Jack & Sally – Who We Become

Formed in the winter of 2018, British alt rockers, Jack & Sally, are poised to badger eager attention with their debut EP, Who We Become. With a sound embracing the snarl of punk and contagion of pop to its rousing rock roar, the London based trio have already teased ears with a pair of well-received singles and it is easy to suspect they will find escalating praise with the unveiling of their next offering.

Who We Become is a concept record based around a character named Macy, an undefined figure who could be “anyone in this world” who becomes a major protagonist in “Nevernia”; a land that reflects the worst aspects of modern society.  The release opens up with Superstar, a song instantly drawing ears with its singular but potent guitar melody. Vocalist Ben Felix enriches that initial coaxing with his brooding bassline before adding his equally alluring vocals to the mix. Subsequently the gentle beginning ignites; guitarist Joshua Jacobs’s riffs and hooks casting an enticing fiery web within which the punchy beats of Pravir Ramasundaram pounce. By now metal and classic rock threads are colluding with punk and pop rock dynamics, the track merging the familiar with the adventurous and unpredictable.

It is a strong and stirring start soon eclipsed by Nevernia, a track baring its pop punk instincts and heart from its first spirited breath. Swinging rhythms and riffs burst from the speakers, the earthier tones of Felix as animated as the sounds providing the galvanic incitement around them. Again imagination and great twists add to the character and temptation of the song, moments of almost new wave like enterprise only adding to its stature and persuasion before Tomorrow’s Revolution steps forth with a more classic metal lined proposal but still with a pop infused punk ‘n’ roll breath to its rock holler.

Both tracks revel in the multi-flavoured breeding of the band’s sound, the fresh and familiar once more making a highly appealing proposition and riven by a strong vein of imagination as proven again by Long Way Home. The band’s new single, it is a more even paced encounter lit by keys and a melodic sway in music and voice, emotive flames lighting its invigorated balladry.

The EP closes with Macy, a song also coloured by emotion seeded keys, a piano bringing it into intriguing view before the song breaks into another lively slice of pop rock drama. There is something familiar about the track but an essence we have yet to define and one which only added to its contagious presence.

Who We Become easily gripped ears and attention from its first lungful of sound and endeavour; providing a great full introduction to a band which could be looking at rather rewarding horizons as they build on and evolve the release’s thoroughly enjoyable adventure.

The Who We Become EP is released November 8th through Engineer Records with new single, Long Way Home out October 11th.

https://www.jackandsally.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/jackandsallyuk   https://twitter.com/jackandsallyuk

Pete RingMaster 08/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Come The Spring – Revive EP

CTS_pic_1

   Come The Spring, come the roar, certainly on the evidence of the UK band’s new EP Revive, a creative bellow which simply ignites ears and emotions. The six track encounter is a tempest of alternative and punk rock, a feisty and impassioned encounter which from a decent but strong start emerges as one fiery and memorable proposition. The EP comes with a snarling attitude and aggressive nature but around its confrontational jaws, band and songs unveil a resourceful and melodic tenacity which is as alluring as the intensity within both is ferocious.

Brighton bred Come The Spring formed in 2012, its line-up including previous members of bands like Rydell. It was not long before locally and subsequently across the UK, that the band’s live presence was earning them a potent reputation and loyal following, The sharing of stages with artists such as Hot Water Music, Green Day, Braid, Texas is the Reason, Appleseed Cast, Piebald, No FX, Samiam and numerous more only accelerated their ascent and reinforced their reputation for having a striking and uncompromisingly stirring sound. Released via Engineer Records, Revive is the band’s new assault on a broader attention, an encounter easy to see earning rewarding success.

EP opener 24 makes an ear pleasing and imaginative introduction to the release, its initial stroke of guitar the prelude to an emotive melodic caress and potent rhythmic enticement. It is welcoming coaxing also carrying a rawer edge, a provocative texture just as keen in the swiftly impressing tones of vocalist Sam Craddock. The song slips into an increasingly rigorous stroll whilst a volatile energy and causticity brews in the heart of vocals and the expanding sound. The snarling bassline is a constant intimidation in this but it is the following blaze of angst in Craddock’s delivery which finally ignites the air, expelling agonized tones against the magnetically radiate enterprise of guitarists David Gamage and Simon Goodrick. The track provides a highly satisfying incitement, the bass of Mark Wilkinson almost persistently carnivorous as it backs the rampantly skilled swings of drummer Jamie Donbroski, but lacks that final spark which would turn an undoubted impressive proposal into a great one.

The brief chilled ambience and sonic ire of the following Winterlude is the same, an accomplished and intriguing offering but pleasing rather than exciting before things really kick up a gear in CTS.Revive.CDcoverappeal and invention. Memory and Resonance is next, launching another deliciously throaty bassline and fiercely expressive vocals at the listener from its first breath. To this guitars swiftly add their vibrant and spirited endeavour to the shadowed heart of the increasingly gripping post hardcore seeded track too. It all breeds an anthemic potency which was less pronounced in the first pair of songs and gains even greater contagion from the next up Air That I’m Breathing onwards. The fourth track of Revive is a wonderfully turbulent yet melodically engrossing tempest of emotion and craft, a tempting fusion of alternative and melodic rock with punk antagonism, and another rich roar that inescapably gets under the skin and into the passions. The EP started in fine fettle but by this point is really revelling in a fresh creative prowess and the potential of one increasingly impressing band.

Maps comes next and from a charmingly subdued and melodically evocative start, courted by great bass sculpted shadows, explores an intimate and increasingly expansive bellow of emotion and sound. The guitars flame with sonic flair and inventive enterprise whilst vocally once more Craddock shows the power of his voice and expression. It is hard to day that the track allows a breath between the more voracious characters of the songs around it such its intense passion, but it is fair to say that it is a less agitated storm amidst its predecessor and the closing might of Home, Sick and Tired. The final track has the biggest punk heart and hostility of all the songs but is still unafraid to exploit the rich hues of searing melodies as it provides a dramatic and thrilling, fully rounded creative storm.

It and Air That I’m Breathing steal the show, suggesting the future capability of the band to create inspirational songs and templates for fierce rock ‘n’ roll is ripening nicely. They are tracks strongly backed by the rest of the collection of highly enjoyable songs though, so much so that Revive leaves only excited and impressed thoughts on Come The Spring.

The Revive EP is available digitally now and on CD from on 22nd March 2015 via Engineer Records

https://www.facebook.com/ComeTheSpring3

RingMaster 13/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Come The Spring: Seven For A Secret

Come The Spring

    Seven For A Secret is the debut release from UK band Come The Spring, a six track mini-album which openly ripples with enterprise. It is a release to which recognition of its potency and accomplished craft in songwriting and sound is easy to state but despite all its strengths there is a feeling of lost opportunity with the band failing to ignite any strong passions with its presence.

Hailing from Brighton, Come The Spring has drawn plenty of attention and fervour towards themselves since forming in the middle of 2012. With members who have the strong experiences of being in bands like Rydell and My So Called Life previously, and also sharing stages with the likes of Hot Water Music, Greenday, Nofx, Texas is the Reason, and Braid, the quintet hit the ground running and soon drew the attention of Engineer Records who release this their debut. Musically the band craft a sound which is rich in the essences of bands such as Hot Water Music, Fightstar, The Gaslight Anthem and more, that possibly the reason the release did not ignite the fires inside which one was expecting considering the brewing excitement around the band, their sound having a too strong a similarity to others.

Conditions opens things up strongly with its initial sonic embrace soon joined by firm beats and an eager wash of striking guitar comethespringcaresses. As the rich and expressive vocals make their presence known, an infectious hook veins the track to help ensure the song is a lingering pleasure. Into its stride the melodic flames of the guitar and rich tones of the bass standout along with the vocals to enthral and satisfy making an impressive and promising start to the release.

The following Northern Star contrasts the keen energy of its predecessor with a restrained and emotive gait. It is a gentle encounter with a certain passion which brings crescendos within the expressive breath of the song. The bass with its melancholic and exhilarating downcast voice steers the stormy atmosphere and reflection of song and its heart into a compelling company for ear and thoughts. As its moves towards its climax, the song shifts and raises the heat with good variety and invention and across its length evolves into a magnetic long-term treat.

The following Patching the Cracks Doesn’t Make it Foolproof and Readbeforeyouwatch both offer capturing elements which entice and infect the passions but equally neither can sustain the effect as they employ familiar underwhelming loud whispers to wrap around the stirring moments. Despite that the two tracks do hold attention and thoughts firmly in their grasp during their company and it is only after that they disappear from view and memory too easily for the fullest of satisfaction. Again as in all songs, they do not leave the listener short on skilled musicianship and passionate songwriting and again help to breed a strong sense and promise that the band is moving on to major things and releases in the future.

      The State isn’t Important as Long as we’re One is the weakest song on the release, a track which passes by without inspiring any real reaction though again it is sculpted and presented impressively and makes a decent enough lead in to the excellent closer Statues. On military driven drum recruitment and angular guitar riffs the song strikes up sparks of real pleasure with its contagious energy and melodic beckoning and ensures as it began that the album ends on a high.

Come The Spring seems to be tagged as post hardcore but stand more as a melodic punk/alternative rock band, though they do recruit other strong flavours to their creative cause. Seven For A Secret is an appealing debut from a band which you can only see unleashing some very notable releases ahead. This album is not quite one itself but for an introduction easily inspires the wish to keenly investigate future efforts whilst in the now makes for an enjoyable to spend your time.

http://www.facebook.com/ComeTheSpring

6.5/10

RingMaster 22/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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