Furyborn – Dawn Of Leviathan

Since emerging in 2010, UK outfit Furyborn seem to make a potent statement with every move they make within the British metal scene. From their live debut in 2011, they have earned support and a reputation which has only gathered momentum and is sure to again with the release of their debut album, Dawn Of Leviathan. It is a ferociously imposing and compelling affair that arouses the same senses it trespasses with the band’s increasingly distinct and adventurous style of melodic death metal.

That live side of the Poole hailing quintet has seen them become one of the most potent forces across the South of England, win the regional Metal 2 The Masses competition and play Bloodstock Open Air for only their seventh live outing. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Threat Signal, Mors Principium Est, Sylosis, The Agonist, Malefice, The Defiled, Evile, (Hed) P.E. and Ted Maul as well as release their first acclaimed EP, The Reaping Of Our Days released in 2012 through Bored Stiff Records. Fair to say the band has been nagging at national and broader attention since day one, increasingly growing both which the highly anticipated Dawn Of Leviathan can only escalate.

The album quickly shows a new strength in intensity, craft, and imagination within Furyborn; a growth in all aspects infused into a maturity which is maybe unexpected within a first full-length, even from a band in its seventh year. Dawn of Leviathan opens with the atmospheric trespass of Second Sun, a brief harass of raw sonic dissonance which leads into the album’s title track where instantly a barrage of intrusive beats from drummer Tim Coulson and ravenous riffs from rhythm guitarist Rob Walker devour ears. Just as forceful are the raw throated roars of vocalist Jut Tabor who quickly seizes attention with his grudging tones, their causticity leading to a great flame of clean endeavour; the frontman, as the sounds around him showing a new dexterity and range which only impresses. It takes little time for band and song to reveal a new lofty plateau to that of the first EP, the melodic suggestiveness of lead guitarist Nick Richardson alone a striking new adventure equipped with the broader imagination and uniqueness that flows through the veins of the track.

The Reckoning follows with the same striking creative tenacity and character, the track a tirade of biting rhythms and corrosive riffs leading the listener into a web of melodic and cleanly delivered temptation. Within the burly, ravenous tempest of bitter sonic and vocal inhospitality, it makes for a compelling mix which only intensifies its lures as the song evolves and broadens its inventive landscape before Exult in Extinction uncages its own rabid assault again led by the uncompromising swings of Coulson. Stalking the senses, the bass of Timmy Hodgson is predatory if sometimes overwhelmed by the storm of riffs and beats while again Richardson veins the cauldron of sound with tendrils of skilful melodic lava. Contrasts flare and meet within the encounter, each colluding with and countering the other in a twisting tempest matched by vocal resourcefulness across the band.

The industrial opening of A Fault in Our Design brings a bold hint of Fear Factory like hues before the track turns to stalking and intimidating the senses. There is a swing to its core presence with breeds the infectiousness soon seeping into every element, the result a blistering yet controlled incitement as predatory as it is melodically tenacious while Life Begins uncages its own mercurial invasion of sound and emotion. Though swiftly persuasive and increasingly compelling, the song does not quite reach the inventive and  gripping heights of its predecessors for these ears though individual flair is as open as the track’s animosity and melodic assurance.

The raw rabidity of I Am Heresy has the imagination and appetite magnetically hooked again straight after with its ravenous and invitingly inhospitable assault of the senses while Deep Rising provides an enthralling lure of Tabor’s striking clean side courted by a laid back but fully suggestive climate of electronically led sound. With the irresistible carnivorous tone of Hodgson’s bass to the fore, the track is superb, another stirring magnet within the release adding further aspects to the bold adventure and evolving imagination of Furyborn.

The album concludes with firstly the varied metal symphony of Wraith, an array of flavours swarming with each other before a writhing death metal causticity bursts from within their midst, and finally with the symphonically laced As We Burn. The closer revels in all the new attributes of the band’s sound and writing, its proposal as invasively seductive as it is rancorous and transfixing. Again Fear Factory-esque hues entice as more Sepultura/Gojira like elements challenge, each woven into the individual character of Furyborn’s own sound. One of its major highlights, the song ensures that Dawn of Leviathan ends on a fascinating high.

Throughout, the album tightly holds attention and fiercely pleases, increasingly so with every subsequent listen. The fact that you still feel we are listening in on one step in a journey still to unfold only adds to the impressive nature of a release which is as much about potential as it is ear exciting craft and adventure.

