Indigo Bones – Self Titled EP

indigo-bones-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

With a definite buzz brewing around British trio Indigo Bones, the Hull hailing outfit release their self-titled debut EP this month, an attention grabbing slab of fiery garage rock sure to add fuel to the fire.

Indigo Bones began with the linking up of vocalist/ guitarist Chris Welburn, drummer Marty Hoyle, and bassist/vocalist Mark Swan, a threesome already having collaborated together on previous projects. Drawing on inspirations said to include Jack White and Royal Blood, they soon developed and honed a sound with unique character but equally freshly embracing familiar textures and essences. A recent UK tour has pushed awareness and support of the band beyond their local fan base, the new EP now poised to build on that success such its striking presence.

It opens with the rather excellent Vertical Sleep, the band quickly and enjoyably leaning on ears with a wall of senses badgering rhythms as raw acidic melodies add their tangy lures. Welburn’s vocals soon join the affair, his tones equally as unpolished and magnetic potently backed by those of Swan as the song flourishes in its expanding stride and creative scenery. There is a great live feel to the track which only accentuates its attitude and power, a roughness perfectly tempering and accentuating the intoxicating wooziness of the guitar’s enterprise.

indigo-bones-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewIt is an outstanding start to the release which arguably is never matched though swiftly Delicate with its mischievous melodies and steamy sonic saunter gives it a bold and close try. With captivating unpredictable adventure to the vocals and bone shuddering tenacity to Hoyle’s eagerly biting beats, the song entices thick attention with sonic adventure lying somewhere between The Black Keys, Electric Woodland, and My Red Cell.

Silver Nosebleeds follows, finding a grouchier, darker feel to its tone and nature whilst spinning another web of spicy sonic suggestion over gnarly vocals and another rousing pulsating bassline from Swan. Psych boozy melodies only add to the attraction, the song’s hazy creative heat and nature laying on and lingering in ears with relish.

Indigo Bones push the pedal to the floor with Elastic Patient, an adrenaline fuelled punk clad stomp roaring across the senses seeping sonic fumes even when its energy shifts down a gear. With carnivorously tenacious rhythms as eager as the riffs and grooves entangling them, the track is a glorious incitement firmly challenging the first for top song honours.

Completed by a fine live cut of Lethal Weapons & Perfect Posture, evidence of how well the band has translated their undoubted stage fire to the studio, the Indigo Bones EP is an introduction suggesting this is a band with the potential to make a potent mark on the UK rock scene.

The Indigo Bones EP is released 16th December.

http://indigobones.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/IndigoBonesBand   https://twitter.com/IndigoBonesBand

Pete RingMaster 14/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Crossfire Hurricanes – The Deviant

The Crossfire Hurricanes - new pic

It is not exactly essential to make a striking impression with your first single but it certainly can do no harm having an introduction which whips up attention and an eager appetite for your sounds, something Northern Ireland rockers The Crossfire Hurricanes do with irrepressible enterprise on The Deviant. Soaked in a captivating and sultry blaze of blues rock, the band’s stirring debut single is simply fiery rock ‘n’ roll with as much punch as it has sultry temptation in its impressive persuasion.

Springing from an initial vision in 2013, The Crossfire Hurricanes did not rush into making their entrance, instead taking their first year crafting and honing their blues infused sound. Once off the leash though, the Belfast quartet of Brendan McGreevy, Johnny Nicholl, Owen Duffy, and Niall Kelly swiftly ignited their local scene with their energetic and impressive live presence, repeating the persuasion around Ireland and into Dublin thereafter. Musically they draw on inspirations from the likes of Led Zeppelin, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, The Black Keys, and Pearl Jam, a thick spicing which is often open but never commanding in their impressive single.

The thrust of riffs opening up the song make an appealing start but it is the swiftly joining tangy melodies and grooves which really capture ears and imagination, their persistent flames swirling magnetically across the blues kissed landscape. Their psyche hued colouring washes over the rhythmically more reserved nature of the track, an aspect which is still a strong dark texture and potent contrast against the smouldering temptation surrounding it though. Vocally too the track is aflame with expression and alluring hues, whilst everything combined creates a tapestry of contagious and accomplished persuasion.

