Sara Lowes – The Joy Of Waiting

Photo Credit Emily Dennison

Photo Credit Emily Dennison

There is no other way of saying it, the voice of Sara Lowes is sheer mesmerism, an inescapable siren drawing the listener into adventures which musically transfixes ears and imagination just as potently. Her new album The Joy Of Waiting, is complete evidence of the fact, basking in these bewitching elements and in turn immersing the listener in charming and imaginatively charmed embraces. The successor to her acclaimed debut Back To Creation of 2011, The Joy Of Waiting is a quite simply a soul mate for anyone with a taste of melodic and harmonic alchemy.

Based in Manchester and North East bred, Lowes is the keyboardist in The Earlies and has working with the likes of Daniel Johnston, King Creosote, Jens Lakeman, Jim Noir, Jesca Hoop, and Dawn Landes on her CV. Her music draws on a diverse maze of flavours and styles, classically bred arrangements entwining and invigorating essences from progressive rock to pop, jazz to seventies psychedelia, and more besides. First album Back To Creation, as mentioned drew potent praise and support which The Joy Of Waiting can only emulate and reap greater rewards upon itself. Inspired by J.B Priestley, with a track using his name as a title, and looking at “observations on our perplexing relationships with time”, the lady’s new full-length is a spell of beauty and evocative reflections, and quite breath-taking.

The album’s title track starts things off and immediately is flirting with gypsy folk like strings which swirl provocatively around ears and emotions, their colourful expression joined by just as picturesque keys and melodies. There is a baroque like scent to the piece of music too, an older drama which wraps around the more fiery and sultry climate which emerges as the song continues revealing its heated landscape. Eventually the song drifts away and within a swift taking of a breath, the album swings straight back as Most Things and a riveting pop contagion which is soon dancing with the compelling tones of Lowes its puppeteer. The track is a ridiculously infectious kiss, a quite magnificent encounter courting sixties beat pop vivacity as fizzy tendrils of carnival-esque keys sport a creativity which reminds of The Stranglers Dave Greenfield.

Lowes has a voice which is hard to compare to another, though on the first songs and a few others tracks, she bears a resemblance to Brighton singer songwriter Cate Ferris, the following new saralowes2single I Find You another blissful example. The song is a smoulder of thickly simmering melodies and enchanting harmonies over a great distortion kissed rhythmic tempting. Keys again bring psyche spinning enterprise to spice up the song’s enthralling canvas, whilst the ethereal radiance of voice and surrounding sweltering sounds merge like a mix of Solar Halos and The Capsules. It is pure creative majesty and has ears and appetite enslaved by the time it makes way for the courtly hug of JB Priestley. Lowes straight away has ears and pleasure cupped as orchestral spices back her sunny presence, the opening gentle lure a passage into a feistier but no less radiant stroll of warm jazz seeded pop catchiness. As across all songs, there is a tapestry of different flavours and styles colluding in their support of the vocals, each song as here, as unpredictable as it is immediately accessible and magnetic.

The intimate balladry of Bright Day smooches with the senses next, its refined texture and voice a warm glaze over ears, even if not quite igniting them as its predecessors do. That success, is sublimely achieved by Chapman Of Rimes, a seventies bloomed pop rock flight with celestial harmonies and bold hooks under a blaze of brass seduction, and even more so right after by the excellent With A Mirror. The opening lure of bass and keys with rolling rhythms is enough to seduce unbridled attention for the new song, helped all the more by the vocal hints which whisper within the sultry enticement and rays of brass bred sunshine which light up ears. Like being lost in your lover’s arms, the song strokes and infuses body and thoughts with a romancing croon of voice and sound. That alone would be enough to wax lyrical about the song but with unpredictable and superbly infused twists of ideation amidst wrong-footing turns, the song is a master-class in songwriting and aural theatre.

Given the hard task to follow such a triumph is Little Fishy, and it makes easy work of keeping enjoyment clasped. From a celestial yet intimate soundscape cast by wistful keys and harmonies, the song emerges as something akin to progressive rock and lounge/electro pop, weaving its own virulent aural carnival.

The quiet reflection of For The Seasons calms things down next, the captivation a haunting ballad with a 10CC breeze to its air, before Cutting Room Floor slips into ears and simply radiates elegance and beauty whilst adding further fascinating diversity and invention to The Joy Of Waiting. The song is a gorgeous soar of melodic enterprise setting up the listener enthusiastically for the final pair of songs which are seemingly placed in different order on the physical and digital copy of the album.

The Clock Plays It’s Game provides a melancholic temptation which blossoms with the dark and light suggestiveness of strings against the just as potent call of Lowes’ voice and classically dramatic keys. Maybe not as immediately impacting as other songs, it is a lingering kiss increasing its stature with every listen, whilst Horizons is a track which just lifts emotions and spirit with sublime craft and open relish. Its swirl of hooks and melodies is a gala of folk pop smiles and sixties pop merry making and quite sensational. Whether the last song on the album or not, we suggest you make it that anyway as you leave its company with a song in the heart and melodic manna in the ears, a remedy sure to cure all ills and chase away dark shadows, much like The Joy Of Waiting as a whole really.

The Joy Of Waiting is available now via Railings Records, digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/the-joy-of-waiting/id963782296 and physically @ http://www.saralowes.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/SaraLowesMusic

RingMaster 25/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

The Permanent Smilers – One Real Big Identity Crisis

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One Real Big Identity Crisis, the new album from UK band The Permanent Smilers, is a release with no apparent direction or framework to its intent and enterprise; a release which basically lives up to its title but boy is it a slab of irresistible fun. Through thirteen songs, band and album take on a torrent of different styles and nostalgic flavours which really should not work alongside each other as coherently as they do, and all come with a humour and mischief which adds to rather than overrides the adventure of the individual characters. It is slightly deranged but not chaotic and thoroughly unpredictable yet not messy considering the vast sounds employed from song to song. Most of all though it is simply a compelling proposition which comes from left-field, keeps its heart there, and leaves the most enjoyable experience in its wake.

There is little we can tell you about the band itself, though The Permanent Smilers is fronted by Richard Lemongrower who was the songwriter behind Norwich band The Lemongrowers, a band releasing two albums on Noisebox at some point in time. Produced with Jonny Cole and mixed by David Pye, One Real Big Identity Crisis takes little time in lighting ears and imagination, though it opens with maybe its weakest song. That is a little misleading as it takes a song to get a handle, or try to, on the release anyway but certainly Identity Crisis did not really grip attention as much as elsewhere and left thoughts with a slight wondering of what have we got ourselves into. Strongly swung rhythms and similarly intensive riffs clasp ears within the first breath of the song, their bait a jabbing lure against the unpolished yet engaging tones of Richard. It is an easily flowing and energetic slice of rock ‘n’ roll with the bass of Jonny Cole pungent bait at the centre of the stomp. Truthfully there is little wrong with the song but it lacks a spark in its presence which evades the reaction it probably deserves and is easy to imagine being found with others.

The good if unsure start is soon a thing of the past as Uh-Oh takes over with its festive folk swagger and emerging carnival like devilment. Sporting a splash of Tankus The Henge to its relaxed but vibrant stroll, the song is a constant swing of melodic hips as it moves towards an unexpected and mouth-watering slip into a Dukes of Stratosphear like ethereal psychedelic charm and climate, returning back into festive mood soon after as if it had just emerged from a dip in the sea. The song is fascinating and bewitching, and just the first of numerous adventures into different landscapes, as shown next by the punk pop devilry of You Know Where To Go. Bred from seventies power pop and carrying a mix of The Flys and The Lurkers to its hookery, the song just hits the sweet spot with its insatiable energy and mischief, before making way for the more relaxed melodic embrace of Elastic. The keys and guitars of Richard weave another enthralling web of sound here, this time with a sniff of sixties pop to it which is punctuated by the crisp beats of drummer Pete Fraser and dark bass lures of Cole. By its close, the song somehow becomes a thumping anthem without losing any of its melodic and gentle elegance, a potent feat for any song to offer.