Dawn of Leviathan is out now through most online stores and @ http://furyborn.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/furyborn/

Pete RingMaster 11/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Codex Alimentarius – The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II)

June 1st sees the re-release of The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources, the debut EP from British metallers Codex Alimentarius. Going a big way, alongside their imposingly potent live presence, in earning them an immediately loyal fan base, the band’s introduction has been “re-fired and re-forged” in such a way that it not only commands but simply demands fresh attention. Like a great many we are sure, Codex Alimentarius evaded our radar first time around and indeed with its successor The Hand Of Apophis. Listening to the MK II version of The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources though, it feels more like destiny than annoyance that the Exeter outfit has taken to now to grab ears and an immediate appetite for their melodic death metal nurtured roar, the EP a searing wake-up call to the world of one fiercely exiting proposition.

Formed in 2009 by the quartet of vocalist Stephen Bending, guitarists Stan Kemble and Tim Wright, and bassist Andrew Dicker, Codex Alimentarius were soon making a strong imprint on the local live scene in their first year before expanding the line-up with the addition of third guitarist Elliott Alderman-Broom and drummer Frank Dennis in 2011. The Infinite Growth Paradigm Vs Finite Resources in 2010 only added to their growing reputation and appeal, its release followed by the band going on to tour with the likes of Vader, Krisiun, and Furyborn as well as share stages with bands such as Sonic Syndicate, Malefice, Evile, Revolker, Ted Maul, Demonic Ressurection and many more over the next handful of years. The well-received release of The Hand Of Apophis in 2014 followed the recruitment of Ray Arrell as the band’s new vocalist and the From Hell To Oblivion UK Tour with Enemy Reign the previous year. Despite all that, Codex Alimentarius was still a passing name for many but it is hard to see that remaining the situation as the revamped The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources resets and re-energises the inevitable emergence of the sextet to the fore of the European metal scene.

Mixed and mastered by Alderman-Broom and wrapped in the artwork of Dicker. Mk II opens up with Baptised and swiftly gets down to catching the imagination with nagging riffs and suggestive melodies within an electronic mist. It is an enticing start which does not force attention but teases and seduces it, coaxing intrigue into the venomously lined tones of Arrell and richly toned grooves just waiting to make their impact. Becoming bolder and in many ways even more toxically attractive, the song blossoms in presence and adventure with Arrell the source of animosity and rhythms the seed of imposing trespass; all bound in the simultaneously seductive and predatory adventure of the guitars.

It is a potent and quickly enjoyable start but one soon eclipsed by the mighty proposal of Collapse. It too harries the senses with riffs and flying beats, their rapacious intent matched by the brooding antipathy of bass. Yet there is a swing and hunger to it all driven by almost rabid grooves and gutturally celebratory vocals which simply enslave ears and imagination. With tinges of thrash and folk metal in its dynamic assault, the track is glorious; only growing to greater heights with reserved passages of melodic endeavour and craft woven into a web of senses entangling temptation.

Good Slaves swaps the boisterousness of its predecessor with a more controlled state but still with a heady drama of energy and portentous suggestion. Sweeping melodies add to its dark edge and cinematic climate, grooves and riffs colluding to provide a heart as rousing as it is invasive as the song ignites body and thoughts with ease before passing its success over to the infectious almost envenomed charm of No Return. It feels calmer and physically kinder than those before it yet makes up for it with a tonal animus which infests vocals, melody, and imagination alike. If missing the extra spark of the previous pair of songs, it is a compelling journey through impressing craft and aural discontent; a merger of light and dark, melody and antagonism which heightens an already keen appetite for band and sound.

There is a bait of real catchiness within the quickly persuasive Symbiosis which follows, a devilish grooving which has swift control of body and attitude as the track grows in virulent contagion and emotional jaundice. It is a beast of a tension strapped, malignant stomp providing another major moment within Mk II, a peak matched by the closing mystique cloaked Arise. With Middle Eastern hues flirting with ears and thoughts from within its feudal proposal, the song breeds and widens its tapestry of creative and physical dexterity; guitars weaving a net of emotional and expressive suggestion around plundering rhythms and vocal causticity. It is a gripping affair which though a slow burner compared to earlier tracks leaves the listener provoked in thought and greed to hear and explore more.

With hindsight now available, Codex Alimentarius have not only given their first EP a new lease of life but released and developed its true character as indeed that of their keenly adventurous and eventful sound. Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II) feels like the moment that the band will truly step out from the shadows or certainly stoke a fire of awareness and attention; the former most likely such the striking presence and also potential found within the release.

Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II) is released June 1st.

http://www.codexthemasses.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/codexalimentariusband/    https://twitter.com/codexthemasses

Pete RingMaster 23/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Huron – The Dead Stay Dead

Photo by Leigh Drinkwater Photography

Photo by Leigh Drinkwater Photography

It will not be the first time that UK metallers Huron will have majorly stirred up acclaim and attention with a release but their stunning new album, The Dead Stay Dead is surely going to ensure that the band is regarded as one of the big boys from hereon in. As mentioned, previous encounters have all drawn strong support and praise from media and fans alike but their new and easily finest proposal to date is a band reshaping and igniting not only their own creative landscape but the metal scene around them.

Formed towards the end of 2007, Plymouth hailing Huron has worked through many line-ups changes which seem to have only help spark new potency and power in their fusion of progressive, thrash, and melodic metal and the increasingly impressive releases it fuelled. Debut album Cheyne Stoking lured strong praise and focus with its release in 2009, the band’s live reputation only being enhanced as they toured the UK in support. Its successor Mary Celeste whipped up an even feistier storm of acclaim across fans and media in 2011, its success matched a year later by the War Party EP. Performances at the likes of Download, Bulldog Bash, and Bloodstock followed whilst a British tour with Skindred was just one more live triumph to add to shows with bands such as One Machine, Onslaught, Evile, Alestorm, Ill Niño, and Viking Skull over the years. As the outstanding The Dead Stay Dead lights an expected touch paper to the strongest spotlights upon the band yet, this year looks set to emulate and surpass the successful twelve months the band had in 2015 and show Huron to be the new big roar in modern metal.

Mixed and mastered by Justin Hill (SikTh) and produced by guitarist Rimmy Sinclair, The Dead Stay Dead opens with The Ark Of Deucalion. A provocative sonic mist first wraps ears before intensive riffery from Sinclair and Chris Smith descends venomously on the senses driven by the barbarous beats of drummer David Parsons and the predatory throaty lures of Rohan James’ bass. It is a swiftly compelling and anthemic incitement built on the contagion of thrash but quickly showing the hefty weave of textures and styles now in the Huron sound as it evolves under the antagonistic roar of vocalist Sean Palmer, who has since left the band with James taking over the vocal spot. Darkly celestial harmonies only add to the drama within the blazing cauldron of craft and intensity, at times the track almost like a merger of Slayer, Devin Townsend, and now demised UK band Mishkin.

Huron Cover artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe striking start is soon eclipsed by the album’s title track, The Dead Stay Dead a predator quickly stalking ears and imagination with its scything rhythms and sizzling tendrils of sonic spice. Vocals assault and ripen the appetite as the song matches their bait with aggressive kind but it is when the track slips into something more melodically comfortable with clean vocals to match, that a great song opens its full temptation. It is irresistible, an ugly duckling evolving into blooming beauty and back with Jekyll And Hyde frequency for the thickest contagion.

Santa Muerte slips in next with a sinister climate and grievous intent in its rhythms and riffs. As in its predecessors, tortuously swinging grooves bind ears and an already greedy appetite whilst the raw vocal tones collude with the open animosity in the thrash bred and increasingly dynamic ferocity devouring the senses. Exhaustion and joy is the by-product of the blistering encounter, ears basking in the melodic enterprise searing their flesh and the rapacious imagination seducing their depths before both Pyschosis and Murder Hole unleash their venomous rancor and creative rabidity. The first of the two is a thunderous onslaught with a death thrash tendency to its equally tenacious weave of infection loaded flavours and ideation. Infused further by the burning prowess of guitars and solo it makes for one glorious collision between song and lust emulated again in its successor, a song which wraps itself in more recognisable thrash spices a la Metallica and proceeds to twist and re-weave those flavours into something far more primal and inventive with another dose of excellent clean vocal adding to the great diversity.

Managing to be brutish and seductive, the mouth-watering Despina feverishly rampages on ears like a cultured barbarian next whilst Bastard King emerges from atmospheric shadows to infest body and psyche with its sonic trespasses and rhythmic predation like a vampiric temptress taking the imagination on a ride through the darkest fearsome scenery. Both again are individual in their nature and bodies but united in igniting the passion with their invasive and imposingly addictive adventures through they are slightly outshone by the merciless virulence of The Spirit Of Hate & Vengeance. Like Black Dahlia Murder meets System Of A Down with Bloodsimple in close attention, to try and give a hint to its insatiable tempest, the track is manna to the metal feeding passions and for personal tastes the king amongst only great warriors on the album.

With the militant natured Bokanovsky’s Process and the flaming progressive subtlety of Solace, band and album continue to beat and thrill; the cunning twists and resourceful stalking of the senses by the first contrasted by the melodically poetic and cantankerously intrusive might of the second. Again each song has its own creative agenda and voice to keep the rich variety to the album flowing before Fresh & Thorns brings The Dead Stay Dead to a fearsomely rugged and invigoratingly rousing close. There is a hint of Mudvayne to the violent wantonness and canny maze of biting textures of the track, yet as everywhere any hints offered to songs in reference to others are slim hues in something uniquely Huron.

It has been a fair while between albums but the time has seen Huron escalate their craft, imagination, and fiercely flavoured confrontation of sound. The Dead Stay Dead is the proof from a band ready and undoubtedly equipped to take on the world.

The self-released The Dead Stay Dead is available from February 12th through all platforms and outlets.

https://www.facebook.com/Huronofficial   https://twitter.com/huron_uk

Pete RingMaster 11/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Stoneghost – Faceless Ghost

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As Faceless Ghost, the new single from UK metallers Stoneghost furiously and creatively bellows in the ears, there is no escaping offering a hearty thank goodness. The reason being that the song and album it comes from, was written at a moment it is fair to say which was pointing to the demise of the band. This had come about because, in the words of vocalist Jason Smith; “I was having a kid and I couldn’t cope with it, I didn’t think I would be able to carry on with the band too, I wasn’t in a good place.” Deciding to go out with a bang and show the world the most potent essence and fury of what was Stoneghost, the South East London quartet created debut album New Age of Old Ways. Thankfully the band’s sound and new offerings found their way to the attention of the Mascot Label Group (Black Label Society, Volbeat, Gojira, Joe Bonamassa), and here we now are with the album scheduled for release in April, its lead single poised to stir up the European metal scene, and Stoneghost seemingly back on compelling course.

The Bromley band began in 2007 and swiftly made a potent impression on the London live scene. Forging a ferocious blaze of rock ‘n’ roll bred from varying strains of metal and a hardcore voracity, the foursome of Cris Finniss (drums), Jamie Nash (bass), Andrew Matthews (guitar), and Smith continued to grip attention and increasingly so across the UK, making highly successful appearances at Bloodstock in 2009 and 2010 with equally impressive performances at the Wacken Open Air festival and Metal Hammer’s Hammerfest IV in their wake over the next couple of years. It was 2013 when the band’s frontman had his ‘crisis’ and turmoil reached the band. Fighting through it though to subsequently record New Age of Old Ways with Russ Russell (Napalm Death, Evile, Dimmu Borgir, Sikth, New Model Army), Stoneghost is now ready to take their place at the forth of British metal and again we can only give thanks.

As the majority of songs gracing the album, Faceless Ghost was bred in that troubled time for band and Smith, the singer talking about the song recently saying, “It’s about my daughter, she was on the way, I was feeling apprehensive and scared about the responsibility and seeing a therapist at the time, I was having some really low points, but because I had a daughter on the way it gave me the reason to sort myself out.” There is a definite personal angst and passion behind the song which echoes that moment, an intimacy to its tempest which rages as potently as the ravenous sounds.

The song opens with a dazzling weave of guitar enterprise, a spicy melodic colour which captivates from around just as swiftly established and equally compelling rhythmic predation. Things only intensify and grip tighter as Smith’s punkish roar spills emotion across the thrash toned canvas. Grooves and hooks add different and fascinating flavours and textures to the song next, the proposition already transcending various metal subgenres whilst brawling with its own aggressive individuality.

Matthews’s superb sonic and melodic designs continue to ignite the imagination as does the lyrical force of the song, whilst bass and drums are predators within the magnetically spiced triumph. Across track there are glimpses of bands like Pantera, Bloodsimple, and Overkill, but only whispers in a sound which leaps out like a beast and incites body and emotions with tempestuous majesty.

Roll on New Age of Old Ways

Faceless Ghost is available from March 2nd and New Age of Old Ways on April 27th via Mascot

https://www.facebook.com/STONEGHOSTROCKS

RingMaster 02/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Chronosphere – Embracing Oblivion

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2014 has already been flush with some impressive and more importantly thrilling thrash metal releases, some old school bred and others sculpting the new penchant for fusing thrash with death metal and other styles. Somewhere in between comes Embracing Oblivion, the exhilarating new rampage from Greek metallers Chronosphere. With adrenaline driving relentless through every vein making up the ten-track avalanche of insatiable thrash baited ferocity, the album is an exhausting and exciting confirmation of a promise already laid from the band previously but now aligned to a new plateau of inventive hostility and mouth-watering creative tenacity. Arguably the release is not casting explosively original persuasions but with ease Embracing Oblivion stands to the forth of the emerging modern twist of Bay Area spawned thrash metal.

The beginnings of Chronosphere started in 2009 when vocalist/guitarist Spyros Lafias formed the old school thrash fuelled Homo Sapiens. The demo Hypnosis came out the following year as well as several line-up changes which subsequently led to the union of guitarist Panos Tsampras, bassist Kostas Spades, and drummer Thanos Krommidas alongside Lafias. The band’s reputation has grown constantly through their live performances which over the years has seen them share stages with the likes of Rotting Christ, Suicidal Angels, and Evile as well as various festival appearances such as Metaldays and Wacken Open Air. 2011 saw the band begin working on their debut album Envirusment, an attention grabber which was released as Chronosphere via Athens Thrash Attack in 2012. Acclaimed and drawing world-wide attention its success is now set to be left behind in the wake of Embracing Oblivion and its explosive might.

The concussive entrance of Killing My Sins awakens attention and appetite within seconds, guitars and rhythms cascading venomously ChronosphereCoverdown on the senses before settling into the casting of predatory riffing and antagonistic beats. It is a dramatic and gripping torrent of intent and sound driven forcibly by the excellent vocals of Lafias supported anthemically by the shouts of Spades and Tsampras. The song is a ravaging onslaught but also a tempest which has the guile and deception to slip into moments of stalking rapaciousness and respectful intimidation, though it is only to un-cage a scorching solo before reasserting that savage and exalting furnace of intent and aggression.

The exceptional start is swiftly matched by One Hand Red Per Saint, again an insurgent proposition from its first breath. Riffs consume ears with an edacious hunger and rhythms unleash a cage of battering animosity, both expected in many ways and pleasingly welcomed but it is the inventive twists and imagination deviation to the core formula which ignites the passions most impressively, those and the ever successful vocals. Already within two songs there is an unpredictability infused into the assumption feeding base charge of the encounters which sets the band apart from the masses and flirts wantonly with the imagination for a full and eager submission, the next up Force Fed Truth equally as effective and ingenious in its presentation. It all makes for a familiar and refreshingly new twin attack from the album, one which simply does not fail in winning an ardour wrapped reaction.

The third song is debatably more expectations feeding than its predecessors but still a thoroughly electrifying provocation before making way for the merciless temptation of Brutal Decay. With a great vocal deviation to its narrative at times and a new intensity of urgency and energy beneath the spiralling casting of guitar and their sonic endeavour, the track is a galvanic onslaught which is anthemic in its recognisable seeds and dramatic enticement but littered with shards of often brief but scintillating invention. The guitar prowess once more lights a blaze of impressed appreciation whilst drums and bass continue to inspire a new strain of hunger for their enterprising voracity.

Things step up another notch with the intoxicating Frenzied From Inside, Lafias and guitars weaving further rousing ideation and breath-taking toxicity into its wonderfully hellacious rampage, whilst the next up Herald the Uprising instantly has the passions eating out of its hands with the opening rough carnivorous bassline, bait impossible not to get carried away over. It leads the ears into a furious pleasure of bad-blood veined enterprise and virulent anthemic beauty, the vocals as magnetic as the flesh chewing riffs and citric touch of the razor sharp cuts from the tantalising guitars. It is an enslaving enticement as potently matched by the scything rhythms and the persistently masterful bass sound, not forgetting one fire soaked solo.

The album continues to inspire hungrier and greedier responses as City of the Living Dead backed immediately by Seize Your Last Chance hold ears and imagination spellbound, the first a haunting and sinister examination which simply engulfs the listener in caustic sirenesque predation and its successor a more concentrated preying of the psyche. One very happy to un-cage an epidemic soaking of barbarous rhythms and similarly inhospitable riffs wrapped in a bewitching grooves expelling exceptionally addictive sonic invention.

The album comes to a close with the bestial brutality and muscular beauty of Beyond Nemesis, a thunderous pugnacious treat of an antagonist, and the melodic metal spawned blaze of craft and ferocity that is The Redemption. Both songs again expel an invention and creative adventure which leaves anticipation for more in the future as full as the satisfaction and pleasure embraced. There are a couple of minor moans which could be placed before Embracing Oblivion, well one really which is the similarity of many tracks across their strong surface which requires extra attention to look through, but that focus is rewarded with that gripping invention and devilry so really it is just an observation which probably will work itself out as the band evolves organically. Chronosphere is another band taking modern thrash to new heights without losing its source and providing impressive highlights in a busy year for the genre.

Embracing Oblivion is available via Punishment 18 Records now!

https://www.facebook.com/ChronosphereGr

9/10

RingMaster 16/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Spirytus unleash their new video

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SPIRYTUS:‘Brutal and Soulful… Spirytus has endless potential’ – Laz Pina, Ill Niño

2013 saw the much-anticipated follow up to Spirytus’ self-titled 2010 debut with the release of ‘The Fundamentals EP’ followed recently by the thrilling new video for  forthcoming single ‘Man Dem’.

The band has been described as a full speed car crash between Faith No More and Korn, sprinkled with Rage Against the Machine and a few surprises in there for good measure, with their stage show being just as entertaining, aggressive, energetic and downright funky as their music.

Spirytus released their self-titled debut album at the end of 2010 with the single “Bullet Ride” being featured on the cover CD for Metal Hammer of Up and Coming bands to watch out for and has been played on radio stations all across the country.

The funk metallers are serving their time on the road and have played throughout the country racking up notable festival appearances, including playing Ibiza’s Hard Rock Hell Road Trip for three consecutive years where the band played alongside Skindred, Panic Cell, Breed 77, Wolf, Evile and more (the band actually headlined the event in 2012).  In 2011, Spirytus opened for Ill Nino, as well as playing the Kick Out The Jams Festival and Hammerfest, where they headlined the Fresh Blood Stage. Spirytus also played Hammerfest again in 2012, after they beat over 1000 bands at the Highway to Hell competition to win a slot to appear at the festival. Along the way, Ryan from the band, has also managed to sing on stage with Fred Durst on three separate occasions; his band mate, Wes Borland from Limp Bizkit, refers to Ryan as ‘the guy with the loudest voice on the planet’.

After the success of their debut album, the band wanted to tweak their sound and parted ways with one of their guitarists, recruiting a turntablist to further augment their funky tendencies. With a refreshed line-up consisting of Ryan Walton (Vocals), Ben Edis (Bass), Alistair Bell (Guitar), Ben McAlonan (Drums) and Daniel Jones (Turntablist) and a revitalised sound that pitches a bouncy mix of upbeat party-time funk crossed with the grit and brutal aggression of modern metal, Spirytus set to work on the‘The Fundamentals EP’, eight slabs of biting groove metal, including the new video single for ‘Mandem’.

Quotes:

‘The guy with the loudest voice on the planet’ – Wes Borland, Limp Bizkit

‘Brutal and Soulful… Spirytus has endless potential’ – Laz Pina, Ill Niño

-SPIRYTUS RELEASE ‘MANDEM’ NOW – VIEW IT HERE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuNqDtoELeE

Spirytus – The Fundamentals EP

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     An invigorating splatter fest of styles upon a nu-metal canvas, The Fundamentals EP from UK metallers Spirytus is one of those slaps around the chops reminding you just how thrilling the core genre to their sound is when explored with imagination and a snarl which ignites the primitive inside. The use of the word splatter in our description should not be read as meaning it is a random approach with flavours by the Nottingham and Leicester based band as they thoughtfully and skilfully weave those spices into a voracious attack which constantly hits the sweet spot. Not since those halcyon days of Korn at their best and when early Drowning Pool gripped attention has nu-metal sounded this good.

