Murder FM – Happily Never After

murderfmcover_RingMaster Review

Murder FM is another band which over recent times has been the subject of enthusiastic talk, their live presence, EPs, and singles sparking increasing awareness on both sides of the Atlantic. Now the band is poised to release their debut album and show all what the fuss is all about. Happily Never After is a rousing proposition, a collection of skilfully crafted and creatively eventful songs that just seem to lure attention back time and time again. It is hard to say that the release constantly set a fire going in the passions or is going to send a major tremor through the metal/rock scene, but there is no escaping that Happily Never After leaves ripe enjoyment whilst making a potent springboard for future and bolder Murder FM adventures ahead.

Hailing from Dallas, the band has persistently enticed ears with their tenacious fusing of varied rock essences and industrial bred metal. Early singles alerted a great and increasing many to their presence, lures reinforced by a reputation gaining live presence and a host of impressive videos, all luring in fan and media appetites alike. Over time the band has supported and shared stages with the likes of Rob Zombie, Deftones, Five Finger Death Punch, Black Veil Brides, Korn, Sick Puppies, Lacuna Coil, Pop Evil and many more across the US and into Europe. More recently the quartet of Norman Matthew (vocals, guitar, programming), J6 (bass, backing vocals), Matt X3r0 (guitar, backing vocals), and Jason West (drums) signed with Famous Records Global for the world-wide uncaging of Happily Never After, easily the strongest step yet in the band’s continuing ascent.

MFMREVOLVER_RingMaster Review   The album opens with Legion, a track which is in no hurry to own ears but instantly springs a web of engaging rhythms and electro bait crowded with enticing vocal roars. It is a restrained yet compelling lure which is soon stirring up a nest of fuzzy riffs and electronic sizzling as vocals prowl and in turn launch the anthemic heart of the track. In no time the song has an air of Korn meets Dope to it but equally has a scent of artists like Marilyn Manson and Society 1 whilst creating what is not exactly unique but certainly an organic character of its own. It is a magnetic and blistering start to the album, a masterful trap which has ears and appetite on board ready for what is to follow.

We The Evil is the immediate proposition, it similarly brewing up an industrial seeded tempest of sound rife with sinew swung beats and grouchy riffs from bass and guitar. Vocally too, there is nothing but attitude as well as great diversity as the band, led by Matthew, all add their individual and eager tones. Even stronger Manson like colouring wraps the track as it stirs up the blood and imagination, powerfully backing up its predecessor without major surprises but plenty of tasty endeavours.

The bruising weight and carnivorous riffery of Last Breath captures ears next, the gnawing of guitar on senses swift infection which only increases as the band imaginatively slips into mellower melodic scenery. With vocals matching the slightly calmer waters, it is a tantalising twist which becomes part of a great revolving surge across the rest of the track through both textured extremes; its success emulated by the punk/alternative metal hued Machine Gun Kisses which again has a Korn-esque feel to its rapacious enterprise and contagious swing.

Four tracks in and Happily Never After is on a thick roll of adventure and persuasion, and as if it ‘knows’ full persuasion is in hand, from this point begins exploring far more boldly varied and unique pastures. Firstly Burn steps forward with a Deftones meets Cold like offering, to be followed by the grungier metal soaked Slaves, both increasing in sheer magnetism over time. The industrial nature of early songs is now a more distant whisper, as Murder FM shows more resourcefulness and imagination in songwriting and sound, it is still not game changing but brings a fresh unpredictability and spice to ears and release.

We get slithers of Black Veil Brides and My Chemical Romance in the classic/modern heavy rock shaped Lethal Lovers next, essences which just seem to work if adding open familiarity to proceedings, whilst Like Glass offers an electronic coaxing and evocative keys initially, before creating its own emotional and musical drama honed from the same kind of template as its predecessor. Neither track matches up to the songs before them but it would be unfair to say they left satisfaction and a want to hear more barren.

With Happily Neverafter and Rainy Day Parade, Murder FM again please without finding the key to stronger reactions, and for personal tastes Happily Never After plays like a release of two halves, the first a storming and irresistible anthem of sound and insatiable energy and the second though arguably the more creative theatre of invention and adventure on the album, after Slaves lacking the kick and incendiary elements to incite the same instincts and thus passions.