The Deviant is an enthralling encounter, reminding a little Norwegian rock band Electric Woodland, which alone has ears hooked and attention on The Crossfire Hurricanes intense. It may be too early to make big declarations but it is not hard to already suspect a big future for the band and more impressive things from them in return.

The Deviant is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the-deviant-single/id932805482

The Crossfire Hurricanes will be playing at The Empire in Belfast on Friday 20th March.

https://www.facebook.com/Thecrossfirehurricanes

RingMaster 11/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Denim Snakes – Self Titled

Denim Snakes

Rock ‘n’ roll obviously comes with constant variety of unique riotous tendencies, and each twist of rock music has a pioneer and driving force which recruits equally impressing cohorts to their direction within the expansive scene. There are few bands though which manages to weave a tapestry from a healthy scoop of all that vast flavouring which is something new and in itself wholly individual. Step forward Welsh rockers Denim Snakes and their debut self-titled album. It roars rock ‘n’ roll with every note, syllable, and second of its resourceful stomp. It makes no demands, has no delusions of grandeur, but instead rampages through ears into the passions with a fresh sound which recalls and revitalises essences which have ignited a million hearts and inspired just as many imaginations.

For a debut the album is irresistibly impressive and striking, though maybe that really should be no surprise as Denim Snakes is led by vocalist/guitarist Russell Toomey. The former frontman of the criminally ignored sonic punks My Red Cell and the inexcusably overlooked garage punks Innercity Pirates, Toomey has a knack of twisting songs into insatiable predators of the psyche whilst leaving a lingering temptation others can only dream of in their music. His new band as evidenced by their first full-length is no different in that ability, songwriting as expressive and intrusively seductive as ever, and an instinctive rock ‘n’ roll ravaging.

Formed in 2013, the Barry quartet of guitarist Jake Ellis-Scott, bassist Matt Clarke, and drummer/backing vocalist Tom Hall alongside Toomey, soon explored and whipped up a sound to ignites ears and imagination, first single 21 earlier this year the proof of something exciting brewing from the depths of the “ghost-town pleasure park” from where he band emerged. It sparked an exploratory interest and appetite for the band which second single The Guard in September soon ignited again. Now the band’s debut album is primed to wake-up the nation and such its potency and sheer thrilling adventure there will be calls of a conspiracy at play if Denim Snakes is allowed to slip away as those previous bands mentioned.

The release opens with The Guard, bulging beats lighting up ears before a raw blaze of riffs and a throaty bassline joins the emerging rugged sonic dance. In no time the song is leading body and emotions on a virulent stroll, Ramones bred Denim Snakes coverhooks and grooves flirting with the passions as the distinctive tones of Toomey’s voice similarly and mischievously colours the contagion. A healthy whiff of garage rock and surf pop is brought into the mix of what is insatiable pop punk of the old school kind, whilst a classic rock spicing clasps the solo and melodic enterprise of the sensational opener.

The band’s first single 21 is next and instantly provides a different creative hue to the release. With a caress of harmonica leading to more melodic scenery vocally and musically, the song sways with folk rock glazed adventure. It is just as catchy as its predecessor, though it has a gentle presence and persuasion which at times is part Weezer and part Late Cambrian, and whilst it does not set a fire in feet and instincts as the previous protagonist, the song emerges as a warm and increasingly tempting offering showing why it made such a strong impression earlier in 2014.

The following It’ll Be Alright also moves with a mellow and breezy charm, though there is a devilry which is never far from its surface. It also finds a forceful prowl in the bass and beats which come more to the fore leading to and in the anthemic chorus, it adding a muscular spirit to another unique slice of melodic pop. In its reserved passages there is a definite Kinks influence which instantly sparks the imagination into greater life whilst it’s punchier exploits rings of Innercity Pirates, though that was always inevitable at some point. It too is a slow burner which grows into something formidable and addictive, the opposite on offer next with Party Hard. This is a song wasting no time in gentle persuasion, instead swiftly gripping ears and thoughts with spicy chords and hungry rhythms before venturing into a hook laden lure of busy riffs and vocal revelry. My Red Cell toxicity teases throughout the song to further colour the fiery rock ‘n’ roll canter, but as across the album though you can pick out similarity of previous exploits, song and album is something openly new.

From the lofty heights of the song, Denim Snakes take another step up in temptation and brilliance with The Runaways. Sinews flex in every aspect of the track from the first breath, riffs imposing and rhythms cantankerous as Turbonegro like punk causticity initially smothers ears. The track is soon exploring its infection drenched melodic side too though, another ridiculously contagious proposition leaping at the passions as riveting twists of guitar and rhythmic endeavour toys with the imagination. A core of hard rock drives the explosively enjoyable encounter, another slither of rock ‘n’ roll variety exploited for something enthrallingly new before the pair of She’s A Woman and Making Money step forward. The first of the two stalks the senses and thoughts straight away, a dark and heavy footed bassline aligned to jabbing beats challenging ears before the effect spiced vocals of Toomey lay their predacious tempting in the web of intrigue. A classic rock breeding smoulders throughout the sultry drama of the song but yet again flavouring is varied and fluid as it almost growls with impressive potency before its successor brings out the big guns in predatory riffs and thumping beats as blues grooving spreads through classic rock devilment. Though not a favourite amongst the pack on the album, the song increasingly convinces and is a sure fire appetite pleaser for fans of bands such as Aerosmith and Alice Cooper.

Don’t You Want Me finds seeds in similar beds but only to lay a canvas for the blues and acidic flames of enterprise erupting over it. Electric Woodland meets My Red Cell meets The Stooges; the track roars and raucously simmers with sonic ingenuity and incendiary expression. It is a fire of anthemic seduction inducing another wave of greedy hunger for the album, which the raunchy tone and energy of Happiness has boiling over with its maelstrom of classic, hard, and punk rock. The song also finds room to drift into a hazy melodic landscape of rock pop, unpredictability as prevalent as imagination and mischief.

Closing with the similarly bred but openly distinct Sex, Denim Snakes has uncaged a slab of rock ‘n’ roll which manages to provide something for everyone in each individual song without leaving one overwhelmed by the intensive brew. The final song is a salacious temptress which simply sums up the whole of the outstanding album. Fans of Russell Toomey’s past works will maybe not be surprised at the craft and invention running over in Denim Snakes but there is no denying the band has tapped into a new depth and maturity in songwriting and sound which is matched by the impressive qualities and imagination of its members. Quite simply it is a must have release for all rock ‘n’ roll fans.

Denim Snakes is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/artist/denim-snakes/id835921265

http://www.denimsnakes.co.uk

RingMaster 26/10.2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Milestones – Higher Mountain-Closer Sun

Photo by Pasi Rytkonen Photography

Photo by Pasi Rytkonen Photography

We cannot say we have a natural appetite for southern and classic rock, nor an over attentive interest, but occasionally something hits the right spot and sparks a thorough investigation. The recent impressive album from Norwegian blues rockers Electric Woodland has been one and the legendary Bad Company in the past another to light a fire of interest and pleasure. Now with new album Higher Mountain-Closer Sun, Finnish southern rockers The Milestones have lit another potent appetite with their hot sultry sounds. Another reason for mentioning the first two bands is that this album comes with a healthy soak of blues/hard rock to its southern sonic climate which brings potent comparisons in many ways to the enticing sounds of those two bands. Higher Mountain-Closer Sun seems to soak up those essences and many more flavoursome spices to create its own feistily simmering proposition, an offering which seduces even our more aggression wanting tastes.

Twenty years since taking its first steps and with now four albums under the belt, The Milestones has earned a strong presence within world hard rock since the release of their debut album Vol. 1 in 1996, an album seeing a re-release later this year. Acclaimed and drawing strong interest in the States, its success and the band’s live presence led to them traveling to New York to record second album Souvenirs of 1999. This proved to be nowhere near as successful in sound and impact as its predecessor and as the promo sheet accompanying the new album states, “Ultimately it would take ten years for The Milestones to heal the wounds.”