      As mentioned there is plenty to entice and seduce in the band’s sound, its funk rapaciousness showing seeds bred in the likes of Limp Bizkit and Sugar Ray whilst their almost carnivorous side and the spicy elements of the sound holds a close relation to bands such as Rage Against The Machine and even more so Clawfinger. It is a scintillating mix which the The Fundamentals EP brings in feverishly exciting encounter even if one you feel does not quite reap all the potential you suspect is brewing in the band’s inventive belly. It is a magnet of an EP all the same from a band which formed in 2004. though it was three years ago they truly erupted into action. Their self-titled debut album of 2010 sparked keen critical attention upon their presence with the band equally earning an impressive reputation for their live performances which has seen them alongside the likes of Skindred, Panic Cell, Breed 77, Ill Nino, Wolf, Evile and many more. Since that debut Spirytus has brought a shift in their sound through the loss of a guitarist and the welcome of a turntable master in 2012, a move which has only added depth and diversity to an aggressive and mouthwatering confrontational sound. The EP is the first seduction since the album and simply a masterful treat of metallic grooving.

      The quintet of vocalist Ryan Walton, guitarist Alistair Bell, bassist Ben Edis, drummer Ben McAlonan, and Daniel Jones on the Spirytus Cover Artworkturntables from an opening sample go straight to the passions with a sturdy rapacious snarl of riffs and equally intensive rhythms. The bass craft of Edis immediately stands out, intimidating and skilled but it is fair to say the guitar and drums similarly steals their share of the imagination whilst the excellent vocals of Walton toys with air and syllables in a varied and thoroughly enjoyable vocal delivery and incitement which never relents across opener Fundamentals and the whole EP. The track bounces and twists with a creative rabidity around its sinew driven spine of almost disorientating rhythms and predatory riffery. It is an incendiary mix for senses and emotions which to the rear of the song dips into a restrained yet still urgently excitable passage allowing the vocals clear rein to tease and coax. It provides the icing on the feisty cake whilst the British feel to the band’s sound where most might and do emulate the American tone and breath of the genre, is a final potent ingredient to the blistering triumph.

     The following Qandahar strolls in on a resonating throaty bassline before sending streams of riffs and sonically cast grooves around the ear. In seconds though the track is roaming thoughts with a simple but inciting reserve of guitar and vocals before all collude for a fiery infectious chorus which brings not for the last time on the release that Clawfinger reminder. Though not as explosively gripping and dramatic as its predecessor the song is another to swing funk clad hips and forge a groove sculpted swagger which sees the already awoken appetite licking its lips.

     Next up comes the outstanding forthcoming single Mandem, a track also with an accompanying video to eagerly latch onto. A Korn like sonic nagging opens the track whilst the bass again lays down irresistible bait before the song leaps out forward with melodic flames and the ridiculous potency tempting turntable skills of Jones. The antagonistic flow of vocals and the surrounding gritty sonic invention reminds of Hed (PE) at times whilst the groove and table splattering taunts as well as the alternative infectious air of Walton’s delivery is definite Limp Bizkit bred but all soaked in a juice and invention all of Spirytus’ own making. The guitar craft of Bell not for the first time is impressive and perfectly controlled furthering the virulently contagious lure of the song.

     Horses Will Bleed is an eyeballing blaze of provocation and again a track which merges intensity and clarity into a compelling mix which is incredibly addictive and powerfully resourceful without bludgeoning the ears with an overload of greedy ideas. The challenging breath of the song develops another funk toxicity which is irresistible and only the guitar solo, which this time feels a little like showing off and a little at odds with the track, a minor niggle.

     The senses carving electro start to Patience Of A Saint is another thrilling entrance to a song on the EP, an invitation which the track takes through a melodically fuelled smouldering, which again merges Clawfinger and Sugar Ray like essences, plus a pinch of early Papa Roach, into a sultry sonic heat rife with plenty of biting vocals. A slow burner of a track compared to those previous triumphs on the EP, it emerges as one of the most exhilarating and inventive propositions on the release to steal top honours.

     The final stretch of the release does not tempt and grip as strongly and feels like a lost opportunity. The brief instrumental/sample piece Horses is fun but wasted whilst All Because Of Me though again impressively presented and crafted lacks the spark and fire of the previous songs; not a filler but a song too far for this particular release and not really offering anything new upon it. It makes way for the Tribal Riot Edit of Fundamentals featuring Dave Chavarri of Ill Nino; it a more percussive endowed version of the great track which reprises the towering start without really stretching it further, but it is such a thrilling song there are no complaints here.

    The Fundamentals EP is an excellent slab of nu and funk metal devilry, a release soaked in old inspirations but forging its own path. Spirytus have re-ignited an arguably forgotten genre and are right on course to become one of its most inspirational tempters. This is a breath-stealing release from a thoroughly impressive band and they can only get better.

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9/10

RingMaster 13/01/2014

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