Fire At Dawn – Self Titled

Fire At Dawn Online Promo Shot

UK hard rock band Fire At Dawn has already been earning a potent reputation for their live performances since forming in 2013, but now have national attention in their sights with a self-titled debut EP. The five track release is a rather captivating introduction to the band, not one to declare the band as the future next big thing in British rock, but definitely a potential fuelled and feistily charming base for the band to spring from ahead.

Hailing from Southend, the quintet was swiftly drawing comparisons to bands such as Alter Bridge, Evanescence, and Muse with their sound. The EP shows there is more to their creativity than that though, an individual flavouring which may not yet be loudly showing but showing there is plenty more to come from Fire At Dawn as they evolve and one suspects subsequently sets themselves apart from the crowd. It is all there on parade from the first track of the release as a familiarity works with a just as magnetic invention to spark senses and appetite to want more.

   Bad Trip is first, and as soon as the sultry wash of keys wraps ears, attention and intrigue are awoken. There is a fizz to the melodic opening, a strong coaxing which only benefits from the pungent rhythms and blaze of guitar which are soon adding their temptation. The strong lure slips a little as the song relaxes for the beginning of its lyrical narrative but nicely compensates with the seductive tones of Victoria Walker presenting them. The guitars of Brad Winter and Ross Turbz court her delivery with a spicy weave of melodies and riffs, the pair swiftly impressing with their enterprise and craft and increasingly so over the whole release. The song never explodes as its small crescendos suggest but firmly engages imagination and emotions from start to finish for a strong opening to the encounter.

The following Choose Me has a gentler start but like a sparkling wine has lively flavour to its acidic lure too. There is a definite eighties feel to the song as it unleashes infectious energy and fiery Fire At Dawngrooves, an essence which colours the whole song which also slips into something more reserved for the start of Walker’s vocals. Its catchiness is never far from the surface though especially with the bouncy beats of drummer Roman Drummond and dark basslines of Lloyd Entwistle making sure feet and thoughts are easily engaged across the song’s vibrant presence.

From the liveliness of two songs, Light explores a more restrained and shadow wrapped adventure. Emotive harmonies slip from Walker’s throat with impressive ease and potency whilst guitars and keys cast a radiance which caresses the senses with smouldering temptation. There is a melancholic but tenacious heart to the song which again threatens to erupt into more intimidating pastures, but it also finds itself on a constant rein even with the flame of sonic invention which drives a gripping solo. The track enthrals as it unveils its canvas and creative expression, subsequently making way for the closing pair of On Me and Run. Neither quite matches the previous songs as a whole, but each has moments of delicious endeavour and imagination. The first travels progressive scenery sculpted by again superb guitar work whilst its successor opens with a tangy twang to its chords and tempting which ignites a certain melodic mystique across the whole song musically and vocally. It is a fine end to the release, every part sizzling in ears without finding that key spark to ignite the roaring blaze you feel is there in the song and EP’s depths.

Fire At Dawn certainly inspires a hunger to know and hear more with their debut. It is lacking as mentioned a certain element and a snarl vocally and rhythmically to bring it fully to life, but such the quality and enjoyment the band do provide, that can be a question to address in future encounters whilst happily enjoying their introduction.

Fire At Dawn is available through all digital outlets on Monday 1st December.

https://www.facebook.com/fireatdawn

RingMaster 01/12/2014

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UK HARD ROCKSTERS FIRE AT DAWN RELEASE DEBUT EP THIS WINTER!

Fire At Dawn Online Promo Shot

Brit rock crew ‘Fire At Dawn’ serve up their engaging self-titled debut record, through all digital outlets on Monday 1st December. Look out for show announcements very soon……

Spawned in Southend, Essex and formed only last year, Fire At Dawn draw together a sound that calls to mind AlterBridge, Evanescence, Muse and the Foo Fighters. The female fronted hard rock combo, comprised of Brad Winter (Guitar), Lloyd Entwistle (Bass & vocals), Roman Drummond (Drums), Ross Turbz (Guitar) and Victoria Walker (Lead vocals), have played shows whenever and wherever possible ever since their formation and have already built a sizeable following throughout the South.