That was when album three emerged, Devil In Men in 2009 pushing the Helsinki quintet back to the stature and acclaimed attention enjoyed before on a global scale. It was followed by tours around Scandinavia, Central Europe, and the US the band supporting the likes of Whitesnake, Deep Purple, Black Stone Cherry, Gary Moore, Raging Slab, and D.A.D. along the way. Now they uncage Higher Mountain-Closer Sun through Listenable Records, a magnetic and fiery romp of instinctive rock ‘n’ roll taking body and passions on a fevered stomp.

From the first track the album seems to have a hook deep into thoughts and emotions, the opening Walking Trouble instantly smothering ears in a blaze of sonic and melodic haze with the guitars of Tomi Julkunen and Marko 10301540_10152415122872560_6266331794037874146_nKiviluoma a seductive graze on the senses whilst the bass of Veli Palevaara roams with equally captivating enterprise and swagger. Completed by the firm beats of drummer Tommi Manninen and the dusty vocals of Olavi Tikka, whose harmonica flair also ignites a twinge of hunger, the track is a storming romp to start things off and get the listener to their feet.

Both the smouldering heat of Shalalalovers and the tarmac stomping Drivin’ Wheel keep the impressive start heading along the same plateau. The first of the two merges a great sultry climate over verses with an almost too easily accessible chorus, its lure predictable and over familiar yet irrepressibly addictive. The union works a treat with a soft spot for the harmonica well fed again before the song’s successor pulls on a Stones like blues colouring to wrap its southern bred adventure. Again there is a simple but inescapable virulence to the chorus which makes a great contrast to the more intensive creative tenacity before and after their expulsions. Both tracks incite full engagement physically and emotionally before allowing a breath to be taken with the evocative southern rock heated scenery of Oh My Soul. With a breath of gospel passion and ‘red neck’ causticity, the track is a sizzling temptation which increases its strength with every listen.

The acoustic ballad Grateful is a pleasing encounter but lacks the spark of previous songs, though that is probably more down to personal preferences for feet sparking revelry. To be fair it is a vocally and musically accomplished song which at times sounds like a mix of Elvis Costello in his country era and Bon Jovi. The following Sweet Sounds does have the body moving with intent next and again apart from its stirring chorus is another enjoyable but underwhelming offering when up against songs like the brilliant It’s All Right. The track is an insatiable rocker from start to finish, grooves and hooks as eagerly tenacious as the increasingly impressive vocals of Tikka and the addictive rhythmic bait. As with all the songs on the album, you feel you already know this bruiser of rock ‘n’ roll devilry which only adds to its invigorating and refreshing presence.

Such the strength and tremendous pull of the track it gives the likes of the energetically fevered You and the melodically and vocally reflective Looking Back For Yesterday a stiffer task to match up to, but both without quite lighting the same fire still treats ears and imagination to exciting endeavour and enflamed melodic sounds. Their success is taken to a new level by the raw and gripping drama of Damn. Again ridiculously compelling hooks and grooves vein what is a darker and sonically fevered canvas to the song. It makes a slow initial impression but emerges as another evolving into a big highlight within the album.

The scintillating Fool Me brings the main body of the album to a tremendous close, the guitars of Julkunen and Kiviluoma bordering on sonic eroticism such the potency and spellbinding strength of their grooves whilst vocals and rhythms dance with impassioned devilry around them. It is a stunning track, a show stealer on any other album.

The CD version of Higher Mountain – Closer Sun is finished by a couple of bonus tracks in Call Of The Wild and Quicksilver which sadly our promo did not contain but such the quality of the rest of the album it is easy to assume they only add to the fun. The Milestones may have taken ‘ten years to heal the wounds’ but there is little to stop them now with releases like this.

