Bad Solution – The War Within

BS_RingMasterReview

A handful of weeks over two years ago, British metallers Bad Solution seriously impressed with their first EP, Self Destruct. A fiery and inventive roar, it seeded a keen anticipation for the London based band’s debut album; a hunger made to wait but now rewarded with a beast of a first full-length not only confirming that early promise but pushing their sound and writing to a whole new level.

That fresh new adventure tempers the slight disappointment of four out of the album’s ten tracks coming from that first release though such their impressive and highly enjoyable impact there is never a negative hearing them again and again. Their infusion within the brand new tracks on The War Within actually brings other previously less noticeable attributes within the quartet out to join those of their newer companions to create a fully rounded and increasingly riveting proposition.

With originally an all Polish line-up, Bad Solution was formed in 2011 by guitarists Trix and Mariusz Chojnowski. By the November of that first year, British vocalist Alex Willox came in with fellow Brit Joe Patterson replacing Mariusz Burzynski on drums two years later. With the current line-up completed by original bassist Wojtek Suberlak, Bad Solution has gone from strength to strength on the UK live scene, also sharing the stage with the likes of Gallows, The Blackout, and Soulfly across numerous festivals. The release of Self Destruct in 2015 thrust the outfit into a new richness of attention which can only be eclipsed by that generated by the outstanding exploits of The War Within.

Drowning starts things off, instantly confronting ears with rapaciously wiry grooves and hard jabbing beats. It pulls back a touch soon after, relaxing into a more controlled stroll as the guitar weaves a melodic web though still the rhythmic incitement of Suberlak and Patterson brings a bite and lively tenacity. The quickly impressing vocals of Willox are potently backed by the roars of Trix as the song develops a Clawfinger like snarl, it in turn evolving into a just as enticing melody rich cry. The carousel of the song continues to turn, increasingly engaging ears and involvement with very round whilst developing a volatility which only adds to its potency.

cover_RingMasterReviewIt is an outstanding start matched by the equally boisterous and aggressive proposal of Nothing (You don’t know me). Like a fusion of Five Finger Death Punch and Bloodsimple, it is a fiery protagonist grabbing and teasing ears with its muscular and melodically seductive enterprise, Willox again a striking and impressive presence within a maelstrom of ravenous and creatively tenacious magnetism.

Demon In My Bed then follows, beckoning the imagination with its initial Middle Eastern flavoured coaxing, a hue continuing to seduce and flourish throughout the track’s beguiling tapestry of sound and flavours. Once more there is a Clawfinger-esque feel to moments within the song but as in its predecessors, the song soon shows its own individual character in sound and writing as mellow passages beget invasive groove stoked dexterity which begets revolving flames of melodic endeavour.

The melancholic caress of the piano amidst sorrowfully ethereal keys brings Self Destruct into view next, Willox laying his plaintive tones in their arms as darker hues simmer and eventually grow. Veining them are spicy tendrils of guitar and a bass snarl which just intensifies as the song eventually erupts into greater aggressiveness bringing a Papa Roach meets Spineshank air to proceedings. Trix and Chojnowski add additional creative flames with their magnetic guitar craft, the track boiling up with every passing twist and turn for an impassioned climax taking a final bite out of the senses before the calmer presence of Echoes Of The Cry steps forward. With captivating elegance to its melodies and atmosphere, Willox similarly restrained in his tone, the track smoulders and simmers but with an increasing edge which sparks thicker flames of intensity across its lively croon. Though a slow burner compared to those around it, the song simply blossoms over time to one of the album’s truly memorable moments.