Completed by a corrosive remix of We The Evil by Tommy Lee, Happily Never After is nevertheless nothing but enjoyment from start to finish and easy to recommend all taking a good listen to at the very least. We can only think Murder FM will get bigger and bolder with every passing release as the potential in this first album is realised with fresh imagination and originality. A happy thought indeed.

Happily Never After is available from August 7th via Famous Records Global with worldwide distribution by Pavement Entertainment.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Murder-FM-Official     http://www.murderfmmusic.com/

RingMaster 05/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bad Solution – Self Destruct EP

Photo_RingMaster Review

A juggernaut is the best way to describe the Self Destruct EP from UK band Bad Solution, a juggernaut of energy, passion, and anthemic potency, not forgetting scything rhythms and crushing riffs. Its quartet of songs also come equipped with a sonic and melodic enterprise bridging the voracious metal and inflamed heavy rock instincts which openly fuel songs and sound. The EP is a beast, a rousing introduction to a band many others have long been crowing over; a proposition easy to see forging an even more explosive and acclaimed presence within British rock ‘n’ roll ahead.

London based Bad Solution began in 2010 formed by guitarists Trix and Mariusz Chojnowski. With initially an all Polish line-up, the band recruited British vocalist Alex Willox late 2011 which was soon followed by the band making their live debut to rich acclaim a couple of months after. The current line-up, completed by bassist Wojtek Suberlak and drummer Joe Patterson, was in place by the December of 2013 and the band simply has gone from strength to strength with a live reputation to match their sound. They have shared stages with the likes of Gallows, The Blackout, Soulfly and many more along the way and released the well-received three track single Echoes of the Cry. Now the quintet is beginning to stir broader attention with Self Destruct and it is easy to see and hear why from its first roar.

cover_RingMaster Review   The EP opens with its title track and a melancholic tempting of piano amidst more sorrowfully ethereal keys. As the strong vocals of Willox join the embrace, so does a bass snarl and a spicy croon of guitar with more rigorous rhythms aligning themselves to the start soon after. It is a potent entrance becoming increasingly inflamed with every second, its volatile ambience eventually erupting into an energetic tempest of intensity and emotion. There is a definite Papa Roach air to the song, when that band was in its early prime, and equally a touch of Spineshank and fellow Brits The Self Titled to the evolving blaze of creative and impassioned ferocity. It is an immense start to the release, the band’s melodic and aggressive side resourcefully and strikingly merging in an impressive union.

To be honest, as mighty as it is, the following Nothing (You don’t know me) just outshines it with its Five Finger Death Punch/ Bloodsimple like riot. Willox quickly shows great versatility to his delivery, matching the furnace of enterprise and sound around him. Riffs chew on ears and rhythms swing lead like bait whilst the guitars stir up a maelstrom of ravenous and melodically seductive magnetism. Neck muscles are soon in allegiance to the brawling intensity, as too are ears and imagination to the heavier rock and melody hued exploits within the thick persuasion. It all results in another hellacious and compelling proposal easy to jump on board with and well before it’s reached its fiery climax.

Dear Sarah steps up next and similarly has attention and appetite eating out of its inventive hands. Though stalking the senses with their jagged tempting, riffs and rhythms carry an inviting swing to which tangy sonic tendrils wind their richly alluring endeavour. Again whispers of Spineshank and also this time 36 Crazyfists nudge thoughts but with every passing half minute, the song fluidly moves into new scenery drawn from varied metal flavours across a tenacious and imaginative landscape.

Fair to say Self Destruct just gets better and better with each proceeding track, ending on its pinnacle, the brilliant Desert Rock. A Middle Eastern spicing immediately coats the emergence of the song, traditional instrumentation colluding with predatory rhythms and antagonistic riffery before the latter takes over and sculpts a ferocious stomp of energy and sound. To this those ethnic hues add their thrilling hues from time to time, lurking and shining from within the groove stoked, rapacity lined furnace of anthemic sound and volcanic intensity. The track is glorious, an aural call to arms which no metal loving body and heart can resist, and surely the single to light the touch paper to national success and more.

