Watch Clark – Couch

photo by Christy Wiseman

The sound of Watch Clark is suggested as being akin to the Seattle indie goth/industrial scene of the early 2000’s but definitely there is also an eighties synth pop inspiration which richly flavours its imagination. It is a fusion which goes to make new album, Couch, one ear grabbing and imagination slab of contagion and very easy to recommend to all electronica embracing ears.

Watch Clark is the solo project of Seattle based musician Paul Furio, a former member of Static Engine and SMP. Founded in 2012, Watch Clark released debut album Perfect Imitation the following year with its well-received successor, First Week of Winter unveiled in 2017. Produced, mixed and mastered by Kasson Crooker (Freezepop, Symbion Project, ELYXR), Couch is the striking successor very easy to see pushing Watch Clark into a far bigger spotlight.

A collection of songs themed by a reflection on relationship, political, and life turmoil, Couch immediately had ears and appetite hooked with opener Misery. The blooming of keys and heavy pulse of rhythmic enticement openly wears a Depeche Mode influence but as swiftly the track reveals its own individual character around the magnetic tones of Furio. Industrial dissonance breaks upon the melodic landscape throughout to escalate the potency of drama within the unapologetically catchy and rousing affair.

The outstanding start to the release is matched by the infectious body and swing of the following Class Actress. Like a blend of B Movie romanticism with Kudzu post punk shadows within a Visage-esque croon, the track like its predecessor is pure contagiousness, its instinctive bounce manna to appetite and body before The Sound of Robots Pooping parades its industrial nurtured dance. As dystopian in breath as it is warmly infectious, the predominately instrumental track proved as much a spark for the imagination as an incitement for hips.

Diversity is a potent trait within Couch and potently shows its creative worth with next up Tansfläch, the track an electro industrial incitement bearing the Neue Deutsche Welle tempting of a D.A.F. alongside the cold wave theatre of a Kraftwerk, while The Darkest Place adds its own individual new wave lined proposal in the varied mix with contagious appetite and dexterity. In voice and sound, Furio lights up ears and speaker with a virulent touch which is hard to ignore in movement let alone pleasure.

The following Cross the Chasm has compelling darkness in its heart and touch which only accentuates its bold almost invasive yet haunting quality while The Act of Wanting offers a flirtatious slice of electro rock which again has energies and limbs hooked like a puppeteer across its purposeful stroll. Each again only adds further sides to the varied electronic prism of the album which Math Grenade emulates with its teutonic breath upon industrial dissonance. Again dystopian hues explore thoughts from within the dark infection and once more Watch Clark had attention glued before the equally arousing Get to Win added its particular electro punk grip on ears.

Featuring a vocal duet with Lark Remy in its haunting sigh, Weakness made for easy captivation. Though the sounds around them only hugged satisfaction it was the vocal prowess of Furio and Remy which most seduced and the way the production alternated between moments when each voice has slight dominance in their union.

Completed by the dark infested instrumental of The Cup of Bitter Fate and the melancholy soaked balladry of Choose, two tracks which lingered to haunt the imagination once sharing their final breaths, Couch is an album which provides a rousing fusion of nostalgia and new imagination which as mentioned earlier can only be suggested as a definite exploration for all with a taste for electronic pleasure.

Couch is out now; available @ https://watchclark.bandcamp.com/album/couch

https://www.facebook.com/WatchClarkMusic   https://twitter.com/WatchClarkBand

 Pete RingMaster 15/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dead Hippies – Resister

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Though music constantly sparks the passions whether through new proposals or simply going back to past adventures of pure joy there are some moments which ignite and excite the spirit and imagination like few others. For us one is the new album from Dead Hippies, a collection of tracks which voraciously burrowed under the skin as they inflamed an instinctive hunger for sound.

Dead Hippies is the creative project of Arnaud Fournier, the lead guitarist in The Hint and La Phaze. 2013 saw debut album, Kill Me Sweety, unveiled to a strong critical welcome. Whereas, it had a mainly instrumental landscape emerging from a fusion of rock and electronic enterprise its successor is a thickly bolder affair as noise, post rock, electro and dance-floor sounds collude in a rousing emprise of aural incitement. As with the first release, there is much more to each album’s body than the descriptions given, Resister a tempest of flavour and textures bound in a thrilling contagion soaked trespass further aroused by the diverse tones of Dylan Bendall (Lab°, Schoolbusdriver).