The chunky invitation of The Last Lie has ears and appetite swiftly on board whilst adding another strain of refreshing flavouring to the release with its echoes of One Minute Silence. Added to the progressive, slight seventies scented journey of the encounter, it makes for a beguiling and seriously virulent persuasion though still not as addictive as the ever manipulative exploits of Desert Rock. The star of the first EP, it seems to grow with every listen even two years on. It’s also Middle Eastern seeded temptations come backed by a rhythmic incitement which has feet bouncing within seconds. As infectious as they are though, they carry an aggressive bent which strikes almost venomously, the snarling bass matching that ferocity as those early evocative melodies continue to seduce around the addiction stoking chorus. Every band has a track which seals the deal with fans more than any other; this is Bad Solution’s and then some.

The swinging stroll of Dear Sarah follows, a flirtatious affair grabbing feet and hips with its first breath as the imagination comes under the magnetism of tangy sonic tendrils and the vocal prowess of Willox. A fusion of alternative metal and hard rock, the song is as rugged as it is graceful ensuring that the album only increases its grip on ears and pleasure; a hold tightened further by the classic/blues rock hued FOD. A fire of sound and intensity equipped with its own contagious kindling, there is no escaping its creative drama.

The War Within is completed by the equally inflamed White Washed, a track with irritability in its veins and a melodic rapacity in its heart. Suberlak’s bass is a delicious grumble within the flames, though not given enough clarity to groan for personal tastes, whilst Patterson masterfully scythes across the hungry tide of riffs and resourceful web of grooves cast by Chojnowski and Trix.

Though maybe not as impacting as those before it, the track is a fine end to a greed inspiring album. Two years back, the Self Destruct EP suggested Bad Solution were knocking on the door of major recognition. Its opening surprisingly never quite came but no worries, the quintet have just kicked it down with The War Within.

The War Within is available now from most online stores.

 

https://www.facebook.com/badsolution    https://twitter.com/bad_solution

Pete RingMaster 08/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

CRNKSHFT – Self Titled EP

Photo Credit – Alex Barredo

We surely have a soft spot for things carrying real punch and that is exactly what the new self-titled EP from Canadian outfit CRNKSHFT has in sound and presence. The four track offering is an imposing roar of hungry and varied metal but equally shows a blaze of hard and melodic rock ‘n’ roll, a trait even more compelling in the successor to their previous well-received debut EP helping stir up a very healthy appetite for the band’s fierce and rousing attack.

Hailing from Vancouver, CRNKSHFT (pronounced crankshaft) have begun waking attention far beyond the local scene they have already been devoured by. Support slots for the likes of Lordi, Prong, Grim Reaper, and The Veer Union have capped a powerful live presence and reputation to date, one like their releases beginning to stir broader spotlights. Providing the evidence, their recent single Systematic won an award from the Academia Awards Academy in Los Angeles and there seems little to stop the Daren Grahn (Metallica, Hedley, Mötley Crüe, Bon Jovi) produced EP nudging greater focus their way.

That single opens up the EP, Systematic instantly stroking ears with grouchy riffs before a wave of tenaciously swung beats and wiry grooves join the initial wave of snarling guitar and the mutually striking tones of vocalist Shane Jolie. With equally rapacious melodic strands breaking through the aggressive trespass driven by Josh Lauze’s potent beats, the song develops a Nonpoint meets Five Finger Death Punch like incitement loaded with the band’s own fresh and inventive attributes. The infectious growl and stride of the song is inescapable, guitarists Geoff Way and Sebastian Mark Pulse casting a web of voracious enterprise as intrusive as it is flirtatious; a union the song embraces as a whole.

The following Tears Me Apart bursts into life with its own antagonistic yet welcoming blaze next, riffs and rhythms ravishing the senses but equally content to pause for melody warm breaths. The calmer moments still have a shadowy air as the bass of Trevor Miles courts the peace while Jolie springs his own diversity of magnetic attack throughout. With unpredictable essences emerging, occasionally with a Korn like nature, the song leaves pleasure full before Old Habits has its go at exciting ears. Another of the singles tempting anticipation the way of the EP, the song assertively simmers and boils; its robust imagination lined body a raw fire of Three Days Grace/ Bring Me The Horizon like dexterity and adventure.

