Bool – Fly With Me

Frustratingly it is far too easy for things to fly under the radar in a time where nothing is secret thanks to the extensive landscape of the internet, but one proposition we insist you do take notice of is Fly With Me, the new album from Bool. The German outfit roar in ears with a strain of alternative rock which infests the appetite with its grunge character and grips the imagination with an array of nagging hooks and rousing enterprise; it all coming together here for one of the year’s most compelling moments yet.

The band’s sound is maybe best described as Bush meets Morphine harassed by Damn Vandals and Fatima Mansions but from that mix thrills with its own unique personality of sound and craft. It demands attention and rewards with every passing second of bold and impassioned rock ‘n’ roll. Formed in 2007, Bool stirred up acclaim and an already growing reputation with the My Spirit, their third release realising the potential already heard in its predecessors. Recorded with producer Jon Caffery (Die Toten Hosen), Fly With Me hits and owns a whole new plateau for the band’s sound and invention, offering a relentlessly harassing and addictively creative trespass to lust over.

It opens up with Here We Are and a flame of guitar before, and not for the last time, a swiftly compelling bassline with its growling tone entices courtesy of Marc Fröhlking. The initial blaze settles down a touch as the vocals of lead guitarist Karsten Dittberner step forward, the bass continuing to offer delicious bait alongside as the crisp beats of Jens Geilert descend. Soon the fiery adventure of Dittberner and fellow guitarist Michael Malfeito rise again, the cycle repeated throughout with increasing energy and adventure.

It is a boldly striking start quickly matched by the more composed but no less sonically seared Soul Train. Emotion drenches every note and each syllable dropping from Dittberner’s throat with a crystalline melody a glassy temper within the growing tempest. Commandingly contagious and wonderfully irritable in many ways, it too lingers in ears and thoughts just as successors Shut Up and Kick Arse do. The first of the two is even more reined in which brings a tension and drama especially to its brewing crescendos which is raw seduction. Dittberner is a magnetic vocal presence potently backed by his companions, while together the quartet unite in imagination and dexterity with that earlier Bush reference at its enjoyable strongest. The second of the two has a Nick Cave like edge to its opening Doors-esque climate, hues which caress the brooding heart of song and sound before the track slips into an almost predatory stroll of primal rock ‘n’ roll at its inventive best with a rolling energy more than living up to its title.

My Own Heaven is a melodically grilled pyre of emotion which ebbs and flows through calm and volatility, each passing moment a web of arousing catchiness and suggestive enterprise around the addictive dynamics of Geilert while the following Revolution uncages a riveting holler of punk ‘n’ roll which has the body bouncing and spirit roaring. It is testy and flirtatious, a true treat among many within Fly With Me.

Bool equally show they are adept at caressing the senses as the dark yet elegant serenade of Hey You shows, its melancholic beauty and melodic croon pure enticement before You and Me stomps in with its own tenacious rock ‘n’ roll. Again Gavin Rossdale and co feels a big inspiration to the track but one which is easily welcomed within its infectious incitement. Essences of metal and heavy rock add to its theatre, a potent incitement more than matched by the rawer edged and dramatically textured Desire where again rhythms simply grip the instincts as the guitars create a web of sonic flames to be trapped by as vocals share their plaintive heart.

Through the even tempered if again tempestuous sonic reflection of Same Mistake, a song which feels very familiar for no obvious reason, and the similarly intimate balladry of Yesterday, there is no urge to pull away from the album, each rich captivation even if not quite reaching the heights of those before them. Fair to say both easily get under the skin as too next up Love is the Answer, a theatre of sound and temptation which barely hides its tension within keys and string woven melodies. The song is certainly a slow burner but over time grows to be one of the most memorable and essential lures of the album.

The release closes up with Right or Wrong, a song which pleases immediately but also takes its time to fully persuade and ignite the passions which, if without the stirring triumphs of its companions, it surely does. It is a potent conclusion to an album which for us has become an addiction in no time.

Fly With Me is the wake up call to one exciting band in Bool, be sure you do not miss the trip.