Higher Mountain – Closer Sun is available now via Listenable Records @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Higher-Mountain-Closer-The-Milestones/dp/B00ILWB4VS and http://www.levykauppax.fi/artist/milestones/higher_mountain_closer_sun/#cd

https://www.themilestonesmusic.com

RingMaster 30/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Singing forest bred blues: an interview with Electric Woodland

Electric Woodland

    Weaving an inescapable and thrilling lure of blues, heavy metal, and classic rock into something organically unique, Norwegian rock band Electric Woodland has been earning eager attention and acclaim through their stunning debut album Potrero. It is a rigorously tantalising encounter which seduces the passions through its skilful infectiousness and riveting old school bred and modern fuelled enterprise. The quartet is making rich marks with their sound and now release so we had to find out more. Thanks to guitarist Christian N. Olsen-Ruud, we explored the origins of Electric Woodland, the making of its first full-length release, opportunities for band in their homeland and much more…

Hi Christian and welcome to the site. Thank you for sharing your time with us as we explore all things Electric Woodland.

Firstly can you tell us about the beginnings of the band, how you all met etc.?

Well, Peder (vocals, guitar) and Emil (drums) are brothers, and Marius (bass) is their cousin, so they didn’t have much of a choice. I (Christian, guitar) first got to know Peder when we both went to the same secondary school and started hanging out. The band started when a mutual friend had built a porch, and asked Peder and I if we wanted to bring a couple of acoustic guitars over and break it in. All of a sudden people started to say that they wanted to come as well, and before we knew it, we had 150 people who were going to show up. We built a stage, Marius and Emil joined, and since every festival around seemed to have closed, we started both the band and a festival called Runerock (Rune is the name of the guy with the porch).

How did the great band name come about?

We come from a place called Skogbygda, which sort of translates to Woodville or Wood village. Growing up in rural Norway and Skogbygda has had a great impact on us, so I guess we wanted to give it a little homage. The other half of the name is from one of our other passions, classic rock, blues rock, and one of the great masters, Jimi Hendrix. As well as giving homage to Skogbygda, we thought that mixing Electric Ladyland in there would sort of define what we wanted to do. Down to earth hard blues rock from the Norwegian forests.

Is Electric Woodland the first musical endeavour for you all?

We’ve all had more or less serious bands before, but Electric Woodland is the first band where we’ve really worked with song writing and recording in the way that we’ve done now. The EP was also the first real studio work we’ve done, but luckily we’ve had great people working with us for both the EP and the album, who have helped us out a lot.

Your music is boldly flavoursome with numerous essences of different styles adding to the mix. What are the predominant inspirations for the band and you as musicians?

As you say, our inspirations are many, and it’s a mix of everything from Robert Johnson, through 70s classic rock, to newer stuff like Queens of the Stone Age. In essence it’s a mix of everything we’ve loved when we grew up. When we get asked about this we usually go with the big bands that everyone knows like Queens of the Stone Age, The Doors, Deep Purple, etc., but our biggest influence over the last couple years has probably been a local artist called Amund Maarud. He’s not only helped us out a lot while recording and through Snaxville records, but he’s got a lot of the same influences as us and blends them together into some really cool stuff.

You recently released your debut album Potrero which follows your well received self-titled EP of 2009. How do you see the progression in your sound and songwriting between the two releases?Electric Woodland cover

The four songs on the EP were basically the first four songs we wrote as a band. When it came to Potrero, we wanted to use a bit more time to develop our own sound. While both have a lot of the same influences, Potrero is a bit darker, and both a bit more bluesy and heavy at times.

The album feels a confident and mature collection of songs but with plenty of potential for even greater heights; is that how you feel about it now it is out there drawing in acclaim and new hearts?

Definitely… Although we started to experiment with our own sound on Potrero, it was still only our second recording ever. I do feel we are gaining momentum as song writers and as a band. After recording Potrero, we kind of know more of what we enjoyed recording and what we enjoy playing, so the next album will hopefully reflect that and show some more progression.

Tell us about the recording of Potrero, I believe it was recorded onto analogue tape?

