King Satan – King Fucking Satan

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In a world bent on self-destruction from the intimacy of relationships through to the broader intolerance of religion and the greed of those governing it up front and behind the scenes, never has there been a more suitable and insidiously compelling soundtrack to it all than the new album from King Satan. Recently released by the  Finnish outfit, King Fucking Satan is a ten track devouring of the senses and an insatiable trespass of the psyche as flirtatious and contagious as it is emotionally pestilential.

Originally a solo project for vocalist, multi-instrumentalist, and producer King Aleister Satan (aka fra. Zetekh, the frontman of Saturnian Mist) when it emerged in 2015, the band has subsequently expanded due to live show demands with Kate Boss (vocals, synths, piano), John Oscar Dee (guitars, bass), Martin Shemhamforash (synths, bass), and Magister Demaniac (beats, additional instruments, programming) completing the current line-up. Musically King Satan creates and fester a senses consuming, body inciting fusion of black and death metal with dark electro, EBM, aggrotech and more besides whilst lyrically and emotionally, nothing is left out from being invaded and violated; the album exploring themes “found within occult philosophy, psychological mind-fuck and even sociological satire hand in hand with renegade rock ’n’ roll spirit that surely bows to nothing and no one!”

Dance With the Devil pretty much sums up the experience of listening to the album as well as providing the title for its opener. As a dark atmosphere crowds around ears, a vocal trigger brings hungry beats and synth cast temptation upon the senses. Equally predacious and alluring, with increasing addictiveness and virulence as melodies and hooks play, King Aleister Satan’s vocal trespass bullies and harries, every syllable explored and sharing primal instruction. Like a mix of God Destruction, Skinny Puppy, and label mates Barathrum, the track infests and incites, its infectiousness and inviting hooks as loaded with viciousness as its boldly direct animosity.

It is a great manipulative start soon matched and overshadowed by As Above So Below, a song managing to be even more primordial and catchy as nagging rhythms pound and synths cast their toxic melodies and hooks; an infectious trait matched in the swing of the punk/black metal scarred vocals. Within moments bodies are bouncing and hips swinging, something we have seen in close attention, as thoughts are twisted and stretched by the corrosive vocal and lyrical intrusion. Addiction appears inevitable so be warned as indeed in regard to Enter Black Fire which though not quite having the body as firmly in its puppeteer grip keeps things feverishly pulsing as thoughts are taken on a tour of ascending oppressive power and its escape.

Psygnosis has everything lustfully involved and enslaved next too, its musical psychosis the fuel for more unstoppable infectiousness and lyrical humour honed drama. Physically exhaustive and imaginatively tenacious refusing to leave the listener alone with its creative bordering psychotic enterprise, the track is superb, a new major highlight though instantly eclipsed by Sex Magick. Stomping over the senses with every beat a haymaker and each synth nurtured sortie of ears a rebelliously sexual coaxing, the outstanding track grows into a relentless and licentious tide of industrial/ EBM contamination adding J-Pop like ingenuity with the vocals of Boss glorious and a devilry akin to something Mindless Self Indulgence might expel.

The predatory instincts of Satanized course ears next, its infectious electro canter a bold niggling of the senses around the raw air and tone of vocals and word before Of Internal, Eternal & Spiritual War, with its haunting Cimmerian crawl through an ominous atmosphere woven around darkly whispered vocals and harmonic siren cries, envelops the senses.

Recalcitrant causticity gets its head in the electro punk epidemic of Spiritual Anarchy straight after; defiance and vocal antagonism a potent contrast to the quenchless dance and devious endeavour of synths and guitars while Destroy the World is a calmer but cancerous embrace of the senses. Suggestive melodies vein an invasive smog of sound and intent which dowses the listener in emotional and sonic malignancy.

The album closes with a similarly toxic climate and reflection, though Kali Yuga Algorithm has a thicker sinuous texture to its layers and black industrial, rancor coated wake-up call. The track leaves a lingering imprint on the senses as pretty much all within King Fucking Satan, a release which enthrals on the verge of rapture and provokes to the point of brutality for seriously one of the most rousing and enjoyable stomps this year so far.