Fly With Me is available now through Boersma Records through most online stores.

http://boolofficial.com/    https://www.facebook.com/BOOLofficial/

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Rum Thief – Time to Make a Move

It has taken a couple of years for Rum Thief to follow up the acclaimed Reach For The Weather Man EP but the wait has been worthwhile as he releases his finest moment yet with Time to Make a Move. The new EP is a richer and broader adventure of sound and word without losing the instinctive energy and raw passion of its predecessors and a wake-up call to major attention.

Rum thief is the solo project of Manchester based musician/songwriter Jot Green, who previously played drums for over a decade in various bands before deciding to explore his own songwriting and imagination. Debut EP Clouded Mind quickly drew ears and praise in 2014 though it was Reach For The Weather Man a year later which truly sparked acclaim and interest the way of the project. The years around and since have established Rum Thief as a just as flavoursome live presence with guitarist Kieran Whitehouse, bassist Gary Long, and drummer Chris Hobbs alongside but it is through Time to Make a Move that you get a feeling everything is going to ignite for and around the band.

Recorded with producer Shuta Shinoda at the legendary Hackney Road Studio, Time To Make A Move opens up with the outstanding Spittin’ Daggers. A single melodic jangle beckons ears initially, its potent coaxing soon joined by the throb of bass and swing of beats, all settling into a tempting stroll as Green’s expressive tones and descriptive lyrics join the appealing mix. It is a lively simmer soon boiling over in a fiery chorus as aggressive as it is infectious. Like a mix of Arctic Monkeys and Fatima Mansions, the song prowls and roars; its feisty rock ‘n’ roll a web of instinctive catchiness, melodic fire, and dramatic heart spawned suggestion.

The thrilling start is followed by the milder flirtation of the EP’s title track; a mellower proposal soon revealing its own strength in tenacious seduction and captivating enterprise. Its heart is also a lively fusion of instinct and imagination, a new wave/indie rock weave becoming more boisterous and volatile with every passing second. There is something familiar about its character but an indefinable quality which just adds to two and a half minutes of pure pleasure.

What Do You Know is next, its raw air and melodic teasing a fusion of pop from the past few decades, being almost Joe Jackson like in its organic contagion of rousing pop ‘n’ roll. With as many hooks in voice as in sound and again razor sharp lyrically without a sniff of indulgence, the song simply captivates before being matched in potency by closing song Toilet Door. With a rockabilly scent to its voice and shuffle, the track at times reminding of The Shaking Pyramids, the song croons and seduces like a smouldering fire; transfixing from the start and bursting into bigger flames over time as its union of sixties/modern pop catches alight.

It is a strong end to a quickly and increasingly beguiling encounter. At the time, it was hard to imagine Reach For The Weather Man being majorly outshone by future offerings from Rum Thief but Time to Make a Move leaves it well in its wake which is why expectations are rising of seeing Rum Thief become something close to a household name.

Time to Make a Move is out now.

http://www.facebook.com/rumthief    http://www.twitter.com/rumthief

Pete RingMaster 19/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Idles – Brutalism

Photo by Stephanie Elizabeth Third

An infestation of the senses, a raw roar on all our responsibilities, and a contagious noise fuelled trespass on everything in between, Brutalism is one of the essential incitements of not only 2017 but we would suggest the decade as a whole. The debut album from British quintet Idles rips into personal and social issues with the insatiable attitude and defiance unleashed in the late seventies, its irritable sound as much punk rock rage as it is a post punk/noise rock  enslaving of the imagination and psyche.

Each song from the Bristol five-piece of Joe Talbot, Mark Bowen, Lee Kiernan, Adam Devonshire, and Jon Beavis is a creative growl, a visceral antagonism with an infectious edge and mischief just as bruising and incisive. Dedicated in part to the loss of Talbot’s mother, who adorns the record’s cover, Brutalism is stretched with such invasive treats, from start to finish a mordant adventure, challenge, and accusation as witty as it is vicious, as devilish as it is ferocious. With Idles in the early days of an UK tour, their first album is sure to see it’s already eagerly devoured and anticipated 25 dates embraced by even greater fevered support.

Straight away band and album show uniqueness within a proposition which also swiftly inspires thoughts of bands such as The Fall, Swell Maps, and early The Horrors. There is so much more to it though as that originality shows, opener Heel_Heal cantankerously striding from an initial dispute with an intrusively nagging riff and rhythmic tenacity which alone lures keen attention as Talbot’s equally confrontational vocals snarl. Punk rock infested with crabbily textured noise, the track rumbles and grumbles; band vocals as anthemically rousing and spiteful as the general character of the outstanding starter.

Fellow Bristolians, The St Pierre Snake Invasion also come to mind with the song and successor Well Done, the second a sonically twisted and lyrically spiky shuffle making use of body and imagination like a peeved puppeteer. Its persistent jabs tenderise the senses for the scourges of sound which erupt to further scorch, Idles pressing all the right buttons for lusty reactions before uncaging the equally enslaving Mother. An irresistible bassline cores the next track, its dark tempting soon surrounded by swinging beats and scuzzy riffs, all uniting with Artery meets Gang Of Four scented tempestuousness. Again no punches in sound and word are pulled, one of numerous traits within the Idles sound which leaves there little to be taken lightly but plenty to find a seriously keen appetite for.

Date Night reveals a tango loaded with a rhythmic incitement which barely stays in the same place more than a second or two, its beats on hot coals but with a composure which aligns perfectly with the monotone growl of the bass. As guitars saunter and blaze, Talbot magnetically assaults with word and character, the volatile squall of the track then emulated in its own way by Faith In the City and its post punk ‘n’ roll causticity. A rousing irritant exposing essences hinting at bands such as again Artery and The Nightingales, submission to its lively acerbic inducement is quick and just as rapid as next up 1049 Gotho waltzes with irritated intent and pounding beats into ears and psyche. For all it and the other song’s choleric probing and inventive dexterity, sonic squeals a delight, there is a melodic lining which as subtle as it might be at times just inflames the catchiness and adventure of all escapades.

Wiry tendrils have ears encroached and alive as Divide & Conquer rises with its own particular grumble of sound, the guitars creating a web of raw enticement as bass and beats prowl with a testy air, Talbot stalking it all with his increasingly compelling tones. The increase in energy and ferociousness only adds to the captivation before Rachel Khoo and Stendahl Syndrome irascibly serenade and fractiously critiques respectively; both unloading their sonic and lyrical venom with snappy and quarrelsome devilry.

Next up Exeter has a slightly lazier gait but still imposes its punk ‘n’ roll canter with addiction forging rhythmic cunning as guitars and vocals get under the skin with their respective exploits like a Fatima Mansions/ Big Black collusion exploring creatively fresh impositions. Both tracks leave an already greedy appetite hungry for more, a lust more than fed by the kinetic stomp and sonic psychosis of Benzocaine and equally by the punk grumble and waspish word prowess of White Privilege.

Idles leave their arguably greatest moment for its final track, though each listen only elevates another moment to drool over. Slow Savage is a haunting dyspeptically lined embrace living up to its title as keys and voice fill the low-key and stark atmospheric mist hugging the imagination as a heartbeat of rhythm throbs. It is a dark, melancholic rapture violating as much as seducing the senses and a thrilling end to one exceptional release.

Being truly excited by something new or unique is a treat rarely found these days, Idles though have cracked that desire in fine style with Brutalism.

Brutalism is out now on Balley Records through iTunes and other stores.

Upcoming Dates on the Brutalism Tour…

March 2017

Thursday 16th – Brighton – The Prince Albert

Friday 17th – Tunbridge Wells – Forum

Saturday 18th – Bedford – Esquires

Monday 20th – Oxford – The Bullingdon

Tuesday 21st – Sheffield – The Plug

Wednesday 22nd – Newcastle Upon Tyne – Think Tank

Thursday 23rd – Aberdeen – Tunnels

Friday 24th – Dundee – Buskers

Saturday 25th – Edinburgh – Sneaky Pete’s

Monday 27th – York – The Crescent

Tuesday 28th – Hull – The Adelphi

Wednesday 29th – Nottingham – The Bodega

Thursday 30th – Liverpool – O2 Academy 2

Friday 31st – Wakefield – Unity Hall

April 2017

Monday 3rd – Stoke-On-Trent – The Sugarmill

Tuesday 4th – Preston – Guildhall

Wednesday 5th – Cardiff – Clwb Ifor Bach

http://www.idlesband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/idlesband    https://twitter.com/idlesband

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kobadelta – The Metaphysical

photography-by-adam-kennedy

photography-by-adam-kennedy

It is fair to say that their quartet of previous EPs have established Kobadelta as one of the most intriguing and captivating prospects to emerge on the British music scene in recent years and also that listening to the evolution of their seriously tantalising sound has captivated almost as much as the noise itself. October sees the release of the Newcastle bred outfit’s new encounter and another growth in songwriting, music, and temptation.

Their five-track EP, The Metaphysical, sees the band’s psych rock spiced sound reveal its richest and most adventurous landscape yet with an even greater weave of textures and flavours. Melodies are imposing, harmonies bewitching yet both offering magnetic warmth which shimmers and radiates against the instinctive dark tones and emotive shadows which breed the band’s songs. It is a tapestry which lays the Kobadelta sound somewhere between Echo and The Bunnymen and The Doors with an almost gothic Nick Cave essence for extra flavouring.

Formed in 2010, the quintet soon built a potent live reputation locally, nudging on wider recognition with the release of debut EP Ritual (Time Flies) three years later. 2014 saw the band make bigger strides towards national awareness and in sound through both the Hidden Door and Remain Distracted EPs, their success subsequently eclipsed by the Open Visions EP last year. It was a dark and compelling encounter pushing the band’s sound to another level which now The Metaphysical cements and takes on again while still showing the potential of even more adventures to be discovered and explored within the band. With shows alongside the likes of Temples, Allusondrugs, We Were Promised Jetpacks, Demob Happy, Splashh, The Temperance Movement, The Weeks, Lola Colt, and The Voyeurs among many more, and those aforementioned releases, sparking a real appetite for the band’s sound, The Metaphysical might just be the moment Kobadelta hits the broadest spotlights.

The EP swiftly captures ears and imagination with opener Hold Yr’self, the track seducing initially with the caress of suggested pipes before the song tumbles into view with tangy grooves and swinging rhythms. There is no escaping The Doors scenting to any of the band’s song, though Ian McCulloch and co are probably a stronger spicing to what soon shows itself to be distinctly Kobadelta. With the synths of Jordan Robson dancing around the magnetic melodic weave cast by guitarist Alex Malliris, the imagination is soon hooked, gripped tighter as the potent vocals of Dom Noble bring a darker edge in collusion with the rapier swings of drummer Jon Marley and Chris Malliris’ brooding basslines.

It is a compelling start matched by the infectious stroll of the similarly shadow rich and sonically fiery Ride By The Light. Mixing mellower seducing with those dynamic flames of sound and energy, the song is a whirlpool of adventure and drama. There are moments which remind of early   but again as keys wrap the predacious tone of the bass in just one of the track’s major attractions, Kobadelta unveil something unique to themselves.

Bathsheba raises the energy and sultriness of the band’s sound next; its raw mystique and fuzzy climate a feisty wrapping to the tenacious rhythms driving yet another irresistible proposal from the EP. As lyrics and vocals tell a story so does the music, both colluding in a spirit rousing incitement which seems to become darker and more volatile with every enjoyable listen; a potency emulated in the following Is This The Start Of Something Beautiful? and its ferine adventure. So easy to get physically and mentally sucked into its suggestive kaleidoscope of sound, the song trespasses and transfixes the senses as each band member unleashes their fiery enterprise.

Bringing the EP to a magnificent close is You Don’t Need To Ask…, a slow prowl of a headily dark song which borders on demonic even with its theatre of catchy charm, spellbinding melodies, and predacious rhythms. There is a definite occult rock air to the track and its dark romance with the minimal but powerful presence of piano icing on another mighty and increasingly tempestuous highlight of the release.

There are a few bands which have emerged in recent years for which it is hard not to find a touch of real excitement to go along with anticipation upon word of a new proposition from them. The Metaphysical is the perfect example as to why Kobadelta is firmly one of them.

The Metaphysical EP is released in October with its launch show on Friday 4th November in Newcastle at Think Tank – Underground with support from local bands Hazels and FOTO.

https://www.facebook.com/Kobadelta

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2016

Headsticks – Feather and Flame

Headsticks_RingMasterReview

Whichever angle you come at Feather and Flame, the new album from UK quartet Headsticks, it is a seriously rousing incitement. Offering eleven diverse and eventful slices bred in the band’s fusion of folk and punk rock, the release gets the body bouncing, thoughts sparking, and the spirit racing. The breeding of serious pleasure is not low on successes triggered either as Feather and Flame not only reinforces the reputation already earned by the band but confirms Headsticks as one of Britain’s most irresistible and essential punk ‘n’ roll adventures.

Formed late 2012 by former members of bands like Tower Struck Down, Jugopunch, and The Clay Faces, the Stoke on Trent hailing Headsticks quickly whipped up potent interest in their sound with a debut three-track E.P in 2013. Their live presence was just as rapid in stirring up of support and fans, the band over time playing shows across the UK as well as numerous festivals whilst sharing stages with a host of well-regarded names in both the folk and punk/alternative genres. The summer of 2014 saw the release of first album Muster, a proposition highly acclaimed by fan and media alike and again backed by the band’s persistent live hunger. Now it is Feather and Flame seriously stirring up ears and attention with its socially and politically charged and challenging songs fuelled by a delicious diversity of sound and dramatic adventure.

The album hits the ground running from its first second, jangling chords and beef rhythms grabbing ears as opener What Do You Want leaps into view. Vocalist Andrew Tranter quickly has the imagination hooked as he lyrically opens up an insight into the lives of the working man and the importance of and habit for things that possibly warrant neither. It is a provocative and swiftly contagious encounter, at times a thumping canter of sound and energy with moments of sweltering funk spice which only adds to its virulent drama.

featherandflame_RingMasterReviewThe thrilling anthemic start gets swiftly matched by the evocatively aired Cold Grey English Skies. Here the rhythms of bassist Nick Bayes and drummer Tom Carter hold a touch more reserve in their framing of a similarly reined urgency shared by Steven Dunn’s guitar, but all easily cast a catchiness which has hips swaying to their movement and the descriptive prowess of Tranter. With a gloriously melodic and addictive chorus, the song has a rich hint of Flogging Molly meets Violent Femmes meets Fatima Mansions to it, further flavouring to seduce ears and appetite before Go Move Shift uncages its own individual virulence. Straight away the song infuses country-esque revelry to its quickly tenacious folk honed rock ‘n’ roll, this time around thoughts picking out Midnight Oil as a hint to the hues working away within another forcibly persuasive track. The flavouring is just another example of the great variety within the album already showing its bold face across the first trio of treats.

The excellent Old Folk Songs has feet and voice soon involved with its punchy mix of folk and punk; a blending of sound around honest appraisal in some ways carrying a scent of Paranoid Visions to it whilst its successor Foxford Town brings a Pogues like lilt to its just as inescapable infectiousness and enthralling drama. Again an array of rock strains collude to create an emotive weave of sound around similarly nurtured syllables and once more Headsticks sculpt a chorus which demands eager participation. Tranter’s harmonica charms bring further colour to the proposal as they do in the traditional folk seeded Mississippi’s Burning where, as you might expect, bodies are induced to bounce and voices inspired to call out along with the band’s rousing croon.

Pay the Price matches it in persuasion and core sound, and subsequently success whilst Tomorrow’s History offers a more rugged affair with its anthemic arousal. The first of the two is an easy coaxing with its successor adding more boisterous attitude and energy to a shared quality of temptation, it bringing a tinge of bands like The Tossers into play before the compelling Every Single Day flirts with fifties rock ‘n’ roll for its power pop/folk punk romp. All three tracks leave the breath short and an appetite for more, greedier; that want more than fed by the outstanding Burn the Sun which follows. Creating a shuffle soaked in sultry seventies funk devilry and seventies new wave devilry, the track swings and flirts like a unique mix of King Trigger and New Model Army.

The album closes with the acoustic tempting and open heart of Falling Out of Love Song, a final folk caress to hungrily embrace before pressing play on Feather and Flame all over again. The album has that addictive quality, one listen leads to another or more almost every time whilst Headsticks is a band for punks, folksters, and rock ‘n’ rollers alike; for anyone who likes being aroused and provoked in equal measure by music that just gets under the skin.

Feather and Flame is out now across most online stores and @ http://www.headsticks.co.uk/shop.html

http://www.headsticks.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/headsticksmusic   https://twitter.com/HeadsticksMusic

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Paradigm – Realize EP

Paradigm Promo Shot _RingMasterReview

Offering four tracks which either hit the ground running with ears and imagination or simply blossom into just as potent propositions over subsequent listens, it is fair to say that the Realize EP is one attention commanding debut. The first EP from London trio Paradigm, it is a striking introduction to a UK rock band already stirring up strong words of acclaim.

With its initial seeds sown when vocalist/guitarist Alex Blake met drummer Angel D at school where they exchanged a Nirvana album and instantly became best friends, Paradigm truly stepped forward with a line-up completed by bassist/pianist Giulio Granchelli. Honing their sound whilst earning swift and potent reputation for their live presence, the band eventually hit the studio where producers John Cornfield (Muse, Oasis, Robert Plant, New Model Army, Supergrass) and Paul Corkett (The Cure, Bjork, Placebo, Nick Cave), after recording the EP with the band, announced that “This is one of the most fresh and exciting modern rock bands we‘ve produced!”

Realize opens with the instantly impressing Desire, a track which has the listener’s physical and emotional involvement on broad with little time or effort. Riffs and rhythms create a united coaxing further enhanced by spicy grooves and the quickly compelling and throaty bassline cast by Granchelli. As melodies add sultry temptation, the dark tones of Blake steal their big portion of attention, his presence already being described as Nick Cave-esque, and understandably so listening to the opener.  It is an enthralling persuasion catching further alight with its rousing chorus and volatile emotive energy. Every twist brings a new spice to enjoy, keys pulsating with an enterprise as resourceful and magnetic as the drama fuelled hooks and collusion of vocals cast across the band.

Paradigm Cover Artwork _RingMasterReviewThe stunning start is closely matched by Your Darker Side. It is a less intensive affair but just as rich in melodic tempting and creative imagination. Many bands have been offered up as an attempt to describe Paradigm’s individual sound; Muse, 30 Seconds to Mars, U2 among them but we suspect everyone will find out their own unique comparisons, as here the song reminds these ears of The Fatima Mansions and Teardrop Explodes as much as anyone else, a Julian Cope air also seemingly lacing Blake’s again impressing tones and delivery. The thrilling and highly infectious song itself proceeds to build crescendos of energy and intensity, each erupting seamlessly into anthemic roars and gentler hugs of expressive sound.

To reveal another shade to their songwriting and sound, the sombre yet fiery Strangers has a Walker Brothers air to it at times, going on to unveil a grungier presence leading up to and for its tempestuous chorus. Pete Wylie also comes to mind across the song, but as suggested each will hear their own references such the thickness and depth of the Paradigm sound and invention. Fusing various strains of rock, past and present, the song fascinates as much as its catchy qualities seduce, and though it does not leap on the passion as swiftly as its predecessors, Strangers has them just as greedily hooked in time

The same with closing track The Miracle. Its theatre of sound and emotion sees the poetic hues of a piano aligning with almost orchestral like drama, an imaginative blend needing longer to explore and get into but emerging as another easy to embrace proposal if admittedly not quite to the same strength as the previous three on personal tastes. Nevertheless the band only impresses individually and as a single thick flirtation of the senses.

Paradigm have announced their presence in big, bold, and at times breath-taking style with Realize so expect to hear much more from and of this potential bulging band.

The Realize EP is released April 8th through Sumind Records across all stores.

http://www.paradigmofficial.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Paradigmcomprock    https://twitter.com/paradigmrealize

Pete RingMaster 06/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Filthy Tongues – Jacob’s Ladder

FilthyTongues Press Pic Jan2016_RingMasterReview

Seriously beguiling and theatrically suggestive, Jacob’s Ladder is the highly anticipated debut album from Scottish trio The Filthy Tongues, and a glorious adventure into the dark and magnetic underbelly of the band’s home and imagination. Consisting of eight slices of dark rock ‘n’ roll woven from an evocative tapestry of caliginous flavours and textures, tracks further infused with poetic lyrical drama, the album is an immersion into gothic cloaked and intimately alluring portraits of, in the words of the band, “a dark neo-feudal Edinburgh.”