Bad Solution is a band which guarantees a good, exhausting time with their music but as shown by the Self Destruct EP, they also bring inspiring energy, instinctive passion, and invigorating invention to the table. It might not be the most original EP you will come across this year, but without any doubts it will be amongst the most memorable and thrilling.

The Self Destruct EP is available now through most online stores.

http://www.facebook.com/badsolution

RingMaster 18/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Radiodrone-The Truth Syndicate Diaries

Radiodrone_RingMaster Review

They have a sound which more than backs up the punch and potency of their lyrical confrontation on the world today, and now US rockers Radiodrone have an album to really stir up attention. The Orange County quartet pulls no blows when it comes to unleashing their take on the social and political ills contaminating the landscape we all battle through and it is fair to say no quarter is given by their debut full-length. That is not to day it is all anger and violence though, The Truth Syndicate Diaries equipped with the thickest contagions, most virulent anthems, and a melodic prowess to give any band a run for its money. Is it the most original thing you will come across this year, probably not, but if looking for one massively invigorating and accomplished proposition, this is a done deal.

Radiodrone began early 2014 and quickly whipped up keen support and awareness for themselves through what has been called a “searing” live presence and tracks like Want it Back and NeverLoution, two early singles sparking acclaim and rich radio play. There is rebellion in the band’s rock ‘n’ roll and as suggested earlier in their lyrical stance, yet it is evolved into something which never gets predictable or is lacking in diversity. The band has been described as being “part schizoid Five Finger Death Punch on the heavy edge, part Foo Fighters rock with the commercial aspects and part hard grooves”, a valid hint which is quickly realised and more by album opener Game Change.

The album is top and tailed by intro skits /provocative commentaries, and every song split by the same, but the release really takes off once Game Change hits ears with rapping beats as its guitars brew up a tasty scrub of riffs. The track is soon into a welcoming feisty stride with the rhythms of drummer Danny Molgaard and bassist Stephen Appel continuing to offer threat and infectious tempting. A hard rock air and swing quickly hits the song as guitarist Ethan Hedayat lays a thick lure with his lead vocals, a strong presence assisted as potently in voice by fellow guitarist Randy Cash and Appel. It is a rousing stomp, stirring up the appetite with heavy rock ‘n’ roll hooks to hang your allegiance on and an anthemic might which easily diminishes any reason to moan the lack of major surprises.

cover_RingMaster Review   The following Want it Back is similarly textured and crafted but quickly filling out into its own antagonistic and commanding character. The bass of Appel is wonderfully grizzly whilst the swinging slaps of Molgaard just seem to get more intensive and effective with every passing rally of beats. The track is a predator yet tempered by again impressive vocal strengths and blends, as well as the magnetic enterprise of both guitarists. You can feel a touch of bands like Seether, Godsmack, and Shinedown to the track, such flavours woven into its own if not unique certainly individual incitement.

NeverLoution is a more even tempered and reserved proposal yet with another throaty bass lure amidst wiry strands of sonic grooving, it blossoms into a tenacious and rigorously persuasive offering. Its melodic side and underlying snarl reminds a touch of Sick Puppies whilst its metallic groaning has a whisper of Nonpoint, and combined both aspects only add to another swift nudge on enjoyment before the gripping Get Your Head Down emerges with an enticing sonic shimmer and melodic coaxing. Appel persistently gives the richest alluring shadows to songs, and here his bass is an entrapping resonance leading ears straight into an infectious tempest making up the body of the song, but a stormy muscular affair built on spicy grooves and melodic flames.

Both Showdown and Massive keep things seriously rocking, the first with dirty blues lined walls around jagged riffs and stabbing beats driven by, as now expected, mouth-watering enterprise from vocals and guitars, and the second through its dusty croon across a restrained yet fiery and unreservedly catchy landscape. In their individual ways, the pair of tracks incites another surge of pleasure whilst impressing more, as the album, with every listen. Despite that potency though, they still have to submit to the best track on the album, the raging roar of Battle Call. Instantly like an old friend back to stir up trouble and anarchy, the song enters ears with a sturdy stride and confrontational attitude. The vocals are an easy conscription to its call alone but backed by the sinew driven rhythms and scything hooks of the track, it is an invigorating storm embracing broader melodic escapades to its vivaciously resourceful and incendiary canvas. Quite simply this is the kind of song the word anthem was composed for.

