Eyemouth – Noera Genesis

eyemouth_RingMaster Review

It is impossible for anyone to discover every band unleashing their imagination and musical prowess on the world alone so it is always with great gratitude when something simply falls into the lap whether as a by-product of doing something else, through recommendations, or simply by an artist introducing themselves personally. That gratitude is especially intense when it leads to something which truly excites and stirs up the imagination. So it is with thanks to Marcus Lilja that we can now enthuse about his band’s latest release and fascinating sound.

A member of Swedish band Eyemouth, Marcus alongside David Lilja, Tove Ekman, and Joakim Åberg, have already sparked great attention and eager appetite with previous EPs, Black and Blue Latitudes and Non Compos Mentis, both out earlier this year. In an intent to bring ears a quartet of EPs in 2015, they now unveil the third in the enthralling shape of Noera Genesis, a theatre of sound and imagination which is as bewitching as it is wonderfully challenging. Formed in 2011, the Eyemouth sound defies pinning down, their original synth led endeavours having evolved over the ears to what captivates within their latest proposal. Merging industrial and post rock ambiences with shamanic rhythms, electro rock intrigue, and darker as well as heavier rock incitement, the Göteborg band had bred a tantalising and unpredictable tapestry which is cinematic, at times sinister, and thoroughly compelling.

noera-genesis-_RingMaster Review     It opens with Come This Far, and a haunting ambience littered with portentously dulled bell tolls in a cavernous landscape. An equally ‘flat’ but alluring bass adds further peculiar bait to the brewing enticement before stepping away again as synths and vocals begin their individual and colluding narratives. Soon, the track slips into an electronic canter awash with the expressive melodies and atmospheric hues of the keys and littered with rawer guitar and bass tempting. Ears and imagination are gripped early on, a hungry appetite soon following suit as the song with its Ghost In The Static crossed with Celldweller like stroll explores more of its imagination whilst simultaneously opening up provocative depths amidst roars of contagious enterprise.

That cinematic essence we mentioned is quickly bringing a suggestiveness across the EP; a gothic/industrial drama with 1984 meets Lovecraftian occultism growing in thoughts during the first song separate from its actually premise whilst the dark bowels of a sea bed leviathan explored and corrupted by the Victorian trespass of someone like Captain Nemo echoes the dystopian siren call seeping out of The Rise Of You. This is just the power of the music triggering such dark adventures, the band lyrically opening up doors to more ideas through its broad yet equally intimate theatre of word and premises. It is gripping stuff which reveals more with every listen and pleasingly confuses the imagination with each turn too as thoughts and ears try to work out the heart of the impressive song and release.

In My Mouth has a lighter soundscape but that leads to a more bedlamic and psychotic playroom for the listener’s thoughts. It is aural madness sublimely sculpted and organically uncaged as deranged keys, haunting harmonies, and demonic textures slim down to inventive smog, this toying with the listener for just under two absorbing minutes. The fact it ends too soon is a brief frustration, a short lived moan though as soon all focus is on the initially just as disquieting Sometimes. We say initially, in fact the song never stops being a disturbing magnetism as it evolves with every passing breath, more shamanic drums and lures aligning with whispered vocals which alone almost taunt the psyche with their tone. Subsequently synths build walls of tempestuous oppressiveness coated in discord laced melodic captivation, that in turn twisting into an instrumental finale of melodic rock infested with rasping and erosive textures.

It is impossible to provide a truly clear idea of what Eyemouth brings to bear on body and mind with Noera Genesis, so much going on as they additionally spark personal thoughts to run wild in grand ideas as you have just read, but every listen is full mouth-watering joy. We have yet to investigate the previous pair of EPs from the band, but you can only assume they too offer an experience rare to the ear and most others going by the invasive beauty of Noera Genesis.

Noera Genesis is available from September 30th via most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/eyemouthmusic/ https://twitter.com/eyemouthmusic http://eyemouth.moonfruit.com/

Pete RingMaster 30/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Ash Walker – Six Eight / Noodle

Ash Walker_RingMaster Review

Following the success of his acclaimed debut EP Agnostic, producer Ash Walker shows another side to his instrumental adventure with double A-sided single Six Eight / Noodle. Whereas the EP caught ears with a more unconventional trip hop led fusion of sound, the new release explores smokier jazz bred landscapes again spiced by varying textures and flavours. The two songs create individual immersive strolls which are more hints rather than forceful suggestions for thoughts to run with, but each suggests a sultry lazy day with smiles and warmth are made for their presence.

cover_RingMaster Review     Previously, Ash has supported the likes of The Specials, Lee Scratch Perry, and David Rodigan as a DJ before signing with Deep Heads, this in turn allowing his increasingly acclaimed productions to entice strong attention. The Agnostic EP incited strong radio focus with the likes of Gideon Coe, Don Letts, and Tom Robinson supporting its release whilst the single Round The Twist, which features The Specials’ Nikolaj Torp Larsen quickly lured individual support of its own. Now with the assistance of bassist Marc Cyril (Joss Stone, Dennis Bovell, Jr Walker and the All Stars) and keyboardist Jason Moe, Walker takes the listener through fresh scenery from his imagination starting with Six Eight.

The track ambles in on a delicious bassline and scratchy percussion quickly washed with enticing horn like bellows and the reflective charm of the piano. Additional keys stoke the ambience of the song with richer, though reserved, flames whilst a ska/dub swagger and enterprise courts the increasingly attractive character and body of the song. With a cosmopolitan feel to its atmosphere and texture, Six Eight has the feel of busy summer kissed streets full of bodies carrying a calm smile reflecting the air around them rather than the impatient voracity generally found on city landscapes. It is an enchanting piece of music, a companion to swing your hips to whilst immersing in its warm embrace.

Noodle is a mellower hug of melodic elegance but again with infectious temptation and an underlying lively gait. The bass once more captivates, its darker emotive tones adding shadows and intrigue to the melodic glow and atmospheric chimes blossoming from the enterprise of the keys. The track in a way is like the night view of life shown in the day time revelry of Six Eight, its presence a noir draped look at a still vibrant but closely intimate world echoing the heart of the first song and its lively energy.

Though the release did not incite the imagination to run away with itself in expansive adventures, both songs tantalise and ignite nothing less than warmth and full enjoyment which we expect to be wrapped in its own acclaim very soon.

Six Eight / Noodle is available now via Deep Heads.

Pete RingMaster 21/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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