Again, it is a song with something individual to CRNKSHFT in its dynamics, a welcome trait even bolder in the dark prowl of Breaking The Silence; a track virtually stalking ears from its start before its emotive and volcanic heart erupts, a cycle then repeated with fluid craft and invention. The most unpredictable moment on the release, it is as cantankerous as it is melodically reflective in tone. Fierce and venomous whilst contagiously engaging in touch, the song ensures the EP ends on the same major high it started with, heights closely nudged in between.

With familiar textures and essences in its design, the CRNKSHFT’s sound and EP do not quite find major originality but the signs are there, as strongly proven by its closer, whilst enjoyment is already a done deal. Things are looking good for band and ears.

The CRNKSHFT EP is out now across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/crnkshft/   http://www.crnkshft.com/

Pete RingMaster 27/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Twenty Second Dimension – Self-Titled EP

Twenty-Second Dimension

Twenty Second Dimension is a trio from Columbus, Ohio who have just released their self-titled debut EP, a release quickly grabbing attention. It offers five magnetic portions of the band’s melodic rock, a quintet of songs which bring a swift involvement of ears and feet. Theirs is a sound which nestles easily within a style many others are making successful use of too and in that respect it is not the most unique proposal you may come across with few big surprises involved yet there is no questioning the accomplished body and character of the tracks or the enjoyment each provides.

The band is made up of Eliot Hosenfeld (vocals and bass), Matthew Bowden (guitar and vocals, and Jeremiah Ross (drums), a threesome with CVs which include the sharing of stages with the likes of Limp Bizkit, Rob Zombie, Papa Roach, Sevendust, Theory of a Deadman, Incubus, Shinedown, Marilyn Manson, Five Finger Death Punch, Halestorm, Volbeat and many more before Twenty Second Dimension. It is a background easy to suggest has helped hone the skills and invention of individual members and the band as a whole; the growing of a craft which certainly makes their first release something to find strong rewards in.

Twenty-Second Dimension_RingMasterReviewReleased through Pavement Entertainment, the EP opens up with Afterlife. Making a low key entrance it soon hits a catchy stroll with simmering keys surrounding a great blend of vocals and am equally inviting and throaty bassline. Guitars add their own specific tempting to the swiftly infectious encounter too, especially as the tenacious chorus erupts, though it is the blend of Hosenfeld and Bowden’s vocal harmonies which grab biggest attention. Continuing to unveil inventive twists and turns through the stylish hooks and riffs of guitar, the track provides a potent start, one soon backed with similar potency by the feisty croon of Without You. Whereas there was a more unpredictable edge to its predecessor, the second track shares a more rounded melodic rock persuasion with again vocals and harmonies commanding as melodies take their share of the imagination involved.

An infectious character and tenacity fuels Dreamless next, the track a vibrantly strolling slice of rock ‘n’ roll springing catchy hooks and riffs like confetti around the throbbing bassline cast by Hosenfeld and the magnetically jabbing beats of Ross. As suggested earlier, big surprises are rare but with the track easily whipping up physical and vocal involvement, there is little more to want from the excellent encounter.

Blindside steps up next, its initial guitar enterprise carrying a slight blues tone and subsequent melodies a classic rock feel before the track slips into a prowling gait with dark intimidating shadows. That in turn is followed by a flaming roar of evocative melody and harmony before the sequence is repeated to increasing effect.  That earlier unpredictability is in full swing here too, the song subsequently taking best track honours before Good Enough fires up its imagination to bring the EP to an impressive close. It too takes unexpected turns with a seamless flow, feistily seducing ears and great satisfaction with each breath and lure of invention.

The Twenty Second Dimension EP is a thoroughly enjoyable and striking introduction to the band and a great base for them to search out greater originality from. Such the quality and rousing success of its contents though, another offering from Twenty Second Dimension like this would certainly go down very nicely too.