We’re Alright is a slow burner of a song, its smoulder working away on ears and thoughts with an underlying and unrelenting persistence. It also takes a few listens to find the same level of greed for its creative adventure as other exploits upon the album. Like Pop Evil meets Stone Sour, the song leaves a good impression from the off nevertheless triggering a want to go back for more. That success is aggressively ripe within the compelling and bracing snarl of Double Think, just one more offer upon The Truth Syndicate Diaries to get keenly involved with.

The album comes to a close with Don’t Get Me Started, one final voraciously galvanic and superbly crafted inflaming of emotion and energy from release and listener. It perfectly sums up The Truth Syndicate Diaries, an album which might not flirt with startling originality but out rocks and outshines most contenders, and yes it just gets better and better over time to.

The Truth Syndicate Diaries is available now on ITunes, and Amazon.

http://radiodronemusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/Radiodrone/1462833703951662

RingMaster 14/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Pop Evil – Onyx

onyx

Though its veins are not exactly bursting with originality, Onyx the new album from US rockers Pop Evil is without doubt a rigorously compelling and invigorating slab of fiery melodic rock. Every shrug of its sinews and each melodic flame exhaled soak ears with an open familiarity whilst every muscular blaze of emotion and searing of sonic enterprise leaves thoughts and passions greedily content. It is may be not going to set the year on fire but the band’s third album is definitely bringing it a thoroughly enjoyable stomp of aural temptation.

Still under a keen spotlight after touring across Europe supporting Five Finger Death Punch, the band hits the European market and ears with a mighty slab of potent contagion. Released via Eleven Seven Records, the album has a voracity and tempestuous passion to its body which along with inciting melodies and perfectly barbed hooks, simple enthrals the senses and imagination. Having already established themselves on their side of The Pond with their rich tempting sound and albums War of Angels and even more so Lipstick on the Mirror, as well as a clutch of attention grabbing singles, the Michigan quintet are setting their sights on a wider audience and it is hard not to expect a healthy success through Onyx alone. Having also impressively shared stages with the likes of Three Doors Down, Papa Roach, Puddle Of Mudd, Theory of a Deadman, Buckcherry, Judas Priest, Black Stone Cherry, and Seether since forming, as well as going through the obstacles music throws up including line-up changes, Pop Evil have found a fresh and determined tenacity which shines across their new release as powerfully as the craft and passion soaking it. Produced by Johnny K (Disturbed, 3 Doors Down, Megadeth), Onyx is an encounter which does not herald a torrent of surprises but does ensure satisfaction is fat to bursting.

The album gets off to a flyer with opener Goodbye My Friend, an instant attention grabbing encounter which from its initial guitar and bass coaxing awakens a potent appetite for what is to come. Nick Fuelling and Dave Grahs take little time casting a web of riffs and grooves to snare the imagination whilst bassist Matt DiRito brings a predatory growl to the mix to accentuate the immediate potency of the song. It is an enthralling mix to which vocalist Leigh Kakaty adds his impressive tones as the rhythms of drummer Josh Marunde punctuate and frame the thrilling enticement. The track also offers the comparisons which stand across the whole album, its sounds like a mix of Seether and Sevendust with the metallic rapaciousness of Spineshank, the emotive angst of Three Days Grace, and the anthemic craft of Drowning Pool. To be fair though that still only gives part of the picture as shown by the second song on the album.

Bringing a rich colour of Alice In Chains to its striking canvas of sound and gripping narrative, Deal with the Devil prowls and strolls around the senses like a warrior, the guitars and bass crowding ears with forceful intensity and ravenous intent whilst rhythms punch with weighty persuasion. The latest single is a stirring and climactic incitement, ablaze at times with infection soaked melodies and senses entwining grooves for a thoroughly exciting temptation. One not quite matched but certainly thrillingly backed up by previous single Trenches. Holding a defiant air to its body of sound and lyrical call, there is an air of antagonism to the song which only urges the sonic warfare of the guitars to blaze with brighter flames and virulence as additional keys and electronic bait bring extra charm.