King Fucking Satan is out now via Saturnal Records and available @ https://saturnalrecs.bandcamp.com/album/king-fucking-satan

http://www.kingsatan.net/    https://www.facebook.com/kingsatan616/

Pete RingMaster 20/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Freak Injection – Freak Is Fashion

Unleashing in the words of its press release, “Blood, Sex and Psycho!” the Freak Is Fashion EP is quite simply a temptation rather hard not to get down and sweaty with. It is a new slice of devilment from French industrial/electro rockers Freak Injection, a rousing four track escapade fusing the familiar and the fresh in a roar sure to inspire the freak in us all.

It is fair to say that big surprises are not as prevalent within Freak Is Fashion as flavours which tempt like old friends yet the Paris hailing quartet create an aural captivation and physical incitement many unique offerings can only dream of. Inspiration to Freak Injection comes from the likes of the Prodigy, Nine Inch Nails, Nina Hagen, Madonna, and Marilyn Manson, though Freak Is Fashion leaps upon the listener more like an insatiable fusion of Animal Alpha, Die So Fluid, and The Guilt with Kontrust like lunacy leading and fuelling it all.

With the raw essences of metal and punk colluding with electro and industrial revelry, the Freak Injection sound needs little time to infest ears and psyche as EP opener and title track reveals. As soon as its initial electro spiral is joined by distortion kissed vocal coaxing, there is no r escaping the song’s devilry and rebellious intent. Within a breath rhythms are pounding upon the senses like migraine, riffs simultaneously harrying them with their dirty tone as hooks and electronic bait are unleashed with insatiable intent. The vocals of Charlie RED just as swiftly get a hold of ears, her infectious guile and mischief accompanied by the melodic teasing of guitarist MAC-F as Kevin Hapexia’s bass heavily prowls. Continuing to probe with the swinging beats of Anthony bordering on the psychotic at times, the track makes a riveting and body rousing trespass to kick things off, its schizophrenic character increasingly unveiled as its bounds along.

The following Sex Me is an instantly panting arousal of sound and creative intrigue, its introduction a slower, more controlled yet insatiable proposal with instinctive seduction lining every note, beat, and vocal taunting. With an increasing swagger, riffs grow in weight and rhythms in impact but equally so too does an unpredictable web of twists and deceitful turns never going quite where you expect and greatly pleasing because of it. Again it is hard to say that the song is truly unique, certainly not across its whole body yet there are only fresh and enthralling times in its midst. It is qualities equally found within successor Crosses, a meaty stomping of electro pop ‘n’ roll which has the body bouncing,  hips swerving, and vocal chords induced within its first anthemic roar. Charlie is again a beacon within a blaze of tenacious captivation naturally fitting and sparking rock ‘n’ roll instincts.

The release is completed by Psycho (Russian Boy), an emboldened motivation of sound which arguably fits expectations of the tags given to the band’s sound more than most but brews volatility in its rock ‘n’ roll which just detonates in ears. It is a high-voltage end to a creatively bustling and animated, not forgetting fervour driven, rampage that the inner freak just cannot refuse.

Freak Is Fashion is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/Freakinjectionmusic/    https://twitter.com/Freak_Injection

Pete RingMaster 23/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Guilt – Self Titled

Here to give your senses an abrasively bracing blasting and the body an irresistible work out is the debut self-titled album from Swedish duo The Guilt, a band which just might be the most exciting thing to happen to punk rock in recent times. Musically the pair of vocalist Emma and guitarist/beat caster Tobias create something angry and seductive from styles bred from electro punk to heavy rock and any flavour of rock ‘n’ roll your ears desire, or as they call it, laserpunk. Bottom line though is that The Guilt creates instinctive punk rock to rouse the spirit and assault the world in one of the year’s biggest treats so far.

The Guilt emerged in Helsingborg 2012, Emma and Tobias making a fresh musical start after the death of an old friend. Initially the pair used an iPod for synths and beats rather than replace the drummer before turning to a Roland synthesizer resulting in the fine mix assaulting the listener from within their first album. 2015 saw the release of their maiden EP on Heptown Records, who now release the album, with another outing for it last year through Suicide Records. It was a nudge on attention now being followed by a mighty slap courtesy of, as already suggested, one of the essential moments of 2017.