The Twenty Second Dimension EP is out now via Pavement Entertainment.

https://www.facebook.com/twentyseconddimension   https://twitter.com/22ndDimension   https://instagram.com/twenty.second.dimension/

Pete RingMaster 16/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Moth’s Circle Flight – My Entropy

mcf_RingMasterReview

They may have a name which intrigues and lures a look, but it is their sound which ensures Moth’s Circle Flight really grabs attention, especially upon latest album My Entropy. Merging fiery groove metal with the hellacious predation of various extreme metal flavours, the Italian metallers show themselves a formidable and aggressively magnetic proposal. Their music is a rousing incitement which warrants attention and now with My Entropy to the fore, it demands it.

Hailing from Parma, Moth’s Circle Flight began in 2003 though it is probably fair to say that the band hit its stride and now firmly established potency when the line-up of vocalists Gabriele “Gabbo” Rosi and Simone “Pancio” Panciroli, rhythm guitarist Francesco “Baldo” Baldi, and lead guitarist Luca “Pellach” Alzapiedi linked up with bassist “Giupy” and drummer “Simo” around 2012. Since forming though, the band has certainly been a potent live proposition and have played with the likes of Sepultura, Extrema, Exilia, and Goddass over time while releasing an early EP before their well-received debut album Born to Burn in 2009. Recently with bassist Marco “Satir” Reggiani and drummer Fabio “Bersa” Bersani making up the rhythm section, Moth’s Circle Flight released My Entropy, a ravenous assault which sees the band hit a new plateau which could and should put the band on the global metal map.

It erupts into life with Man On The Peak, a distant sonic wind bringing the track towards ears as antagonistic vocals roar. Upon arrival it uncages a host of ear entwining grooves which alone ignite the appetite such their irresistible bait backed by thumping rhythms and the already impressing and enjoyable dual vocal assault. The song relaxes a little as it slips into its accomplished stride, jabbing and confronting the senses with an array of spiky twists and subsequently barbarous turns.   It is a fiercely rousing start to the album, like a seductive fury built on the animosity of Sepultura, the ire of DevilDriver, and the swing of Five Finger Death Punch.

Art_RingMasterReviewThings only get more compelling and furious with the following Ends Of A Shadow, its initial riffs a thickly alluring bait of invasive resonance. Swiftly southern hues seep from the track’s rabid pores too, a Pantera/Down like flavouring spicing up an already greedy appetite for the encounter. The great mix of vocal delivery from Gabbo and Pancio is a magnetic pull on its own; their tones embracing every shade of clean, guttural, and psychotic even occasionally encroaching on a Burton C. Bell toning. There is a touch of Fear Factory to the music at times too within, with both guitarists weaving a masterful challenge and seduction, a more melodic/nu metal-esque hue.

Raise Your Head rouses ears and emotions next; its body a bruising turbulence of craft and sonic dispute bound in melodic tempting. Again the pair of vocalists capture the imagination, backed as resourcefully in voice by the band and their musical web of unpredictability and multi-flavoured invention. The track is another simply whipping up more greed for the band’s proposal and quickly matched in success by the outstanding Late Promises and its tide of carnivorous riffs and rhythms. Bass groans and sonic whines accentuate the fiery character and intent of the song, though again, it all comes perfectly tempered by melodic and harmonic vocal imagination as well as some great off-kilter twists and turns.