Live, Dead Hippies is unleashed through a quintet of guitars and it is that sonic abundance which fuels the intensity and exploits of Resister. The album opens with Drip Drip Drip, a track which admittedly took longer than the rest to get us hooked once exposed to all yet from its first melodic poking the song proved an itch which had to be scratched and often. Its rhythmic shuffle soon aligned to that initial electronic lure, vocals close behind again picking their shots before it all ignites in sonic dissonance as feral as it is caustic. Bendall switches between hip hop and noise punk dexterity within the repeating cycles of constantly fresh imagination, Fournier’s sounds equally esurient in their challenge and temptation as they evolve through a kaleidoscope of climates.

Get off the Boat follows, the track teasing ears with its opening electronic coaxing around a thick rhythmic pulsing. Melodic wires soon entangle those early seeds, Bendall’s tones moving from composed confrontation to a fiery insurgency as the surrounding enterprise follows suit. Like a mix of Girls In Synthesis and As A New Revolt, the track moves in a jarred shuffle throughout, its eruptions further manipulation of the senses and passions.

Featuring American rapper Mr J. Medeiros (The Procussions, Alltta, The Knives), the album’s title track is next up. It steps from an industrial lined electronic welcome into a prowling slice of Senser-esque rap rock where every second brings stringent observation amidst a consuming galvanic stride of sound. Though unleashed with a certain hand of control it is a ravenous encounter, electronic and punk ‘n’ roll dexterity amassing on a dance-floor bred rapacity.

That Senser like breath continues into the addictively rousing Feel so Freaky, a track which had the body feverishly bouncing like a puppeteer as its mania infested every note and syllable through to each magnetic twist and turn. Its dervish styled antics proved pure virulence from the first breath, a post punk hue only adding to its devilish magnificence before Laugh in Sadness flowered with crystalline elegance in ears. Guitars and keys blossom their intimation hand in hand, tears shared in its imposing shadows as the instrumental spreads and broadens its haunting tension and invasive drama. Compelling from first lure to last, the track eventually drifts back into the darkness for The Little Ones to unveil its corrosive radiance. A PiL tinted toning equips voice and sound as the song strides boldly and menacingly through ears, unrelenting rhythms on invasive manoeuvres as again Dead Hippies burrow deep into the psyche.

Across the swarthy climate of Anna Logue the Alien and the Morricone hued landscape of Tearing Us Apart with a Poisoned Dart addiction to Register only escalated. Once more ravenous electro-dubstep beats pummel as they incite across both tracks, the first of the two entangling that core bait with a web of guitar and electronic intimation as unscrupulous as it is dynamically persuasive, the vocals of Bendall equally as stirring. Its successor takes its time to build to that same rhythmic infestation, but once triggered brings a voracity of sonic turbulence and emotion before expanding both aspects in greater drama and tension.

The album finishes off with firstly the sonically rich ever evolving exploits of Flanger, a dance-floor bred instrumental at times as fearsome as it is incendiary to feet and body grooves and lastly the dystopian realm of Dramatic Control, a piece of music again which invades and provokes as potently as it draws the imagination into aligning its own darkest to that of the track.

Together they provide a compelling end to an album which simply consumed ears and attention not forgetting the passions from the first second and continues to do so which increasing success. There have been numerous striking releases across the year to date but Fournier with Register simply leaves so many of those in the shade.

Register is out now via Atypeek Music / Bruillance.

https://www.facebook.com/deadhippiesdead

Pete RingMaster 11/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Primal Static – The Corrupting of the Revolution EP

Align blues breathing guitar, imagination manipulating electronica, a soul bred rock roar, and vocals that border on the feral as they echo the angst of a modern disconnected world and you have the striking sound of US outfit Primal Static and their new fascinating rather enjoyable EP. Not that it is just a blending of styles the Austin, Texas based duo offer but a bold and rousing new adventure of noise as individual as it is wonderfully challenging.

Primal Static consists of vocalist/guitarist/songwriter G.T., a self-taught musician discovering a love for rock and blues as a child, and keyboardist/bassist HouFei, a classically trained pianist from the mountains of China who came to the United States on a full scholarship to study piano and graduated from the Peabody Conservatory. Together they create a proposition which tantalises ears and imagination whilst enveloping both like a sonic infection; one borne of the melodic discord and dark ravening shadows that pervade a world seemingly intent of personal and global self-destruction and a proposal which is unapologetically contagious.

