Peur – Future Architects EP

Gas STN B&W_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Only days in and June 2015 is proving to be the source of some striking and seriously exciting encounters across a wealth of styles and genres. Another to add to that potent list is the Future Architects EP from UK trio Peur. Uniting their past two attention grabbing singles with new imagination loaded tracks, the Manchester band easily and forcibly confirm their growing stature as one of the more mouth-watering prospects on the British music scene.

Formed in 2013, the threesome of guitarist/vocalist Joe Lomax, bassist Ryan Greenhalgh, and drummer Sam Tempest quickly sparked support and attention with first single Anarchy and following debut EP We Can Build Astronauts in their band’s first few months. Live they did not take long in making a strong, acclaim earning impression either, 2014 seeing the band sharing stages with Empty Yard Experiment, DZ Deathrays, Allusondrugs, and Dearly Beloved. It was a busy and successful year which has continued into this with the release of a trio of singles, including This Will Destroy You, and now the Neil Treppas produced Future Architects.

The band’s inspirations includes artists ranging from Biffy Clyro to Nine Inch Nails, essences amongst many which make a swift spicing in the EP once the atmospheric Intro lays down the almost dystopian air of the release. The brief sonic narrative slips into the following They Have Destroyed Everything, and immediately the guitar of Lomax is casting melodic veins of acidic expression through the encroaching shadow thick landscape of the instrumental. That oppressive ambience is an imposing hue over pungent rhythms and a striking electronic colouring but suddenly lifts as the music in turn seamlessly flows into the gripping stroll of Explosions.

FA_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   An open and immediately magnetic Queens Of the Stone Age bred groove ignites ears first, its swinging persuasion matched by the rhythmic tenacity of Greenhalgh and Tempest. Contagion is a quick infestation of the song whilst drama and emotion is as rich through the enjoyable vocal tones and delivery of Lomax. That Josh Homme like spicing is an on-going tempting but as it expands and proceeds, the song explores a Muse like croon in chorus and voice where the early dramatic quality enriches every irresistible hooks and addictive groove within the encounter; familiarity and originality aligning for one voracious roar of a proposition.

     It Ends Before It Starts steps up next and it too is quickly enslaving ears and thoughts with healthy grooves, the thick lure of the one conjured by the bass especially captivating. Though it does not quite have the consistent swagger of its predecessor the track ebbs and flows with powerful energy and evocative invention. At times it offers a reflective, angst hued sigh and in others a bellowing expulsion of passion and intensity with both contrasts as potent and alluring as the other. Once more a Matt Bellamy and co breath coats the adventure but fair to say that again both songwriting and sound only use such influences as colour to their own designs.

The release ends with Hollow Skies, and if atmospheres and emotional intensity was thick before, they combine here for a smothering seduction fuelled further by the harmonic richness and craft of Lomax’s voice. Once more shadows line the noir lit theatre of the guitars and the emerging depths of the song, its body almost cavernous in feel with jabbing beats and darkly toned bass enterprise. Fair to say this time though it is the songwriting and the voice of Lomax which steals the show, even if unavoidably you have to also offer Muse as a close but certainly not quality defusing comparison to his presence.

The EP is as compelling as Peur is openly inventive, every track blossoming from the technical and inventive canvas the band members skilfully craft. They may still be looking for their truly distinct sound but more treats like Future Architects will see few complaining as Peur continues their impressive emergence and exploration.

The Future Architects EP is available now @ https://peurofficial.bandcamp.com/album/future-architects

http://www.peurofficial.com   https://www.facebook.com/PeurOfficial

RingMaster 04/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

The Top Twenty Metal/Rock releases which most excited The RingMaster Review in 2014

In a year of some seriously and gloriously anthemic, not forgetting creatively inspiring releases The RingMaster Review picks out twenty metal and heavy rock releases covered by the site which gave us that extra tingle of excitement in 2014.

 

EYE_CoverArt_Kallisti

01. Empty Yard Experiment – Kallisti

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/empty-yard-experiment-kallisti/

02. Escapethecult – All You want To

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/08/19/escape-the-cult-all-you-need-to/

03. The House Of Capricorn – Morning Star Rise

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/12/02/the-house-of-capricorn-morning-star-rise/

04. Hollow – Mordrake

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/05/30/hollow-mordrake/

05. Voyager – V

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/06/03/voyager-v/

06. Nexilva – Eschatologies

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/04/08/nexilva-eschatologies/

Arcade Messiah Album Cover

07. Arcade Messiah – Arcade Messiah

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/11/25/arcade-messiah-self-titled/

08. We All Die (Laughing) – Thoughtscanning

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/01/14/we-all-die-laughing-thoughtscanning/

09. Goatcraft – The Blasphemer

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/03/06/goatcraft-the-blasphemer/

10. Destrage – Are You Kidding Me? No

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/03/06/destrage-are-you-kidding-me-no/

1911882_983788448302453_5892065009981890503_n

11. Void of Kings – Stand Against The Storm

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/12/23/void-of-kings-stand-against-the-storm/

12. No Sin Evades His Gaze – Age of Sedation

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/08/22/no-sin-evades-his-gaze-age-of-sedation/

13. Dioramic – Supra

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/09/15/dioramic-supra/

pigeon lake

14. Pigeon Lake – Tales of a Madman

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/08/10/pigeon-lake-tales-of-a-madman/

15. Imbroglio – The Struggle in Pursuit

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/04/16/imbroglio-the-struggle-in-pursuit/

16. ICOSA – The Skies are Ours

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/07/25/icosa-the-skies-are-ours-ep/

17. Mars Red Sky – Stranded In Arcadia

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/04/29/mars-red-sky-stranded-in-arcadia/

18. Anti Clone – Hands Sewn Together

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/08/25/anti-clone-hands-sewn-together/

jwb walkingunderwaterpt2

19. Johnny Wore Black – Walking Under water Parts 1 & 2

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/02/27/johnny-wore-black-walking-underwater/

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/johnny-wore-black-walking-underwater-pt-2/

20. The Body Politic – Egressor

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/the-body-politic-egressor/

Empty Yard Experiment – Kallisti

EYE-INTHEMIX-PORTRAIT-1

   Kallisti is an album to which you have to commit time and attention but rewards with an enthralling journey for thoughts and emotions to deeply immerse within. The new release from Empty Yard Experiment, the fourteen track encounter is a transfixing and compelling proposition which never lets you comfortably settle into its exhausting textures and climactic structures but equally never relinquishes its grip and temptation on the imagination. A riveting web of progressive and melodic rock with just as rich veins of post rock and alternative metal, the album is an expansive landscape of consuming atmospheres and provocative emotion wrapped in a craft and enterprise which pushes Empty Yard Experiment to the forefront of progressive exploration.

Formed in 2006, the Dubai based band consists of musicians from the United Arab Emirates, Serbia, Iran, and India. Taking influences from the likes of Tool, Porcupine Tree, Nine Inch Nails, and Mogwai into their own invention, Empty Yard Experiment (E.Y.E.) has certainly on the evidence of this second album, forged a unique yet almost recognisably engaging presence and sound. It comes in an ingenious tapestry though which sets it well apart from the band’s influences and others engaged in a similar weaving of multi flavoured styles into sonic experimentation. With the band already earning acclaim through shows with the likes of Evanescence, Metallica, and Anathema, their Joshua F Williams (Bruce Springsteen, Stevie Wonder) produced Kallisti has the quality and potential to thrust the band into the keenest spotlight. Named after the inscription on the ancient Greek Apple of Discord, Kallisti is a concept album themed by the threads of chaos and discord which permeate our lives and existence, its lyrical provocation as rich and intensely provocative as its sound.

The journey starts with Sunyata, an instrumental introduction which places melancholic keys from Gorgin Asadi and strings in a crystalline and slightly portentous ambience. It is an easily engaging opening cloaked in emotive shadows and swiftly has thoughts wrapped up in its restrained yet potent drama. The track builds up a sonic link between itself and the following robust and intimidating Greenflash. That threat is slightly defused with the great ragged rub of riffs which soon emerge and mellow vocals which instantly brings a whisper of Deftones or Palms to the otherwise predatory entrance of the track. As it opens up its rhythmic pressure and sonic ruggedness everything takes on a fresh, bordering on antagonistic, approach to the melodic temptation. The result is a song which flirts and melodically roars like a mix of Alice In Chains and Karnivool. As with most tracks there is so much going on that we can only give brief glimpses, each proposition within Kallisti an on-going exploration of an evolving soundscape.EYE_CoverArt_Kallisti

The outstanding track makes way for the dystopian ambience of Red, a brief instrumental clad in an emotively sinister ambience before it in turn slips into the reflective caress of The Blue Eyes of a Dog. The track is like a stark imposing breeze, its emotional intrusion at times a wispy elegance and in others a forceful wind all sculpted by respectful rolling rhythms, melodic experimentation, and emotional turbulence. The instrumental is a beacon for ears and especially imagination to find their own scenic visions within the track and album, matched to more sinister effect by the more disturbed There Will Never Be where keys and vocals unite for a severely troubled caress.

Entropy provides the loftiest peak on the album, the track an enslaving bait of sinew stretched riffs from Bojan Preradovic and the probing beats of Josh Saldanha within an atmospheric sonic glaze courted by a gripping throaty bass temptation unveiled by Kaveh Kashani. Vocals swiftly add their smooth and evocative tension as keys swarm tenderly over the senses with a smouldering breath of seduction. The song prowls as it seduces, expelling raw abrasing flames of sonic and emotive passion throughout for a climactic and absorbing flight.

Blue is another short cinematic slither of industrial bred scene setting before the transfixing beauty of Anomie immerses ears and senses, the skilled designs of guitarist Mehdi Gr a gripping narrative alongside the increasingly mesmeric vocal qualities of Preradovic. There is a sinister almost bedlamic eruption of discord kissed sonic ingenuity within certain twists of the song which simply adds to its engrossing intrigue and unpredictability. The following Lost In a Void That I Know Far Too Well has less of the second of those two aspects but certainly a wealth of the first within its soaring melody strewn instrumental landscape. The piece again has thoughts flying their own agenda before Untitled spreads its unique but easily accessible melodic rock revelry and provocative expression. Detours into cinematic glimpses of life and festivities wrong foots at first but opens up further exploration within the constantly surprising track which over time only enhances its suasion.

The dark cavernous depths of Sama make another short but impacting twist in the narrative of Kallisti before it seamlessly evolves into the melodic enchanting of God Has His Reasons, a self-reflection driven slice of melodic and harmonic beauty. Keys and vocals steal the ears but only because the striking canvas built by restrained rhythms and an inescapable web spun by the enterprise of the guitars and bass gives them a potent background.

A final short piece called Green leads into the closing triumph of The Call, a track from its initial rhythmic trap binding ears and passions in a nine minute travelogue of gentle and tempestuous emotional climates and rugged aural terrains. It is a final emprise for thoughts and feelings, a thrilling sonic gest to lose reality within.

Though many tracks work alone superbly, Kallisti works best as a whole even though that means greater attention and effort is needed. The rewards though are enormous as Empty Yard Experiment proves themselves to be one of the truly exciting emerging forces in melodic and progressive endeavour.

The self-released Kallisti is available now @ http://emptyyardexperiment.bandcamp.com/album/kallisti

http://www.emptyyardexperiment.com/

RingMaster 29/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/