The embrace of melody and clean vocal charm opening up An Old Chant takes mere seconds to seduce and impress before its brutality and creative trespass is unleashed to harry and prey upon the senses. As its predecessor, the track is glorious, a busily resourceful and adventurous invasion built on the keenest grooves and sonic scythes aligned to another great drama of voice and sound. It is a web of persuasion soon emulated in its individual way by Write My Name. The song is almost carnal in its inventive assault and irresistible, though it does lose its potency just a touch when it slips into more melodic passages throughout its otherwise gripping prowl. Managing to weave in some hardcore, blues, and glam metal too, the track still feeds a by now seriously hungry want for more, a need equally satisfied by both With Love, With Flames and Bursting Into Existence. The first of the pair is a relentless fusion of diverse flavours and styles, all honed into a bullish involvement and enslavement of ears and emotions whilst its successor is another instinctive predator. Its thrash and death metal scented infestation of ears is inescapable slavery whilst the net of melodic and sonic mystique which colours the songs’ scenery at times, is the inviting lead to some more richly satisfying vocal and guitar crafted enterprise.

My Entropy closes as powerfully and dynamically as it began; Madball making the first voracious assault to whip up spirit and energies, with plenty of that already established unpredictable imagination involved, before Ray Of Ira brings things to a volcanic fusion of nu, alternative, and death metal with the band’s instinctive groove sculpted emprise of sound.

Though there is plenty about My Entropy which is somewhat familiar, everything is either boldly fresh or twisted into an adventure distinct to Moth’s Circle Flight; a band as suggested earlier, worthy of the closest attention.

My Entropy is out now via Logic(il)Logic Records via most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Mothscircleflight/

Pete RingMaster 04/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Order Of 315 – Antipi

 

Photo_RingMaster Review

Three years ago French metallers Order of 315 awoke ears and attention with their debut album Near-Birth Experience, a fierce and tenacious offering which only grew in persuasion and stature over time. Now the Paris quartet have returned with its successor Antipi, raising the heat of the qualities and potential found in the first album whilst creating an even more compelling and varied confrontation. Antipi is a rousing incitement and cantankerous roar bred across eleven individual stirring aggravations of sound and imagination. Fair to say the band’s music still wears open inspirations at times but is now really showing its own character whilst unleashing tapestries of varied and aggressively delivered flavours.

Formed in 2010, Order of 315 draw on a host of styles from metalcore and hard-rock to progressive, djent, and alternative-metal; flavours bred in the experiences and tastes of its members with bands such as Black Label Society, Pantera, Machine Head, Slipknot, Stone Sour, Five Finger Death Punch, and Korn amongst individual sparks to their sound and imagination. The 2012 released Near-Birth Experience earned strong attention and acclaim from certainly the metal underground and media with its striking tempest, its seeds now blossoming into the creative voracity that is Antipi. The new album is more brutal yet equally richer in melodic tempting and certainly a more atmospherically volatile confrontation around a heart feverish in its resourcefulness.

Cover_RingMaster ReviewAntipi opens with A Slap On The Wrist and an initial sample stroked by an innocence drenched, single strand melody. It caresses the imagination, awakening ears ready for the swift assault on the senses of jagged riffs, beefy rhythms, and the instantly recognisable and welcome grizzly tones of Edgar Jabberwocky. His voice and delivery is a mighty lure alone easily igniting a pleased reaction in ears to match that being sparked by the growing rabid swing and antagonistic rumble of the sounds around him. The song is bullish rock ‘n’ roll, an easy anthem to get eager teeth into and a hungry appetite from, both fed with every passing swell of bruising enticement.

It is an outstanding start to the album quickly continued by Telescope. From its first groaning breath the track is a more imposing and intrusive proposition with the rhythms of drummer Pablo Civil unruly in their skilled design. Aligned to the predacious air of Grm Lecouflet’s bass, they make for a hostile yet gripping frame entwined by the thick winy grooves of Klaus Kersey, his guitar just as magnetic in primal riffery and sonic enterprise too. As with its predecessor, the track has hips violently gripped with its swinging challenge and ears hooked by its rapacious sound, Jabberwocky leading the incitement as masterfully as ever before The Feather Factor takes over with its industrial metal breeding and groove meets heavy/alternative metal tempestuousness. Subsequent switches into melodic flames bring a relatively undefined familiarity to things but only adds to the thick and captivating drama unfolding within ears.