With a strong work ethic and a commitment to regularly recording, Fire At Dawn started work on their self titled debut EP in the Spring of 2014, and now the record is set for national release this winter. The EP comes at you with its fiery riffage and impassioned vocal lines, and boasts some killer future singles as well, namely the bouncy ‘Choose Me’ and the majestic ‘On Me’. Also, be sure not to miss the snaring groove of their opener ‘Bad Trip’ and closer ‘Run’. With tour dates in the works to coincide with the EP’s national release, keep your eyes and ears peeled for the rising hard rockers this winter.

Fire At Dawn

-FIRE AT DAWN RELEASE THEIR SELF-TITLED EP ON MONDAY 1st DECEMBER THROUGH ALL STORES-

https://www.facebook.com/fireatdawn     https://twitter.com/Fire_At_Dawn

A Mouth Full Of Matches – Smoke Signals

AMFOM Promo

Swiftly showing a fresh maturity and adventure to their sound, the new Smoke Signals EP from UK alternative rockers A Mouth Full Of Matches, leaves no doubt that this is a band truly finding its creative feet. The four track release bulges with thick melodies and intriguing hooks, providing ears and imagination with a warm and persistently impressing landscape of evocative textures and adventures. It is a riveting encounter from start to finish and though it is possibly a few sparks short of the blaze it could have been, the EP is a stirring and rigorously captivating proposition from a band on the rise.

Formed in 2012, A Mouth Full Of Matches, the name taken from a piece by spoken word poet Anis Mojgani called Milos, took little time in drawing attention with their sound, live presence, and debut EP, Tasting Fire. The Manchester quintet’s first release was well-received and potently opened up the potential and invention of the band’s songwriting and sound, a promise skilfully realised by Smoke Signals whilst providing suggestions there is still plenty more within the band to be explored. Recorded with producer Matt Hyde (Bullet for my Valentine, Slipknot, Machine Head, Funeral For A Friend), and following the band’s success in making it to the final Red Bull selection of 15 bands vying to play Download Festival, Smoke Signals is a potent statement in luring a greater spotlight upon the band.

The release opens with a sultry and gentle caress as first track Danger High glides into view. It is an atmospheric start embracing the imagination but just the gateway into punchy beats from drummer Steven Hall and a weave of raw AMFOM Artworkriffs and sonic enterprise cast by guitarists Mark Holden and Jane Hebenton, the latter’s twin Helen providing dark portentous shadows with her brooding basslines to the mix. It is a masterfully magnetic entrance to song and release, which as it grows and brews in intensity, continues the charm offensive through the excellent mellow tones of Tom Buxton. Finally settling into a firm and contagious stride, as guitars and vocals spread evocative and harmony soaked expression respectively, the song almost growls in creative contentment and melodic temptation. It is an enthralling encounter which just gains in strength and depth over time.

The following One By One matches rugged riffery and imposing rhythms with more seductive melodies and vocal elegance. It works from a similar template to its predecessor but in its individual way builds a wall of lingering persuasion, which again over time shows inventive twists and avenues within its tantalising scenery. The rhythmic bones of the track are big and its melodic skin tight, creating an anthemic potency which is inescapable. The song, as maybe the EP, is missing a snarl or two to wrong-foot or intimidate ears and thoughts, but with the impressive design and skills of the guitars aligned to soaring vocals deeply flavoursome, the track easily makes the strongest engagement.

Wait For Me attempts to find a grizzled call initially, though it is tempered by keys which continually help enflame each song in varied ways, before slipping into an emotionally flamed flight of pungent melodies and vocal warmth veined by sinew driven rhythmic tenacity. It is a transfixing track which sits somewhere between Deftones and 30 Seconds To Mars, with the bordering on orchestral strength of keys finding seeds in the likes of an Evanescence or Flyleaf. Though not the most accessible song of the release, it is its most gripping in imagination and exploration, the band on a new plateau for invention.

Smoke Signals is closed by Young Blood, another track which suggests it is an explosion in the making but remains within an appealing restraint, swapping ferocity for spicily tanged short grooves and crystaline keys amidst guitar sculpted melodies. Once more individual flair combines for a lively smouldering of emotive colour and sonic expression, resulting in an engrossing melodic adventure.