We recorded it at Snaxville Studios in Skogbygda, with the help of Amund and Henrik Maarud. It’s a top, modern studio, but they record everything on analogue tape before any modern technology touches it. We did it in a couple of sessions with some time in between, so that we could think about what we had done and do adjustments in the song writing for the remaining songs if they needed it.

What was behind the decision which it has to be said works a treat in defining the album’s sound.

Again, a lot of our inspiration comes from old blues artists and 60s and 70s rock, so to get that genuine dirty and gritty old school sound, this was what we had to do. The general feeling of recording on tape just felt right as well. You don’t get a million takes when recording on tape, and I think that is a good thing. Each take gets more focused. In a way, it’s also what you always imagined a studio to be. Not just plugging the instruments into a laptop and there’s your album, but you get the whole studio ritual that gets you ‘in the zone’.

Did you go old school/vintage in other aspects of the recording and creating of the album?

A lot of the equipment we use is either vintage or new but made to sound vintage. Some of the pedals we use are clones of old legendary pedals that people like Hendrix, Gilmour and Iommi used, and that’s sort of where we want to go. In addition, a lot of the other equipment in the studio was vintage, form old 70s tape delays to microphones that were used by the BBC in the 60s and 70s.

Is this something you will look to do again or have you already new ideas to explore with the next release?

I think it is important to try to evolve the sound in some way, but in our case it will probably be to try to dive even deeper into that way of working. We really enjoyed it, and really like that type of sound as well. We just need to push it one step further.

There is a raw and gritty texture to the songs on the album, was this deliberately sought or an organic success which just happened?

It was definitely on purpose. We listened to different stuff before recording, and decided that this was what we wanted to do. It’s the sound that we felt the songs needed.

How does the songwriting work within the band?

Usually Peder does most of the writing. He often comes to rehearsals with riffs and lyrics, and we arrange it together into finished songs. Peder and Emil tries out a lot of stuff when they’re both home as well (we rehearse in their old hen house!).

Bad Shoe and the song Electric Woodland steal top honours on the album for us amongst only great tracks. Give us some background to the pair.

They’re two very different songs that’s for sure. Bad Shoe is a rather happy-go-lucky, straight forward, feel good song, where Peder wrote most of it and just brought it to a rehearsal. Electric Woodland is a lot grittier and heavier, and a lot more jam based. It is also without a doubt the song that has evolved the most of all our songs. Some of it was actually some of the first material we produced, and it was almost on the EP as a very straight forward rock song. We started working on it as a band, and suddenly we had new riffs, parts and vocals that took it in a completely different direction.

Is there a particular moment on the album which gives you an extra satisfied tingle inside?

One of the things I’m most pleased with in the response to the album is that everyone seems to have a different favourite song on it. I think that Electric Woodland is probably my pick of the bunch. It’s one of my favourite songs to play live, and the way we just jammed to make it into what it became was a great moment for us as a band. It also has great energy.

Electric Woodland 2Obviously Norway is your home, a place where different music seems to find a place but black metal and folk based styles seem to be what people most assign to the country. What is the reality as a band from there and have you found a ready appetite there for your blues seeded sounds?

There’s a lot of melancholic music in Norway. Maybe it’s the long, depressing winters, but if it’s pop, rock, blues or black metal, there’s often a hint of melancholy in there somewhere. It’s certainly true for Norwegian folk music and black metal, and of course, for blues as well. A lot of people also like a bit of rock and classic rock, so I think we fit in nicely!

We get the feeling that across Europe and now starting in the UK recognition and attention is awakening to your presence, how are you seeing this now Potrero is out?

We do feel we’re starting to build up steam. You feel that gradually things are beginning to move, with an interview here and there, some radio plays here and there, gigs at a bit bigger venues, etc. We’re in this band because we love creating and playing music, but getting some recognition and that people enjoy what you do feels great. It’s something we spent a lot of time and effort on, and take a lot of pride in, so that people don’t think it’s just bullshit really helps!

Is Electric Woodland an active live proposition at home and what are the prospects of seeing you tour across Europe and the UK at some point?

