Little Lapin – Wake Up With The Sun

There are many obvious things which are evidence of being in the throes of a seductive summer, most you will need no reminding of but there is something else which equally has emotions wrapped up in the beauty of its warmth and that is a new release from British singer-songwriter Little Lapin. Just short of two years ago, the Cornwall based songstress entranced and impressed with debut album Remember The Highs, repeating the event a year later with its even more striking successor Holding Out For The Kicks. Their collection of heart bred, spirit stroking songs firmly imprinted their creator on the indie folk/ alt country scene. Now third album, Wake Up With The Sun, is a day or so away from living up to its title and sparking a new melodic summer for the senses and imagination to bask in.

Quite simply Wake Up With The Sun puts its predecessors in the shade; easily eclipsing both impressing releases as Little Lapin’s (Lucy Hill) reveals her most potent, accomplished, and creatively imaginative and elegant songs yet. She is no stranger to acclaim, those releases and surrounding singles as well as her live performances drawing eager praise and attention. From radio shows to the scribbles of music blogs and magazines, plaudits have gathered as too a worldwide fan base through her shows and tours across Britain and New Zealand as well as New York. Wake Up With The Sun is also the call to the rest of the world to take notice with its season of melodic seduction.

Initially and no doubt continued to be inspired by the likes of Regina Spektor, The Cranberries, Florence & The Machine, Laura Marling, PJ Harvey, The Cure, and The Pixies, Little Lapin has persistently nurtured her own character of sound and songwriting; its current pinnacle and uniqueness coming within Wake Up With The Sun. From its first breath, the album smiles and kisses ears; opener and album title track stroking ears with the tender touch of acoustic guitar. That in turn sparks a skip of eager guitar and bass, their perky stroll wrapped in the warm caress of LL’s ever captivating voice.  A slice of pop folk, the song proceeds to radiate like its namesake; rays of energy and senses inciting warmth infusing body and spirit.

My Complexion follows, swiftly sharing its own infectious gait and nature as LL courts ears and thoughts with her evocative words and enticing voice. Its unique spice adds a delicious tang to her melodic prowess, essences emulated in the blend of jaunty guitar and jazzy bass alongside.  An eruption of fiercely fragrant guitar only adds to the temptation, a one off moment not to be repeated but lingering as long as the song’s general spring and beam.

Just as potent in its reluctance to leave ears and thoughts is the delicious animated serenade of Isn’t Life for Living, a blossom of beauty simultaneously sharing a smouldering flame and frisky waltz as it ignites feet and hips as easily as a lustful appetite for its virulent pop.  As throughout the album, there is a sixties/seventies scent, a whisper but giving the song another endearing hue to get hooked on as it sublimely captivates with its keen and poetic vivacity before latest single Narrabeen adds its own catchy enterprise and bold imagination to the release. With the haze of harmonica and a suggestive rumble interrupting its tenacious country spiced swing, the track is a sultry and dusty Kiwi hued adventure and, as its predecessor, just riveting.

Through the delicate melancholy lit Luna and the reflective hug of A Song for Alex, the album lures the listener deeper into its majestic yet intimate arms while Need a Change of Scene has the body on its feet again shuffling round with tenacious versatility to the song’s wonderfully unpredictable invention and evolving landscape. Like a mix of Laura Marling and Imelda May, LL has ears and imagination enslaved whilst revealing another aspect to the diversity shaping Wake Up With The Sun.

LL simply bewitches once more within Radio Nocebo, her tang lined voice an appetite inflaming siren and storyteller within the sparkle of hearty and innocence spun melodies. Captivation is swift and inescapable as the song provides another peak to the loft range of the album; its triumph followed by the final wash of warmth and melodic intimacy provided by closing song I Told You So. It is a last kiss on the lips of pleasure as Wake Up With The Sun leaves the listener wistfully bound in the hug of creative grace.

It is probably fair to say that Little Lapin has yet to ignite the biggest spotlights so far but it is easy to suspect that global attention will be stirred, as the sun, by her new and quite simply gorgeous album.

Wake Up With The Sun is released April 14th across most online stores.

http://www.littlelapinmusic.com/    https://www.facebook.com/littlelapin/    https://twitter.com/1littlelapin   https://littlelapin.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 13/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Little Lapin – Californian Sun

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It was almost a year ago that Devon bred songstress Little Lapin seduced ears and attention with her seriously well-received album Remember the Highs and its lead self-titled single. To build on their success, this July sees the release of the already eagerly awaited Holding Out For The Kicks and before it the captivating single Californian Sun. The lead track from the upcoming release, the single is a bewitching and melodically sultry teaser which easily ignites all the warm emotions and eager appetite experienced with Little Lapin’s music before as well as a very keen anticipation for what is on the near horizon.