Without quite finding the same dynamic impact as the first tracks, Abelian still keeps satisfaction fully whetted with its spidery melodic enterprise around a fierce tempest of a heart whilst the following Meiosis almost beats pleasure from the senses with the brutal rapier swings of Civil, though the atmospheric melodies, scything sonic trespasses, and unpredictable landscape of the assault are just as thickly tempting and alluring. Once more there is something recognisable in the spicing of the song but warped perfectly by its great bedlamic nature.

A creative composure lines Rumble Fish, the bass of Lecouflet a prowling protagonist leading the listener into the awaiting animus of the song. It never breaks its pleasing chains though, hinting and provoking with subtlety and atmospheric imagination whilst showing more of the growth in songwriting and maturity of the Order Of 315 sound, something clear across the whole of the album and indeed next up Data Warfare with its Korn meets Bloodsimple like turbulence with just a touch of Fear Factory adventure to it all.

Both the magnetically wiry Greyscale and the senses enveloping Densen keep things mean and keen; the first an inflamed mix of heavy metal and alternative rock as flirtatious as it is menacing whilst its successor crawls through ears with a slight but definite salacious sway to its evocative and intensive rock ‘n’ roll design. Both carry an attitude and hearty intimidation which, with the sonic imagination, sparks a want for more, a success just as easily drawn by the spiralling textures of Unperfect Circles. The track perpetually winds around the senses, the guitars especially influential in tempting out lusty enjoyment.

Drone brings Antipi to an end, the track a tangle of sonic craft and expression ridden by the brawly tones of Jabberwocky amidst a rhythmic tempest. Though in some ways the song takes longer to get to grips with, it is a fine end to another thrilling offering from Order Of 315. To be picky, there is a slight diminishing of unpredictability towards the rear of the release, until the final encounter anyway, but each track only ignites body and imagination to declare Order Of 315 one of the potent fresh roars within the metal scene.

Antipi is available now through numerous online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/OrderOf315

Pete RingMaster 21/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

V For Violence – The Book of V

VFORVIOLENCE-band_RingMaster Review

Finnish metallers V For Violence first made an attention nudging statement with up their debut album The Cult Of V in 2009, now after a fair time in the making they unleash its successor The Book of V. Vocalist Jarkko Lähderanta said of the band’s new offering, ”The Book Of V took years to get its shape and sound. We wanted to take the next step in songwriting and paid more attention on details.” It is an intent finding success as the eleven tracks contagion frisks ears and sparks the imagination, and though it easily lures references to other protagonists in the industrial/alternative metal scene and styles around it, the album is simply one rousing and thoroughly enjoyable ferocious stomp.

Formed in 2007 by Lähderanta, drummer Miikki Kunttu, and guitarist Janne Salo, V For Violence was soon luring ears with their first demo in 2008. Its track/video Boy Called Fucker was a swift spark in the band being eagerly devoured by fans and media too, helping lead to their signing with Osasto-A Records soon after for the release of the 2-track single Constant Of Death in the summer of 2009. It was a strong teaser to their impending debut album The Cult Of V released in the November of that same year. The full-length was a well-received proposal pushing the band towards stronger spotlights backed by a live presence which by this point had already seen V For Violence support Hardcore Superstar and in turn going on to the sharing of stages with the likes of Die So Fluid, Cold Cold Ground, Amorphis, Hypocrisy, Underoath, and Architects at shows and festivals. Now with bassist Jani Rahkonen and guitarist Riku Vuorio alongside Lähderanta, Salo, and Kunttu, V For Violence have the long awaited The Book of V poised and ready to stir up the metal scene.