The riotous charge of the album takes a break with power ballad Torn To Pieces, a magnetic song which goes exactly where expectations assume but still leaves a lingering and increasingly potent lure in its wake. Kakaty is a powerful and controlled vocalist throughout the album and shows his depth of expression and emotional quality masterfully here to match the strengths of the sounds caressing and at times scorching his words. It is a glorious emotive encounter which leaves the following Divide looking a little pale in comparison. To be fair the song is a feisty and vivaciously striding suasion but lacks the extra guile of say its predecessor or the punchy invention of other songs on the release. Nevertheless it makes a pleasing play upon the ears as does its successor Beautiful, another song which just misses the potency and success of others, but still leaves a flavoursome offering for a hungry appetite to devour.

Things return to the opening plateau with the outstanding Silence & Scars, a song which seduces and pressurises thoughts and emotions simultaneously with imaginative and emotion driven invention. There is a touch of Bush to the song, its grunge spice and melodic weaves absorbing whilst a cathartic essence to its whole picture offers a magnetic radiance. The track is bewitching as is next up Sick Sense, a furnace of a song which is as raw as it is mesmeric, as caustically charged as it is a resourceful seducing. Again it is like an instant friend, that familiar seeding inescapable bait but with a voracious fuel to the backing vocal roars and a nu-metal menace to the ingenious twists within the song, again that Spineshank reference coming forth, the track is an exhilarating proposition.

Fly Away and Behind Closed Doors keep the album burning brightly and at times ferociously, the first an eagerly striding charge of pop rock urgency across evocative textures whilst the second steps into a more formula yet forcibly appealing canter of melodic fire and vocal enticement. Both songs leave a smoking long term bait working away even after their departure, their heat and passion enough to override a slightly predictable design, before the more aggressive and excellent Welcome To Reality has it moment to ignite the senses. It again confirms that Pop Evil are masters at creating songs which might not break away from existing trodden paths but bind the listener up in feverishly addictive and irresistible anthems.

The album closes with Flawed, a striking dramatic and impressive end to Onyx which simply underlines the quality and exciting presence of band and release. Pop Evil is not inventing the wheel, or arguably even redesigning it, but it is giving it a breath-taking and often scintillating soak of explosive colour.

Onyx is available now through Eleven Seven Music with the standard European version holding 3 additional tracks whilst the deluxe version features an extra 5.

www.popevil.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Senser – To The Capsules

Senser_promo2013_lores

It is always hard not to have an extra buzz to the anticipation of a new Senser release and the unleashing of their fifth studio album To The Capsules is no exception. Following the Biting Rhymes EP, an interim covers release between albums, the new ten track tempest from UK’s crossover legends shows the band at its most eclectic yet. Experience and maturity has certainly not diluted their want and intent to stretch their boundaries and on the evidence of the new release Senser have openly taken their consistently adventurous confrontational enterprise and inventive provocation to new levels. The debate is still going on in thoughts as to whether the album is their finest moment to date but certainly with a compelling expanse of imagination within a sumptuous storm of metal, hip hop, and electronica to simplify it all alongside the as expected political and social lyrical confrontation from the sextet, To The Capsules is a bright blaze in a fiery musical year.

Fan -funded through a highly successful Pledgemusic campaign and released via Imprint Music, the self-produced album takes the strong base established on the band’s comeback record How To Do Battle of 2009, and expands it into an intensive, incendiary, and satisfaction filling encounter. With a live presence which has accelerated into one of most exciting and inspiring over the past couple of years, Senser stir things up to another tempestuous height with To The Capsules, a record returning the band to the fore of genre merging invention and antagonistic ingenuity.

Big bulging magnetic rhythms open up the release, the initial pulsating lure of Devoid an immediate seizure of ears and thoughts. Senser-To-The-Capsules-cover-hi-resSoon after the guitar of Nick Michaelson is sending scars of searing sonic temptation across the rhythmic slavery, the merger only accelerating the hunger already brewing from the album’s entrance. Taking a stand of classic metal seeded enterprise alongside the still compelling rhythms, vocalist Heitham Al-Sayed unleashes his distinctive and passionate narrative delivery. It is prime Senser at this point but with a growl and predation which is as fresh a bait as ever laid down by the band. The album features guest vocalist iMMa across its length, the excellent vocalist having toured with the band since founding member Kerstin Haigh stepped down last year, and even as support on the song through the chorus raises the temptation and sultriness wrapping the metal bred intensity. As the predatory bass stalking of James Barrett and the outstanding drum exploits of Johnny Morgan, as well as the desk twisting skills of Andrew Clinton (aka DJ Awe) conjure greater shadows and traps for the listener to be enthralled by, the track is an immense and memorable lure into To The Capsules.

