Jack of None -Who Shot Bukowski

Having released one of the most fascinating albums of 2016, US trio experimental brother sister trio Jack of None offer up one of this year’s most compelling in its successor Who Shot Bukowski. Weaving a tapestry of art, alternative, post punk and electronic rock, to simplify their sound, the band infests ears and fingers the psyche across ten tracks of creative drama. It is a journey into the shadowy side of the human condition, an adventure into devious infectiousness, and increasing addiction to embrace with every manipulative listen.

Splitting themselves between Philippines capital Manila and Chicago, Jack of None consists of brothers A.G. (principal composer on guitar, bass and synths) and Julian Syjuco (guitar) alongside sister Maxine (poet-songwriter and vocalist). Last year their first album, Who’s Listening to Van Gogh’s Ear?, was greeted with widespread acclaim, going on to receive 3 nominations at the 15th Independent Music Awards including Best Album in its genre, though what that genre maybe is anyone’s guess such the eclectic nature of their imagination and sound. Who Shot Bukowski is destined to not only replicate its predecessor’s success but thrust the threesome towards thicker and richer attention with its irresistible theatre of contagious intrigue and bold enterprise.

Swiftly Who Shot Bukowski reveals that doughty adventure and imagination in opener Strangest Bedfellows, allowing the hints and seeds sown in the more industrial lined Who’s Listening to Van Gogh’s Ear? to blossom and flourish. The track glides in on a slow swing, guitar and rhythms teasing with tantalising bait around the seductive temptation of Maxine’s voice. Steelier grooves erupt as things get provocatively hazier and magnetically sinister but still the emotive affair between ear and song continues to have the thickest grip whilst sharing increasingly catchy and flirtatious lures along the way.

It is an outstanding start swiftly matched by the following pair of Sticks and Stones and X-Y-Sex. The first of the two merges industrial and psych rock with folk pop hues, its touch simultaneously grainy and warm as Maxine erotically touches the imagination with her tones. A Marilyn Manson like causticity breaks as the track bursts into a more volatile state but soon returning to that initial now increasingly jazz funk laced calm; a carousel which continues to turn across the song before its successor steals the show with its noir lit beauty and haunting contagion. The previous track reminded of US industrial electro rock outfit Scream Machine, this even more so but equally has something of eighties UK band The Passage to it too. Like a dream almost nightmarish in its Orwellian design as visual eroticism teases, the track is pure bewitchment leading the imagination on a flirtatious dance from start to finish.

Dear Georges (Vous Petit Monstre) is next, an even darker bête noire of emotion and thoughts with its entrancing charms and seductive shadows, all led by Maxine’s almost predatory melodic grace and the similarly disarming exploits of her brothers. It too carries flames of metallic toxicity through the raw torrents of guitar but is at its most fantastic with its deviously mellow caresses.

Lyrically every song is a story, a gothic poem of sorts which is as much an engineer of the imagination as their delivery and the sound cradling their revelations, The Brainwashers another fine example within its raw dance and invasive electronic machination. A uniquely beguiling hook offsets a slight repetition of earlier tracks in certain moments, a lining of dark sounds and insidious suggestion adding greater individuality to the encounter before Polyamorous Serial Monogamist writhes seductively in ears. Every melody and smouldering syllable is a physically swerving enticement only accentuated by the surge of guitar and keenly slapping beats, it all woven into a mesmeric incantation.

From the six seconds of Again, the excitable rock ‘n’ roll exploits of The Princess and the Pistol (Can You Feel That?) tenaciously romp with the senses, the track a restrained yet tempestuous incitement while next up Little Devil Girl provides its own suggestive haunting with almost visceral charm and beauty. It is an edge which grows with the subsequent surge of guitars and bass groan which emerges within the garage punk scented treat, the superb encounter never losing its composure but instilling lingering seeds of fear.

The album closes with Tenderly, She Said, a song which from a melodic kiss of acoustic guitar grumbles and smooches with the ever arresting presence of Maxine. Progressive in its tone, hungry in its diversity of texture and flavouring, the song grabs ears and imagination with sublime craft and ease, epitomising the album with its own inescapable alchemy.

