seeding brings a rawer punk grouchiness with its presence. Each has feet and emotions joining their rigorous coaxing before Ghosts allows a breather for the body if not the imagination with its Simon and Garfunkel meets Burt Bacharach like embrace. The brass persuasion of Dave Land seductively flames over similarly captivating keys and vocal caresses through the song but as always there is a scent of devilment to the song with thoughts wondering at times if they should be enjoying this as much as they are. There is no escaping its thick charm though.

The next pair of songs brings a rich sense of XTC to their enterprise and persuasion, Rebel broadening that over time with a seventies kissed soar of progressive fuelled psyche rock whilst its successor, Voodoo has the stamp of Andy Partridge to its flirtatious pop and virulent enterprise. The pair leaves nostalgia glazed lips licked and, through the latter especially, ears basking in psyche pop of the most delicious kind complete with jazzy brass and funk spirited unpredictability.

You Know When To Go dives straight back into punk infused rock ‘n’ roll for its brief but sparkling instrumental before Unforseen manages to conjure an encounter which recalls the quirky indie pop of The Monochrome Set and the plainer but no less tasty essence of Tom Robinson. The song alternatively stomps and swirls around ears, every passing hook and melody it conjures an intriguing and quaint yet voracious tease before it moves off into the distance allowing the outstanding See Through You to make its lingering mark. Acoustically shaped with an avalanche of panzer gun delivered rhythms, the song initially is a smouldering and majestic sway of sound. It subsequently explodes though into a tempest of energy and revelry which only lifts a great song to a heady plateau. Imagine the volatile energy of De Staat at their most devilish with the epidemic hunger of eighties punk/power pop and you get a sense of the glorious treat.

One Real Big Identity Crisis closes with the acoustic lullaby of Sleepyhead, the album ending as it started with a track which does not catch the ardour triggered elsewhere but certainly graces ears with tantalising propositions. This album is one unexpected and seriously enjoyable adventure; not breaking down boundaries or venturing into the unknown but never providing a moment when you are not surprised or wrapped up in its refreshing simplicity woven by skill and invention. There is only time left to lick lips all over again as we close off and dive straight back into The Permanent Smilers’ irresistible arms, something we suggest you do too upon release.

One Real Big Identity Crisis is released in April via IRL Records with new single Identity Crisis out in March.

http://www.thepermanentsmilers.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Permanent-Smilers/1539697962929725

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Little Lapin – Remember The Highs

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There is no getting away from the tantalising Chrissie Hynde essence to the voice behind and The Pretenders like colouring of new single Remember The Highs, but equally there is no escaping the seductive potency and unique bewitching qualities of song and creator either.

   Little Lapin is a British singer-songwriter who from the release of her self-titled debut EP in 2013 has continued to inspire a greedy appetite for the melodic folk/pop romance she crafts. She has captivated audiences and imagination around the world, UK crowds and fans joined by those in New Zealand where she was based for five years, and in New York where she recently performed the last performance of her acoustic tour. As mentioned it is not a new persuasion on offer though, the song Waiting Room from her first and equally well-received EP, luring radio play with the likes of Tom Robinson on BBC Radio 6 and eager online radio play. Ahead of her highly anticipated debut album, Remember The Highs is now here to tease an even greater appetite and anticipation for the forthcoming full-length whilst confirming Little Lapin as one of British folk’s most bewitching propositions.

Remember The Highs opens on a wonderful tangy guitar melody, its winy lure an instant temptation swiftly matched by the mesmeric vocal croon of Little Lapin which in turn is embraced byPicture 76 an additional caress of reserved but potent guitar strings. That Pretenders simmer is lively from the start, recalling Hynde and co around their first album but similarly casting a fresh and vivacious breath which has a texture more aligned to a Metric or even The Cranberries. The song continues to entwine ears and imagination with its spicy melody and sultry temptation, assisted by a great dark bassline which flirts behind ever compelling vocals. The song is delicious, pure manna for body and soul and the most rigorous enticement likely to be heard this year for any album.

The track is accompanied by Over The Draft, an acoustically crafted smooch with ears moving into a more folk bred proposal compared to the rock pop triumph of its predecessor. Radiating charm and melodic elegance as a rhythmic shuffle offers a lively backing, the song shimmers over the senses. There is an essence of Lizzyspit to the song, revealing more of the variety within sound and songwriting of Little Lapin as previously suggested on her EP and previous tracks. Without quite rising to the heights of the first song, it still seduces from start to finish with sublime beauty within the rich smoulder of keys.

Featuring celebrated New Zealand producer, and ex member of Goldenhorse, Ben King, Remember The Highs is one of those songs which has the potential to open up broad spotlights and worlds to an artist, much like Brass In Pocket did for a certain Ohio bred musician/songwriter. It is an irresistible and exciting treat from an artist which still feels like they are only just beginning their journey.

Remember The Highs is available from February 9th @ http://littlelapin.bandcamp.com/

http://www.littlelapinmusic.com/

RingMaster 09/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Billy Momo – Drunktalk (album)

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With the first two breath-taking singles taken from their new album providing spicy and diversely flavoursome appetisers, Swedish urban-folk collective Billy Momo faced not only eager anticipation but greedily demanding expectations here, and most likely everywhere, in regard to Drunktalk. Of course it and the seven-piece from Stockholm swiftly fed all those wants, unsurprisingly but thrillingly casting fifteen songs which croon, seduce, and romance ears and imagination. Admittedly still those early tracks, I’ve Got You and the album’s title track, remain as the pinnacles of the release and enjoyment but every caress and twist of Drunktalk leaves the richest transfixing experience and pleasure.

Originally a duo brought to life by Tomas Juto and Oskar Hovell, and now a riveting septet with Tony Lind, Mårten Forssman, Oscar Harryson, Christopher Anderzon, and Andreas Prybil alongside the founders, Billy Momo has persistently sparked attention and potent support since the self-release of debut album Ordinary Men in the closing shadows of 2011. It is fair to say though that the past few months, especially around those previously mentioned singles has seen the band become a keenly sought presence further afield, the UK and US especially. it Is easy to expect that Drunktalk will only accentuate and accelerate that spotlight and hunger, such its emotional and inventive charm alongside mouth-watering variety and adventure.

The album opens with the first single taken from its fascinating body, I’ve Got You providing an irresistible introduction and scene setter for the album. Gentle and endearing melodies from guitar and keys embrace ears and thoughts first, their romance soon coloured and reinforced by an emotive caress of strings as the musical narrative slowly broadens. The start alone is inescapably bewitching but once the strings reveal a thicker drama with the deep throated croon of the cello adding its voice, the song is sheer majesty. Their scything strokes of orchestral incitement provide exhilarating bait to which gripping harmonic vocals and the melodic theatre of the song unveil new virulent temptation. The baroque aired song is quite glorious, as on its first unveiling last year still one of the most striking and compelling songs heard anywhere.

Wishing Ain’t No Sin leaps on ears with the same attention grabbing quality straight after, its banjo twang and devilish enterprise a unique mix of seemingly dark country and Nordic folk. The song strolls with a creative and melodic swagger, a strong lure which, with again impressive vocal combination and colour, becomes an instant addictive lure for the feet and voice of the listener. It is a potency virtually all songs upon Drunktalk possess, especially the album’s following title track. Once more the opening of the song ensures body and mind are gripped before it fully reveals itself, here resonating ticking and clunky chain swipes startling before a wonderfully dark melodic and the ever outstanding vocal union emerge around them. The song is pure intoxication, voice and keys as infectiously seductive as strings and harmonica, and like the opener but in its own deceptively contagious way, infests and enthrals the psyche and heart. Think Nick Cave and Helldorado with a splash of Dennis Hopper Choppers, and you have an inkling of the alchemy at work.

The high bar set by the album continues with the catchy It’s Mine, a song starting with mischief in its melodic tempting and an increasing vaudevillian nature to its gypsy folk revelry. Once more it is impossible for body, voice, and emotions not to be enlisted in the enticement of the irrepressibly magnetic adventure, its enticement the appetiser for further unpredictable variety with firstly the soulful Keep It Unreal and straight after the fascinating proposition of Shine Like The Devil. The first of the pair also offers a blues and pop colouring to its warmly swaying and again contagious proposal whilst the second weaves in emotive shadows and haunting ambiences into its tapestry of golden harmonies and radiant melodic twists.

The sultry seventies psych kissed climate of Keep Dreaming comes next. It bursts from an almost melancholic bordering on portentous intro into a feisty stride of beats and guitar invention within delicious harmonies and emotional reflection, musically and lyrically. Maybe more of a slow burner than previous tracks it still has ears and thoughts bound before letting the country spiced Oh Lord and the following La La Land to have their moment. The first of the pair is an easy listen with plenty to intrigue and provoke the imagination but fails to find that final spark to inflame the passions, though again it is a constantly welcome companion for time and ears. Its successor as you might suspect has plenty of la-las to its romp but also a web of fleet footed beats and heated melodies which with the equally ripe vocals, provides an anthemic lure.

Setting things up with the western bar room quaintness of Drifting Away, the album hits party time with The Weekend, its blues rock/ jazz folk dance just as eagerly spiced by a country rock liveliness, a mix soon having feet tapping heartily and without inhibition. The two tracks continue the striking landscape of new flavours and ideation within Drunktalk, a quality continued through the two ballad bred encounters of the cinematically aired and emotionally provocative Headlights, and the haunted elegance of Waiting for Walls. The latter of the two ventures back into that earlier vaudeville like spicing, this time though staying in more emotionally shadowed and darkly mellow corners. They are two more tracks which may not manage to live up to the early heights of the album, but each offers something engrossing and spellbinding in their own distinct ways.

New Grounds provides the meatiest moment of the album, keys and energy having a muscular edge to their commanding lures whilst another country seeded spicing colludes with tangy melodic drama and a different vocal offering, in a pulsating stomp. The track never slips its reins but is the perfect tease because of it, relishing its moments of lively quickstepping to raise the temptation to even greater potency.

The acoustic croon of Let’s Make The Night Last Long brings the magnificent Drunktalk to a close, the album everything hoped for after the band’s previous singles but so much more too. Every song has its own identity and character in sound and intent but all sit seamlessly in the whole romance of the must investigate album. Just be warned though that once a song like I’ve Got You has its seeds fermenting inside, there is no escape.

Drunktalk is available on Hype Music from February 2nd

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RingMaster 02/02/2105

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