The Corrupting of the Revolution is the latest venture into their unique sound, an overspread of the senses cast by four blatantly individual tracks. It opens up with Velvet Crush and instantly entangles ears and appetite in a splatter of mercury hued electronics. Guitar cast smog soon washes through the potent lure; it in turn swiftly joined by the distinct tones of G.T. as a haunting atmospheric air rises. That growing sonic enterprise of guitar is simultaneously matched in craft and imagination by the startling twists and almost psychotic prowess of HouFei’s keys, they an adventure in their own right in a riveting first track.

Need You So Bad follows freshly wrapped in attention and acclaim as the band’s recent single. A tenebrific throb of bass colludes with the unpredictable stroll of electronic rhythms and the similarly seeded steely noises dancing with them. From its first breath, the catchy web is set and ensnaring ears and thoughts, guitar teases flirting alongside before a great blues groove seduced as vocals shared their reflection. It is easy to hear why the song made such a rich impact on ears and radio shows around the world though for us it is definitely eclipsed by next up Blister Core.

The track is simply compelling rock ‘n’ roll, a song sure in its reserved but bold stroll and enticingly heated in its blues spawned guitar flames and psych rock nurtured keys. The warm vocals of HouFei equally make a thoroughly engaging contrast and companion to the grainier tones of G.T. though ultimately it is the complete picture of all aspects together which left the passions transfixed.

The EP’s final offering is Soul Jacket, a song which certainly took a fair time longer to persuade than those before it but eventually seduced with its sultry lures and sixties psyche blues hues. As throughout the release, the classical breeding of HouFei’s craft links up with the freedom driven imagination of her instincts, that complimented by G.T.’s own unshackled writing and dexterity. Soul blues fuelled, the song emerges as an inescapably strong close to an EP which just enthrals by the listen.

The Corrupting Of The Revolution is a release which may not rest easy with everyone but thrill those truly looking for something individual, fresh and creatively honest.

The Corrupting Of The Revolution EP is available on iTunes, Spotify and other online retailers now.

https://www.primalstatic.com/    https://www.facebook.com/PrimalStaticOfficial/

Pete RingMaster 23/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Moonshot – Last Train Home

Try tracking them down in Google and UK bred Moonshot is an eagerly evasive proposition but musically they are one warmly welcoming pleasure especially courtesy of new album, Last Train Home.

Consisting of Dan Kent and Rich Wolfe, Moonshot is an electronica weaving melancholy embracing duo which have been no strangers to praise and recognition through previous releases. Last Train Home is our introduction to their sound which has been described as “Depeche Mode meets Pet Shop Boys and Hurts at Massive Attack’s house party!” You may easily add other eighties nurtured artists to that list yet the London and Margate hailing pair have a sound which is as potently individual as it is at ease revealing its likely inspirations. With radiance burning vocal harmonies and a melodic enterprise which almost physically resonates through every vein of the band’s writing, their new album has proved an unexpected and at times breath-taking treat.

It opens with the lively shimmer of Winter Within, instantly alluring electronic dew glimmering in ears before the song springs into its creative canter around falsetto set vocals. As another burst of energy is triggered, the duo’s truly captivating harmonic union descends perfectly tempered by the darker tone and pulsation of rhythms. Contagion soaks every aspect of the track, its lushness and shadowed intimation a cradle for the band’s vocal prowess and its own suggestiveness.

The following Winter Will Pass is a warmer glaze to the slight chill of its predecessor, again a crystalline soundscape conjured this time with a hue easy to hear why Depeche Mode has especially been mentioned in reference to the Moonshot sound. It too has a dark breath to its often cool caresses and is just as inescapably entrancing before the melancholic sombre of Dark Clouds floats across the senses and imagination. Kent and Wolfe are a sunspot of harmonious beauty, their vocal craft and ethereal dynamics the real sun and heart of the album but as here keenly backed by the understanding adventure and at times climatic contrast of their music. Like a fusion of The Radioactive Grandma and Ladytron the song is irresistible.

The steelier presence of next up Too Much makes just as potent an impression with its rockier ambience soaked saunter, guitars and synths gently swinging to the earnest croon of the vocals while Speak No Words offers a cinematic allusion to its shadow hearted intimacy. The latter also has an instinctive catchiness in its belly which erupts in a chorus which simply beguiles from within the song’s otherwise darkly lit slightly heavy climate. To be honest there are so many major highlights within Last Train Home, and though this may not consistently be one for personal tastes that chorus is aural alchemy.