Know to her parents as Lucy Hill, the Devon hailing Little Lapin is no stranger to luring eager ears and praise. Emerging in 2012, she has enticed and transfixed UK audiences and equally those over in New Zealand and across in the US on stage and through her previous singles and a self-titled EP, before stirring greater success up last year with Remember the Highs. Inspired by the likes of Regina Spektor, The Cranberries, Florence & The Machine, Laura Marling, PJ Harvey, The Cure, and The Pixies, the Falmouth residing singer songwriter creates songs and sounds which certainly embraces those spices but, as proven yet again with Californian Sun, she weaves all flavours into a vocal and melodic adventure which is uniquely Little Lapin.

Little Lapin invites ears to Californian Sun with a gentle acoustic caress before slipping into the pool of sultry melodic suggestiveness and rhythmic vivacity woven around her voice and strings by lead guitarist Alex Hill and drummer Harry Harding. In no time the song has the imagination involved, its emotive smoulder and dark rock ‘n’ roll merging with a sixties psych rock twang as Little Lapin’s distinctive tones provide their own evocative texture and expression to the almost cinematic poetry of the song.

Bordering on bewitchment, the warmly glowing Californian Sun has ears basking and the imagination conjuring in its arms, with anticipation for Holding Out For The Kicks quickly following the last smouldering note.

Californian Sun is released April 14th with Holding Out For The Kicks following on July 16th @ https://littlelapin.bandcamp.com

http://www.littlelapinmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/littlelapin/   https://twitter.com/1littlelapin

Upcoming live dates:

Apr 16 The Stable, Newquay, UK

Apr 17 Ben Tunnicliffe, Penzance, UK

Apr 22 Bar 35, Bude, UK

Apr 23 Ben Tunnicliffe, Penzance, UK

Apr 29 The Stable Plymouth, Plymouth, UK

Apr 30 The Drewe Arms, Exeter, UK

May 05 Ben Tunnicliffe, Penzance, UK

May 06 Rick Steins Fistral, Newquay, UK

May 07 Bystro at the Bank, St. Austell, UK

May 08 The Rock Inn, Devon, UK

May 11 George Inn Brailes, Banbury, UK

May 14 Rough Trade Nottingham, Nottingham, UK

May 15 Lamplighter, Northampton, UK

May 20 Pakhuis De Zwijger, Amsterdam, Netherlands

May 27, Mobile Blues Club, Hamburg, Germany

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Diamond Days – Love Struck Kids/I Rewind

diamond days_RingMaster Review

UK alternative rockers Diamond Days released their new single a matter of days ago and already have its successor eagerly waiting for release in a few short weeks, so we thought we would look at both Love Struck Kids and I Rewind in one clean swoop.

Diamond Days hail from the Northwest of the UK and have already impressed and drawn good praise with their We’ve Come A Long Way EP which came out last November. Even before then debut single, Start It From The End had given a potent introduction to the Liverpool quartet, receiving over 60,000 views on YouTube and sparking over 20,000 followers for Diamond Days across the social media. As mentioned We’ve Come A Long Way ignited even stronger and eager attention from fans and indeed media, as well as a live presence which has seen the band supporting the likes of The Blackout, William Control, and Verses, and now it is the turn of their two new singles to stir up more welcome fuss.

cover_RingMaster Review   First, and released a number of days back, is the Seb Berrios and Arthur Indrikovs (Florence & the Machine, Foxes, Jon Newman, Clean Bandit) produced Love Struck Kids. Immediately hefty rhythms and keenly eager riffs are rapping ears but equally a melody built sonic persuasion is there coaxing ears too before the strong voice of Alex Fearn erupts with equal colour. It is a powerful and thickly enticing start which only grips a little tighter as the guitars of Tom Shepherd and Fearn flirt with open enterprise and the commanding rhythmic bait of bassist Tom Jack Jackson and drummer Mark Highdale sets to work.

The song soon shows a familiarity in its surging stride of sound and energy yet has a freshness and invention which turns that to merely another spice in its resourceful adventure, which subsequently brings in mellow keys around an additional reflective vocal piece portraying a deeper emotion fuelled drama. The track is soon roaring as before though to leave ears and appetite just that little greedier and without doubt more energetically pleasured.

It is an invigorating proposition understandably already getting rave responses; a result forthcoming single I Rewind will surely match. In fact it has already drawn great praise as part of the We’ve Come A Long Way EP from where it comes. Featuring Yashin vocalist Harry Radford, the song ‘tickles’ ears and expectations with an initial lure of smiling guitar, this in turn sparking healthy beats and a throaty bassline as the guitars broaden their tapestry and the vocals of Fearn, backed again impressively across band and guest, unfurl the narrative and its emotion.

With a great vocal ‘spitting’ midway and a greater snarl to its heart and nature compared to the first single, I Rewind is a formidable and anthemic incitement and remains, if not arguably the best Diamond Days song to date, certainly the biggest favourite.

Both singles only reinforce and push the reputation and growing stature of Diamond Days, a band it is easy to suspect as it evolves a richer distinct identity to its right now You Me At Six meets Lower Than Atlantis meets Fall Out Boy sound, will only get bigger and better.

Love Struck Kids is out now with I Rewind released in September 2015.

RingMaster 27/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Little Lapin – Remember The Highs

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It was only a couple of months ago when Little Lapin seduced and enthralled with the single Remember The Highs, its masterful coaxing of ears and imagination the wake-up call to the mesmeric sound and voice of the UK singer-songwriter for a great many. The acclaimed track also revealed inventive and bold songwriting, something her fans were already vocal about and now impressively confirmed by the artist’s debut album also called Remember The Highs. It is a fascinating and captivating collection of songs which with diversity and melodic resourcefulness simply leave thoughts and emotions spellbound.

Little Lapin is Lucy Hill, a Devon bred songstress now based in Bristol who has been entrancing audiences from the UK to New Zealand and New York since emerging round 2012. Musically her inspirations include the likes of Regina Spektor, The Cranberries, Florence & The Machine, Laura Marling, PJ Harvey, The Cure, and The Pixies, many providing creative whispers in what is a sound and songs which are openly distinctive to Hill. The swift proof comes with the last single, though before that she had bred a strong and loyal fan base through a tantalising live presence and releases such as earlier tracks Sound of Summer and Winning Is Losing, and more so a self-titled EP last year which sparked attention from the likes of Tom Robinson on BBC Radio 6 and regular online radio play. It is easy to assume though this was just the appetiser to more fevered responses and acclaim destined to be earned by Remember The Highs, the album a beacon of melodies and harmonies set to draw greedy appetites like moths to a flame.

a1696187169_16   The album opens with Magnet Eyes and an immediate inescapable tempting of warm guitar and keys taken to another enslaving level by the unique tones of Hill. Her voice has a quality of sounding familiar as well as freshly bewitching, but from person to person it seems we hear someone different as a reference, the likes of Laura Marling, Regina Spektor, Sinead O’Connor, and Chrissie Hynde just some references used, with the latter the closest for us as a descriptive hint. As the song stretches its melodic nature and evocative air, a shadow of darker resonance comes into play to catch the imagination all over again, whilst voice and keys especially almost flirt with rich expression and emotive radiance.

It is a captivating start, but also a potent teaser to the glories of the following Over The Draft and the album’s title track. The first of the two songs creases ears with an initial persuasion of guitar again quickly enhanced by the sultry tones of Hill. Eager rhythms then gently and enticingly march into the exotic landscape now being cast by keys, everything settling into a scenic lure of melodic mystique and catchy hooks with the voice of Hill one giant romance of a snare. Its successor remains as potent as the first time heard, and if there is an air of Chrisse Hynde in the second track, Remember The Highs wonderfully reeks of The Pretenders in its sonic groove and provocative melodic hooks. Vocally too Hill brings her spiciest tang to syllables and a slightly nasal croon reminiscent of the Ohio musician. The darker bred bass groove alongside the irresistible winy flames of guitar is equally as compelling, the song providing one delicious embrace of tenacious enterprise and beauty.

The acoustic opening to Go!Stop!Go! has ears lit and body swaying instantly but it is the brooding air of drama cast through keys and an orchestral breath which ebbs and flows across the track, that turns a potent encounter into a spellbinding one. It is a serenade with haunting shadows and dark aural reflections which offer a melancholic temper to the invigorating partnership and narrative of voice and melody. The song just blossoms with every listen, its slower initial smoulder, compared to the previous songs, soon as engrossing and seductive as anything upon the album.

Sound Of Summer rolls in next on a rumble of rhythms which quickly evolves into an embrace of seventies seeded Beatle-esque keys and the ever inviting vocals. Occasional crescendos of drums add to the expanding and again sultry canvas of the song, guitars and keys colouring its scenery with alluring and imagination inciting enterprise to which bass adds swarthy lines of juicy shadows. Once more there is no option but to sink into the depths of a song before being left face to face with the rockier acoustic persuasion of In My Mind. The song is barely a stroll across the senses but even in its low key gait reveals a tenacious and sturdier character in its absorbing balladry compared to its predecessor.

Both songs though get over shadowed by the outstanding Colour Blind, a track emerging as a definite favourite. It starts on a thoughtful and evocative persuasion of guitar, Hill in moments adding her reflective vocal spice for an engaging start. Soon though, everything erupts into a gently concussive belt of emotional and creative turmoil, agitated rhythms and clanging riffs consorting with fiery keys in a bedlamic expulsion. It is a striking and thrilling twist to an already highly persuasive proposition providing yet another major highlight in Remember The Highs.

The album finishes with firstly the melancholic but again vibrantly arresting Panic, a song which has an essence of the drama found within The Smiths songwriting to it, and finally the closing warm smile of A Nice Coincidence. Contrasting textures flirt from within the encounter, sombre strings find themselves courted by skittish rhythms and another seduction of voice and melodies. The lyrical side of songs, as once more shown here, is just as intriguing and enticing, Hill able to cast hope in dark experiences and show the shadows within the brightest adventures.

Remember The Highs is a musical love affair for the senses from an artist in Little Lapin, who has the potential to become one of Britain’s most exciting and innovative singer songwriters. Thinking about it as her album seduces once again, she already is.

Remember The Highs is released on May 15th @ http://littlelapin.bandcamp.com/album/remember-the-highs-2

http://www.littlelapinmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/littlelapin

RingMaster 14/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Ron McElroy – Japanese Song

Ron McElroy pic

Earlier this year London based singer/songwriter/guitarist Ron McElroy impressed with his debut single World At War, so much so that a definite anticipation for his first full-length album All Her Kisses which is to be released soon, was sparked. Now he releases the second single from the impending album in the intriguing form of the Japanese Song. It is a track which raises questions as well as confirming the promise previously triggered, but overall it still adds to the appetite for his debut album.

With the experience of working and playing with the likes of Juliette Lewis, Isabella Summers (Florence & the Machine), Sian Evans (DJ Fresh, Kosheen), Trouble Over Tokyo and Amber Bella Muse, the artist has come a long way from receiving a simple hand-me-down guitar given to him by a friend, and striving to master its charms and develop his own unique style with inspirations from the likes of Jimmy Hendrix and Miles Davis.

From the more eager anthemic rock intent of his first single, Japanese Song is an arguably less accessible and certainly more of a slowly persuasive piece of invention. The lone acoustic guitar declaration is an instantly lure whilst the soon joining oriental percussive suggestion adds a joint mystique and question in thoughts. The distinctive vocals of McElroy soon add another texture to the narrative and at this point senses and imagination are consumed with whether the combination works or not for them, and debatably the song does not quite engage as may be  it should at this point. As great vocal harmonies and the simple but evocative guitar tempting wrap their further suggestion around the ear you soon discover a smouldering persuasion working and soon providing a compelling answer to any questions being raised. The song by its end has left a nicely composed rock/folk ballad which does not light fires but still offers enough to tempt a check out of the forthcoming album.

Definitely a song which makes a stronger suasion with each listen though it does not feel like the natural temptation for newcomers to investigate the album ahead, Japanese Song is another wind of intrigue to the talent of McElroy and certainly well worth a listen or two.

http://www.ron-mcelroy.com/

7/10

RingMaster 15/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Ron McElroy – World At War

Ron McElroy 1

Singer/songwriter/guitarist Ron McElroy has earned a wealth of experience from years playing with other artists such as Trouble Over Tokyo and Amber Bella Muse, as well as making notable collaborations with the likes of Juliette Lewis, and Isabella Summers (Florence & the Machine), and writing songs with people such as with Sian Evans (DJ Fresh, Kosheen). Now ahead of his debut album All Her Kisses which is set for an Autumn release, he unveils the first single from the forthcoming release, World At War. A more than capable rock song with the ability to easily satisfy, the track is an open invitation to the man and his sounds which without ripping up trees certainly ensures that attention for his full length is going to be very alert.

The London based musician steps into his own light having helped ignite that of so many others and it has to be said that the single certainly captures the imagination. It is a song which slowly persuades, its initial grabbing of nodding approval soon tempting the listener to add their dollar of effort for a pleasing and lingering union. As mentioned it does not ignite fires of passion with its melodic rock presence but undoubtedly sparks a continuing welcome for its catchy and honest presence.

Starting with big beats and a smokey blues kiss from the guitar, World At War is immediately a warm stroll with anthemic whispers just waiting to jump out. The vocals of McElroy are decent enough without being openly impressive but his skilled and engaging guitar craft certainly is a striking call from the heart of the track, his playing a richly appetising feature. Once the song hits a fiery sonic blaze of things take a further lift with the subsequent second strain of vocals making a better impression and filling the walls of the song with an infectious warm energy. Easy to join and enjoyable to the ear, the track is a fine teaser for the album, and though it is not without elements which do not quite work as well as others World At War makes the upcoming appearance of All Her Kisses an intriguing prospect.

http://www.ron-mcelroy.com/

7/10

RingMaster 22/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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