The track sums up the strength of the EP, and also its only miniscule want, that of the previously mentioned aggression or snarl to draw a more distinct line between the overall sounds of songs. Nevertheless Smoke Signals is a tasty and bewitching encounter marking another big step in the emergence of A Mouth Full Of Matches, a band heading in the right direction with the prospect of major horizons in their own hands.

The Smoke Signals EP is available now @ http://amouthfullofmatches.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/amouthfullofmatches

RingMaster 21/10/2104

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Empty Yard Experiment – Kallisti

EYE-INTHEMIX-PORTRAIT-1

   Kallisti is an album to which you have to commit time and attention but rewards with an enthralling journey for thoughts and emotions to deeply immerse within. The new release from Empty Yard Experiment, the fourteen track encounter is a transfixing and compelling proposition which never lets you comfortably settle into its exhausting textures and climactic structures but equally never relinquishes its grip and temptation on the imagination. A riveting web of progressive and melodic rock with just as rich veins of post rock and alternative metal, the album is an expansive landscape of consuming atmospheres and provocative emotion wrapped in a craft and enterprise which pushes Empty Yard Experiment to the forefront of progressive exploration.

Formed in 2006, the Dubai based band consists of musicians from the United Arab Emirates, Serbia, Iran, and India. Taking influences from the likes of Tool, Porcupine Tree, Nine Inch Nails, and Mogwai into their own invention, Empty Yard Experiment (E.Y.E.) has certainly on the evidence of this second album, forged a unique yet almost recognisably engaging presence and sound. It comes in an ingenious tapestry though which sets it well apart from the band’s influences and others engaged in a similar weaving of multi flavoured styles into sonic experimentation. With the band already earning acclaim through shows with the likes of Evanescence, Metallica, and Anathema, their Joshua F Williams (Bruce Springsteen, Stevie Wonder) produced Kallisti has the quality and potential to thrust the band into the keenest spotlight. Named after the inscription on the ancient Greek Apple of Discord, Kallisti is a concept album themed by the threads of chaos and discord which permeate our lives and existence, its lyrical provocation as rich and intensely provocative as its sound.

The journey starts with Sunyata, an instrumental introduction which places melancholic keys from Gorgin Asadi and strings in a crystalline and slightly portentous ambience. It is an easily engaging opening cloaked in emotive shadows and swiftly has thoughts wrapped up in its restrained yet potent drama. The track builds up a sonic link between itself and the following robust and intimidating Greenflash. That threat is slightly defused with the great ragged rub of riffs which soon emerge and mellow vocals which instantly brings a whisper of Deftones or Palms to the otherwise predatory entrance of the track. As it opens up its rhythmic pressure and sonic ruggedness everything takes on a fresh, bordering on antagonistic, approach to the melodic temptation. The result is a song which flirts and melodically roars like a mix of Alice In Chains and Karnivool. As with most tracks there is so much going on that we can only give brief glimpses, each proposition within Kallisti an on-going exploration of an evolving soundscape.EYE_CoverArt_Kallisti

The outstanding track makes way for the dystopian ambience of Red, a brief instrumental clad in an emotively sinister ambience before it in turn slips into the reflective caress of The Blue Eyes of a Dog. The track is like a stark imposing breeze, its emotional intrusion at times a wispy elegance and in others a forceful wind all sculpted by respectful rolling rhythms, melodic experimentation, and emotional turbulence. The instrumental is a beacon for ears and especially imagination to find their own scenic visions within the track and album, matched to more sinister effect by the more disturbed There Will Never Be where keys and vocals unite for a severely troubled caress.

Entropy provides the loftiest peak on the album, the track an enslaving bait of sinew stretched riffs from Bojan Preradovic and the probing beats of Josh Saldanha within an atmospheric sonic glaze courted by a gripping throaty bass temptation unveiled by Kaveh Kashani. Vocals swiftly add their smooth and evocative tension as keys swarm tenderly over the senses with a smouldering breath of seduction. The song prowls as it seduces, expelling raw abrasing flames of sonic and emotive passion throughout for a climactic and absorbing flight.

Blue is another short cinematic slither of industrial bred scene setting before the transfixing beauty of Anomie immerses ears and senses, the skilled designs of guitarist Mehdi Gr a gripping narrative alongside the increasingly mesmeric vocal qualities of Preradovic. There is a sinister almost bedlamic eruption of discord kissed sonic ingenuity within certain twists of the song which simply adds to its engrossing intrigue and unpredictability. The following Lost In a Void That I Know Far Too Well has less of the second of those two aspects but certainly a wealth of the first within its soaring melody strewn instrumental landscape. The piece again has thoughts flying their own agenda before Untitled spreads its unique but easily accessible melodic rock revelry and provocative expression. Detours into cinematic glimpses of life and festivities wrong foots at first but opens up further exploration within the constantly surprising track which over time only enhances its suasion.

The dark cavernous depths of Sama make another short but impacting twist in the narrative of Kallisti before it seamlessly evolves into the melodic enchanting of God Has His Reasons, a self-reflection driven slice of melodic and harmonic beauty. Keys and vocals steal the ears but only because the striking canvas built by restrained rhythms and an inescapable web spun by the enterprise of the guitars and bass gives them a potent background.

A final short piece called Green leads into the closing triumph of The Call, a track from its initial rhythmic trap binding ears and passions in a nine minute travelogue of gentle and tempestuous emotional climates and rugged aural terrains. It is a final emprise for thoughts and feelings, a thrilling sonic gest to lose reality within.

Though many tracks work alone superbly, Kallisti works best as a whole even though that means greater attention and effort is needed. The rewards though are enormous as Empty Yard Experiment proves themselves to be one of the truly exciting emerging forces in melodic and progressive endeavour.

The self-released Kallisti is available now @ http://emptyyardexperiment.bandcamp.com/album/kallisti

http://www.emptyyardexperiment.com/

RingMaster 29/09/2014

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Rose Redd – Perfectly Useless

Rose Redd 1

A surprise and a treat, the debut single from UK singer songwriter Rose Redd is a song which manages to smoulder and romp upon the senses at the same time, its emotive elegance and gentle caress as potent and loud as the energy and eager heat driving it. Expectations were not filled with a pre-determined opinion before approaching Perfectly Useless but it is fair to say they were not biting with intrigue either. The eighteen year old songstress soon changed that with a voice and song which drew submission from thoughts and emotions.

Born in Eastbourne but within six months finding a home in the West Midlands with her family, the eighteen year on was brought up with the eclectic sounds of the likes of Ella Fitzgerald, Iron Maiden, and Kate Bush filling her welcoming ears. It was the discovery of the lyrics and songwriting of Martin Gore of Depeche Mode though which ignited her inner musical flame, the kindred spirit she found inspiring her to investigate her own songwriting and to approach the guitar for the first time. As her first single shows she has not looked back, the Gavin Monaghan (Editors, Scott Matthews, Robert Plant) produced song an impressive following to the extensive time she has had touring and playing shows to consistently growing success.

Perfectly Useless is a pop rock song which is a hybrid of styles and genres, a track holding a sultry mix of Evanescence, Depeche 547459_562153730496617_875716635_nMode, and March Violets in their pop rock time. It is a vibrant and compelling song as bright as a sun but is also equipped with pleasing shadows, the well-lit pop stroll veined with darker elements of gothic and symphonic rock. The simmering crystalline opening sparkles against the excellent tones of Redd, her voice a blend of Amy Lee and Alison Moyet, and the beginning a mesmeric charm upon the ear. Soon electro beats make their punchy entrance to offer a little uncertainty but it all blends into a tantalising expanse of heated melodic wash, every note and vocal touch wrapping tenderly yet firmly around the ear and beyond. Whether stepping into a reserve of passionate enterprise or a contagious dance of pure pop temptation, the artists and song offers a lingering thrilling embrace which is impossible to refuse.

Perfectly Useless is impressive, an exciting entrance by Rose Redd, a lady we surely will be hearing a lot more of ahead, her horizons destined to be wrapped in welcoming success.

http://www.roseredd.co.uk/

8.5/10

RingMaster 22/04/2013

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SIVA Addiction: Bad Decisions

You can never say no to a dose of heart bred rock n roll and that is exactly what you get with Bad Decisions from US hard rock band SIVA Addiction. The album is a feisty and eager collection of very agreeable well groomed rock songs presented with great ability and even greater passion. Bad Decisions may not be the most original album but it is one of the more satisfying and undeniably contagious.

Led by the outstanding voice of Bridgette Oliver, SIVA Addiction is a band on a rise with this their second album already garnering strong acclaim and support. The follow up to their equally well received debut album Artifice of 2009, Oliver with guitarists Andy Hopkins and Vince Lindstrom, bassist Jesse Slone, and drummer Brandon Fields, have created a release which triggers all the right instincts in a rock album, passionate lyrics, heart driven sounds, and unbridled energy. Bad Decisions also has the similar effect on its recipients ensuring a great and satisfying time is felt by all.

Unavoidably in this genre and with striking clean female vocals the accurate comparisons to the likes of Evanescence, Halestorm, and to a lesser extent Paramore, are inevitable and as said they are for the main spot on but with hand on heart I know which band I would prefer to listen to, SIVA Addiction. It is not that they are particularly unique or stand far apart from the others but there is honesty with no disrespect to other bands, which coats their songs and an irrepressible connection which develops as the album plays.

With an almost reserved start the opening title track soon has the ear engaged with muscular riffs and incendiary guitar play before Oliver unveils her exceptional voice. With the bass pulsating just under the surface and rhythms making a fine framework for the band to explore, the song is an immediate keen companion. It does not offer anything particularly unexpected but when a song just scoops you up in a mutual friendship only enjoyment can break out.

The latest single comes next in the fine shape of One Night Rodeo. From the off the song hits the spot, the slightly grizzled guitars teasing before flexing and  evolving into a hard yet melodically driven ball of rock n roll. Anthemic in its pull the track like the opener is an instant infectious pleasure with robust riffs bursting through the ear for the vocals and grooves to follow with skill and energy.

The impassioned Hit Me, a song full of defiance and contempt steps forward next with the voice of Oliver bringing bigger balls than her target soon followed by the stirring Gone Away and excellent emotive ballad Take Me Home. All three gratify without lighting uncontrolled fires and keep attention and enjoyment at a high. What is impressive about the band is though the vocals of Oliver stand out they do not deflect from the excellent sounds and musicianship alongside her, SIVA Addiction finding the right balance throughout.

The consistency of the album is held tight across its whole length with songs like the pop rock When It’s Over and Get On Out with its great ill tempered riffs continuing to leave the ear and beyond treated to strong songs and full contentment. The album does hit a real peak with best track Night To 5, an insatiable rampage of riffs and adrenaline fuelled energy. The track is an infection unleashed and has feet and head in tandem within moments of its high octane explosive start to emerge as one of the most contagious rock songs let loose in recent months.

Bad Decisions is an album which ticks all the right boxes, it does not venture into particularly new pastures and at times calls out for a rawer edge to its polished surface but does quite simply deliver some very enjoyable rock n roll to spend a very satisfying time with, and the SIVA Addiction idea of rock music is very pleasing indeed.

http://www.siva-addiction.com

RingMaster 21/06/2012

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Interview with Darvius Noctem of Days Of Our Decay

Brought together by Cosmo Morte of US band Scream Machine, we had the pleasure of meeting Darvius Noctem of Canadian goth/black/industrial metal band Days Of Our Decay and reviewing the excellent album Electric Twilight which was released a few weeks ago. With a rich mix of flavours reminding of the likes of Rammstein, Deathstars, Dimmu Borgir, Type O Negative, and Sisters Of Mercy, as well as unique and vibrant imagination of its own it was a release that found a firm place on our playlists. Wanting to know more about the band and the great creativity brought forth by Days Of Our Decay we threw a flurry of questions the way of Darvius and he graciously revealed all.

Hi Darvius welcome to The RingMaster Review and many thanks for talking with us.

Firstly could you just tell us about yourself?

Man, you gave me the hard question first.  I am so horrible talking about myself, but I think my Facebook “about me” section sums it up.   Here goes…

I draw stuff and occasionally get paid for it. I also compose and play music, but usually don’t get paid for that. Sometimes I collaborate with other musicians for various projects. I end up talking to myself a lot because no one really listens to me to begin with. I hate most things, particularly: people, religion, and summer. Most people often mistake me for a “snob” when I am actually a misanthrope. I’m extremely opinionated and often voice my opinions, which usually get me into some degree of trouble. I have a dry, morbid sense of humour, but I am usually the only one laughing.

What is your musical history before Days Of Our Decay?

I started playing guitar when I was 15 or 16, but just couldn’t really get into it and moved on to learn bass, drums and then keyboard.  I took piano in high school but never really took it seriously until just before I started Days Of Our Decay.  During high school I played in a really lame electronic/rock/metal/experimental band called: The Spacemen On Vacation.  Later on in my early 20’s I joined my friends’ band: Malice.  It was more of a nu-metal influenced band in the same vein as bands like Coal Chamber, Spineshank, etc.  Initially, I played drums and then moved into the keyboard and bass position just before the other guys called it quits, which is then when I started Days Of Our Decay.

Days of Our Decay was initially and in many ways still is a solo project?

I started the band and wrote a few songs, but wanted to get my ex band  mates from Malice to join and contribute, but due to our life schedules and one of the members alcoholism, it ended up just becoming my solo project, and in many ways it still is a solo project.  I have had many different people in and out of the band over the years, but the only other official member is Demonika Demise.  Most of the past members were just brought in so we could play shows.  I recorded some demos and alternate versions of songs with a lot of the past members, but none of the final songs included them.  There are some demo cds and a live cd floating around – I will tell you that.

What was the intent and spark behind starting the project for you?

I wanted to have a rock/metal influenced band that was really keyboard savvy.  The thing that annoyed me the most in metal and rock is that the keyboards were always mixed so low, or just so minimal, so I wanted to have a band that featured keyboards as the driving instrument.  In addition, I am really attracted to dark music, whether it is heavy or soft, which is something I also wanted to incorporate into my project.   Ultimately, I wanted to create a sound that I wanted to hear in music, from a listener perspective, and at the same time, I wanted something that didn’t take itself too seriously.

You have self termed it “Elevator Music For The Dying!” could you elaborate on that and did that apply to your music from the very beginning? I ask as I know you had a later album with the term as its title.

It was originally a line from a poem/song I wrote in my late teens and I thought it was just something silly and over the top, and just decided to run with it.  The term did apply from the beginning.  In regards to the album:  Elevator Music For The Dying, it kind of summed up every aspect of the band at the time and prior to that.  That album was more or less an end of an era and Graveyard Superstar was the first album of the new era.  It’s ultimately still “Elevator Music For The Dying” it’s just expanded a bit more, I think.

 From what I know of your music you are unafraid to explore your own and the music’s boundaries?

Umm, sort of.  I don’t stray much from my trademark style, but I am always trying to incorporate new elements per song or album.   Overall, I just try to write and play what comes natural at the time.  That’s also easier said than done.  I tend to over think everything.   Sometimes I write a riff or a song and have to think “Did I write that riff before?” or “Does this song sound too much like this one?” etc.

You are quite prolific release wise especially in recent times and I know people have commented on that to you but I get the sense whereas other musicians might do the same but just throw everything out they create whatever the standard you have a disciplined and strict standard you place upon your work and maybe discard songs as many as you release?

Definitely, for every album I generally write and record up to 20+ songs and narrow it down to the best 11 or 12.  It’s hard to determine what makes the cut until the end because each song means something to me, but I try and make each album as dynamic as I can and have it flow really well from beginning to end.  I always second guess myself though because you never know what songs are gonna connect with people.  I find that most of my favourites are people’s least favourites and vice versa.  One of these days I might just make an album of songs that I hate and maybe everyone will love it and it will be a big hit.

Is creating music the first and last thought for you each and every day?

Sometimes.  I think about drawing and art just as much.  Sometimes I write songs in my dreams.  No joke.  I wrote 2 songs from how I remembered them in my dream.  One was called:  “The Letter And The Ghost” and the other was called: “Gift.”

As you mentioned you work with Demonika Demise in the band and though she is mentioned as a backing singer she brings a lot more than her vocal skills to the project?

I think of her vocals as more of an instrument, rather than a backing singer.  It’s a complete contrast to my vocals, but somehow they seem to work well together.   I think that if I sang more conventional or if she sang more unconventional, it wouldn’t work.  In addition, she helps me with some of the final mixes.

How did you both meet?

We met online in December, 2006 when I was living in Minneapolis.  We got engaged and I moved to Canada in 2007 and the rest, they say, is history.

Does she get involved with the initial songwriting?

Haha, no, not at all.  She admits that she is not a songwriter.  She understands this is more my project and doesn’t want to interfere with that.  She has helped with a few parts though.  She helped me revamp an old song and she wrote a choir part to the intro/verse of our song:  The Dark Gift.

We have had a discussion about bands that people compare your music to rightly or wrongly so what are your major influences and which ones do you think have most added texture to your ideas and sound direction?

I`d say that our biggest influences that helped shape our sound would be: Deathstars, Type O Negative, Marilyn Manson, Rammstein, Dimmu Borgir, Nightwish, She Wants Revenge, Sisters Of Mercy, Diary of Dreams, and The 69 Eyes.  Demonika’s influences are roughly the same as mine, but she is really influenced by more female -vocal oriented stuff like: Tarja Turunen, Evanescence, We Are The Fallen, etc.

I know Marilyn Manson is mentioned a lot when talking about your music especially vocally though I do not see it; does this get a bit tedious?

You are probably one of the only people who don’t see it, haha.  That’s cool though.  Overall, it does get tedious, but I usually find that it`s mostly from people who don`t know of any other darker- type bands, and since Manson is so mainstream, everyone just associates me with him.  I admit that I think our singing techniques are fairly similar from the raspy-ness in our voices and how we drag our notes, but if someone were to listen to us back to back, they would notice drastic differences.  I suppose at the same time, if someone compares us to Manson in a complementary way, I don`t get offended or anything, haha.

Always late to the party haha our introduction to you came with the great Electric Twilight which came out earlier this year. You first started making music for Days Of Our Decay with your first release The Devil’s Concubine appearing in 2005 I believe? How has your music evolved through the past decade and you as a musician and songwriter?

Yep, I wrote Devil`s Concubine back in 2005, but rerecorded for world release in 2007, and to also include Demonika Demise, as she was not on the original recordings of the first 2 albums.  Over that course of time, my songwriting and composing has gotten so much more refined and mature.  I can play stuff now that I could never play years ago.  We integrated new elements over the years and gradually got away from a lot of the `metal` aspects in our initial sound.  However, that will always be there in some form or another, I think, which is cool.  The production has greatly improved over the years for sure.  Even our vocals have changed and matured, quite a bit.  In the early albums it was about 50/50 singing to screaming, whereas now, I barely scream anymore.  Our vocal accuracy has greatly improved as well.  In a lot of ways we simplified and in other ways we expanded from the drums to the keyboards and all the sounds in between.  It was just a natural progression, I think.  I also managed to learn how to create and define a “mood” for a particular song much better.  Before it was just playing notes and making riffs.  For Graveyard Superstar, we started incorporating more guitar-synths and simpler compositions, as compared to our older work.  At this point, I can barely listen to our first handful of albums without cringing. 

Your website http://daysofourdecay.yolasite.com suggests you have already three more albums planned for the rest of the year and into 2013, are you that far ahead or is this just planned targets?

Ever since 2009 we have been 2 or more albums ahead of schedule (so to speak).  Keep in mind, we have been this far ahead even with me scrapping lots of songs.  I work extremely fast and can put out 1-2 finished songs per week.  If I were to die or end the band today, there would be a good 5 albums ready to go.  We’d be like the Tupac of the gothic rock world – dead, but still coming out with albums!

How do you create your music, what most often comes first and how do you develop these seeds?

I usually sit around and think to myself, “What would people really NOT want to hear.”

I’m usually inspired by a song, whether it is good or bad, or some kind of mood or feeling and then I sit at my keyboards and see what comes out.  I have spent hours just messing around with keyboard riffs and ideas, but usually I try and get the music to the chorus part done first and build the rest of the song around that.  A lot of times it doesn’t work that way, but that is initially how I start.  Once I finish writing and recording the main keyboard part, I fill in the rest of the sounds.  The drums usually come together last, as far as the music goes.  99% of the time, the lyrics and vocals are written and arranged after the music has been finalized.  I hate writing lyrics though, yet, ironically I spend a lot of time working on them.  It’s like an organized chaos and sometimes a warzone when I am writing a song.

You produce and mix your own releases too?

Yep.  I have the most unconventional equipment set up, but somehow it works for us.

How do stop yourself from getting too close in that department when you are doing every aspect of the music, do you have an outside ear to offer thoughts and ideas around too? Demonika maybe?

Exactly!  You hit the nail on the head, my friend.  I have to step away from it a lot and have Demonika take a listen.  Aside from her, I don’t want any outside influence because I don’t want to feel like I have to compromise what I do to appease someone.  Occasionally, I will ask my friends what they think of a particular mix or song, but that’s it.

How do you set up your live shows, still just the two of you?

It has changed for every show.  For the first 3 shows, we had a full line up (vocals, guitars, keyboards, bass, drums), without using any kind of backing tracks, but when I moved to Canada, we got booked for a show and I couldn’t secure a line up, so I had to resort to having our music (keyboards and drums) backtracked with Demonika and myself on vocals (respectively).  Honestly, I had so many problems with live musicians in the past, that we decided to keep the backtracks and go from there.  Some people might see that as unethical, but whatever.  The music is all created electronically, and unfortunately I can’t sing and play keyboard at the same time, so we have to resort to extreme measures to play shows.  Demonika doesn’t want to play shows anymore, and honestly, neither do I.  However, I get that “itch” from time to time, so if we play any shows in the future it will just be me and my lap top on stage.  I am also considering doing “internet shows” so people from all over the world can check it out, being as most of our fans are either in Europe or the U.S.

Is there a good audience for goth/black/industrial metal in Canada and especially Ontario where you are from?

Not at all.  We constantly get the cold shoulder from promoters around here, as well as bands, and just people in, general.  Most of the people around here just hate our style of music.  It’s really discouraging and disappointing.  The main thing is that it’s so divided here between crowds/scenes.  To make it in a band around here you either have to play really banal sounding hardcore/metal or classic rock and country.  There is no in between.  With most of our past shows, we’d get booked to play with all metal/hardcore bands, and that crowd is definitely not our demographic, to say the least.  Our last show we ended up opening for a blues, cover band.

Can we move on to the great art work to your albums, that is all your work too I believe?

Yes, indeed!

How long have you been creating art and is it an important part of the whole music experience you bring to your releases?

I have been an artist way longer than I have been a musician.  I have been creating art since I was a little kid.  I think my art is really contrasting to my music, but I think they work well together as a package deal.

What are your inspirations in this aspect of your skills?

I’d say mostly:  Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali, and Joan Miro.

I am sure I am wrong but I just have this thought there is a link or theme running through your art which wraps around your releases?

Well, the art you see is just my style, so all of my pieces have a unique, ongoing look and theme.  For album covers, I generally just choose a piece that seems to fit for that particular album.

Apart from your album sleeves you do not have a gallery for your work on the website so where can people see more of your art?

Thanks for asking. Yes, I do:  https://www.facebook.com/visualdecadenceofficial

Does the art come after the music when creating music or arrive hand in hand?

No, I do art and music completely separate.  However, a song title has been known to influence a piece of artwork.

Which receives the priority of your time music or painting?

I’d say it’s about 50/50 give or take.  Some days I work on music all day and vice versa.

When can we get our ears and thoughts into your next album?

“Master Of Funerals” will be the next album, which we are planning for Halloween this year (2012).

Once again a great many thanks for sharing time with us.

Would you like to leave with a final thought or comment?

It’s not how much Crown [Crown Royal] you can drink, it’s how much ass you can get while drinking Crown.  I believe Vinnie Paul said that or something like that.  In regards to the music and art, you can download most of our albums on our website and tell all your friends (who might like us) to ‘like’ us on Facebook and spread the decay.

https://www.facebook.com/daysofourdecay

Read the review of Electric Twilight @

The RingMaster Review 16/05/2012

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