Illuminations has its own distinct drama, its initial melodic crystals subsequently discoloured and revitalised by the dark atmospheric shadows and headier heavier touch of evocative rhythms. Vocals counter the song’s bold trespass with their usual harmonic radiation, seeping under the skin and into the imagination as richly as the apocalyptic theatre around them.

We did not take to the album’s title track as keenly as other songs yet its melodic luminance as unsurprisingly the band’s vocal enticement is impossible to gloss over as it entices on its way to passing satisfied ears over to Hunting Down the Hunter. You would not say the track was predatory but it definitely has a certain dark edge to its tone and touch even as its dance and infection creating instincts collude and escape into a broadening landscape of persuasion.

The final pair of The Way To Go, a caress of acoustic guitar and vocal reflection within an electronic misting which in certain moments rises to its dramatic feet with compelling tenacity, and the similarly accomplished Angels in the Snow ensures the album’s conclusion is a hug of captivation. The closer is a fascinating slice of storytelling adding just another dark meets light shade to the album’s creative landscape.

Truthfully we did not expect to enjoy Last Train Home anywhere as much as we did due to that fusion of comparisons earlier mentioned, but it was a surprise we have only greedily devoured. There is every chance you will too especially if electronic, pop, harmonic, and atmospheric enterprise is your particular treat.

Last Train Home is available now via F&G Records @ https://fandg.me/independent-label/shop

https://twitter.com/m00nshot

Pete RingMaster 06/09/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dave Barbarossa – Mudsharks

Some musicians have the most distinctive style and enterprise that it is easy to know who they are just from a burst of sound. When it comes to drummers for us here it is not so easy but one man has a touch and style to his rhythmic imagination that it is impossible not to recognise. That artist is Dave Barbarossa and he has just released a rather irresistible new EP as part of the Icon Series.

2013 saw the publishing of Dave’s excellent debut novel Mud Sharks and the new EP adds its apparent connection through its title. The Mudsharks EP provides three instrumentals uniting his trademark style with electronic intimation and endeavour; at times marrying the rhythmic sound which ignited so many musical journeys in the seventies with his just as potent exploits through more recent projects such as Cauldronated.

The EP opens with Buttercup Girl, a slice of tenacious dance music with summer fervour in its keys and melody and flirtatious incitement in its rhythms. Like a flight through spatial climes but with earth bound muscularity pulling at its exploration, the track has the body bouncing and imagination conjuring in no time.

It is a rousing start though one for us swiftly eclipsed by the following pair of tracks. First up is Keep Walking, a piece which strolls along with relentless tenacity through cosmopolitan air over a more defined urban landscape. Dave’s rhythms just shape the imagination; suspense and drama fuelled by his web of swings as a cinematic weave is cast by electronics and synths. Quickly addictive and more so by the listen, the song reveals itself a viral persuasion.

The closing arousal of the EP’s title track is the perfect union of nostalgia and new. MudSharks harkens back to the irresistible rhythmic exploits of Bow Wow Wow but incitement draped in thick electronic intimation and drama amidst the floating lures of vocal harmonies. As its predecessors, it masterfully lures thoughts into painting adventures whilst turning hips and feet into its puppet.

Dave Barbarossa has been integral in numerous major treats and now the Mudsharks EP can be added to the list.

The Mudsharks EP is out now on download and Ltd. Edition Cassette Tape via Icon Series.

https://www.facebook.com/dave.barbarossa   https://www.facebook.com/iconseriesrecords/

Pete RingMaster 13/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hardcore Anal Hydrogen – Hypercut

When covering The Talas of Satan, the last album from Hardcore Anal Hydrogen we called a particular track a “beautiful meshuga.” It was a suggestion which undoubtedly applied to the whole release and is even more apt for the French outfit’s new wild adventure, Hypercut. Both halves of that description has been escalated within the new album, a release which it is best not to try and make sense of but one to just sit back before and immerse its crazed manna and manipulation.

Hardcore Anal Hydrogen is the manic creation of vocalist/programmer Sacha Mouk (Sacha Vanony) and guitarist/programmer Martyn Circus (Martyn Clement), a project emerging in 2009 and releasing debut album Fork you :​(​)​{ :​|​:​& };: that same year. Two years later, its successor Division Zero was unleashed with the band’s truly eclectic sound fully fledged but still growing and evolving as the mighty theatre of The Talas of Satan showed in 2014. As expected, things have not stood still since then, the pair’s imagination never taking a rest as they boldly breach another plateau in suggestive sound, diversity, and craziness with Hypercut, a release not so much schizophrenic as simply loco.