And that it pretty much does even if its originality is locked in the arms of open familiarity to a few heavyweights. Like a fusion of Fear Factory and Marilyn Manson in league with Dope and Powerman 5000, the album and opening track, The Halted Saint explode on the senses with anthemic ferocity. For some you suspect that recognisable air might not work as well as for others, but V For Violence bring their own raw and aggressive twist on things too ensuring that each track has something fresh and extra to say and certainly grip a demanding appetite and imagination by. The band’s new single clouds ears with thick industrial smog but swiftly sends sinewy tendrils of guitar and scything rhythms through it as the climate begins to clear on a corrosive and quickly addictive stalking. Those previously mentioned references straight away work on thoughts as too Society 1 in regard to the caustic and impassioned, bordering on sexual, intensity driving the encounter. Grooves and hooks just spark whilst the strong vocals of Lähderanta roar with expression and incitement for an outstanding start to the album’s fury.

V-For-Violence-TheBookOfV-cover__RingMaster Review     The potent beginning continues with the predatory prowl of The Downfall Pt. I: To Feel Alive. Initially it smoulders within imposing walls with mellow melodies and vocal coaxing but is soon building a volatile atmosphere and intimidating lining of textures, though still dipping into its elegant reflective heart throughout. Once more Manson is an obvious comparison to a song which at times has you drooling and in other moments simply fascinated by its adventurous nature and spicing.

Never Enough uncages the darkest bestial bass riffs and salacious grooves next, splintering them with vocal bellows and psyche gripping hooks to get very greedy over whilst Like It Like That and I Need You spew inescapable virulence in their individual characters. As most songs, choruses conjured are like infection dosed traps, impossible not to be fully involved in whilst around them creative snarls and in the latter of this trio, sinisterly dramatic nuances toy with the imagination. It is fair to say that a few songs share a closely seeded template but many, as here, create from that something strikingly inventive and captivating.

Band and album continues to hit the spot as tracks like the carnivorous A Place To Fill with its electronic festivity and guitar led twists, and the wonderful sonic groan and intimate melodies of God On Trial just ignite the senses. The second of these two is another major pinnacle in the album, every minute a cauldron of emotion and flirtatiously venomous enterprise equipped with unpredictability before it has to make way for Sodomedia which rivals it with its own hellacious and irritable industrial grooving. Once more limbs and thick involvement in the tempest is unavoidable, the breath taken too in the exhausting pleasure consuming the senses

The following Not A Word with its more hard rock seeded swagger lacks the spark and triggers of its predecessors yet again has a keenly persuasive impact on ears and satisfaction whilst What The Fuck! throws its attitude out with zeal, rhythmic and vocal relish fuelling the Five Finger Death Punch/ American Head Charge spiced confrontation.

The Book of V closes with the sweltering croon of The Downfall Pt. II: Amourageddon, its initial acoustic and emotive smoulder again as in Part 1, rising to dense intensity and melancholic ire whilst this time embracing classical and symphonic hues alongside an evocative industrial climate. A relative slow burner compared to other tracks within the album, it constantly evolves and reveals new treats to bring the release to a fine conclusion.

Fair to say we greedily devoured The Book of V and continue to, each track a tasty slice of invigorating fire and hostility. If any of those previously mentioned comparisons do not work for you than possibly V For Violence will struggle to persuade too but for the rest, this is one easy to recommend incitement.

The Book of V is available now via Inverse Records.

Pete RingMaster 08/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Stone Angels – Give In To Temptation

Stone Angels Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

Give In To Temptation is a great title for the debut album from the Brighton hailing Stone Angels (not to be confused with The Stone Angels from Devon), as that is exactly what you do, inescapably submit to its eventful rock ‘n’ roll roar. Jammed with eleven fresh sounding tracks which brew up rousing exploits from admittedly pretty recognisable sounds and inspirations the album is hefty in anthems and punchy adrenaline charged stomps, and as high on that familiarity to others as it can be at times, Give In To Temptation lets no one down when it comes to thrills and enjoyment.

Stone Angels emerged in 2011 from the ever musically resourceful scene in Brighton, the experienced quartet rising from the ashes of ‘several broken’ bands. Drawing on inspirations from the classic LA rock and legendary UK rock scenes, and bands ramngimng from Alter Bridge, Black Stone Cherry, Black Spiders, AC/DC, Massive, and Rival Sons to Five Finger Death Punch, Foo Fighters, Iron Maiden, Motorhead, Slash’s Snake Pit, and King’s X, Stone Angels’ hard rock incitement has seen them become one of the UK’s most potent live propositions. Now the band is looking to awaken even broader attention with the national re-release of Give In To Temptation, a prospect you can see gathering rather potent success.

The reason being songs like Misplaced Memories and Devil’s Child, they just the first two tracks on the swiftly persuasive encounter. The opener worries ears with a torrent of hungry riffs and spiky grooves meshed into a rhythmic web cast by drummer Ben Taylor and bassist Chris Wilson. There is grouchiness to the tone of the song and instant contagion on offer with the sonic enterprise of guitarists James Innes and Niall Kersey tempering the growl a touch with melodic enticement, especially the former’s precise grooves. Kersey’s vocals also carry a dusty snarl which only adds to the easily accessible and familiar but refreshing confrontation, a blend exploited enjoyably again in the slower prowl of the second song. Bands such as Black Stone Cherry and Rev Theory get hinted at though the song has a more vintage bluesy hue to it as it backs up the album’s forcibly engaging start.

Stone Angels Album Cover_RingMaster Review   That sultry air and texture becomes richer in the following fiery melancholy of Last Goodbyes where keys deliciously add a psychedelic strain to the increasingly eventful and impressive croon, Stone Angels revealing more good variety to their sound and songwriting. Uniqueness is, as suggested earlier, not a dramatic quality to their sound and indeed the song but it matters little in its persuasive bellow and not at all in Can You? straight after. Again attitude and melodic flames fuel the track, but it is the bewitching sonic hook and easy swagger which grips most prominently, they and the vocal lure of Kersey backed potently by the rest of the band’s calls.

At only two and a half minutes, the track is a swift, bait loaded jab and the relative shortness of most songs within Give In To Temptation does add to the rapier like feel of the album and its thick success on ears and appetite, this proven again by the not much longer body of Fantasy and swiftly after in the slightly lengthier Lines In The Sand. The album is like a heavy weight poking senses and satisfaction, this pair uppercuts of rock ‘n’ roll which has energy reeling and bodies exhausted. Both tracks unveil individual grooves which induce ears and hunger to arousal amidst greedy riffs adding enticing weight to the song’s tenacious grip.

Thousand Years slips into a mellower melodic reflection within a hazy flame of emotive intensity to bring a respite of sorts for adrenaline and energy whilst Falling Down gets funky on the listener whilst unleashing another dose of predatory riffs, wicked rhythms, and spice rich, bordering on salacious, grooves across guitar and bass. The first of the pair takes longer to find the right spot but is perpetually enjoyable nonetheless whilst its successor is an immediate stomp which just has bodies swinging, an anthem no doubt igniting venues for the band and calling out to be a single.

There is a darker almost sinister shade to the imposing blues rock stroll of Devil’s Grip and a lighter glaze of stoner-esque infectiousness to Fine Day, both songs rich with tendrils of sonic imagination and the healthy spices bred by some of the band’s influences. The latter is another single prospect for these ears; its Alter Bridge meets Shinedown character tantalising before Shadows Of The Black Sun is left to bring the album to a close. Again it is ripe with a familiarity which only seems to works in the song’s favour, as indeed for Give In To Temptation’s success.

Future demands might ask for more distinctness to the Stone Angels sound next time around though you are pretty much sure of some stonking songs at the very least anyway, but for an introduction, Give In To Temptation is one enjoyable slab of rock ‘n’ roll you can only have a thoroughly good time with.

Give In To Temptation is nationally released on Friday 4th September on CD and digitally through all stores.

RingMaster 04/09/2015

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