Who Shot Bukowski simply captivated and thrilled from its first moment in speakers and ears, and indeed has only tightened its lure and grip ever since. This time around Jack of None would not be too misguided in hoping those previous nominations become awards.

Who Shot Bukowski is out now across most stores and @ https://jackofnone.bandcamp.com/album/who-shot-bukowski

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Pete RingMaster 02/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Maths and The Moon – Familiar Strange

MATM_RingMasterReview

This month sees the release of the eagerly awaited second album from UK alternative rock trio Maths and The Moon. It has been not too many weeks short of three years since their debut full-length, Night Train Daydream caught and captivated ears and imagination with its tapestry of droning seduction and fire drenched melodies spun with uncompromising invention. Familiar Strange is the natural and bold evolution of its predecessor’s sound and character; a generally calmer proposal with fascination and maturity flowing through every pore yet still creatively, an unpredictable and forcibly adventurous exploit.

Southampton bred and made up of vocalist/guitarist/principal songwriter Andy Fielder, drummer Luke Taplin, and bassist Matt Hirst, Maths and The Moon has persistently provided sounds and sonic explorations which have challenged as powerfully as they have enthralled. Formed around 2010, the band made its live debut supporting the legendary Can frontman Damo Suzuki, building on that thick interest sparking moment thereon in before sparking rich acclaim with Night Train Daydream in 2013. The album was an experimental fusion of psych rock and post punk with plenty more involved. Familiar Strange similarly embraces those hues but with an even richer array of equally dramatic flavours involved. It provides a sound and experience which is less spiky than on the first album, even more welcoming melodically and emotionally in many ways, yet still immerses the listener in landscapes as imaginatively scenic as they are emotionally invasive.

The trio has honed their sound and ideas into aural tales, where words and notes collude to cast individual glimpses into shadowed hearts and emotive reflections whilst, to use the words in the album’s press release, losing the listener “in the forest with nothing but shadows, memories and strangely familiar characters.” It all begins with recent single Futurist, a song instantly imposing on ears through the rumbling bass and some heftily swung beats as the guitar spreads an evocative jangle. That relatively forceful first touch soon mellows into a calmer incitement, the song prowling on its rhythms as the inviting tones of Fielder croon over the web of sonic enterprise and drama. The volatility which persistently courts the track does erupt in its chorus to fine effect, arousing ears and appetite further before the song swings through its merger of all aspects while smouldering harmonies and melodic flames colour the fiercely infectious encounter.

Familiar Strange _RingMasterReviewThere is a touch of Muse about the opener, but just a passing whiff before a Pixies-esque spicing emerges in the following Magic. Again it is a scent in an offering uniquely Maths and the Moon; a track which merges a charming sonic irritability with tenacious beats and the spiny lure of the bass. As with the first, the song is inescapably contagious, inciting body and ears with equal prowess and success whilst its fuzzy air and emotive drama seals the imagination’s involvement. Across its length, it blossoms an increasingly blistered surface to its melodies and voice, flirting with a Jesus and Mary Chain meets scorched shoegaze like glazing, while superbly continuing the impressive start to the album with a success quickly backed up by Amongst Trees and its shadow grasped balladry. It is a subdued and mesmeric persuasion where poetically suggestive guitar and voice hug ears as drums and bass build a pulsating frame around them. A thicker stroll of psych rock does emerge within the track, another enticement as catchy as it is soothing in the album, which in turn breeds a rolling rhythmic incitement which provides the hook for celestial harmonies and sultry melodies to hang around.

Howling is another with that alternative meets indie rock essence to its persuasion, the Maths and The Moon seemingly inspired again by the Frank Black kind of songwriting in the creation of their very own addictive tango on the ear. A sizzling slice of dark pop, the track hits the sweet spot dead centre, an accuracy matched by the outstanding In The Ellipse. The track is a ten minute instrumental providing a rhythmic canter with suggestive melodies and lively enterprise in its creative mane. The virulent ride has the scent of The Cure to it, their kind of emotive theatre laid in a tenaciously sculpted and offered gallop though an ever shifting and descriptive landscape.

From the warm and bright emprise of the last track, The Collector envelops ears with a haunting and intimately melancholic sigh. As with the previous ballad, the song is a minimalistic proposal coaxing ears and emotions, but luring full attention with an underlying infectiousness to compliment the maudlin shadows and the great repetitive coaxing around Fielder’s magnetic vocals.

In the band’s first album, Wire often came to mind but not with Familiar Strange, not until Boomerang anyway which weaves some colder steely hues reminiscent of the great band into its low key but snarling seduction of the senses. It is simply just another texture though, taken and twisted to suit and fit what, the album continues to prove, is their most distinctive and robustly compelling sound yet.

Familiar Strange is brought to a close by firstly the solemn acoustic balladry and heart of As The Crow Flies, though a song building a pyre of emotion and sound which burns with more intensity by its departure, and finally, the haze soaked psychedelic saunter and mesmerism of Psych-Seeing. Providing a riveting end to a thrilling encounter, the track glows and resonates across the senses like charmed smog with a melody spilling lighthouse at its heart.

It is fair to say that Night Train Daydream impressed and still does but Familiar Strange is Maths and The Moon on a whole other plateau offering their most exciting and accessible but still invigoratingly experimental proposal yet.

Familiar Strange is released May 20th @ http://mathsandthemoon.bandcamp.com/

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Pete RingMaster 19/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

dälek – Asphalt For Eden

Photo credit: Devine Images

Photo credit: Devine Images

Returning from their hiatus a few months back, dälek have confirmed their return with the release of their new album Asphalt For Eden, the successor to 2009 full-length Gutter Tactics. Released via Profound Lore, it also sees a new line-up bringing their imagination to the band’s renowned experimentation.  Revived by mastermind and producer MC Dälek (aka Will Brooks) last year, with the permission of ex-member and co-producer Oktopus, and with DJ rEk on turntables and co-producer Mike Manteca on samplers and effects alongside, dälek reveal the first result of their fresh union with an album which bewitches as it intrigues, provokes as it explores new dramatic adventures in the band’s sound and imagination.

Whether it is a new pinnacle in the band’s creative endeavours we will leave others to decide but certainly Asphalt For Eden ignites the imagination with its raw noise within ambient beauty and dark trip hop meets hip hop experimentation and provocation. It opens with the hypnotic Shattered, a persistent nagging of drone and sonic repetition hugging the lyrical prowess and delivery of MC Dälek. It is a haunting waltz of dissonant shadows and throbbing resonance; reminding a little of British hip hop band Honky, with MC Dälek prowling ears and thoughts with his stirring presence.

The sensational start continues with the also toxically atmospheric Guaranteed Struggle. Again the senses are immersed in inharmonious textures and sonic trespasses, rhythms roaming with a distracted gait as the vocals spread their evocative insight. The cacophonous air is as mesmeric as the swing and vocal enticement, becoming more invasively compelling and corrosive with each passing minute of the song’s droning beauty. It increasingly seeps deeper into the psyche, magnetic in its mystique laced discordance and ravenous in its oppressive envelopment of body and mind.

art_RingMasterReviewMasked Laughter (Nothing’s Left) is a lighter distraction; its elegant fuzzy harmonies blossoming into halos of sonic suggestion around effect cloaked vocals whilst Critical provides an industrial toned intrusion with a carnival-esque revelry and infectiousness to its melodic undercurrent. As with its predecessors, there is a busy creative machine working away within the muggy climate of the track, new revelations emerging with every listen and in turn a fresh wave of virulent contagiousness.

The rockier incitement of 6dB comes next with its haze of sonic instrumentation and raw ambience around a brewing rhythmic stroll. It is a plaything for the imagination before Control simmers and bubbles with its bracing celestial air and harsh romance of noise around MC Dälek’s ever alluring presence. Its spatial qualities are emulated in It Just Is, a closing slice of transfixing sonic and melodic discord aligned to a pulsating trespass of charm. Though it, and the track before, do not quite ignite the same strength of reaction as those before, both leave satisfaction full in their absorbing embrace.

The biggest pleasure comes in the repetitious and enjoyably monotonous drones of sound which shape tracks in a range of differing textures and ways. It provides a mesmeric and imposing romancing of the senses and imagination simultaneously acting as fuel to the creative fire of Asphalt For Eden and spicing to its rousing explorations. It is as if dälek has never been away.

Asphalt For Eden is out now via Profound Lore across most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 28/04/2016

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Rangda – The Heretics Bargain

art_RingMaster Review

The Heretic’s Bargain is the new album from instrumentalists Rangda, a trio who take ears and imagination on tantalising and feverishly unpredictable adventures of sound and intent, as evidenced by the five temptations making up their latest release. The album is a kaleidoscope of flavours and exotic hues, an incitement as psychedelically sinister as it is melodically sultry and perpetually hypnotic.

Rangda is the imagination fuelled union between drummer Chris Corsano alongside guitarists Richard Bishop (ex- Sun City Girls) and Ben Chasny (Six Organs of Admittance/ Comets on Fire). 2010 saw their debut album False Flag released with two years later its successor Formerly Extinct unveiled, both on Drag City who also release their new carnival of sound and invention. With also the live 10” offering Rangda Live in Krefeld and a split album with The Dead C under their creative belts, and the experience of featuring on over 400 albums between the three of them, it is fair to say that something new from the band is highly anticipated by a great many, something The Heretics Bargain rewards in magnetic style.

Starting with To Melt the Moon, Rangda provide a maelstrom of suggestiveness for the imagination which will undoubtedly create unique tales for each immersing in the song and album’s escapades. The opener instantly ruffles ears and appetite with its direct shuffle of niggling riffs and feisty rhythms. It is eager bait which in no time then slips into something mystique wrapped; melodies toying with thoughts as the perpetually nagging lure of guitar and drums entices. Within its other-worldly landscape, surf rock colludes with psyche rock; psychobilly and blues rock scented hues further adding to the cinematic yet intimate nudging of hips and thoughts.

Rangda_RingMaster ReviewThe track is glorious and quickly matched by the compelling and devilish canter of The Sin Eaters. Once again grooves and melodies entangle spicy hooks as the crisp jabs of Corsano create an alluring frame. They are all sinisterly seductive ingredients courted by hidden dangers in the song’s shadows as the track becomes a tenacious soundscape of drama and tangy temptation, much as its successor Spiro Agnew. Bishop and Chasny explore in the same scenic emprise as the previous pair, where Middle Eastern flirtation romances the senses whilst sparking in thoughts a tapestry of interpretations of the sound soliciting ears with every listen; that a success found by each track in their individual ways.

Sonic smog with deranged rhythms descends on the senses as Hard Times Befall the Door-to-Door Glass Shard Salesman smothers ears next. Straight away Bishop and Chasny create a cauldron of discordance and sonic trespasses as the beats of Corsano court their own deranged challenge. From this electric dust storm calm eventfully emerges, a mellower passage which still unbalances thoughts and emotions with its jazzy, seemingly improvised but expertly conjured exploration of depths soaked in melancholy led emotions.

From its haunted body, Mondays are Free at the Hermetic Museum slips out, the nineteen minute exploration a gallery of musical and emotive avenues clad in humid sonic invention and sweltering melodies soaked in an air of romance and dangerous intent. Perpetually evolving from start to finish, with moments of lively festivity merging into dark strains of emotional espionage and vice versa, every turn a whole new outlook of scenery and suggestiveness, the track alone makes the album a worthy sharing of time with.

Coming new to Rangda, we cannot suggest how it compares to its predecessors, but certainly we can say for coherently exhilarating, experimental, and creative drama, The Heretics Bargain is a temptress very hard to say no to.

The Heretics Bargain is out now via Drag City @ http://www.dragcity.com/products/the-heretics-bargain

https://www.facebook.com/RANGDA-Ben-Chasny-Chris-Corsano-Richard-Bishop-381243065276869/

http://www.dragcity.com/artists/rangda

Pete RingMaster 22/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Nekrogoblikon – Heavy Meta

 

Nekrogoblikon

For all those acquainted with and new to Nekrogoblikon and their self-tagged “goblin metal” sound, time to embrace one of the most enjoyable and impressive metal albums of the year so far. You might initially snigger at the band’s goblin themed presence and invention, and you will giggle with the band’s lyrical rascality and self-referential mischief, but ultimately you will come away from one exhaustingly inventive and exhilarating new album basking in metal at its stirring best; you might also just want to be a goblin yourself.

Hailing from Los Angeles, Nekrogoblikon formed in 2006 releasing debut album Goblin Island the following year. At this point the band was just the founding duo of Nicholas Von Doom and Tim Lyakhovetskiy. The line-up subsequently expanded as their sound began evolving as shown by second full-length Stench in 2011; becoming even more openly diverse and exploratory in third album Power two years later. The raw black and death seeded sounds which primarily fuelled their first release, were soon part of a maelstrom of rabid flavours and styles from electronic to folk, symphonic to experimental metal, all colluding to seduce ears and imaginations. The evolution has continued and is now in full blaze with Heavy Meta, the band’s new savaging of the senses. It is a fascinating and irresistible tempest; simply a devouring proposition of flirtatious menace and bewitching voracity.

From opener The End of Infinity, band and album has attention gripped and appetite licking its greedy lips. The song’s initial stride through ears has an electro air to its contagious swing and as it expels further ingenuity and imagination, thoughts of bands like 6:33 and Destrage give a nudge. Keys and hooks only add to the virulent web being cast, the great weaselly vocals of Scorpion almost dancing on the strands of their tempting. A brilliant start only explodes into a greater escapade as guitars cast a melodic weave with tangy hooks and grooves whilst rhythms stalk that enticing with lustful intent. The devilish nature of melodies and enterprise has an additional feel of French band Pryapisme to it, and quite simply everything combined creates aural addiction, an intimidating and fanatically unpredictable shuffle impossible for feet, neck muscles, and the imagination to resist.

Nekrogoblikon-HeavyMeta-AlbumArt_Reputation Radio/RingMaster ReviewThe passions are ignited just as potently too, finding further lust as the following We’ve Had Enough with its opening saunter of evocative keys swings in with drama and rampant devilment. Riffs and grooves are soon driving infectiously through ears, vocals spilling the narrative with salacious intent as clean harmonies court ears in the background. The diversity of emerging sound is matched by the great variety of vocals, every second and twist of the song as unpredictable as they are a fluid persuasion. Like a temptress ruffling the love sacks whilst stealing the gold, the track is a salacious temptation leaving ears and emotions on a high ready for the quick step and tenacious revelry of Bring Us More. Jazzy keys, pop bred harmonies, and funk kissed energy are all sucked into the fiery climate of the song’s rabid creativity, once more the likes of 6:33 coming to mind alongside hints of Trepalium and Mr Bungle whilst devouring the unique goblin sound.

Snax & Violence is a more predatory proposal, its blackened heart and melodic death metal voracity a ravishing of the senses. The song though is unafraid to infuse guitar and keys bred beauty into its climatic tempest, adding folkish hues to its grooving simultaneously. It is an enthralling stalking of ears soon outshone by the outstanding Atlantis. The band’s latest single exposes its rhythmic muscle and tenacity straight away, lacing it with scythes of sonic bait as vocal squalls and synth spawned teasing bring their individual persuasions to the rebellious landscape of the song. Like a death infused version of Hardcore Anal Hydrogen, the track is a puppeteer to body and soul, pulling the strings of pleasure before making way for the equally thrilling We Need A Gimmick. Think of a style of music and it is most likely infused into the bedlamic but flowing emprise of a song with something for everyone within and outside metal.

Full Body Xplosion is as grouchy as a ravenous bear and as rhythmically skittish as a dog in heat. Riffs and vocals are similarly fuelled across the volatile storm of invention whilst hooks and grooves offer magnetic toxicity and the keys intrusive seduction. The growl of the bass we will leave for your discovery and nightmares as another pinnacle in the lofty plateau of the album moves over for the raucous anthem that is Let’s Get Fucked. Featuring Andrew WK, it is as riotous as you might suspect and more merciful than you might imagine, with its guest the welcome and Scorpion the venom. Without rivalling its predecessors, the track still has the real world a distant memory in its company and energies ready to take on the caustic and sultry saunter of Mood Swings. Musically the track lives up to its title, each twist bringing a fierce fondling or flirty soliciting of the imagination, everything fully agitated and hungrily unpredictable.

The song Nekrogoblikon brings Heavy Meta to a glorious end; its cantankerous stomp an alchemy of relentlessly catchy rock pop exploits aligned to ferocious hostility. It is a torrent of vivacious turmoil and creative diablerie, just as the album itself. Heavy Meta is easily one of our favourite offerings this year so far and a major incitement for the metal scene, demanding and deserving the fullest attention in return. Now where do you get goblin masks…

Heavy Meta is available via Mystery Box now on CD and vinyl @ http://www.districtlines.com/nekrogoblikon and digitally @ http://bit.ly/1JycbMS

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RingMaster 03/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Abrahma – Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird

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It is not a rare event to immerse in a release of expansive and spellbinding imagination, to be taken out of the real world into a creative adventure for an hour or so. It is less often though that you get simply lost within a proposition of such complex and unrelenting ideation that you feel trapped, caught in a claustrophobic tsunami of creative consumption where only the brief gaps between songs offers a hint of escape. Not that you will want to break free from the fascinating and suffocating glory of Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird, the new album from French rockers Abrahma. It is an irresistible and exhausting emprise of perpetually evolving sound and dramatic atmospheres, an experience as sombre as it is bewitching and as creatively ravenous as it is emotionally disorientating.

There is no real surprise that the album is so intensively and imaginatively imposing, its predecessor Through the Dusty Paths of Our Lives when released in 2012, a similar maelstrom of sound and invention, as described elsewhere as a “heavy odyssey peppered with Hindu mysticism and voodoo convolutions”. The new album has taken that canvas to new and even more expansive and hypnotic realms; every track an individual journey uniting for one colossal and wonderfully unpredictable landscape of senses examining, thought provoking heavy rock.

Released as its predecessor via North American label Small Stone Records, Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird makes a low-key entrance as Fountains Of Vengeance comes into view on a wave of sonic noise and intrigue, eventually stepping from its presence with thick beats and equally tense riffs and grooves. A grungy air also lines their invitation as the sombrely delivered tones of vocalist Sebastien Bismuth bring a colder subdued presence to the already mesmeric encounter. His and the guitar of Nicolas Heller increasingly entangle and merge to cast a raw and magnetic web of sound, hooks potent and melodies fiery as the song creates a tapestry of Stone Temple Pilots like tempting with invasive post rock ambiences and psyche bred exploration. The song roars and seductively sways across its ever twisting adventure, keys from again Bismuth inventively caressing the darker prowling hues of bass and the predatory beats cast by Benjamin Colin.

Abrahma_album_Artwork     The following An Offspring To The Wolves is immediately a darker imposing character, the bass of Guillaume Colin resonating with menace and toxic enticement as a doomy air colludes with stoner-esque sonic expression. There is an underlying swing to the lumbering infection surrounding the captivating and varied vocal delivery of Bismuth, part of a slow smothering of the senses sparking with flames of sound and emotion across the consuming prowl of the senses. As all tracks upon the album, it is impossible to fully explain all of the textures, emotions, and dark almost meditative radiance oozing from the cauldron of sound and invention at work, but easy to say it is thoroughly absorbing.

Omens Pt. 1 comes next, its sultry climate and sweltering melodic intrigue lying somewhere between psychedelic and occult rock, its exotic lure almost shamanic on ears and thoughts. That of course is only part of the picture, rhythms at times a rapacious confrontation whilst melodies and vocals spill an evocative croon within the explosive causticity embracing ears. It is bewildering and fascinating simultaneously, needing as all tracks plenty of partaking of its proposal to come close to exploring its world. The same of course applies to equally dramatic and engrossing Weary Statues, the track a tapestry of carnivorous intensity, volatile textures, and emotion fuelled drama. It is all, with much more, woven into another transfixing and physically stifling tempest sculpted with creative ingenuity, bold unpredictability, and mouth-watering craft.

Next is the spellbinding Omens Pt. 2, a peaceful reflection of surf rock seeded beauty shimmering with melodic elegance and a haunted breath which becomes more unsettled and agitated with every passing tangy caress and melancholic sigh, Another switching of calm and ruffled intensity eventually leads to a bedlamic finale set ablaze by the slightly psychotic flames of sax from album guest Vincent Dupuy. It is inescapable bait, enslaving attention and emotions before making way for the mystical, tempestuous flight of Kapal Kriya, the track another brooding mix of varied heavy rock sounds in one diversely layered, intimately spatial adventure.

The raging diversity and expectations ruining enterprise continues to thrill through firstly the ferocious rock ‘n’ roll stomp of Square The Circle, its charge on ears as probably assumed by now, never dawdling in one style, torrent of sound, or urgency of delivery for long. Its outstanding incitement is followed by the emotional and increasingly physical turbulence of the excellent Omens Pt. 3 which then moves aside for the equally enthralling A Shepherd’s Grief, which features guitar solos from Monster Magnet guitarist Ed Mundell. It is a squalling seduction, employing vast arrays of challenging spices and emotions in its expansive soundscape, and yes it is creatively sorcerous.

The album closes with the mournful beauty and blistering fire of Conium, a devouring sonic embrace bringing a thrilling release to a dramatic conclusion. The Abrahma /Thomas Bellier produced Reflections in the Bowels of a Bird is a virulent listen which can be as uncomfortable as it is pure seduction, but with constant attention grows from an impressive encounter into something very special.

Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird is available on CD and digitally via Small Stone Records @ https://smallstone.bandcamp.com/album/reflections-in-the-bowels-of-a-bird

http://abrahmamusic.net/      https://www.facebook.com/ABRAHMAMUSIC

RingMaster 14/05/2015

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Juggling Wolves – Mercury

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Ahead of their debut album, UK rock band Juggling Wolves unveil first single Mercury to spice up a definite anticipation for its full-length source. A merger of alternative and progressive rock with experimental hues and striking ambient colours, the track is a captivating proposition which alone ensures that How To Salvage A Failing Butterfly upon its release in October will get keen attention.

Hailing from Ireland, Juggling Wolves is the creative alternative experimental adventure of Jimmy Deface from folk/blues rockers Rufus Coates & the Blackened Trees and Johno Leader of acoustic indie rock band The Radioactive Grandma. It is a very different proposition from the pair’s other exploits but just as rich with earthy melodies and organic breath. In late 2012, the duo united in The Beast-Suite Studios in Co Cavan, combining their skills and ideas for what would become How to Salvage a Failing Butterfly. One track does not make an album but taking Mercury as evidence and a potent teaser, the album is destined to be a provocateur for the imagination and seduction to the ears.

The single opens with a distant caress of keys and radiant yet fiery harmonies, the song drifting in keenly but with restraint as a guitar circles ears with its resourceful coaxing. It is not long though before rigorous stabs of sound break through, sinew crafted rhythms and sturdy strokes of guitar splicing the air. The union of both calm and fire entwine as an atmospheric wind of melodic expression and percussive agitation unite for a milder but no less pungent flight of endeavour. With keys bringing an emotive drama as bass shadows surround the slow vocals tones with a melancholic hug, the song evocatively glides across senses and thoughts. It is a masterful incitement, a waltz which seamlessly either flirts with emotional intensity or dances with vivacious appetite whilst leading the imagination into a poetic landscape of suggestion and reflection.

As unpredictable as it is enthrallingly mesmeric, Mercury is a thick yet smoothly flowing sunset of emotions and sound. The track constantly surprises as it relentlessly wraps inspirationally textured ingenuity around ears. If this is a hint to what we should expect with the band’s first album then roll on the short weeks to its arrival.

The self-released How to Salvage a Failing Butterfly is available worldwide from mid-October and Mercury on August 7th.

http://jugglingwolves.com

https://www.facebook.com/jugglingwolves/

9/10

RingMaster 02/07/2014

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