Everything from electro to rock, jazz to every shade of metal you can think of and more is entangled in Hypercut, much of which colluding to make album opener, Jean-Pierre, vigorously irresistible. Tenacious beats and electronic squirms grab ears first, guitars and rhythms swiftly involving their rapacious coaxing before the vocals of Mouk bounce in like a demented cartoon character. Raw metal trespasses burst as the song throws its self around dervish style; riffs, hooks, and grooves colliding like wayward atoms as keys conjure suggestion. Unsurprisingly twists and turns come at a rate of knots too, keeping the imagination dancing like a cat on a hot tin roof. It is a stunning start, prime but fresh Hardcore Anal Hydrogen offering up essences of artists such Pryapisme, Aphex Twin and Cryptopsy in varying degrees.

If the first is a tangled web, the following Coin coin is spaghetti of sonic wires all twisted up like the knack iPod headphones have when in the pocket if only for a few seconds. Circus’ guitar is a creative thrashing of enterprise yet with a composure and coherence which paints individual pictures as around it jazz flames and psych rock tendrils ignite and explore.  More progressive hues similarly escape the metal nurtured cage, Jean Michel Jarre-esque elegance honing an atmospheric landscape as wildlife voice their involvement before the track eventually drifts into the sunshine.

The Cajun opening of La roche et le rouleau is a deceitful prelude to rock ‘n roll time in the asylum;  a wacked out stomp again involving an array of flavours in its contagion and even managing to keep feet and hips involved as it slips into a sultry noir lit jazz detour, coming out the other side with even more certifiable zeal. It is a madness which is even lustier within Paul, a track which has fifties in its breath, dark gothic theatre in its air, and blackened dementia in its heart. Many bands weave a tapestry of diversity but as this track alone echoes, few can rival Hardcore Anal Hydrogen in the organic fluidity it comes in or the bedlamic mastery.

Next up, Blue Cuts provides a piano spun jazz saunter for a relatively ‘normal’ caress of the senses while Charme oriental creates a Mad Capsules Markets like sonic holler in a carnivorous extreme metal dissonance, but a fusion as infectious as it is invasive especially once Eastern hues join the musical curiosity. Both tracks simply enthral but are still eclipsed by Phillip. It is a sinister slice of musically and emotionally suggestive espionage; dark drama and deeds soaking every note in every twist and turn. In a moment in time where spying and death is headline, it manages to be a perfect echo yet has an intimacy of inner threat and turmoil just as potent. Its eight plus minutes conjures a cinematic tale in thoughts, no doubt one again sure to be individual to each listener but a rich one all the same.

Through the rhythmically tribal and aggressive spectacle of Murdoc and the glorious vocal and musical delusion of Entropie Maximum, one already lustful appetite just could not stop drooling; the second especially incendiary with its mischievously screwy, seriously catchy, unhinged romp. It has the body bouncing, spirit racing, and shoulders hunched in puzzlement; pure bliss.

In turn Sproutch savages the senses, electronics and metal at their carnivorous best and though only thirty seconds long leaves an unforgettable impact before the cosmic ingredients of Daube carotte unite with barbed hooks and hellacious metal in another rousing incitement, though it too has some intimation fuelled downtime where the imagination is even more stretched and pleasure overfilled.

Automne 1992 provides a slow prowl through rain drenched scenery and darkly shadowed threats. It did not quite grab the senses as its predecessors fair to say but has plenty for the imagination to weave with, 6:33 coming to mind once or twice while Bontemmieu brings the other side of climate with its summery charms and ethic festivities, though again there is just a tease of darker flirtation.

The album ends with Alain, l’homme télévitré, a track just epitomising Hardcore Anal Hydrogen eccentricity and their bizarre craft. Yet there is much more to it, as all tracks, a truly smart and inventive core which twists the listener around physically and emotionally whilst providing all the tools and ingredients for them to paint their own pictures and tales. It is not going to be for everyone but Hypercut is simply creative manna, the fullest sonic ambrosia yet from Hardcore Anal Hydrogen.