Both Just No Good and It Doesn’t Work Anymore keep album and ears bouncing with energy and pleasure, the first using a garage rock spicing again teased by a sixties almost Doors like toxicity, whilst the second again spawning from the same kind of seeding brings a rawer punk grouchiness with its presence. Each has feet and emotions joining their rigorous coaxing before Ghosts allows a breather for the body if not the imagination with its Simon and Garfunkel meets Burt Bacharach like embrace. The brass persuasion of Dave Land seductively flames over similarly captivating keys and vocal caresses through the song but as always there is a scent of devilment to the song with thoughts wondering at times if they should be enjoying this as much as they are. There is no escaping its thick charm though.

The next pair of songs brings a rich sense of XTC to their enterprise and persuasion, Rebel broadening that over time with a seventies kissed soar of progressive fuelled psyche rock whilst its successor, Voodoo has the stamp of Andy Partridge to its flirtatious pop and virulent enterprise. The pair leaves nostalgia glazed lips licked and, through the latter especially, ears basking in psyche pop of the most delicious kind complete with jazzy brass and funk spirited unpredictability.

You Know When To Go dives straight back into punk infused rock ‘n’ roll for its brief but sparkling instrumental before Unforseen manages to conjure an encounter which recalls the quirky indie pop of The Monochrome Set and the plainer but no less tasty essence of Tom Robinson. The song alternatively stomps and swirls around ears, every passing hook and melody it conjures an intriguing and quaint yet voracious tease before it moves off into the distance allowing the outstanding See Through You to make its lingering mark. Acoustically shaped with an avalanche of panzer gun delivered rhythms, the song initially is a smouldering and majestic sway of sound. It subsequently explodes though into a tempest of energy and revelry which only lifts a great song to a heady plateau. Imagine the volatile energy of De Staat at their most devilish with the epidemic hunger of eighties punk/power pop and you get a sense of the glorious treat.

One Real Big Identity Crisis closes with the acoustic lullaby of Sleepyhead, the album ending as it started with a track which does not catch the ardour triggered elsewhere but certainly graces ears with tantalising propositions. This album is one unexpected and seriously enjoyable adventure; not breaking down boundaries or venturing into the unknown but never providing a moment when you are not surprised or wrapped up in its refreshing simplicity woven by skill and invention. There is only time left to lick lips all over again as we close off and dive straight back into The Permanent Smilers’ irresistible arms, something we suggest you do too upon release.

One Real Big Identity Crisis is released in April via IRL Records with new single Identity Crisis out in March.

http://www.thepermanentsmilers.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Permanent-Smilers/1539697962929725

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Little Lapin – Remember The Highs

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There is no getting away from the tantalising Chrissie Hynde essence to the voice behind and The Pretenders like colouring of new single Remember The Highs, but equally there is no escaping the seductive potency and unique bewitching qualities of song and creator either.

   Little Lapin is a British singer-songwriter who from the release of her self-titled debut EP in 2013 has continued to inspire a greedy appetite for the melodic folk/pop romance she crafts. She has captivated audiences and imagination around the world, UK crowds and fans joined by those in New Zealand where she was based for five years, and in New York where she recently performed the last performance of her acoustic tour. As mentioned it is not a new persuasion on offer though, the song Waiting Room from her first and equally well-received EP, luring radio play with the likes of Tom Robinson on BBC Radio 6 and eager online radio play. Ahead of her highly anticipated debut album, Remember The Highs is now here to tease an even greater appetite and anticipation for the forthcoming full-length whilst confirming Little Lapin as one of British folk’s most bewitching propositions.

Remember The Highs opens on a wonderful tangy guitar melody, its winy lure an instant temptation swiftly matched by the mesmeric vocal croon of Little Lapin which in turn is embraced byPicture 76 an additional caress of reserved but potent guitar strings. That Pretenders simmer is lively from the start, recalling Hynde and co around their first album but similarly casting a fresh and vivacious breath which has a texture more aligned to a Metric or even The Cranberries. The song continues to entwine ears and imagination with its spicy melody and sultry temptation, assisted by a great dark bassline which flirts behind ever compelling vocals. The song is delicious, pure manna for body and soul and the most rigorous enticement likely to be heard this year for any album.

The track is accompanied by Over The Draft, an acoustically crafted smooch with ears moving into a more folk bred proposal compared to the rock pop triumph of its predecessor. Radiating charm and melodic elegance as a rhythmic shuffle offers a lively backing, the song shimmers over the senses. There is an essence of Lizzyspit to the song, revealing more of the variety within sound and songwriting of Little Lapin as previously suggested on her EP and previous tracks. Without quite rising to the heights of the first song, it still seduces from start to finish with sublime beauty within the rich smoulder of keys.

Featuring celebrated New Zealand producer, and ex member of Goldenhorse, Ben King, Remember The Highs is one of those songs which has the potential to open up broad spotlights and worlds to an artist, much like Brass In Pocket did for a certain Ohio bred musician/songwriter. It is an irresistible and exciting treat from an artist which still feels like they are only just beginning their journey.

Remember The Highs is available from February 9th @ http://littlelapin.bandcamp.com/

http://www.littlelapinmusic.com/

RingMaster 09/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Billy Momo – Drunktalk (album)

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With the first two breath-taking singles taken from their new album providing spicy and diversely flavoursome appetisers, Swedish urban-folk collective Billy Momo faced not only eager anticipation but greedily demanding expectations here, and most likely everywhere, in regard to Drunktalk. Of course it and the seven-piece from Stockholm swiftly fed all those wants, unsurprisingly but thrillingly casting fifteen songs which croon, seduce, and romance ears and imagination. Admittedly still those early tracks, I’ve Got You and the album’s title track, remain as the pinnacles of the release and enjoyment but every caress and twist of Drunktalk leaves the richest transfixing experience and pleasure.

Originally a duo brought to life by Tomas Juto and Oskar Hovell, and now a riveting septet with Tony Lind, Mårten Forssman, Oscar Harryson, Christopher Anderzon, and Andreas Prybil alongside the founders, Billy Momo has persistently sparked attention and potent support since the self-release of debut album Ordinary Men in the closing shadows of 2011. It is fair to say though that the past few months, especially around those previously mentioned singles has seen the band become a keenly sought presence further afield, the UK and US especially. it Is easy to expect that Drunktalk will only accentuate and accelerate that spotlight and hunger, such its emotional and inventive charm alongside mouth-watering variety and adventure.

The album opens with the first single taken from its fascinating body, I’ve Got You providing an irresistible introduction and scene setter for the album. Gentle and endearing melodies from guitar and keys embrace ears and thoughts first, their romance soon coloured and reinforced by an emotive caress of strings as the musical narrative slowly broadens. The start alone is inescapably bewitching but once the strings reveal a thicker drama with the deep throated croon of the cello adding its voice, the song is sheer majesty. Their scything strokes of orchestral incitement provide exhilarating bait to which gripping harmonic vocals and the melodic theatre of the song unveil new virulent temptation. The baroque aired song is quite glorious, as on its first unveiling last year still one of the most striking and compelling songs heard anywhere.

Wishing Ain’t No Sin leaps on ears with the same attention grabbing quality straight after, its banjo twang and devilish enterprise a unique mix of seemingly dark country and Nordic folk. The song strolls with a creative and melodic swagger, a strong lure which, with again impressive vocal combination and colour, becomes an instant addictive lure for the feet and voice of the listener. It is a potency virtually all songs upon Drunktalk possess, especially the album’s following title track. Once more the opening of the song ensures body and mind are gripped before it fully reveals itself, here resonating ticking and clunky chain swipes startling before a wonderfully dark melodic and the ever outstanding vocal union emerge around them. The song is pure intoxication, voice and keys as infectiously seductive as strings and harmonica, and like the opener but in its own deceptively contagious way, infests and enthrals the psyche and heart. Think Nick Cave and Helldorado with a splash of Dennis Hopper Choppers, and you have an inkling of the alchemy at work.

The high bar set by the album continues with the catchy It’s Mine, a song starting with mischief in its melodic tempting and an increasing vaudevillian nature to its gypsy folk revelry. Once more it is impossible for body, voice, and emotions not to be enlisted in the enticement of the irrepressibly magnetic adventure, its enticement the appetiser for further unpredictable variety with firstly the soulful Keep It Unreal and straight after the fascinating proposition of Shine Like The Devil. The first of the pair also offers a blues and pop colouring to its warmly swaying and again contagious proposal whilst the second weaves in emotive shadows and haunting ambiences into its tapestry of golden harmonies and radiant melodic twists.

The sultry seventies psych kissed climate of Keep Dreaming comes next. It bursts from an almost melancholic bordering on portentous intro into a feisty stride of beats and guitar invention within delicious harmonies and emotional reflection, musically and lyrically. Maybe more of a slow burner than previous tracks it still has ears and thoughts bound before letting the country spiced Oh Lord and the following La La Land to have their moment. The first of the pair is an easy listen with plenty to intrigue and provoke the imagination but fails to find that final spark to inflame the passions, though again it is a constantly welcome companion for time and ears. Its successor as you might suspect has plenty of la-las to its romp but also a web of fleet footed beats and heated melodies which with the equally ripe vocals, provides an anthemic lure.

Setting things up with the western bar room quaintness of Drifting Away, the album hits party time with The Weekend, its blues rock/ jazz folk dance just as eagerly spiced by a country rock liveliness, a mix soon having feet tapping heartily and without inhibition. The two tracks continue the striking landscape of new flavours and ideation within Drunktalk, a quality continued through the two ballad bred encounters of the cinematically aired and emotionally provocative Headlights, and the haunted elegance of Waiting for Walls. The latter of the two ventures back into that earlier vaudeville like spicing, this time though staying in more emotionally shadowed and darkly mellow corners. They are two more tracks which may not manage to live up to the early heights of the album, but each offers something engrossing and spellbinding in their own distinct ways.

New Grounds provides the meatiest moment of the album, keys and energy having a muscular edge to their commanding lures whilst another country seeded spicing colludes with tangy melodic drama and a different vocal offering, in a pulsating stomp. The track never slips its reins but is the perfect tease because of it, relishing its moments of lively quickstepping to raise the temptation to even greater potency.

The acoustic croon of Let’s Make The Night Last Long brings the magnificent Drunktalk to a close, the album everything hoped for after the band’s previous singles but so much more too. Every song has its own identity and character in sound and intent but all sit seamlessly in the whole romance of the must investigate album. Just be warned though that once a song like I’ve Got You has its seeds fermenting inside, there is no escape.

Drunktalk is available on Hype Music from February 2nd

https://www.facebook.com/billymomomusic

RingMaster 02/02/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

David Bronson – Questions

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Emotionally intimate and exploratory, with a just as expressive melodic climate, the new album from New York City singer songwriter/producer David Bronson is a warm and resourceful landscape of thought and sparkling enterprise. Consisting of songs which as its title, seems to stem from Questions Bronson has asked of himself and his life, the album is a striking and immersive caress on ears and imagination. It is not an encounter which always consistently lights personal appetites to the same strength as its finest moments, but one emerging as a lingering and thoroughly enjoyable proposition easy to recommend to those with a want of soulful and melody drenched creativity.

The successor to his acclaimed 2013 debut album The Long Lost Story, ‘a decade-in-the-making, 22-song autobiographical double album’ split into two separate releases, Questions sees Bronson looking at his life and the world right now, and drawing on the likes of vocalist Robin Clark (Aretha Franklin, Bob Dylan, Michael Jackson, Al Green, Bruce Springsteen, Beyonce, David Bowie), guitarist Carlos Alomar (David Bowie, Iggy Pop, Paul McCartney, John Lennon), guitarist Robbie “Seahag” Mangano, drummer Lautaro Burgos, and Gordon Grody to inventively colour these investigations. Whereas the first release expressed a more indie rock seeded sound around his seventies inspired songwriting, the new album embraces new adventurous flavours such as soul, folk, and gospel in its new proposals, a spicing helping the Godfrey Diamond (Lou Reed)/Bronson produced Questions become a captivating and intriguingly varied encounter.

From the opening Songbird, Bronson and album has ears and attention awake, its acoustic caress of guitar the canvas for some delicious harmonies and the lyrical prowess and insight of Bronson. Immediately there is a Paul Simon like air to the heart of the song but also plenty to make it radiate a fresh and original presence. Vibrant beats only add catchy texture to the gentle swing of the song but it is the gospel bred harmonies which steal the impressive show.

Both Move Like Water and Day By Day glide through personal balladry with Bronson and guitar again offering a sure and warm entrance to which melodies and sultry climates, not david bronson questions cover lgeforgetting a great throaty bassline in the first of the two, immerse senses and thoughts evocatively. Each pleases with their individual charms but it is with Push that another surge of greed hits ears and personal appetite. The fourth track is an instant drama with keys straight away looming and laying down a single prod before taking a pause, returning a few seconds later with the same Boomtown Rats like potency as they align to the alluring strum of the guitar. It is a mesmeric track, voice and music sketching an easily accessible and emotively connecting narrative in a dance of creative and vivacious enterprise.

The following Task is another stirring and inescapable invitation for feet and emotions to fully engage in, its sway of funk fuelled revelry a swift and fascinating infectiousness with melodic resourcefulness to match. It and its predecessor provide the pinnacle of the album, the thrilling peak to which other songs aspire but with varying success cannot quite emulate. Despite that the likes of the Lennon-esque All These Things and the smouldering dark folk theatre of Life Is long provide thoroughly enjoyable and lingering temptations whilst the melodic rock fuelled My Good Friend with its compelling seventies psyche rock keys, add another strain of bright adventure and full pleasure to album and emotions respectively.

The closing pair of Connect The Dots and Passing Fiction slip into more reserved hugs of melodic and harmonic endeavour which, without finding the same persuasive spark as their immediate predecessors, ignite ears and thoughts with consummate ease. The guitar adventure of the pair is an especially thrilling and magnetic coaxing, the twinges of discord which bless the imagination of strings and fingers as enthralling as anything on the album.

Questions is a definite investigation for certainly fans of the likes of Paul Simon and John Lennon but equally those of current talent like Seth Lakeman and Thom Bowden. The album did not quite ignite enough fire in emotions across its length but really only due to personal tastes and with some quite thrilling tracks and invention involved it is easy to assume it will spark a blaze in a great many.

Questions is available from 19th January via Big Arc

www.davidbronsonmusic.com

RingMaster 19/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Billy Momo – Drunktalk

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Following the acclaimed success of the single I’ve Got You, Swedish urban-folk collective Billy Momo unveil the title track of their upcoming second album Drunktalk. The band’s new song is a riveting and dramatically seductive embrace of folk intimacy and country ambience with a rhythmic and invention which is almost De Staat like in its imagination and Helldorado in its atmospheric ingenuity. Also seemingly drawing on the melodic richness of Broken Bells, the single is an engrossing treat to start off 2015 and simply ignites even greater anticipation for the band’s impending album.

Billy Momo is the brainchild of Tomas Juto and Oskar Hovell. Initially just the duo, the band swiftly drew potent attention and praise with the release of debut album Ordinary Men on Christmas Eve 2011 through their own Mobetter Music label, the record eventually getting a re-release via Hype Music in 2013 to greater success. The pair soon realised they needed to bring in 10881589_10152485803824071_4577033260872051476_nlike-minded musicians to take their music into the live arena with the addition of Tony Lind, Mårten Forssman, Oscar Harryson, Christopher Anderzon, and Andreas Prybil eventually completing the creative line-up which has already seduced their homeland and is working quietly but potently away on the UK scene thanks to the last single and live shows. Drunktalk is another inescapable temptation destined to light ears and appetites ready for the February release of its full-length namesake.

Drunktalk opens on a clunky ticking and heavy swipe of chains, a portentous almost industrial incitement which immediately teases the imagination before a winy twang of guitar and sultry vocal union cast their embrace on ears and attention. The startling and imposing presence of that opening ‘clang’ continues its baiting from within the brooding and provocatively melodic and expanding landscape draping the equally enthralling narrative. With strings adding broader and deeper shadows to the texture of the song and radiant harmonies aligned to evocative keys thickening its emotional drama and colour, Drunktalk provides an intoxication of senses and thoughts whilst creating a rich tapestry of vocal and musical expression.

The single is a temptation which lingers and worms into the psyche with increasing potency, building on the impressive presence of its predecessor but exploring a greater inventive aural theatre. Quite simply it is a glorious taster for an album which cannot come soon enough.

Drunktalk is available digitally via Hype Music from January 5th.

https://www.facebook.com/billymomomusic

RingMaster 03/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Alex Highton – Nobody Knows Anything

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Whether it is charm or simply mischief which fuels the songs of UK singer songwriter Alex Highton, probably both to be honest, it makes for a thoroughly engaging proposition and his new album one captivating treat. Nobody Knows Anything is a collection of intimate yet easily connectable songs for the imagination and emotions to greedily embrace. The successor to his folk seeded debut album Woodditton Wives Club, the Liverpool hailing Highton has pushed into more jazz and at times dare one say eccentric explorations within Nobody Knows Anything, resulting in a fascinating and almost devilish proposition.

Naming prime inspirations as Sufjan Steven, Here We Go Magic, and Joni Mitchell for his new Gare du Nord released album, Highton has called on an array of musical talent to explore his new songs, long time musical companions double-bass-player Jonny Bridgwood (Morrissey, Kathryn Williams, The Leisure Society) and drummer Howard Monk (Billy Mahonie, The Clientele) joined by the likes of Nancy Wallace (of The Memory Band and The Owl Service), Laura J Martin, and Robert Rotifer (of Rotifer) across the David Dobson produced release.

As soon as the melodic caress of opener You Don’t Own This Life cradles ears, there is open vivacity to the song, especially in the relish which Highton’s distinctive tones seem to have casting every syllable. The track entices even more potently as keys and sultry flames of trombone and clarinet join the narrative, ending on a jazz drenched shuffle which simply ignites ears and an anticipation for what is to come. It is an appetite given a flavoursome dose of fun through It Falls Together, a mischievous canter of melodic revelry and vocal adventure. Instantly there is a potent scent of 12 Stone Toddler to the imagination and revelry of the track whilst the discord spiced keys provide an early XTC flavouring, all very welcome and thrilling in the inventiveness of Highton’s verging on avant-garde creativity in the song. It is an early pinnacle of the album, joyful harmonies and tenacious revelry all adding their colour to the dance before the following mellow reflection of Panic takes over. In a synth cast celestial climate veined by blues kissed and seventies spiced melodies, the song floats and resonates over the senses. It swiftly awakens the imagination, its visual tones magnetic scenery to which electro and rhythmic enterprise add their creative fun.

Through both the gentle croon of Sunlight Burns Your Skin and She Had This Sister, Highton offers varied and enthralling melodic proposals, the first a simultaneously melancholic and vibrant weave of twilight lit jazz infused temptation and the second, a folky acoustically bred kiss on ears with a seductive swing and tangy groove to its smoulder. Though neither matches the romp of previous and the more experimentally infused songs for personal wants, each leaves a lingering hug and easy to accept invitation to soar their elegant landscapes again.

   The rich hazy atmosphere and emotive enticement of Kills is next and again offers plenty to warrant a constant return to its warm seduction, the vocal union of Highton and Nancy Wallace pure magnetism, a lure matched by the melodic aesthetics and emotion of The Evil That Men Do, where this time the cello of Claire Hollocks and additional vocals of Bonnie Dobson add a riveting glamour to the song’s mournful countenance. The pair has ears and thoughts tightly embraced in their reflective beguiling, but soon have to give sway to the bubbly provocative pop of Fear and its pulsating magnetism.

I Only Asked You to Try and Somebody Must Know Something each add individual drama and forlorn intimacy to the expressive depth and uniqueness of the album before the instrumental majesty of the album’s title track takes ears and imagination on a provocative fall through emotive structures and melodically flirtatious adventure. It is a trigger for thoughts and feelings to play and invent before relaxing into the welcoming humid embrace of the outstanding Mephisto, another merger of folk and jazz filtered through a resourceful vat of discord mystique.

Nobody Knows Anything is completed by the glowing tempting of It’s, a bewitching end to a powerfully engaging release. Certainly some songs leap out over others for personal tastes but every moment upon Alex Highton’s album is an exciting opening into the adventure driven heart of its author and a tonic for ears and emotions.

Nobody Knows Anything is available now via Gare Du Nord @ http://alexhighton.bandcamp.com/album/nobody-knows-anything

http://www.alexhighton.co.uk/

RingMaster 09/12/2014

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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