Day by day with Reverse Family

We all have different outlets for extreme emotions be they bred in grief, frustration, anxiety or romance for example. For many an artistic avenue is the release from such overwhelming trespasses and so it is with Reverse Family who are about to unleash a daunting but we can already assure you irresistible adventure for ears.

The Reverse Family is the solo project of Dermot Illogical, someone probably better known right now as Andreas Vanderbraindrain, the frontman of British outfit The Tuesday Club. Towards the end of last year, he released acclaimed debut album My Songs About Life Mid Crisis, a collection of multi-flavoured lo-fi experimental goodness which continues to hang around in the imagination and passions like an inescapable itch. It was an introduction which commanded attention and breeds real anticipation for the next epic outing with Reverse Family.

Starting in October, Dermot is releasing 365, a project made up of 52 EPs released as one a week for a whole year. Before panicking, shouting impossible, or mistakenly thinking anything that massive has to be more filler than thriller let us declare that with the evidence of the sampler sent by the man our way in our hands, it is going to be an escapade taking ears and imagination on a helter-skelter of honest and emotionally raw but instinctively fun exploration; a journey given greater intimate potency by Dermot’s diary entry of that particular day by the way of ‘sleeve notes’.

The tracks making up the project were all recorded DIY style at home between Jan 1st 2015 and Dec 31st 2015 with Dermot playing every instrument and sharing every syllable. Everything heard is as played and recorded; no editing or tampering made with every song bred in heart and spontaneity. It is an organic air and array of textures which grips the imagination as much as the sounds themselves; a fly-on-the-wall like climate baring the same open heart as that of their creator.

The catalyst to the project was the death of Terry, the drummer of The Tuesday Club. His sad passing came just as the band was deservedly stirring bigger and bolder praise carrying spotlights, a time topped by the band supporting Toyah at The 02 Islington and releasing their most successful and critically acclaimed EP to date. It was a world crushing time for the band and especially for Dermot who was also coming to terms with divorce, life dictating and changing illnesses for both parents as well as the constant struggle of being self-employed. It was a time many would have buckled under but Dermot focused all the suffocating turbulence into his music and turned it into a creative quest, one which at times you feel probably completely took over his world but gave him a survival and now the listener a spark for pleasure and thoughtful contemplation.

As the tracks we have reveal there is no ‘woe is me’ self-pity fuelling the adventure. Yes, it scratches his open wounds at times and is not always sharing smiles but every moment is an open insight and reflection on his feelings across the evolving year of those challenges and the life around Dermot in St. Albans with plenty of knowing black humour involved along the way.

The first track swiftly grabbing years was Future son – The Twa Twa’s, day 8 of the creative pilgrimage. Instantly it reminds of My Songs About Life Mid Crisis with its post punk twang and Dirk Wears White Sox era Adam and The Ants like character. A gorgeous hook lurks within the angular clamour, Dermot’s vocal delivery a swinging flirtation matching the similar allure of bass. The structurally organic design of the track alone is a web of lust clasping shenanigans, the song in its whole a psyche infesting treat.

Some tracks have an even rawer sound and temptation than others, This house is empty (day 10) one which borders abrasive in sound but within its causticity is an instinctive funkiness which has the body bouncing and appetite eagerly exploring words and emotion. There is a sense of despair and also hope carrying new beginnings felt with the track, a conflict most of us are no strangers too at some point and can grab with nodding recognition.

The clutch of songs within the sampler show the great array of styles embraced by the Reverse Family sound, the outstanding I stand alone (day 13) a post punk natured infestation managing to sound like a mix of Fire Engines, Swell Maps and unsurprisingly The Tuesday Club with Dermot’s distinctive tones yet is unique in every pore while MP3 (day 310) is a junction box of sonic wires casting a Devo meets Pere Ubu scented discord over the imagination.