The following Time Travel Scratch drips intrigue and simmering seduction from its opening sample and coaxing, the DJ craft of Clinton stalked by the bestial bass sound conjured by Barrett immersed in a psychedelic funk kissed weave of imaginative persuasion. The track at times reminds of nineties UK rap group Honky, its grooves and senses mesmerising rhythms a similar toxicity wrapped in a soul and jazz funk fusion. The invigorating dance makes way for another lofty peak for the release. Witch Village with more than a whispered element of the weight and might of debut album Stacked Up to it, courts groove metal vengefulness and classic rock melodic enterprise for a result which is an aggressive and fearsome blaze of aural exploration and lyrical incitement.

The brilliant Wounded Spectre continues the torrent of diversity already rampaging across the album, its hardcore/punk rabidity linked to an alternative metal invention. Riffs are a carnivorous instigator of the passions whilst the sonic noise rock like stabs from Michaelson fall like shards of aural manna around the vocal vociferousness provided by Al-Sayed and iMMa. It keeps the album at its highest plateau, and is soon backed by the scintillating Break The Order, the track two and a half minutes of thrash ‘n’ punk fury. Take a pinch of Motorhead, The Grumpynators, Fuckshovel, and maybe a little Five Finger Death Punch and you have another piece of Senser alchemy to bask within.

The sultry sirenesque beckoning of iMMa within Alpha Omega and its sweet Eastern bred toxicity only increases as the track unveils intensive sinews and spite and melodies as virulently tempting as any release this year, whilst its successor Liquidity is a beguiling fluid heat of rap vocals, scratching squeals, and a psychedelic wash with a flavour of Dizraeli and the Small Gods to it. Neither track triggers the intensity of passion as their predecessors but both leave appetite greedy and satisfaction full to continue the raging pleasure.

Echelon features Kerstin Haigh on vocals alongside Al-Sayed and is another which just fails to reach earlier heights but for unpredictable and exhausting adventure is on the frontline, the track a bruising and uncompromising scorching fire of metal and hard rock rapaciousness. In its distinct character Chemtrails which has UK hip hop artists Junior Disprol and Manage guesting on its offering, also has a hunger which toys with rabidity within its electronic swamp and brass irresistibility. It is a challenging swarm of aural fascination, a glorious investigation which adds another startling aspect to the album whilst setting up the closing seven minute epic, Let There Be War. Despite the track epitomising all the strengths and invention of Senser it is a little disappointing, lacking that essential spark though like the other songs which slip below the album’s fullest heights, it is more down to the quality surrounding them on the album than any major shortcomings within its skilled and provocative walls.

      Nevertheless To The Capsules is a thrilling and richly exciting release and Senser back as one of the most innovative and boundary worrying bands in British rock, metal, rap….well within any genre they wish to employ.

http://www.senser.co.uk/

9/10

RingMaster 25/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ix9QEZ4lUjI

Emphatic – Another Life

emphatic

Nestling potently and comfortably amongst the likes of Three Days Grace, Alterbridge, Chevelle, and Creed, US rock band Emphatic step forward once again to light up ears and thoughts with their new album Another Life. It is not a release which exactly sets down new markers or offers dramatically unique ventures within its eleven emotively powerful offerings but certainly it is one which leaves a strong canvas of infectious and richly rewarding musical narratives for senses and imagination to eagerly indulge in. The successor to the acclaimed Damage of 2011, the new album provides an appealing dose of heart sculpted highly accomplished rock intensity and passion.

Formed in 2004 by guitarist Justin McCain, Emphatic has had a steady and constantly ascending emergence, first leaving strong marks through their self-titled debut album of 2005 and three years later the Goodbye Girl EP. It was the release of Damage though which triggered a new depth of attention and awareness, not forgetting acclaim around the band. Live too with the sharing of stages with the likes of Stone Temple Pilots, Buckcherry, Avenged Sevenfold, Papa Roach, Breaking Benjamin, Flyleaf, Five Finger Death Punch, Theory of a Deadman, Alter Bridge, Black Stone Cherry, and Adelitas Way, the band’s reputation has grown and brought an enthused audience to their excellently crafted and energetically honed sounds.

The release of the last album was followed by the departure of vocalist Patrick Wilson who suffered a career halting injury when he fractured his larynx, and with also rhythm guitarist Lance Dowdle and bassist Alan Larson leaving, Emphatic was facing uncertain times. Eventually though McCain and drummer Patrick Mussack enlisted Jesse Saint (Scum of the Earth/The Autumn Offering) on bass and Bill Hudson (Cellador) on guitar whilst the frontman spot was taken by Toryn Green, the former vocalist of Fuel and touring lead vocalist for Apocalyptica. The new blood and energy gave a new lease of life to the band it is fair to say and certainly has combined to create in Another Life, their finest moment yet and a thoroughly enjoyable and persistently satisfying encounter.

The Omaha, Nebraska based band immediately works on the senses with the opening persuasion of Life After Anger. The song is a keen Album Coverand emotional caress with the vocals of Green taking little time to impress amongst sturdy beats and sinew driven riffs. The melodic heat and expressive voice of the track equally lays a reflective enticing lure and with an element of Seether to it, the song makes an excellent lead into the heart of the release which is straight away backed up by Time is Running Out. Again there is a familiarity to the track, something which applies to the album as a whole, but equally there is a flourish and intensity which marks it as Emphatic bred. The addictive sonic groove and continuing to impress vocals and supportive harmonies capture the imagination alongside a solid resource of invention and enterprise which parades across the song to bring forth a strong appetite for album and band.

The following Lights makes a gentle coaxing with its first breath before adding a little more urgency to its still restrained and emotional beckoning. The song than settles into a provocative and intensive narrative which without matching the heights just set still draws thoughts and emotions into its embrace whilst stretching the variety within the album, a melodic diversity given another flame by next up Some Things Never Die. The song similarly misses previous plateaus set but with a melodramatic touch of keys and tenderly preying call of riffs and bass, emerges to give its share of strong satisfaction and another string to the album’s aural bow.

Both The Choice and the title track bring the album up to its earlier heights, the first with an expectation feeding slice of rock but one which ensures they have a skilled and potent meal whilst the second entwines a delicious groove around an imaginative and fiery melodic painting of contagious adventure and evocative craft. The best song on Another Life, it leads passions by the hand into a sweltering dance of reflection bred, melody soaked colour within captivating passionate scenery.

As tracks like the stylish I Don’t Need You and the ballad Louder Than Love unveil their varying temptations and the fevered Forbidden You provokes the imagination, Emphatic continue to provide a thoroughly engaging presence. The three songs again are slightly adrift of the biggest highlights of the release whilst being soaked in a sound which arguably many bands have explored previously, but each nevertheless creates a persuasion and invitation that is hard to refuse or not want to accompany again.

Closing with the greatly pleasing Take Your Place, a track like many with an anthemic lure to its chorus and skilled bait to its melodic craft, and the lead single from Another Life in the shape of the adrenaline fuelled Remember Me, the album at the end of the day is an absorbing and openly enjoyable encounter. Superbly crafted and impressively delivered, Emphatic has brought a proposition which leaves you fully satisfied and with an increased appetite for their offering, a meal you know and feel safe with but also one filled with little spices of invention that keeps it fresh and daring.

http://Emphaticrock.com

7.5/10

RingMaster 23/10/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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All Else Fails – Fucktropolis

AEf 2013 Promo Brightened-1

As Canadian metallers All Else Fails escorts the passions on a hungry and richly satisfying trip through new EP Fucktropolis, you soon realise that the eclectic R.I.Y.L. in the promo for the record was not merely casting a wide net to pull people in but actually an accurate call on the diverse sounds parading their sinews upon the release. Listed are the likes of Killswitch Engage, In Flames, Cancer Bats, and Five Finger Death Punch, and in the EP all those essences can be heard as rich spices within something which is not exactly drenched in originality but offers an intensively riveting encounter setting thoughts and emotions aflame.

Hailing from Edmonton, Alberta, All Else Fails has carved out a big reputation certainly in North America for their constantly evolving and vibrant sound and live performances which has seen the band alongside the likes of Protest the Hero, Cancer Bats, Dayglo Abortions, 3 Inches of Blood, Fear Factory, Threat Signal, Decapitated, Suffocation, and many more as well as numerous festivals. Their previous releases, especially 2011 album The Oracle, What Was, Is And Could Have Been, have equally earned strong acclaim whilst the band itself has garnered nominations at the Edmonton Music Awards for the past two years. Now the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Barrett Klesko, bassist/backing vocals Seedy Mitchell, guitarist Mike Sands, and drummer Shane Tym, return with was is claimed to be their heaviest and most expansive release yet. The Suicidal Bride Records released Fucktropolis is a tremendous proposition, one which though not quite flawless leaves a determined hunger to keep band and their releases entrenched within future horizons, with some retrospective investigation too.

First track AntiMartyr emerges from behind a vocal sample wrapped in musical drama. It is not long before riffs and rhythms add their Fucktropolis Cover High Resmenace to spark a smothering rise in intensity and immediately enterprise and temptation grip thoughts and senses. Soon the track takes full hold as guitars carve out a weave of sonic manipulation and a fury of riffs driven by ravenous basslines and now fully imposing drum volleys take aim. The harsh vocals growl and scowl with excellent lure and expression, reaping the aggressive sounds for further intent. It is not all about ravaging the ear though as equally excellent clean vocals and acidic melodies spiral around the muscular hulk of the song to offer a full range of rich flavour and variety. The technical strikes of the guitars jar and crack on bone with riveting relentlessness locked in compelling craft whilst the array of vocal delivery keeps things moving and evolving within song and thoughts.

The following Better Left Undead unravels a precise groove from the off, additional melodic flames searing the surrounding air before holding sway as the gruff vocals graze the surface of the lyrical narrative, soon replaced by again accomplished clean persuasion. They are a moving target which never settles in to a singular gait, much like the music, and it all adds to a continually intriguing and appetising proposition. The song itself is strongest when its rage is lit but the mellower and sultry washes within still leave hunger greedy to immerse its teeth into the emotive meal. As the intensive face of the song returns with a Bloodsimple feel to its caustic breath the song leaves the flight of the release as potent and enthralling as its predecessor started it.

     La Demencia Violenta  with its sultry mystique swirling behind the again rigid framed rhythms and steely riffs is a provocative wash of metallic bite and sonic colour, the smouldering heat of the vocals initially swapped for a full fire of sizzling syllables and spite coated words. There is an underlying lure to the song which calls persistently even when the track savagely bites at the ear, imagine Palms meets Five Finger Death Punch, and though arguably it is in the shadow of the rest of the EP, the track burns and lingers perfectly, especially its jabbing compelling riffs.

The final two songs are simply the pinnacles of the release. Firstly Obedience At The Altar of Sacrifice steps up face to face with the listener, its passion brewing from behind a mesh of brightly hued guitar sculpting and rhythmic building. Limbs and neck are soon in eager union with its rapacious energy and torrential gait, though again melodies and harmonies as well as descriptive keys all have a defined place in the brawling storm. It is a scintillating blaze of heavy and corrosive, one which simultaneously scars and seduces with skilful majesty, but one instantly challenged by the following triumph A Most Unwanted Reprieve. The track is just anthemic metal at its very best, group calls roping in the passions as riffs and drums set addictive trap after trap in the unbridled charge of howling invention and sinew clad imagination. The best track on Fucktropolis with its almost schizophrenic avidity, it is the perfect end to an outstanding release. Actually it is not quite the finish as there is the hidden track The Deep Roads, but as it is just a brief schizo reprise of the opening to the previous song, it is not really something to be discussed, though it did raise a grin.

Fucktropolis is simply great, a release which has limbs, senses, and passions leaping in tandem with its metallic adventure. If this is the direction and future ahead of All Else Fails, there will be exciting times as the band places themselves on the front line of world metal.

http://allelsefails.ca/

9/10

RingMaster 30/07/2013

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