We’ve been a bit unlucky with some health issues in the band this year, so we haven’t been able to do as much as we’ve wanted to, but we’ve still managed to get quite a few gigs under the belt. All of us have other jobs, so we try to do a gig whenever we find the time. We hope to do a bit more though, and a tour of the UK and Europe would be great at some point. So tell your local promoter!

For all bands the internet has been full of pros and cons for their musical journey, how have you found it so far?

When four guys can sit and play what can be pretty introvert music, in a forest in the middle of nowhere in Norway, and suddenly have about 200 fans on Facebook from India, you see what a powerful marketing tool the internet can be. It also makes everything so much easier and gives you so many more options when it comes to producing and publishing records. Bands no longer need a record label’s financial backing to be able to produce something, which can mean that you get a bigger variety of bands out there for people to listen to. You get music in all shapes in all shapes and forms, which can be both good and bad, I guess.

What is next for Electric Woodland and across the rest of 2014?

Hopefully, we’ll get the time to write some more music. We’ve got a couple rough drafts of songs for the second album that we want to keep working on, as well as doing a few more gigs this year.

Thanks again for taking time to chat with us.

Any last words you would like to leave us with?

If you get the chance, check us out on Spotify, give us a like on Facebook, and tell us what you think!

And lastly putting yourself in the place of an interviewer what question would you most like to ask to who?

Black Sabbath and the question would be if they needed an opening act!

www.electricwoodland.com

Read our review of Potrero @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/12/07/electric-woodland-potrero/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 25/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Electric Woodland – Potrero

Electric Woodland Cover Artwork

Having impressed a great many with their self-titled EP of 2011, Norwegian rock band Electric Woodland take things further into richer potency with first album Potrero. A ten track mixture of classic rock and metal infused with an equally vintage soaking of blues, the release is a magnetic lure for the imagination which though a little undulating in its heights has all the craft and invention not forgetting compelling sound, to push the Skogbygda band right up to the coat tails of the likes of The Black Keys and Them Crooked Vultures. It is an absorbing encounter which seduces the passions with an infectiousness and enterprise which at times lingers and seduces long after its departure to make for one memorable and easy to re-engage with pleasure.

Electric Woodland came to be in 2009 taking influences from the likes of The Doors, Deep Purple, and as is openly evident, The Black Keys into their fiery melodies and carefully sculpted sound. As mentioned their EP placed a certain focus and success on the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Peder Kjaernli, bassist Marius Nordby, guitarist Christian Olsen-Ruud, and drummer Emil Kjaernli, from which they have stretched and driven on their imagination and songwriting on the new album. Recording Potrero on analogue tape at the barn studio of Norwegian Grammy winners Amund and Henrik Maarud, Electric Woodland tease and seduce with the emerging album though not always to the same strength throughout admittedly. nevertheless the Snaxville Recordings release is relentlessly captivating and resourcefully appetising.

As soon as the heated guitar strokes cup the ears opener Heavy Eyes gives more than a hint of what is too come, their blues kissed tones an immediate lure caged by punchy beats and additional acidic melodic enticement  prowled through by the great bass tones of Nordby. The guitars sculpt a reserved yet stomping gait which simply magnetises the senses and imagination, a Queens Of The Stone Age swagger and seduction woven into the sonic bait with the vocals only adding to its essence. There is also a classic bred familiar sound to the song though one evading definition of its source, the band’s influences maybe simply breeding a recognisable air to the refreshing endeavour making the strongest persuasion.

The following Bad Shoe not only cements the impressive start but takes it to another level to fully open up a hunger within the already emerged appetite for the release. Once again guitars make the initial contact before vocal harmonies caress the ears and Peder Kjaernli opens up his fine voice for the brewing narrative. There is a definite rockabilly feel to the core stroll and vocal delivery, a rock ‘n’ roll stance to which melodies and sonic expression weaves and stokes its evocative flames and textures. Not for the first or last time the guitar play is constant bait alongside the mutually gripping rhythms and barbed hooks that litter the song and album throughout.

After the slow burner This House, a track which smoulders and writhes within its blues crafted opening shell before holding a breath and erupting into an excellent brazen melodic lined dusty romp of again QOTSA like scuzz filtered energy, Have You Seen My Baby pushes the blues coloured walls of the release to another diverse depth. The song with its romping rhythms led by the great throaty bass feels like a major anthem for the band within moments, the guitars and emerging keys casting a spellbinding tide of invention over the ears. Drummer Emil Kjaernli is an attention grabbing key to the song though everything about it is an irresistible hook for the passions, the track best described as Seasick Steve meets The Black Keys with Kyuss in close attention.

From here the album goes into a bit of a lull though really it is just that the likes of To You, Humbread, and Old Airplane do not manage to light the same potent fires as their predecessors like those before. All tracks are superbly written and crafted, each providing moments and lures which certainly recruit eager attention and a want to engage them again and again, especially the first two of that selection, but each lacking the spark to raise the same emotions as before. That is something the song Electric Woodland has no problem with, the song another classic to rival the opening pair. The rhythmic onslaught lays the first inescapable trap, the drums a commanding provocateur soon aided in its mission by the grizzled riffs and the ever alluring vocals. There is a predation to the song which never leaves the listener alone, a niggling persistence which you can only devour greedily as the song, safe in its knowledge it has you hooked, paints a melodic venture with stoner tendencies and blues mixed hues. It is a brilliant reminder of just how good this band is and will be.

Closing with the decent enough acoustic folk bred song Dog Without A Bone, a slight Arctic Monkeys air to its elegance, Potrero is an exciting and deeply satisfying release, one which marks out Electric Woodland as a band which has to be paid attention to. The album suggests as the band grows it is just the appetiser for greater things to come; our lips already being licked in anticipation.

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www.electricwoodland.com

8/10

RingMaster 07/12/2013

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ELECTRIC WOODLAND to unleash new album ‘Potrero’, out 9th December‏

 
 Electric Woodland Cover Artwork

RISING EURO ROCKSTERS  ELECTRIC WOODLAND RELEASE DEBUT ALBUM AND PLAN TO TAKE THE UK BY STORM….…

 
High Flying Norwegian Rock outfit ‘Electric Woodland’ fuse an encyclopaedic knowledge of The Doors’ and Deep Purple’s back catalogues with the modern rock suss of The Black Keys and QOTSA; the result is highly engaging. Electric Woodland unleash their explosive debut album ‘Potrero’ through Snaxville Recordings and all digital stores on Monday 9th December 2013.
Formed in 2009, it didn’t take long for Electric Woodland to get itchy feet in their countryside home of Skogbygda. So the quartet decided to rebuild a henhouse into a rehearsal room, and then construct a wooden stage at a local farm, thus spawning a festival. Needless to say, Electric Woodland have a strong work ethos and an industrious attitude to their craft. Despatching a sound that supremely pitches raw, psychedelic texturings with cleverly woven guitar lines and vocal hooks, Electric Woodland are unquestionably innovative, dextrous and poignant. Continually moving forward and breaking boundaries with a willingness to evolve and progress, Electric Woodland produce music that offers an inventive twist on bands such as Wolfmother, Them Crooked Vultures and The Doors.
Following on from the successful release of their debut EP in 2011, the band went into the barn studio of Norwegian Grammy winners Amund and Henrik Maarud to record their debut album ‘Potrero’, where the foursome laid their organic sound down to analogue tape. Now loaded with ten tracks that truly shine and showcase the band’s vast array of talents, from the twisted alluring groove of their opener ‘Heavy Eyes’, to the up-tempo blues swagger of ‘Have You Seen My Baby’ and to the timeless anthemic sway of their new single ‘Old Airplane’, Electric Woodland have crafted a record that has all the ingredients to be a bona fide modern classic.
**ELECTRIC WOODLAND RELEASE ‘POTRERO’ THROUGH SNAXVILLE RECORDINGS AND ALL DIGITAL STORES**