An electronic squiggle draws ears to the waiting clutches of opener Cunty Mess, the song swiftly taking advantage of intrigue with its scuzzy riffs and wandering groove. Once the voice of Emma saunters in, defiance reeking from every breath and syllable, the song just comes alive. Tobias conjures a web of hooks and unpredictability as a gnarly bass grabs its piece of an already lusty appetite for the track’s punk ‘n’ roll. Bouncing with catchy enterprise across its body but especially a pop infested chorus, the song seduces within its first spirit inciting roar.

The following Hate Hate Hate is swifter to unveil its antagonistic attitude, guitar and synth colluding in devious coaxing before Tobias unleashes a deliciously nagging groove as Emma stands hollering, irritation fuelling her presence and attack. She almost prowls song and listener, building her zeal loaded rage for the rapacious chorus; the sounds around her just as dynamic and predacious. Yet there is virulence to the repetitive groove and tenacious beats which has limbs and body as involved as energy and thoughts, dancing and rioting united in one song, though pretty much all the tracks within the album spark matching reactions.

I Don’t Care follows with its dose of crabby rock ‘n’ roll, the track simply punk rock to its core. Like L7 meets Midnight Mob, the song strolls along with a militant air; its middle finger raised under the defiance stoking shout of Emma and driven by the equally ferocious sounds of Tobias. The track is superb, maybe even eclipsing its predecessors before I Just Know It has feet and hips bouncing to its electro pop punk antics. With a touch of The Objex to it when it snarls and a whiff of The Knife in its calmer electronic shuffle, the song epitomises the band’s ability at fusing danceable pop and threat loaded punk rock if showing more restraint of its aggression than those tracks before it.

Having your senses crawled over; imagination fingered does not come much more potent or enjoyable than the start of Bad Things. It infests ears with its dark deeds and growling textures, the Roland popping away with its electronic spots to highlight rather than temper the irritated heart of the track; a union only blossoming to bigger exploits as the song boils over in another anthemic chorus surrounded by enjoyably corrosive flames.

The stunning Anomlays is next; the band’s latest single an incendiary eruption of punk and pop sounding like Animal Alpha leading Morningwood into a pit of hellacious body corrupting toxicity. One of the highest pinnacles in nothing but across the album, its success is closely matched by It’s Not Me It’s You. A little like Blood Red Shoes given a hefty dose of animosity but again emerging as something unmistakably unique to The Guilt, the song swings and grooves while spreading venomous fun and ravishing attitude; electro pop and punk has never sounded so delicious together.

That is another key thing about the album; for all the references we suggest or others different people may offer, The Guilt has a sound which stands alongside no-one. Its voice, imagination, and character is one of the most original around right now yet feels like a friend from its first hungry touch. Next up When The Honey Comes is proof, the track swaggering through ears with another grimace to its tone but is as quickly springing infectious flavours and hip provoking exploits as guitar and bass niggle away with their great persistence.

The release is brought to a fiery close with firstly the cantankerous stomp of Give It and lastly the psychotic hop of Ovaries. Both tracks leave exhaustion and instinctive pleasure in their wake, the first with its primal punk ‘n’ roll and its successor with its electro punk revelry though even with its kinetic web of sound and contagious consuming of the body there is something inescapably predatory to the album’s thrilling conclusion.

The Guilt is beginning to catch and excite new ears and passions in droves, their album shows exactly. It assaults, infests, demands, and rewards in equal measure; most of all it gives music and its fans the kind of fun time and rebellious streak it has arguably been missing lately. We say let their album be your next port of call and as for us, they just might be your new favourite, probably obsessive passion.

The Guilt album is out May 5th through Heptown Records.

http://www.theguilt.se/    https://www.facebook.com/theguiltsweden/    https://theguiltswe.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 05/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Calling All Astronauts – Life As We Know It

lawki_RingMasterReview

With their second album still drawing wide acclaim, British electro punks Calling All Astronauts ensured 2016 left in fine style with Life As We Know It. Their ninth single and taken from Anti-Social Network, the song is more enticing evidence to the variety in the band’s sound and their ability to get the body grooving as eagerly as the spirit devours their rousing sounds.

Backed by three remixes of the single, the proposition is more an EP than single and a fine end to another increasingly successful year for the London based trio of vocalist/keyboardist/programmer David B, guitarist JJ Browning, and bassist Paul McCrudden. Earlier single Empire reached the No.2 spot on the Official European Indie Chart while the band twice hit top spot in the Hype Machine Twitter Chart, success capped by CAA headlining the Bandstand Stage on the final night of Beautiful Days Festival.

Released on Supersonic Media, Life As We Know It is an encounter hard for hips and the imagination to resist. It is a warmer, mellower affair compared to the band’s usually eclectic but attitude loaded sound; irresistibly catchy with a nostalgic air bringing thoughts of bands like The The and B-Movie whilst being distinctly CAA. Few bands create a sound truly unique to themselves but the threesome persistently achieves that while still pushing their creative boundaries. With suggestive melodies colluding with punchy beats and David B’s uniquely captivating tones, the song is an offensive of melodic charm and funk spiced basslines wrapped in tempting guitar and caressing keys, all fuelled by a contagion which as suggested has feet and bodies at its mercy; manna for any dance-floor.

The remixes bring bold new shades to the song with the Daak Sun Remix especially striking. Darker bordering on sinister as it rumbles in sound and atmosphere, the track is a far more physical proposal which if anything has the body and imagination even more frenetically involved.

Surrounding it the Naked Highway Remix is a fuzzy stroll under a spatial sky, its bassline earthily scuzzy as keys radiate a cosmic revelry while the Malandrino Remix is a seductive sunset, intimately exotic as keys dance evocatively through ears to the bouncy beat of the rhythms like a tropical Thompson Twins.

Together they all add up to another richly enjoyable outing with Calling All Astronauts with the original slice of Life As We Know It further evidence of a band deserving the keenest attention.

Life As We Know It is out now through Supersonic Media across most online stores.

http://www.callingallastronauts.com    https://www.facebook.com/CallingAllAstronauts/     https://twitter.com/CAA_Official    https://callingallastronauts1.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ventenner – Invidia

Ensuring 2017 gets off to a powerful start, UK’s Ventenner are poised to release their new album; an encounter which from start to finish rapaciously devours ears and imagination. Increasingly irresistible with every passing slice of alternative metal, rock, and industrially infused electronic involvement, Invidia is the natural yet inventively bold offspring of the band’s previous successes across. When giving us the heads up last year about the forthcoming encounter, band founder Charlie Dawe (vocals/synth) suggested that “This one is set to be a lot heavier, more powerful and a superior record!” It needs little time and barely one listen to confirm his hopes and assessment are right on the money.

Variety and imagination has never been lacking in the Ventenner sound as evidenced by previous albums This Is The Reason of 2012 and the acclaimed Distorture two years later. Power and forceful enterprise has never been absent in the band’s music either since emerging initially as a solo project for Dawe in 2007. Ventenner’s last album alone was an encounter leaving “the senses beleaguered and imagination ablaze from start to finish”, its emotionally raw dystopian soundscapes seductive and compelling but indeed Invidia while embracing similar qualities taps into an almost primal yet involved intensity and abrasive energy which consumes the listener.

Produced by Esoteric vocalist/guitarist Greg Chandler, Invidia also unveils the most intricate tapestries of sound from the London based outfit yet starting with opener The Start Is The End. A synth resonates in ears first, it’s coaxing swiftly joined by the prowling tones of Dawe with restrained but striking rhythms alongside. As riffs and hooks bring their invention to the mix, the song breeds a Nine Inch Nails scented predation; exotic hues lining an emerging melodic suggestiveness within a controlled yet tempestuous proposal. Throughout, the song’s character is intrusive and raw yet magnetically infectious, traits blossoming throughout the album.

cover-art_RingMasterReviewBreak In Two reinforces the release’s impressive start, its resourceful entrance calmer yet just as instinctively invasive as its predecessor’s as a Gravity Kills meets Celldweller air grows and colludes with Ventenner’s openly distinct imagination. A gorgeous melodic hook caps off a mighty temptation, its prowess and potency matched by the sinister charm and emotive fire of next up Saligia. Almost devious in its weave of flirtatious melodies and sonic causticity, the song is pure addiction as industrial metal and electro punk merge for a hauntingly irritable raid on the senses.

A superb and masterfully woven conflict of textures makes up Enemy next, an outpouring of beauty and the beast sound and creativity lined not for the first or last time within Invidia by a Pitchshifter like essence while next up Be Still brings fresh crabbiness to ears as Ventenner again confirm their expertise at aligning melodic elegance and bordering on hostile emotional and musical tetchiness.

The former of the essences is embraced primarily by the bewitching Only The Empty Remain, though it too has a disgruntled undercurrent which erupts throughout before Circle while carrying a touch of Society One to itself, roars commandingly, making its mere two minutes another of the most powerful and essential moments within Invidia.

Dividing Seed just as enjoyably hits the spot, its web of guitar and synth intrusiveness as disarmingly seductive as it is cholerically bracing; essences further inventively twisted by successor Bruxism. A bear of a song with bone shuddering beats and senses binding vines of sonic invention around the emotional challenge of Dawe’s vocals and words, the track is sheer power but tempered by the disarming flow of melodic grace and harmonic beauty which breaks through the October File spiced tempest.

A predatory air is cast by Anamnesis, a trespass captivatingly countered by the reflective melodies and warm textures blossoming in voice and sound. Like two souls in dispute yet eager union, the track adds to the pinnacles of the release before being instantly matched by the imagination gripping landscape of closing track Omega. Its melancholic beauty immerses ears and thoughts in a haunting almost spatial flight accentuated by Dawe’s transfixing tones in a temptation which alone urges a swift return to the roar of the album.

Distorture impressed two years ago but has been easily eclipsed by Invidia, already one of this year’s important highlights. In many ways the Ventenner sound has come of age yet it is easy to still feel there is plenty more for they and us to discover.

Invidia is released via Hibernacula Records 20th January on CD and also digitally and on vinyl through http://www.ventenner.com/store

http://www.ventenner.com/

https://twitter.com/ventenner   https://www.facebook.com/Ventenner/

Pete RingMaster 10/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sonny Lanegan – Coma

cover_RingMasterReview

The Coma EP is the first offering from the solo, self-titled project from Sonny Lanegan, a release offering six rousing slices of alternative/industrial post rock which command attention and spark the imagination with drama and craft. All offer an adventure bringing a familiar and distinct invention to the ear which does not always surprise as it might but any moments when expectations are offered a recognisable but still tasty morsel, the individual character of Lanegan’s sound ensures there is plenty of fresh imagination on offer

Lanegan is an Italian born singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist better known so far for his former band White Pulp and as one half of the duo The Dead Good with vocalist Isabella Knight. Through his many projects, the now Los Angeles based Lanegan has played hundreds of live shows and been part of numerous international album releases. Now it is his solo project beginning to stir up eager attention, it providing a new vehicle for his renowned creative and stage presence to blossom into new areas of sound and adventure.

Released worldwide at the beginning of May and to be backed by numerous live shows across the summer, they to be followed by a national tour, Coma seizes ears and appetite straight away with opener And No One Ever Gave A Fuck. Its dark atmospheric beginning swiftly has the imagination intrigued, the quickly following predation of hungry riffs and spiky beats taking care of ears with the attitude soaked tones of Lanegan leading the way. Quickly a tribal, shamanic like tempting and tenacity infiltrates sound and vocals, its contagion an inescapable lure alongside similarly potent electronic and industrial metal enterprise helping shape the rousingly infectious and increasingly volatile tempest.

It is a tremendous start to the release quickly revealing the variety and diversity to be found in EP and sounds ahead, its suggestion confirmed by the following Down and Dirty. More whispers in its predecessor, Marilyn Manson meets Society 1 like hues make a thicker colouring to the fiery and dynamic body of the second track. It has certain irritability and almost predatory aggression to its tone and incitement too but it is an intimidation tempered by the great electronic exploits and their listener involving catchiness.

A broader rock landscape accompanies the electronic revelry of Loaded and Crooked next, the song an eagerly catchy proposal almost dancing in ears even with a feisty nature to its creative cavorting. It is not the best track within Coma but it has to be said that the spirit raising encounter has single written all over it before making way for the more carnivorous tone and challenge of Love Will Never Die If You Spice It Up With Narcotics. With a touch of glam and grunge to its industrial booty, the song rumbles and blisters on the senses as vocals and sounds create a fascinating and invigorating clamour. At times it is a muggy maelstrom and in other moments a provocative slimline rock ‘n’ roll roar, and persistently an encounter which keeps ears and thoughts enjoyably busy.

The salacious tempting of Foreplay comes next, its pulsating rhythmic resonance and electronic flirtation a bold seduction egged on by the ever inviting tones of Lanegan. The repetitive nature of its beats and the stalker like enticement of its grooves acts like an excitable drone, leading the listener towards some explosive climax, every beat and sonic nag like a countdown. That kind of a finale never arises but its absence just caps the drama of the song off perfectly.

The EP is closed by the sultry smoulder of What If, though it is a lively simmering which electronically and sonically bubbles and froths over its brief length, subsequently immersing the senses in a lava-esque wash of body rousing temptation. Its infectiousness brings the EP to a memorable and richly pleasing conclusion, adding the final potent bait to a release which, as suggested, might not be the most unique in some ways but leaves little more of it to be desired. If this is a sign of things to come, Lanegan’s solo adventure might be his most fruitful yet.

The Coma EP is out now @ https://sonnylanegan.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/sonny.lanegan/   https://twitter.com/SonnyLanegan

Pete RingMaster 18/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Rousing waltzes and alluring confrontations: talking Calling All Astronauts with David Bury

Calling All Astronauts_RingMaster Review

British electro rockers Calling All Astronauts continued an inescapable trend of releasing some of the UK’s finest provocative and rousing encounters with their new album Anti-Social Network a short few weeks back. An uncaging of snarling and virulent rock ‘n’ roll with a political and emotional bite, the album showed the addictive prowess of CAA in getting bodies bouncing and thoughts exploring. Meaning for a long time to talk with the band, the outstanding album was the spark which made the time to act now. So with big thanks to band vocalist/writer/producer David Bury, we turned the spotlight on CAA and Anti-Social Network with plenty more insights in tow.

Hi David and thanks for sharing time with us.

Before we get into your new album, Anti-Social Network, can you tell us about the beginnings of Calling All Astronauts for those still new to the band? How did you all meet and what became the spark to the creation of the band?

J and I used to be in a band called US:UK together, J then went on to be in the pop-punk Caffeine. Caffeine had drawn to a standstill after numerous tours of the UK and US, we bumped into each other and just thought we’d like to have a jam for old time’s sake. One thing led to another and Calling All Astronauts was born. We originally had Andy the Caffeine drummer, but he went travelling, while he was away I decided to learn about programming drums and keys, and that’s how the sound we now have developed.

As you said all of you in the band now have experiences before and outside of Calling All Astronauts; how much has the band been shaped by those musical adventures either in where you want to go with it or in what not to get involved in again?

You learn a lot about the industry over the years; the good memories, the parties, the massive gigs are the ones you cherish, but the knowledge you gain about how the music business runs really shapes your attitude towards it.

We first caught on to the band through the single Winter Of Discontent in 2012, which was your second? This was already a lively and potent time for the band live, the playing with the likes of Echo & The Bunnymen, PWEI, Sigue Sigue Sputnik and A Place To Bury Strangers amongst your shows, and in making music as well as reactions to those early releases. What was the feeling in CAA back then and how has that differed over time, if at all?

The feeling than was actually pretty much the same as it is now, we always feel both flattered and humbled that anyone likes our music, we are just three guys recording in my lounge, yeah in modern terms that’s a studio, but it’s a lounge nonetheless; we’ve got Sky Sports on in the background, my cats walking through, and we are under the Heathrow flight path, so I regularly have to redo a vocal when a plane has been particularly low. 🙂  We do what we do; it’s a kind of love us or hate us, it’s your choice, we won’t take it personally if we are not to your tastes, but we’ll embrace you as a friend if you get what we do.

Calling All Astronauts Promo PictureSince then singles, EPs, and an impressive debut album has come and gone; all leading to the recent release of second album Anti-Social Network. Following the band over those encounters, your music has clearly evolved and grown over time. From the inside how do you see and hear that change?

I think that is a direct reflection on my production skills. I’ve learnt so much in the last four years about how to actually make a record. We are a Rock And Roll band that works in the manner of a dance act; we pay a lot of attention to how our records sound sonically. We took a long time recording Anti-Social Network because we wanted to make an album that we’ll still be proud of as a piece of art in 25 years’ time.

Apart from personnel, how too as CAA changed mentally in regard to making music and how you deal with the music scene.

I don’t think we have actually changed much, we are all kind of set into the people we are. We do however have an increasing dislike of the mainstream music industry, and how it brainwashes kids into thinking things that are mediocre at best are amazing. If you swallow diamonds your turds with contain diamonds, but they will still be turds.

The band is seems defiantly DIY; your releases for example being uncaged on your own Supersonic Media. Has that always been the intention or just how things have worked out?

It seems that way, as yet, we’ve never sent any demos or any of our releases to any record labels. Actually I lie. I did give a copy of the first album to Brett the radio guru at Epitaph. I met him in LA and just wanted him to know how we sound rather than looking for a deal, so gave him a copy of the album, but that’s about it. We like having artistic control; yes we would be a lot bigger than we are if we were with a big indie or major, but at what artistic cost. I’m doubtful any of them would allow us to make an album as eclectic as Anti-Social Network; they want their artists to make an album of the same track 11 times, all the different variations around the same three chords.

Let us get right into Anti-Social Network now. Did you approach its writing and creation as you have previous releases or try something different in its making?

Yes pretty much, except we had Paul on board for this one. We tend to start with a drum track and built up from there, it’s quite like building a house, and as we all know, without solid foundations you may as well build your house out of straw.

You seem to have woven essences of many of your inspirations over the decades in its sound which was an extra tasty spice for us as I know we share similar favourite artists and songs from the seventies and eighties especially. Was this something you set out to do or just an organic arising from the writing?

Not really, we had a bunch of ideas, and as they grew organically into the songs they now are, we often referenced them using the names of the bands that they had a feel of. All the album sounds like us; I don’t think any of it could be called a pastiche. I think it’s maybe more a case of, band X made some amazing records, let’s see if we can make something that can stand up in its own right against what they did. It would have been the easiest thing in the world for us to make 11 tracks all sounding like Time To Fight Back or conversely Always Be True, but that’s really not what we are about. CAA to us is about making music we like, it’s not some master plan to sell millions of records; we’d rather be Clock DVA than Coldplay every day of the week.

Like many we generally call CAA an electro punk/rock band. As the new album shows, your sound is much richer and varied than that suggests. How would you describe it for newcomers?

It’s kind of like a ride on the world biggest Rock And Roll Rollercoaster. You never know whether it’s going to turn, or drop or go upside down until it’s upon you. Wow that sounds pretentious; ok, just imagine all your favourite left field rock bands since 1976, i.e. Killing Joke, Ministry, PIL, Bauhaus, New Order, Psychedelic Furs, and then getting them produced by Skrillex and Prodigy

Lyrically Anti-Social Network is as biting as ever, something easy to expect from your music, but equally there seems a thicker intimacy to some songs too. Can you give some background to art_RingMasterReviewthe themes of songs and to the album in general?

I have been hoping somebody would ask this, this will be quite extensive but I’ve been longing to go through the album track by track, please feel free to edit this if you want.

  1. Living The Dream

I grew up in a northern town, not a city, and in towns you see people on the local music scene who are the “big cheese”, they walk around like Billy Big Bollocks, they get a little bit of interest from local radio and think all they have to do is move to the big city and world will be the oyster. When the reality is something far different, when you make that leap to pursue your dreams, you have to be prepared for the reality that you are suddenly a shrimp in an ocean of sharks.

  1. Empire

We are very active on social media, especially Twitter, where we have a lot of young followers, and I see their tweets about how in love they are and the next second they are broken hearted. It’s kind of sending the message that broken hearts are only temporary when you’re a teen and that you are going to fall in love many times during your life and that if one relationship doesn’t work out, move on to the next one.

  1. Time To Fight Back

The world and society is pretty much on the brink of imploding; if the majority of us don’t stand up and say, “enough is enough” 1% of the world’s population has 99% of the wealth. There are children dying because they don’t have clean water, how can that be right in 2016?

  1. Hands Up Who Wants To Die?

Is about youth crime and gang violence and how leaving the house with a weapon can lead to a whole heap of consequences due to one thoughtless move

  1. Life As We Know It

This is about envy and how people wish they were somebody else, it’s clichéd but life is what you make of it. If you’re happy in your life, embrace the fact you are happy and celebrate it, if you are not happy, do something about it. Sitting on your ass complaining is never going to improve things, unless you grasp the metal and go for it.

  1. The American Dream

It is not particularly about the US, but as the American Dream has always been held up as a goal for what people can achieve through hard work, I thought it was a good example for society as a whole, and how things have changed from the days that people left school with ambitions of professions or trades. They now want to be YouTubers or famous on Vine, they want fame from zero talent in a narcissistic shallow world.

  1. God Is Dead

God is a metaphor for consumerism; you don’t get consumerism without the word consume and society has become all consumed with the latest product X until they have it, and once they have it, their thirst for the net product X is instantly greater than their joy at getting the latest thing they’ve craved for.

  1. Always Be True

As I mentioned earlier we have a lot of young fans, this is a message to them not to bow to peer pressure. If you don’t like something or don’t want to do something never be afraid to say no, because one day, your day will come.

  1. Look In Your Eye

This is about the cynical people at major labels who only see artists as product and really have no feelings about the long term futures of said artists as long as they have them signed to 360 deals, make a profit and keep themselves in a job

  1. Black World

Is really saying, I don’t have all the answers, but if you listen to what I’m saying in my lyrics and think about them and join us in thinking that the world doesn’t have to be like this, together we can make the world a better place

  1. Divisive

Is about how the media and governments manipulate the news to suit their own agendas. They tell us they are doing it for righteous reasons when it’s all about greed and power and that once you turn to violence it becomes both self-perpetuating and self-defeating; hence the chant of Greed Equals Power Equals War Equals Death repeating almost to infinitum at the end because wars go on and on and only increase the misery.

Do the same things predominantly rile up the lyrical muse or are you adding to the recipe of sparks as years and records pass?

The constant in my psyche is that I don’t like inequalities in society.  I’m not saying that people shouldn’t be rewarded for doing good work or being enterprising but I don’t think people should be forced to live in poverty. I just think people need to keep their eyes open and feel compassion for others, see both sides of every story; never judge people on their race colour creed, religion or lack of it, or their sexual orientation. Judge people on whether they are good people or not. While these things still exist in society, I will maintain my motivation as a lyricist.

Can you give us some insight into the recording of Anti-Social Network; any unexpected dramas and surprises?

There were no real disasters along the way, however it did take way longer than we hoped or expected it would. In all it took 2000 hours to record;, I think that’s maybe on a par with some of the 70’s prog rock bands, but you have to be truly happy with your records as you have to live with them forever once you release them.

CAA_RingMasterReviewFor most artists it is fair to say that playing live is their favourite part of making music. When it comes to writing and recording something though, what is your favourite part or element?

It’s actually when people tell you that they have listened to your record and really got what you’re doing. It’s the greatest feeling in the world to know you are not the only people that think the way you do.

Is there any particular moment in Anti-Social Network which gives you an extra glow of satisfaction?

There are three parts I love; on the intro of Divisive where the combination of guitar drums and keys gives the impression of a weird pitch shift on the drop, it gets me every time. I also love the almost UK Garage drop on the middle 8 of Always Be True, and J’s guitars on Life As We Know that sound like Cellos. But we are very proud of all of it, I honestly believe there are no fillers on the album and that if we released all eleven tracks as singles, we could get radio play on all of them, I could however be delusional.

Tell us about the art work for the album which seems to sum up the air of the great release more and more every time you look at it.

It was amazing, we were trying to come up with ideas, and Paul had googled the word Anti-Social Network and up this came. It’s an actual sculpture by South African artist Maurice Mbiyaki. We contacted him and asked if we could use it on the cover, and he replied “he’d be honoured”; the rest is history. J

What is next in store for CAA fans and the band itself?

We are working on a new live set and will be out and about before too long. Time To Fight Back is set to be released as a single in June with David CAA VIP Remix and a specially recorded cover version.

Big thanks again David for chatting with us; anything you would like to add?

Not really other than a big thanks to you for being so supportive of our releases, we really do appreciate the kind words you have written about us.

And finally, give us an insight into the records and artists which could be claimed to have most inspired your own life and creativity.

Blimey, this is a massive question for me; I think I can nail it down to genres rather than actual acts, I’m very influenced by, Punk, Northern Soul, Goth, Metal, 80’s Hiphop, Synthpop, Industrial, EDM, 90s Indie, Post-Punk, Hardcore, Big Beat, Reggae, Ska, and DnB.

Check out our review of Anti-Social Network @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/03/11/calling-all-astronauts-anti-social-network/

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Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 16/04/2016

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