The Filthy Tongues consists of vocalist/guitarist Martin Metcalfe, bassist Fin Wilson, and drummer Derek Kelly, a threesome who were the core-members of eighties/nineties band Goodbye Mr Mackenzie. The band, which also featured Shirley Manson as keyboardist and backing singer, evolved into Angelfish and recorded a well-received album with Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth of Talking Heads, whose manager Gary Kurfirst gave a helping hand to the Scottish band. Subsequently Manson was lured to front a new project called Garbage whilst Metcalfe, Wilson, and Kelly became Isa & the Filthy Tongues and released a pair of albums with American-born Stacey Chavis as vocalist. Now the trio have stepped forward as The Filthy Tongues and uncaged a creative incitement which must rank up there with the finest offering to come from their creative minds and talent.

The album opens with its title track and a melancholic caress of strings which soon part for a vibrant stroll of dark bass and nagging riffs around distinctive vocals. A ripple of keys adds to the instant expressive character of the track, backing vocal lures just as potent as the track strolls along with a sinister yet mesmeric swagger. Like a mix of The Monochrome Set and Milton Star with a healthy scent of Nick Cave to it, the opener alone gives Jacob’s Ladder all the bait needed to tempt ears and appetite, whilst setting up an already eager imagination with the lust to delve into what is to come and enslave.

album_RingMasterReviewThe brilliant start continues with the rhythmically tenacious High. As the bass aligns it’s ominous yet invitingly throaty suggestiveness to the anthemic pull of beats, Metcalfe’s tones bring the narrative to pungent life like a lyrical Pied Piper within the post punk seeded and dramatic ambience of the sounds around him. It is gripping, irresistible stuff that demands increasing attention with consummate ease, much as the album and songs surrounding it, including the following Holy Brothers. Rhythms again create a bold canvas for keys and strings to share their provocative and melodic suggestiveness which in turn creates an aural sketch for vocals and words to captivate within. There is a slight feel of Fatima Mansions to that lyrical and indeed emotional prowess cast, a sharing of the descriptive and virulently compelling art of offering the imagination a fully equipped landscape to play with.

Long Time Dead brings a steely edge and attitude to its guitar crafted opening and subsequent body next, providing a dark country spiced proposal bred in the dirty back streets of life whilst Bowhead Saint swings and seduces with a delta blues kissed romancing of the imagination. Both tracks enthral and tantalise from within their individual creative skins and darkly lit hearts before Violent Sorrow shares its intimate and, as throughout the album, lyrically raw croon. Each of the trio leaves a lingering mark in their varied ways, all offering a long term flirtation with the psyche and passions.

A more physically agitated piece of rock ‘n’ roll, Children Of The Filthy keeps enjoyment and excitement as high as ever. Once more rhythms provide the irritable yet anthemic side of the song, vocals the dark scenic persuasion, and melodic and sonic imagination a bewitching poetic majesty which here is surf rock infused. The track is glorious, with Metcalfe vocally continuing to be like a Vaudevillian Poe sharing a dark tale to embrace and be inspired by. Its success is swiftly matched by the sultry exploration of Kingdom Of Ice, a song as enchanting as it is emotionally intimidating. Carrying a sound brewed with volatility, the closer is a firmly arresting proposal with as much suggestive depth and persuasion as the words it merges with, and a superb end to a similarly impressive release.

Jacob’s Ladder is destined to be one of the most acclaimed debuts of 2016, if it can truly be called a first release or simply another proposal in a long term evolution of three artists. More than that though, the record is a blend of fantasy and reality which ignites ears and emotions like a sonic poet; so being destined to emerge as one of the most acclaimed albums of the year might be the better suggestion.

Jacob’s Ladder is out now via Blokshok and available in varied formats and packages @ http://www.filthytongues.com

https://www.facebook.com/Isa-the-Filthy-Tongues-144934250476   https://twitter.com/filthytongues

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/