The darker, grungier Faded colours (day 336) offers melancholy at its most magnetic, In my head (day 337) sharing a sonically and emotionally haunting incursion on the senses as pained as it is corrosively elegant, and both songs continue the broadening maze of flavours and emotional tempestuousness within the sampler alone. Like many tracks, each is also a relatively brief encounter; fleeting moments in an unsettled and often unsettling day though Bad cartoon (day 343) stays a little longer with its melodically jangling and evocatively persuasive as Bowie-esque toning draws the listener with seductive ease into its own personal melancholy.

The punk ‘n’ roll of Do it just for me (day 344) hits the spot just as easily, its tenacious canter a gentle cacophony of guitar, rhythms, and voice while I built a new contraption (day 356) shares a broad grin in its post punk/art rock pop. The pair relish in the addictive prowess Dermot constantly finds in his minimalistic but oh so potent grooves and hooks, though he saves maybe the most addictive for Breathy graffiti (day 365), its electronic poking the kind of inescapable nagging lust was bred for.

So that gives a hint of what is in store for us once 365 begins revealing its heart in a few weeks. It would be a little unrealistic to expect every one of the songs within the 52 EPs, each suggested to contain seven tracks, will hit the lofty heights of those on the sampler but do expect each to be the most honest and spontaneously shared temptations sure to intrigue and captivate like nothing else around today.

We for one just cannot wait!

The first of the 365 EPs will be released digitally from 2nd October 2015 through Perfect Pop Co-Op / Nub Country with one a week through to the first week of October 2018. For more information keep an eye on http://reversefamily.co.uk and https://www.facebook.com/reversefamily/ or through https://twitter.com/PerfectPopCoOp and the Perfect Pop Co-Op magazine.

Pete RingMaster 26/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cardboard HIT – Subject to Status

We all have favourite bands which feel like they have been bred to pleasure personal tastes and desires and now adding to our list is UK trio Cardboard HIT. Creating a tantalising mix of punk, alternative and noise rock, and numerous other rock ‘n’ roll nurtured flavours, the East Sussex based band just creatively teased, tickled, and ravished our sweet spot with debut EP Subject to Status.

Though a brand new proposition for us, thanks to an introduction sent by drummer Matt Rouse, the release has been tempting ears for over a year now but well worth highlighting such its potent presence in an overwhelming landscape of bands and encounters very easy to be lost from sight within. With bassist/vocalist Ross Towner and guitarist/vocalist Lee Hayes alongside Rouse, Cardboard HIT opens up their first EP with the irresistible Bobby. Teasing wiry strikes of guitar get things underway, their post punk scent soon a rapid trespass with great Fire Engines like discord to their tempting. The dual vocal strike of Towner and Hayes is as magnetic as their sounds whilst the probing beats of Rouse manipulate ears and instincts with a controlled but bold touch. Growing into something akin to Eighties B-Line Matchbox Disaster and Japanese Fighting Fish in league with eighties band The Three Johns, the track is superb; manna to an already hungry appetite for more.

Say Yes is the next to feed the need, the thick strains of bass and guitar marking out its predecessor enslaving ears again as vocals and a melodic dexterity brings a calmer if still dramatically tenacious enticement. More dance friendly for feet and hips, the song swings with a bullish attitude and infectious boisterousness as again distinctive vocals rouse a similar energy in the music around them.

The grumbling tone of the bass is a delicious ingredient and once again ignites the first breath and subsequent stroll of the band’s latest single All the Voices. Its grumble is tempered by the dexterity of the two prong vocal lure, beats a swiping incitement alongside the calmest texture as the song grows more manic and wicked with every passing second.

That mellower essence is a bolder instinct within closing song Rabbit Hole, though it too has an unpredictable nature and off-kilter instinct which grabs attention and the passions. Showing a whiff of 12 Stone Toddler in its punk ‘n’ pop shuffle, the song has the body bouncing and a hungry want for more in motion in no time; heavy grooves, rapacious rhythms, and a loco invention for the fourth time seducing the senses and spirit.

With Cardboard HIT working on new material as you read, the time feels right for new fans to find the band and be swept away with their punk disco. With a trio of great videos accompanying the EP, Subject to Status is the doorway into an adventure meant to be lustfully devoured.

Subject to Status is available on iTunes, Spotify, and other stores.

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Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Parachute For Gordo – Possibility of Not

Three years ago, British post rock trio Parachute For Gordo impressed with their mini album Ten Metres Per Second Per Second; its instrumental adventures increasingly captivating vehicles for the imaginations of band and listener alike. Now they have returned with its successor Possibility of Not and an evolution in songwriting and composing which had bred the band’s boldest, most bracing yet creatively composed escapades yet.

With new drummer Mark Glaister alongside original members in guitarist Laura Lee and bassist John Harvey, Aldershot hailing Parachute For Gordo escaped to the mountains of Austria for a weekend last year to record Possibility of Not. Whether the assumed isolation their DIY pop-up studio was set up in has been part of the incitement breeding the outfit’s most intimate and refined yet instinctively raw exploration yet only the band can say but certainly there seems a richer and thicker atmospheric depth and boldness going hand in hand with the threesome’s pushing of their creative boundaries.  Where Ten Metres Per Second Per Second was a leap on from debut EP Eight Minutes Of Weightlessness of 2012, Possibility of Not enjoys another step forward in all aspects without losing that organic brashness almost punk bred cacophonous heart which has already set their music out from the post rock incubated crowd.

Jellied Eels opens things up, its initial melodic shimmer a crystaline enticement like a window on a warm and inviting yet stark landscape. Whether it is the pre-knowledge of where the band recorded the album or the track itself, its post rock investigation only sparks thoughts of beauty strapped isolation and the intimacy of thought and emotion such surroundings can inspire. It is a mesmeric piece, that raw essence of the band’s music invasive to temper but equally compliment the sweeping grace of the melodic exploration being woven within it.

The following Anemone to Manatee has a more volatile and intrusive presence from its first breath but equally greater flirtation of joyful revelry in its energetic shuffle further accentuated by infrequent but welcome bursts of vocal incitement. With Lee’s guitar almost carving out its melodic portrait like a post punk steeled knife on canvas and Harvey’s bass going on a throaty groove lined dance as Glaister’s swings with each passing minute take greater relish in their jabs, the outstanding track tantalises from beginning to end; an emerging Fire Engines like discordance only adding to its might.

A mellower tone frequents next up Wallet Moth, every trait strolling with a lighter air as flames of melodic dexterity leave suggestive trails like reflection sharing comets. That previously mentioned intimacy is no more powerful than on the third track, it’s weaves of sound and textures magnetic glimpses into the song’s emotive heart before Gopher the Throat floats across the senses being driven by tribal beats and aboriginal like bass textures. Instantly absorbing ears and thoughts, the track is another dance of intimation and enterprise, the trio conjuring a piece of intrigue and adventure sure to be different for each individual but a creative emprise for all.

There is no escaping the fun and demanding stimulation of Cornholio Slaps the Goose, the track a funk assed, indie pop infused romp of swinging beats and infection spewing grooves unbridled in its hunger to have feet and hips indulging in its primal catchiness. Dips into dub spawned tenacity only adds to the virulent exploits toying and seducing the senses as the track grabs best track status though it is continually challenged with every listen of Possibility of Not.

The album is brought to an equally fine end by Put your hands up if you like Sloths, an eight minute plus saunter into imagined mysterious deeds inspired by its cosmic radiance and cinematic hooks. They grab ears and the imagination like a sticky web of lures rather than making a more imposingly direct attack but with the same inescapable outcome, the listener trapped and basking in its highly suggestive soundscape.

With their music Parachute For Gordo find a more insular terrain to explore than other post rock flights of imagination though certainly Possibility of Not breaks into broader challenges too but it is that more intimate feel which sets the band apart from most, that and their undoubted craft and maybe slightly deranged imagination. Accompanied by a video for each song which together provides a visual experience as potent as the aural one, Possibility of Not deserves plenty of your attention especially if post rock and bands like The Mars Volta and The Fall Of Troy are to your taste.

Possibility of Not is out now through Rose Coloured Records @ https://parachuteforgordo.bandcamp.com/album/possibility-of-not and http://www.rosecoloured.com/parachute-for-gordo

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Pete RingMaster 18/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Introducing Reverse Family

RF_RingMasterReview

Ever had that dream where an insect invades the ear and sets up home to mercilessly tease and torment thereon in? If so, a form of similar reality is about to be unleashed as the Reverse Family step forward to announce themselves with a sound which trespasses and festers in the psyche. The difference is that this is set to be the most welcome invasion of ears as it crawls with relish into the imagination.

Reverse Family is the solo project of Walmington-on-Sea resident Dermot Illogical, better known as Andreas Vanderbraindrain, the frontman of British band The Tuesday Club. Aided by a fluid band of collaborators from time to time, the new offering from Dermot is a lo-fi exploration into an experimental DIY web of sounds and flavours which is hard to pin down but certainly embraces everything from post punk and noise pop to indie and old school punk.

The RingMaster Review had the honour and pleasure to be the first to hear the tracks set to make up My Songs About Life Mid Crisis, the debut album from Reverse Family which is not due until next year through Perfect Pop Co-op but makes the ideal introduction to the new proposition so we thought we would share our findings within its dementedly addictive lures.

The first song we came up against was Alchopoppers on Fast Food, a brief and gentle yet deviously engaging song which instantly entices thoughts of seventies bands like Swell Maps and The Shapes but with the melodic natures of The Freshies. It is captivating stuff even with a drop into calmer waters which does not quite connect with personal tastes. We are not sure of the album’s track order but if this is to be the opener it provides a potent start though the brilliant Way It Goes is an even bigger pull. Carrying an early Adam and The Ants feel to its magnetic stroll, the song is pure addiction with a funk revelry bubbling under its pop punk surface, Dermot as vocally mischievous as the guitar led sounds around him.

art_RingMasterReviewThere is great variety to the songs too; Bit Slits for example flirting with the senses through keys which manage to sound like the brass flames of Essential Logic while guitar and vocals veer towards the Nikki Sudden school of discord blessed minimalistic seduction while Electronic 6 entangles portentous keys and winy guitars with fuzzy vocals for a Dalek I Love You/Artery scented melancholy. It is fair to say that Dermot wears influences openly yet each song develops its own distinct character under often familiar hues.

Hand of God has a darker and meatier nature to its predacious swing, contagious hooks and a great grumbling bassline aligning with melodic enterprise for a proposal which swiftly grips ears and appetite; a success just as easily won by the lively pop bounce of One Eyed, a seemingly early Television Personalities seeded encounter and the hypnotic I Can Sense Their Watching Eyes. This too has a flavour of Dirk Wears White Sox to it but with funky beats and another irresistible post punk guitar jangle in its off kilter dub teased shuffle, the track blossoming into another unique proposition within My Songs About Life Mid Crisis.

Other tracks in the mix are Business or Pleasure, a delicious song which sounds like Weezer soaping The Piranhas while recording it all in the bath, The Legend of Pierre with its haunting keys wrapped sultry croon, and Odd Mix Newgates, a seductive magnetic monotone tone spawned track surely inspired by Mark E. Smith.

The collection of tracks are completed by Higher Power with plaintive melodies and dour yet emotionally suggestive vocals and the outstanding May Number 10 Dream which again hints at bands like The Fall, Marc Riley and The Creepers, and The Mekons, as well as the criminally catchy Sods Law. Hips and feet beware as even in its low key nature it will have you swinging in an instant.

There are so many highlights offered by the Reverse Family songs; each track connecting with an ever eager hunger for punk fuelled, post punk spiced imagination. Plastic Punks epitomises this perfectly, its Fire Engines toned melodic jangle and Spizzenergi devilry sheer temptation again emerging as something specific to Reverse Family.

With a tongue in cheek lining to the lyrical reflection shaping songs which spreads into the music itself, Reverse Family is a beguiling adventure with a nod to the past and a grip on an imagination as fresh as it is, well quite simply a touch loco.

As mentioned My Songs About Life Mid Crisis is due for release next April but it is never too soon to get into something this craftily tasty.

http://reversefamily.co.uk

https://www.facebook.com/reversefamily/

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright