The Correspondents – Puppet Loosely Strung

 

The Correspondents pic

     …And the treats of 2014 just keep coming; in a year already endowed with some of the finest releases and debuts, Puppet Loosely Strung just might be the best of all so far. A masterful aural tapestry of sonic magnificence and unbridled imagination, the first album from UK band The Correspondents is simply stunning and quite irresistible. The creation of London based duo, producer Chucks and singer Mr Bruce, the album is a weave of intrigue, adventure, and diversity showing exactly why for the last few years the band has been drawing fevered attention and adoration for their live performances. Reaping the glories of everything from dance music to jazz, blues to electro and drum ‘n’ bass for a pop soaked exploration unique to themselves, The Correspondents is one of those bewitchments everyone needs in their lives.

    Mr Bruce and Chucks came together as The Correspondents in 2007, two South London artists taking as little as two years to find themselves playing main stages across numerous festivals. The years since their emergence has seen the band touring with the appetite of a hungry predator, small and large audiences constantly enthralled and enamoured by their invention driven sound and the band acclaimed as The Telegraph’s Top Ten Glastonbury Highlights two years in a row. With one EP, What’s Happened to Soho?, the only recorded offering until now, the band has impressively sparked a greedy appetite towards them, one which will soar as Puppet Loosely Strung seduces and provokes with its stunning radiance. Bringing in well-loved and established songs from their live set and a new breed of introspective emotive tracks, the release is the ultimate crossover album, one forging and sculpting a realm all of its very own and one sure to inspire hearts and numerous other upcoming bands.

     The self-produced, recorded, and released Puppet Loosely Strung, digs deep in the heart of its recipients from the first song The Correspondents - Puppet Loosely Strungand never relinquishes its seduction thereafter. Opener What Did I Do? initially croons the ears, the exceptional voice of Mr Bruce serenading thoughts as keys caress his presence before beats add their mildly skittish suasion to the emerging stroll. Within seconds the track is a full captivation turning into a virulent lure as its unpredictable and mischievous enterprise skirts the reflective grace of the vocals. It is a delicious sway of ingenious sound and loving imagination which whirls senses and thoughts around like an evocative carousel of thoughtful temptation.

     The striking start is soon taken to another plateau with the first single from the album, Fear And Delight. A dramatic shadowed coaxing of keys makes a mysterious entrance which moves into a feisty romp of indie rock and electronic temptation. If the first track was virulent, the second song is an epidemic, infectiousness rampaging with lustful energy and sound as the pair merge dub into drum and bass with a ska kissed melodic ingenuity. Not for the last time The Correspondents remind of little known and even quicker forgotten eighties band Zanti Misfits, the swing and quirky balance of the track the spark for thoughts. The song is pure musical alchemy, a classic stomp with irresistibly lingering bait which the rest of the album has to try and make you forget, which it soon manages with the next up Give You Better. The song lyrically is almost the warped mirror image/alternative guise to the plaintive narrative of its predecessor, even emerging from the same melodic stroke before casting is own personal persuasion. Once again the keys paint a dark drama to proceedings before the vibrant and magnetic saunter of the song brings a tempering light to the blues pleading hues of the song. As the previous tracks the urge to join in with limbs and voice to the creative trespass of the passions is impossible to resist, the already broad grin on the face and imagination now connecting ears.

    The seductive shuffle of Kind Of Love next licks temptingly over the senses, its jazz bred almost easy listening leaning call leading the senses into an electronic elegance before the instrumental skit of In The Meantime brings a cinematically emotive breather to the dance of the release. It’s enjoyable if slightly underwhelming presence in the larger scheme of things is succeeded by Devil’s Lighthouse, a song which encloses the listener in a melody rich sonic exploration which simply brings another flush of ardour towards the album. Restrained yet brisk in its step, the track pushes shadows into the arms of warm ambition and hope for another pinnacle in the continuously lofty range of majesty.

   Both Well Measured Vice and The Last Time leave a spellbound state over ears and thoughts, the first another upbeat romp with provocative colour to its melodies and vocals playing within a rhythmic and pulsating courting. The song designs riveting adventures within its fluid waltz to easily transfix whilst its successor s offers the most potent seduction with its XTC like eccentricity and occasional Andy Partridge flavoured twist in the vocals. The song is one of the few happy to simply walk around the senses and coat them with a thick breeze of varied inventive whispers before making way for the dance floor spawned Back Again. Even if missing the benchmark set, the track is another drawing a mesmeric rapture which simply draws you in without reserve, its rhythmic tantalising as potent as its melodic fascination.

    The album’s title track lays a haunted ambience around the imagination as the song and Mr Bruce explain their feelings and thoughts respectively, the song a smouldering and sultry flight into observational and inward reflection to which the keys place compelling embers and imagination shaping sparks. The enchanting journey is matched and surpassed by the latest single, the brilliant Alarm Call. Released with a video to raise awareness and funds for The Epilepsy Society, there is a definite Julian Cope feel to the song vocally, emotionally, and exploratory; it’s pulsating contagion aligned to evocative textures and thoughts pure addictiveness.

     Closing with Some Nights, another impossible catchy and passion securing musical rap of peerless prowess and excited imagination, Puppet Loosely Strung is just sensational. It is a quite brilliant investigation of lost loves, dark relationships, and shadowed reflections all wrapped up in one of the most extraordinary sirenesque designs of sound and spirit. The Correspondents is our new lust and we suggest you make them yours too.

https://www.facebook.com/TheCorrespondents

10/10

RingMaster 10/03/2014

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Mano’s Daughter – The Machine

 

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    The Machine is one of those songs which start seducing with its first breath whilst also laying an underlying lure with its sublime and mesmeric textures which immerses the imagination and passions into an even deeper involvement. The first single from London based electronic synth band Mano’s Daughter, the song is a captivating introduction to an immediately absorbing proposition and simultaneously the most potent invitation to the band’s forthcoming debut EP.

     Mano’s Daughter emerged two years ago and brings the synth and programming artistry of Matthias Garrick, the rhythmic skills of Dan See, and the elegant beauty band sirenesque vocal charm of Sarah Carter together. As evidenced by The Machine, they create a spellbinding embrace of sound which provokes and evokes the imagination. Taking their initial time to write and craft a powerful sound and live show, the band began teasing and exciting the live arena from last year with the February of 2013 seeing Mano’s Daughter selected to go through to the second round of Glastonbury’s Emerging Talent competition.

    The band released The Machine as a free download last December and now with the unveiling of its official video, the track unsurprisingly is brewing up and inciting a wealth of enthused and acclaiming reactions. The song makes a gentle entrance; electronically drawn melodies washing over the ears with a melancholic breath but also with bright hues lighting the way for the brewing narrative. As soon as the magnetic voice of Carter wraps her evocative tones around the continually coaxing and immersive sounds, the song raises its temperature and allurement ready for the impending burst of electro pop vivacity. When it comes the track strolls boldly across the senses right in to the passions with a tantalising saunter come stomp of virulently contagious melodies and expressively bred hooks. It invites rather than demands an appetite for the entrancing persuasion but also ensures it digs deeply from the off to increase the suasion so that you never forget the song and certainly specific moments of its immense attraction.

     Part Portishead, part Kate Bush, part The Mouths of Ghosts and still all Mano’s Daughter, The Machine is melodic and emotive alchemy leaving one of the strongest imprints from electro ambient pop in a long time. The previously mentioned new video for the single is equally as attention grabbing. Featuring the introduction of young actress Ria Ellis Burke alongside Sarah Carter, the video impressively brings the heart and emotive potency of the song into visual colour, the opening and subsequent scenes with the young actress evocative and enthralling whilst the thrust of the song vividly lit in picture by the cinematic presence of Carter bringing a richer urgency and scenic menace to the aural tale. Directed by Ian Gathard and filmed by cameraman Nick Pope, with Carter and Garrick editing, the picture brings another dramatic facet to the impressive track without altering its already full fascination.

     Thanks to The Machine it is very easy to be excited about the first EP from Mano’s Daughter; it is hard to imagine it will be anything but refreshing and bewitching when it makes its entrance in March, the release accompanied by a UK tour. This is a band where climbing on their certain rise at the very first stop is a must.

http://www.manosdaughter.co.uk

9/10

Ringmaster Review 24/01/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWNB6Ua6T_A

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The Hidden Cameras – Age

AGE album cover

    Providing the sumptuous musical bounty The Hidden Cameras are already recognised for whilst stretching the boundaries further with a spicy array of sounds and styles, Age the new album from the Canadian indie pop band irresistibly seduces and incites the imagination and emotions. It is an expansive and welcomingly invasive evocation which thrillingly drowns the listener in feverish temptation and enthralling colour drenched invention. Every corner, twist, and adventure explored emotionally and aurally, leaves a lingering persuasion and mark whilst Age as a whole shapes itself up as an early melodically sculpted pinnacle of the year.

      The brainchild of the perpetual creative driving force behind the ever enticing project, songwriter/frontman Joel Gibb, The Hidden Cameras has continued to challenge and impress musically and emotionally since being founded in 2001. From debut album Ecce Homo that first year, the Toronto hailing Gibb has pushed boundaries and thoughts through five acclaimed full-lengths with this the sixth being no exception. Igniting a dormant even non-existent music scene in his home city, Gibb became the first Canadian artist to sign with Rough Trade. Now Berlin based, the unique imagination and craft of the man has forged another questioning and spotting of sexual prejudices and social inadequacies in the Evil Evil released Age, a record which is a kind of coming of age investigation with undoubted personal incites and in the words of Gibb an album which “deconstructs my musical roots”.

     That deconstruction gives the expansive flavouring and diversity which openly calls out from Age, and is soon absorbing attention and appetite with opener Skin & Leather. Immediately vocals croon as a brewing electronic shadow looms up from behind their invitation, a potent lure soon aided by guitar stroking and the lyrical voice of Gibbs. It is a gentle and mesmeric start; a warm magnetic bait seizing the imagination easily getting it ready for the impending explosion of bulging rhythms and climactic melodic fire. Instantly contagious and sublimely tempting with the orchestral aspects the band is renowned for weaving an evocative beauty to immerse within without restraint, the song engulfs the listener in a wind of poetic beauty and feisty energy. Not for the last time there is an eighties indie pop essence, the melodic endeavour and almost raging anthemic gloriousness of the song sparking thoughts of bands like The Wild Swans and Bourgie Bourgie.

    Bread for Brat matches the impressive start with its own riveting imagination and incendiary tempting. Its brilliant start of acidic violin swipes alongside a deliciously moody cello coaxing which almost snarls at the ears is irresistible and only strengthens its potency as the smooth and expressive vocals of Gibbs opens up a provocative charm. Thick in drama delivered in a reserved gait though admittedly with a bold attitude, the track is an enthralling and luxurious baroque like encounter which bewitches an already strongly bred hunger before the following pair of Doom and first single from the album Gay Goth Scene add their vital stimulus.

     The first of the pair emerges from a dark brooding affair, synths and orchestral inducements flirting closely with melancholic intensity. Once the melodic electro grace and vocal harmonies spread their warm embraces, the song still cloaked in emotional shadows unveils a heated dance of lively adventure with folk undertones. Not as immediate as other tracks but equally as impacting and thrilling its presence it makes way for its outstanding successor. A song which apparently was written ten years previously and you assume addresses the times in Toronto for Gibbs when he staged what became legendary nights in Churches of the city, the single like its predecessor smoulders as it first comes into view, like a breaking dawn slowly filling the senses and imagination with strong vocals within tender orchestral bait. It is another strong breath of magnetic power which digs deeper with its lure once energy and intent raise their urgency through rapacious beats and vivacious electronic seduction. Add the increasing exertions physically and inventively from the strings and the wonderful wailing witchery of guest artist Mary Margaret O’Hara and Gay Goth Scene makes the most compelling and dramatic incentive for the album.

    The diversity of the release is already in full swing and takes another striking turn with the reggae lilted Afterparty, a track which saunters and breezes through the ears like a combination of the dub craft of Ruts DC meets the reggae seduction of By The Rivers. It is a mesmeric entrapment for thoughts and emotions revealing more of the inspirations which have impacted on Gibbs, more assumedly coming with the next up Carpe Jugular. An eighties seeded alchemy of synth pop and new wave exploration, the song resonates with a toxically infectious electro enticing. It plays like a cross between Heaven 17 and later Dalek I Love You providing a tantalising brightly glowing slice of melodic suasion. Bringing the kind of incandescent and virulently captivating melody driven weaves which marked the songwriting of Martyn Ware and Ian Marsh (Human League/Heaven 17), the song simply romances and invigorates the senses.

     The folkish element returns in Ordinary Over You, a song which also adds drama to rich flames of evocative enterprise in its short presentation, before final track and recently released new single Year of the Spawn brings the release to a stunning conclusion. As with all of the songs there is something engagingly familiar to the sound and heart of the track but this only adds to the fullness of pleasure and satisfaction. With strings and vocals painting an ensnaring allurement alone, a fascination which only increases through the blaze of strings and brass around a heady and sturdy piano scripted emotional narrative, the song is a mouthwatering evocation.

     Age is a magnificent confrontation, an album which makes love to the senses whilst awakening thoughts and emotions to wider issues and drama clad textures. Whether it is the best The Hidden Cameras album to date can be debated but certainly it is at the fore and a real treat to get the year really rolling.

http://thehiddencameras.com/

9/10

RingMaster 23/04/2014

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Strobegirl and D’Jaly – How Are You? EP

 

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    Having been seduced by The Strawberry Sessions EP a few years back, we have always had time and dreams over the melodic crafting and tones of its creator, UK singer/songwriter Strobegirl.  Weaving a mix of pop, indie, and folk spices in a host of sultry embraces, the Croydon girl is one of Britain’s musical secrets. With the release of new EP How Are You? may be that hiding place will be under threat through its magnetic temptation. The release sees Strobegirl, better known to her stalkers as Heather-Jane, team up with fellow Croydon based artist D’Jaly. It is a tantalising union as evidenced by the seven track release, a collaboration which sets the new EP alongside the acclaimed Strawberry Sessions in temptation and imagination.

     Strobegirl is no stranger to collaborations, having worked closely with producer Roger Fife (Cyndi Lauper, Anthony and The Johnsons, The Orphans) on her successful debut EP and subsequently the likes of UK Industrial band Illustrial as well as other artists on individual songs. Marked by dreamy shoegaze kissed textures to her music and vocals, Heather-Jane won indie artist of the year on Somojo radio in 2010 as well as being heavily played and promoted on various radio shows, especially the champions of independent music Audioburger. Her partner in invention upon the How Are You? EP and better known to his family as Jon Daly, has been emerging as an artist/producer through his infusions of electropop, house, and deep house. Originally called Unknown Tone with an electronic/dance flavouring to his creativity, Daly first released debut album the Fourth Dimension under his own name in 2008 before unleashing robotic dance machine 4000 in 2010 as Unknown Tone. Now the two artists have combined to craft a tantalising offering which joins both their styles in one electro pop persuasion, an encounter which leaves ears alive and passions feasted.

    You Can’t Stop Me Now starts things off and immediately cloaks the ear in a melodic coaxing aligned to sultry keys all aided by a brassy temptation. It is a smouldering mix of funk and jazz within an elegant pop embrace, piano and the appealing vocals of Strobegirl casting an emotive allure which only accentuates the beauty of the melodies which brew, merge, and erupt with evocative flames across the song. It is a magnetic persuasion which soon recruits thoughts and hunger towards its impressive invitation into the release.

     The following Nothing Else Counts Now unveils an electronic wash of grandeur and crystalline beckoning to make its entrance. Its initial coaxing is strong but arguably not as reassuring as to what will follow as the hinting found at the start of its predecessor. Those doubts are soon pushed aside though as the track twists its body to release a striking flame of Depeche Mode like melodic caressing littered with startling electro pulses and splurges of sound to shake up the song and expectations. Slight whispers of industrial and dubstep mischievously play their part in the bait of the song too and though the more general electronic course of the track is less inspiring than those elements, it is a refreshingly enterprising and imaginative eccentric dance within melodic witchery holding an almost spellbinding call.

    Next You and My Heart steps forward with its own distinctive fusion of electronic eccentricity and electro pop bewitchment, the song another which comes with a devilry to offset and taunt the raging melodies and ever appealing vocals. Production wise the track does want a little, the clashing electro scatterings and climatic orchestral bred melodies often suffocating and overpowering the vocals, though to be fair it does also help a haunting breath to wash the piece which does the song no harm. Overall though despite the smothering it is a lingering wash of melodic persuasion which adds extra to the release if less potently as elsewhere.

     The best two songs on the release come next, firstly Wake Up which admittedly we have a soft spot for having heard it in its early stages a while back. A summer wind of folk seeded pop placing the acoustic skills and vocal enchantment of Strobegirl in a rich electronic stimulus, the track is a warm stroll through evocative aural sorcery. Again the production is a touch claustrophobic but cannot derail a quite delicious croon of shoegaze revelry. With a chorus I dare you not to join in by its second tempting the song is one irresistible romance.

     The title track is equally infectious in its individual way and passion conjuring character. With almost sinister shadows flitting in and out of the song as the keys play with light and dark intermittently within a flame hued melodic narrative, vocals and lyrics adding another bloom of passionate colour and imagination to the picture. The best track on the release if not quite the favourite, it is a thoroughly captivating incantation of Siouxsie and the Banshees mystique filtered through a restrained Propaganda sculpted beauty.

   Completed by the Monster Electro Mix of You Can’t Stop Me Now and lastly the Deep House Mix of Nothing Else Counts, How Are You? is a delightful enveloping of the imagination and emotions, a release which might finally push Strobegirl and indeed D’Jaly in a new deserved spotlight.

The How Are You? EP is available as a buy now name your price download @ http://strobegirl-djaly.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/StrobegirlUK

https://www.facebook.com/djaly0

8/10

RingMaster 22/01/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Mr.Kitty album re-release with new material.

COVER
Voted as one of the top 5 albums of 2013 by various zines, "Life" first came to our attention last summer with the 
previous label generating a very limited CD run that sold out - and sold out FAST. A recent cassette edition by 
Ritual Tapes also flew off the shelves in a manner of days - and one of the big questions asked often to Mr.Kitty is
 "Will we ever get another shot to get this on CD?"
 
Being "Can-do" people, our answer was a resounding "Yes". Not only have we agreed to re-release this modern classic 
- we've gone one better and added TWO new tracks, both exclusive to this release.
 
"Hurt" is a brand new track - closing this chapter of Mr. Kitty's career. "Insects" - a firm album favourite, gets 
remixed by our own Synthpop/ New Wave project "IIOIOIOII" - who tunes into the true essence of the song and gives it
a seriously dark, "Witchy" sound.
 
We think this final, deluxe, definitive version of "Life" will make all fans and supporters ecstatic - and there's 
countless reasons why. Mr.Kitty is an act that deserves to be worldwide - and this is his time.
 
Life comes in 4-panel Digipak, released 28th March with all art, songs and concepts by Mr. Kitty. Remix and Mastering on Track 
17 by Christopher Gurney.

 https://juggernautservices.bandcamp.com/album/life-deluxe-edition

Katsuo – Creators

Katsuo Online Promo Shot

    Rife with more ideas than occasionally and debatably it knows what to do with, it is fair to say that the Creators EP from Katsuo is a feverish dance of sound and imagination which is impossible to ignore. Five tracks of electronic pop merged with dubstep, alternative rock, and just a whisper of j pop, the release is an undulating, in success, and rousing inciter of the dancefloor with just enough to suggestively infect even the more hardened resistance. First listen raised doubts and a strain of antipathy but it has to be admitted over time Katsuo and EP became a deviously addictive proposition with moments which just had to be enjoyed more and more.

     Katsuo is the project of multi-instrumentalist Alex Larkman which he formed in 2012. Gaining experience in numerous bands, the musician wanted to ‘create something edgy, contemporary, and innovative’ so taking inspirations from the likes of Fall Out Boy, 30 Seconds to Mars, Skrillex, and Prince into his invention created Katsuo. The first year saw debut EP Silver Tongue released as well as the single Warrior a little later. Their well-received success was built upon last year by the release of the Stereo Jesus video which featured Suicide Girl and Front Magazine cover girl Rebecca Crow (Katherine Suicide). Again it only enhanced the presence and hunger for the sounds being unleashed, something the Super Happy Records released Creators can only emulate and drive on.

     The title track kicks things off and immediately has pulsating beats resonating through the senses whilst an electro rummaging Katsuo Cover Artworkingrains an even deeper alluring presence. As much a contagious agitator on feet as a bed of hot coals, the song is soon striding with a hungry energy alongside the compelling vocals which have been laying down their particular infectious bait from the first second. Assumptions soon kick in that this rampant electronic taunting and enterprise is the way of the track but Larkman is soon dismissing expectations as from the vibrant brew of electro pop urgency with guest vocalist Nakisha Esnard adding her glorious harmonic tones to the mix, a burst of swing and jazzy temptation with delicious dark piano enticement included breaks free from the feisty melodic waltz. Fusing it all in a continuing anthemic seduction with virulently addictive endeavour and adventure, the track is an excitable and exciting start which like the whole EP feels like a bit of a guilty pleasure for more heavily boned and aggressive tastes but simply is predominantly irresistible.

     The following I Wanna Know continues the enthralling start, its industrial bred entrance a reserved yet keen coaxing which welcomes and wraps around the strong and smooth vocals of Larkman. Again there is sense of ‘should I be liking this so much?’, but as the mischievous and provocative slice of electro pop rock continues to embrace the ears there is little resistance to its uncomplicated and radiant presence. Carrying an essence of eighties synth pop to its magnetic croon the song is another thoroughly appealing highlight on an already satisfyingly teasing release.

    From here on in the EP loses some of its potency on personal tastes though the next up Secret Supervillian featuring US singer songwriter Zoe Ann still recruits feet and appetite in its richly catchy web of electro rock infestation ripe with melodic craft and vocal harmonies. There is the spark missing which ignites the previous pair of songs though, and especially with the seductive voice of its guest bringing the strongest temptation it feels like a missed opportunity. With a tantalising brief interlude of cheerleader driven tribal toxicity embraced by electronic groaning sitting between this track and the following As Good As Mine, which itself hosts another guest appearance this time from Mark Bolton, the EP still nestles nicely in the emotions but here without sparking and igniting the imagination as it started out achieving so easily. The second of the two songs is too boy band like for these hungry ears and is a soon forgotten encounter though this is down to personal tastes only. It is a pop song to be fair which has all the tools to capture the passions of teen girls and day time radio whilst to its latter melodic narrative the emerging growl will satisfy soft rock pop enthusiasts. Well-crafted and presented the track is a straightforward flight of pop sound spreading the charm of the release if not the kindling for a fire in the emotions.

   The closing song The Wicked hints at the same results with its acoustic opening and vocal harmonies but it saves itself with dark electronic revving and a bewildering yet inviting mix of ideas and sounds. Just when you think the song is about to fall into a bland pop abyss it comes up with a twist to nudge attention though equally when you hope it is about to expand those elements it slips back into the uninspiring caresses. Arguably messy in its mesh of ideas but persistently nagging with shards of temptation it is a more than decent if not inspiring end to the release.

    The Creators EP is two scintillating long term incitements and three generally pleasing if not lingering pieces of pop kissing. The release will not be for everyone though certainly it offers enough at its start to entrap and enslave all imaginations at least once but with promise soaking every step it is easy to see Katsuo emerging into strong acclaim and greater potency within dancefloors and electro pop appetites over the time ahead.

http://www.theycallmekatsuo.com/

www.facebook.com/theycallmekatsuo

7/10

RingMaster 17/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Ed Zealous – Wired

    ed zealous pic

    Unveiled on the back of three singles which certainly raised an eager appetite for its appearance, Wired the debut album from electronic pop band Ed Zealous easily confirms and reinforces all the promise and radiant enterprise brought from those early releases. The February 3rd released ten track album is a feisty adventure of energetic electro/ dance enterprise and guitar crafted indie pop, a record soaked in a busy sound seemingly seeded in eighties electronic endeavour yet constantly taunting and careering thrillingly through the ear with a modern rock rapaciousness. Arguably the sound of the Belfast quartet is not breaking in new ground to explore but there are few others striding confidently down the same interpretative path of already discovered invention as this richly promising and powerfully enjoyable band.

     Consisting of vocalist Steve McAvoy, guitarist Andrew Wilson, bassist Pete Lloyd, and drummer Paul Irwin, Ed Zealous as mentioned has stirred up very potent attention and anticipation for their album through the trio of singles released in 2013. One by one Medicines, Thanks A Million, and Telepaths have washed creative juices around the passions to breed a hunger for Wired, an appetite the album feeds with ease and more. Forging emotively fuelled synths with fiery guitar temptation within a rhythmic punch which never relinquishes its addictive bait whilst drawing on influences which come from the likes of David Bowie, Talking Heads, Pulp, and TV On The Radio the band look set to make 2014, like the last, another year to mark a rapid ascent in their striking emergence. Predominantly recorded with engineer Rocky O’Reilly with additional production by Eliot James (Bloc Party, Noah and The Whale and Does It Offend You, Yeah?), Wired is an exhaustive magnetic party of creative rampancy and contagious adventure; not necessarily ripe with pure originality but undeniably bulging with excitement and riveting imagination.

     As soon as the opening suspenseful drama of 147 hits the ear you sense there is something special brewing. Synths lure in the 400573_10152084633124304_1585922415_nimagination right away before the song settles into a mellow yet intensive persuasion with thumping rhythms and moody dark tones puncturing the electronic wash. It is an instantly engaging and provocative encounter but one which goes more directly for the passions once the guitars and bass temptation strides and erupts across the song around the expressive enjoyable vocals of McAvoy. At times unashamedly anthemic and constantly stirring up the imagination with a melodic craft which helps fuel an already hungry appetite for the release, the track is an urgently persuasive introduction to the album setting a high bar for it to maintain.

     Something it definitely does with the following Thanks A Million, the one song on the album recorded with producer Rich Jackson. As soon as its initial melodic narrative wraps around the ear followed by a lush groove, there is a familiarity to the song which only pleases and takes thoughts to eighties electronic pop essences. A definite Thomas Dolby feel emerges with the senses wrapping synth imagination yet equally you are reminded of the current sounds of James Cook and Does It Offend You, Yeah? whilst the track sculpts its own identity to devour eagerly. A track which manages to impress immediately and also slow burn its way deeper into the emotions over time through its big bruising bass tones and gripping melodic coaxing, it is dark temptation immersing the ears in a sizzling evocative wash.

    The devilishly infectious Medicines steps up next to deepen the lure of the album, its Blancmange like electro pop excitement and bordering on wanton energy insatiably seductive whilst the infection clad chorus and vocal call only grips satisfaction tighter for a lingering and compulsively addictive encounter. Recent single Telepaths breathes the same contagion as its predecessor, guitar and synths driven by outstanding vocals luring senses and feet to a feverish submission for the raucous electro rock party. Both tracks continue the high range of peaks established by the album and light the fuse to even greater suspicions as to how good and successful Ed Zealous could become.

     I Will Destroy You is a perfectly placed track, its melodramatic and emotive textures aligned to a slower gaited temptation exploring new depths and enterprise within the band and their songwriting. Though not as immediate to persuade as those before, the song enslaves keen attention for its thoughtful shape and evocative hues and allows a breath to be taken whilst it’s subtle and inventive majesty works its way into the imagination. The following Talk With Your Hands also takes time but with its David Byrne like creative swagger and heavy rhythmic caging it also secures full satisfaction and hungry attention over numerous exploits.

     There is something infuriately familiar to the start of Diamonds For Eyes yet it evades definition even after plenty of adventures with the dancefloor hugging track whilst These Words reaps those eighties influences yet again as its magnetic body inspires thoughts of China Crisis. Both songs stretch and add to the fascination of Wired with skill and mischievous flair before making way for the outstanding Videohead, a track which emerges as the favourite here. Adding an electro punk element to its fuzzy electronic flaming, the song is like a mix of Calling All Astronauts, B-Movie, and at times the John Foxx led Ultravox, the band again bringing a touch of nostalgia into a more aggressive modern exertion and invention. It is an enthralling and addiction causing maelstrom of ideas and sonic sculpting brewed into a contagious provocation of epidemic proportions.

    Completed by the funk ripped It’s Only The End, a song which you feel would ignite the dancefloor of any era such its blend of irrepressible decade crossing melodies and electronic virulence, Wired is an exceptional first album from Ed Zealous, one which impresses right away and only increases its strengths and stature over time. This is a band you can see creating new boundaries for electronic pop ahead and becoming a well-worn name over time.

http://edzealous.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ed-Zealous/89457839303

9/10

RingMaster 06/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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PET – Talk To You

Pet pic

A song which seduces the senses and intrigues thoughts whilst taking emotions on a mesmeric dance, Talk To You the new single from German electro pop band PET, is an enchanting invitation for the upcoming album from the Berlin sextet. Released via Neun Volt Records, the song is a magnetic persuasion which as the lead track from the forthcoming Imitation of Life, makes an investigation of the band’s new album a must.

Hailing from Berlin, PET have bred plenty of acclaim and attention with their singles such as No Yes No and the albums Player One Ready (2004) and Rewind The Sofa Lady (2006). Taking influences from the likes of Roxy Music, Blondie, XTC, and Buzzcocks into their mesmeric weaves, Pet with a new line-up consisting of guitarist/vocalist Andre Abshagen, keyboardist/vocalist from Monika Martin, drummer Dodo NKishi, bassist Stefania Vacca, percussionist Eric Voss, and newest member Julie Miess on bass and keys, has evolved its trademark electro-beats and sophisticated melodic venturing to new thrilling levels, certainly on the evidence of Talk To You.

The song opens with striking electro spirals of sonic temptation over excited beats. It is an instantly enthralling invitation which having 581168_759531444072274_29682852_nawoken attention settles into an embrace of melodic caresses around soothing vocals. There is an enchantment to the delivery which kisses the ear constantly whilst the bass litters the scenery with a delicious dark shadowed tone persistently skirted by the strikes of funk gaited guitar and the fascination of keys. Virulently infectious and evocatively entrancing the song is a sirenesque call upon the dancefloor and a contagious bait for the impending full-length release.

Supported by a remix of the song by Sao Paulo based DJ, Kina, a track which stretches out the emotive punchiness of the original without losing its snap and intensive catchiness, the single is an appealing and thoroughly enjoyable encounter. Wholly hypnotic with a seeming simplicity which belies the craft and intently sculpted textures of the sounds, Talk To You is a irresistible temptation, one quite impossible to ignore the invitation from.

Imitation of Life is due for release 28th November

https://www.facebook.com/PETmusicBerlin

8/10

RingMaster 04/11/2013

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Naked Lunch – Slipping Again, Again

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Following their return with the single Alone earlier this year, UK electric rock band Naked Lunch back up its intrigue and success with new release Slipping Again, Again. Building on its predecessor’s potent temptation the new single ups the ante with its magnetic and enthralling shadow clad electronic enterprise and electro punk seduction.

Consisting of band founder vocalist Tony Mayo with original members Mick Clark and Cliff Chapman alongside Paul Davies who was in one of the band’s earlier line-ups, and newest members Mark Irvine and Jet Noir, Naked Lunch has shown that time has enriched their snarl and imaginative depths, and they were never short on those facets when they emerged in 1979. A key influence and driving force in much of the eighties electronic movement, in sound and behind the scenes including the coming together of the important Some Bizarre album via Mute Records, the band had a difficult time with line-up instability and the like, though it did release the single Rabies and contribute the track La Femme to the aforementioned album, two iconic tracks to emerge form that period, before disbanding. Their return in 2012 at the BAS II and the haunting dark caress of comeback single Alone brought the band back to the attention and appetites of fans old and new; a hunger which the new release will only increase you suspect.

Slipping Again, Again is a reworking of the B-side Slipping Again from the 1981 single Rabies. It is a darker, more sinister and intense presence than the original but an encounter which does not lose the essence and heart of the song, instead giving it a fresher breath and stronger intrigue. The opening electronic breeze is soon grasping the spiralling bass fuelled throat of the dark magnetism immediately at work within the song. Guitars scar the air with acidic endeavour whilst the vocals of Mayo, showing age and maturity which is strikingly noticeable when playing both versions of the song side by side, bring further menace and confrontation to the track, his dark croon a provocative incitement within the contagious call of the song. With a delicious rhythmic dance ensnaring the senses and emotions further, the song is an irresistible lure which as good as the original was presents a scintillating new presence.

Hinted at on Alone, there is a stronger undeniable Frank Tovey breath to certainly the darkest edges and depths of Slipping Again, Again, a spice which only increases the temptation of the song. It all adds to a single which leaves full satisfaction and pleasure at large, and as much as the want for new material from Naked Lunch is an open wish, Slipping Again, Again fills the gap with impressive enticement and thrilling suasion.

www.nakedlunch.org.uk

8.5/10

RingMaster 14/10/2013

 

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Strange Names – Self Titled EP

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The self-titled EP from US electro pop band Strange Names is best described as an exploding star of warm mesmeric radiance and rich melodic hues falling upon the senses with varied flavoursome and refreshing warmth. It shows with ease why the duo of New York born Liam Benzvi (vocals, percussion, keyboards)and Minneapolis hailing Francis Jiminez (vocals, guitar, keyboards) has created such a buzz around themselves back home and now the UK release of their debut EP should act as a magnet for the imagination and passions of plenty more eager appetites this side of the blue too.

The two musicians met whilst at the University of Minnesota in 2010 and soon were collaborating with live performances following in2012, the band growing to a quartet live with the addition of bassist Andre Borka and drummer Fletcher Aleckson, who also play on the EP. It’s and a single’s successful Stateside release to strong acclaim via White Iris Records followed Strange Names being named as the Twin Cities Best New Band of last year. Live the band has also garnered strong reactions including shows with the likes of Yeasayer, Mac DeMarco, and The Walkmen. With the pair working on their debut album right now, the EP gets its timely unveiling on this side of the pond through Minor Times Records September 16th  to equal response.

Potential Wife starts things off with electronic starlets of sound expelling their sonic beauty in the sky of the song before beats rupture 644462_450928411612262_606119642_ntheir elegance and the track is led by a delicious bass croon bursts into a contagious blaze of jangly guitars and melodic dance. With the bass adding extra funk to proceedings the sound sits somewhere between Talking Heads and The Tom Tom Club before evolving into even juicier affair as the great dual flames of harmonies and mesmeric vocals from Benzvi and Jimenez kiss and caress the ear.  It is an absorbing start to the release with elements of eighties new wave and modern electro brewing further enticing whispers within the elegantly grooved waltz.

Strange Revelation continues the impressive start and instantly shows the variation and diversity ripe within the songwriting and its sound, a haunting post punk breath wrapping every note and lyrical coaxing whilst a melodic breeze stokes up further irresistible heat. The bass and excellent chilled guitar taunts have a Joy Division cold beauty whilst the contrasting warm melodies and vocal exploits pull thoughts of China Crisis into play. It is a mesmeric weave of masterful and evocative craft which confirms the potency and temptation of band and release.

     Luxury Child finds seeds back in the pop well of enterprise though the throaty pulsating dark tones brings welcome shadows to contrast the excellent Haircut 100 like guitar stroking and the ever impressive and smouldering warm vocals. Simultaneously tender and vibrantly energetic the song is an enthralling venture soon matched by final song Young. The closing track is a deep wash of potently hued electronic incandescence and slightly raw but invigorating sonic colour which continues the immense bewitchment and creative heights of the EP. It does not quite match the success of the previous songs but is arguably the most intense and imaginative of the four, and the most telling of the strength and expanse of the band’s songwriting.

Strange Names is poised to seduce the UK and Europe just like it has its homeland, their first EP an undeniable persuasion of that assumption and future promise, the first step towards many exciting horizons for them and us.

http://www.strangenamesmusic.com

9/10

RingMaster 13/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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