Hypercut is available now via Apathia Records @ https://hardcoreanalhydrogen.bandcamp.com/album/hypercut   or https://apathiarecords.com/en/releases/hypercut

http://hardcoreanalhydrogen.com    https://www.facebook.com/hardcoreanalhydrogen

Pete RingMaster 10/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

We Are Band Nerds – Forget Me Nots

When something is self- described as “Deftones meets Outkast” you just have to have a sniff but it was a mighty lung full we subsequently grabbed when diving into the debut album from US outfit We Are Band Nerds. That description certainly fits the Dallas sextet’s sound, though we would also suggest The Kennedy Soundtrack at times in their blend of alternative hip hop and nu metal, yet there is so much that is individual to the band that it is one imagination grabbing adventure within a debut which just demands plaudit loaded attention.

We Are Band Nerds consist of Brandon Cross (Lead Singer/Rapper), Tony Lucas (Rapper/Vocalist), Dorian “Scullie” Thomas (Guitarist), Carlos “DJ Sol*Los” Juarez (DJ/Sampler), Stephen “S Dot” Bonilla (Drums), and Santos “Sandman” Johnson (Bass). They all bring individual craft and loves into a united sound keenly embracing further diverse styles from jazz, metal, electronica, rap, and varied rock music. Within their first full-length, Forget Me Nots, it quickly proves to be a fascinating mix. Lyrically too the band transfixes, never pulling their punches whilst showing honesty fuelled insight and craft which whether with subtlety or force bewitches as firmly as the sounds around them in songs exploring the depths of everything from relationships to racism, poverty to life’s experiences.

From opener Hunger Games it grabs ears and imagination, electronics almost teasing as they suggest and lure before embracing a current of metal nurtured riffs, dancing beats, and the vocal prowess of Cross and Lucas. The snarl of the guitars is gripping and portentous; vocals matching their angst and irritability with the pair of singers and their individual styles a magnetic union.  All the while the melodic instincts of the band add a mesmeric glaze to veins of creative suggestion and the encounter’s natural rawer rapacity. It is a compelling mix of threat and contemplation in word and sound and a gripping start to the album.

The following Whore has an instinctive catchiness from its first breath of voice and bass, their natural swing controlled but bold and setting the tone for the outstanding track. Like a clock, each note ticks by with consistency and intimation, vocals matching their gait yet all the time volatility in the song’s belly is brewing and stirring, never truly erupting but adding a rousing trespass between the crystalline breaths and organically bred emotions. Like Palms meets Mudvayne in an unexpected way, it is simply glorious and reason alone to check out band and album.

Fake In You similarly has a relatively calm climate within which turbulence and intense shadows lie, essences which burn bright at times but are tempered by the atmospheric glides of the keys and the smooth blend of rap and clean vocals. That tempestuousness does take hold momentarily towards the song’s close but again is dampened down by the tranquillity and beauty of melody before Dreamer opens its heart and diminishing hopes through elegance, grace, and corrosive intensity. As with all songs, hindsight brings a sense of familiar hues within the inventive drama but there is no chance of predicting the landscape and enterprise of each encounter as hearts are shared and thoughts turned over.

Without quite stirring the passions as thickly as those before Under Water still holds attention tight with its evocative drama in sound and word amidst rapacious metal encroachments while American Trash springs from an electronic breeze of an interlude/intro into a heady windstorm of sonic manipulation and lyrical dissonance, though never breaking from its restraints to truly create a blistering tempest.  That control just makes the song though, ensuring its portentous air is a tantalising harassment behind more of the stirring blend of mellow and ire sealed vocals.

The industrial bent Hagel Trumpf is a prowling predator breeding addiction and lust for its senses preying beauty lit with nu metal stalking while Savage borders on the carnivorous, in comparison, but too holds its ferocity in an embrace of suggestion soaked harmonics and melodic intrigue. Both are mutually unique and magnificent, just two more reasons to be excited about their creators and lustfully keen to recommend the album they grace.

Forget Me Nots concludes with Fade Away, a scalding slice of rap and rock infused metal which is the band at their organically rawest on the album but once more infused into a searing irradiation of melodic beauty. It is a compelling end to an album which we can only repeat, must be checked out especially if those comparisons at the beginning hit the spot but equally atmospheric metal/rock in general.

Forget Me Nots is out now via Pavement Entertainment across most stores.

http://www.wearebandnerds.com/    https://www.facebook.com/wearebandnerds/     https://twitter.com/wearebn6

Pete RingMaster 09/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright