The Briefs – Platinum Rats

As much as we have an ever ready appetite at The RR for all things punk from across the decades it is the 77’ eruption and the DIY irreverence it sparked which gets us most excited; lustfulness now ignited once more by the new album from Seattle punksters The Briefs. Coming to the end of their second decade as one explosive and mischievous proposition, the band still breeds its antics on the inspirations of that time and as Platinum Rats proves, it only makes for the most rousing and thrilling romp.

With a lull in their escapades, the quartet within the 2000 formed Briefs were just as busy with other ear grabbing propositions. Guitarist Daniel Travanti formed Sharp Objects and drummer Chris Brief brought us Suspect Parts while guitarist Steve E. Nix and bassist Kicks created another of our major favs in The Cute Lepers but as their bio says, “In the end, it all came back around to the beginning—to The Briefs” and another quite irresistible outing with them courtesy of Platinum Rats.

It is a collection of songs unafraid to wear their influences on their sleeves but it would be wrong to think there is anything but individuality to The Briefs seventies punk meets power pop styled sound. Released via Damaged Goods Records, Platinum Rats bursts from the speakers with its lungs in full holler, never taking its foot of the throttle until its final virulent note and breath is expelled.

Bad Vibrations starts the stomp off, riffs and rhythms in mass assault spilling hooks and grooved lures from every devilish move. Unapologetically infectious from its first roar, the track revels in the angular clips of the guitars and the swinging incitement of its rhythms, vocals just as persuasive in their recruitment of listener involvement before Shopping Spree takes over body and involvement with its own severely short but hungrily catchy pop punk.

Just as animated and galvanic as they are, both songs are quickly eclipsed by next up Nazi Disko and its rawer punk trespass. Like the deformed offspring of illicit doings between The Vibrators and Slaughter And The Dogs, the song barracks and bruises the body it has bouncing from its first handful of notes, only escalating all traits as it bares its antagonism.

She’s The Rat has the same effect on limbs and energy but inspires with its own particularly inescapable lures, one being a flavouring out of The Dickies songbook, one as anywhere on the album twisted into the band’s own unique character and voice while GMO Mosquito does the same to Buzzcocks spiced hooks and riffs. With a seventies glam rock lining to its chorus reservedly audible too, the song nags ears and appetite with ease, recruiting each with increasing potency by the listen.

The feral rock ‘n’ roll of Underground Dopes adds yet another fresh and hungrily tempting flavour to the album, roaring with something akin to a fusion of The Pirates and The Saints while I Hate The World is defiance fuelled virulence recalling bands such as The Flys and Radio Stars and straight after The Thought Police are on the Bus springs a general seventies punk hue within The Briefs stubbornly individual sound and enterprise.

The contagiousness soaking the whole of Platinum Rats is at its greediest within the outstanding Dumb City, a song with a sweeping breath of The Cortinas to its pop infested punk epidemic and no less rapacious as Out of Touch uncages its dirty and irritable punk ‘n’ roll stroll. From its ear snagging hooks to tenaciously biting rhythms, the track is a seductive bully which again the body had no defences to.

The album concludes with the dual stomping of Kids Laugh at You and What’s the Use, two tracks which alone sum up the pop punk mastery and devilment of The Briefs past and present. The first is Class A addiction in the making, every hook and melodic lure devious in their success as rhythms and vocals unscrupulously manipulate. Its successor closes things up with a bold Eddie And The Hot Rods meets The Motors saunter as less openly a Devo-esque essence flirts.

If there is a single punk bone in your body it is hard not to see Platinum Rats stirring up the spirit and if the genre, especially from its first breath, is food and drink expect to heavily drool.

Platinum Rats is out now via Damaged Goods Records.

http://www.thebriefsofficial.com   https://www.facebook.com/TheBriefs

 Pete RingMaster 16/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Sourheads – Care Plan For The Soul

Since forming in the Spring of 2016, UK rockers The Sourheads has drawn increasing attention and support through their live presence, singles, and most of all their dirty, multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll. Now the band has added another accelerant to their emergence with the release of debut album Care Plan For The Soul. Offering nine slices of rowdy but skilfully woven incitement embracing classic and fresh rock diversity, the release thrusts the listener into a grubby cellar of salacious intent and irreverent sound; a temptation the body gets the urge to dance to and appetite the need to increasingly devour.

Hailing from Wakefield, West Yorkshire, The Sourheads embrace an array of inspirations in their sound ranging from Deep Purple, Kasabian and The Doors to Kyuss and Clutch. It is a web of punk and garage to psych and classic rock which is just as grungy as it is melodically enticing and within Care Plan For The Soul an incitement which makes a potent first impression but really grows in persuasion listen by listen. Mastered by Pete Maher (The Rolling Stones, Depeche Mode, U2), the album swiftly grabs ears and appetite with opener Demon. Straight away it is enticingly grumbling in ears, bass and riffs an irritable lure soon bound in sonic tendrils as familiar and new endeavours collude in the blossoming growl capped by the slightly gnarly tones of Jake Coxon. The bass of Ben Taylor continues to be a belligerent presence in the caustic captivation, guitarist Mik Crone and drummer Chris Lambert adding their bold touches to the ever evolving roar maybe best described as Turbonegro meets The Senton Bombs meets Guns n’ Roses.

It is a great start to proceedings which Morally High continues with its spicily grooved stroll. Carrying similar essences and flavours to its predecessor in its own individual way, the track is equally as infectious and magnetic with again classic and modern textures rubbing excitedly again each other within its controlled yet salacious swing. As the music, Coxon has a snarl to his croon, attitude dripping from every syllable and note before My Rock And Roll steps up to coax bad behaviour with its blues skinned devilry entangled in more of the great guitar enterprise which veins the whole of Care Plan For The Soul.

Power Of Addiction shares some of that psychedelic influence next; keys and melodies a sultry tempting while Rag And Bone Man has a great scruffy feel and character to its predacious gait and rhythmically rousing proposal. The song alone sums up the variety of flavours within The Sourheads sound, a host of rock bred essences embroiled in its inescapable command of body and imagination. It all adds up to one of the biggest highlights of the release, one quickly matched by the voracious punk ‘n’ roll of Don’t Get Caught (I Am The Lotus). Like The Stooges and Eddie and The Hot Rods caught in the act by The Vibrators as AC/DC hold the camera, the track is superb, taking best song honours with its manipulative temptations and craft.

Both Secret Cigarette and Warbird take a firm grip of release and listener next, the first an invasive but seductive fire of blues and classic grooves with punk bred kindling while its successor merges sullied rock ‘n’ roll with some of the most addictive melodic hooks and enterprise within the album for another pinnacle. As with many songs, it openly draws on some classic punk hooks and teases but equally shares psych rock imagination for the album’s most imaginative moment to stand alongside its best.

Care Plan For The Soul concludes with Mad Dog, a song rising from an initial Queen/Skid Row like invitation into an invasive and volatile ballad which becomes more captivating by the minute and listen, much as the album itself.  Indeed just as many will take to the release within seconds many others will need time to explore and discover its qualities; the big rewards for the attention we can vouch for as too the finding of a potential of even greater fun and adventure ahead with the Sourheads.

Care Plan For The Soul is available now through Oak Island Records on CD, Vinyl and Digitally.

https://www.thesourheads.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesourheads    https://thesourheads2.bandcamp.com/

 Pete RingMaster 23/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Royal Podencos – Broken Bones

Released earlier this year, Broken Bones is an album well worth taking a close listen too especially if you have an appetite for boisterous garage rock. The second album from Spanish quartet Royal Podencos, it offers much more than that garage rock tag, the Santander outfit creating their sound with a  just as rich flavouring of punk, blues rock, and power pop for a proposition as fresh as it is enjoyably nostalgic.

The successor to 2014 debut What´s your plan, the eleven song strong Broken Bones needs little time to get the body bouncing and an appetite for the band’s rock ‘n’ roll brewing with opener Sexuality. The foursome of Jonny, Jota, Toni, and Hans instantly tease with a rockabilly riff, its lure aligned to a rousing hook and melodic devilry as rhythms dance invitingly in the ears. With great distinctive vocals riding its mischievous almost salacious antics, the song swiftly springs its inescapable trap to inspire the body and imagination to be as lively as its own escapade.

It is a rousing start to proceedings which is never outshone within Broken Bones but certainly rivalled like by its successor Break us down. Its own swinging flirtation and gait brings a more sixties flavoured adventure but one quickly revealing its seventies punk instincts as vocals and hooks unveil their infectious intent. As the first song it is a highly catchy and addictive proposal, a slice of pop infused punk ‘n’ roll to get the hips and spirit dancing; their energies given no respite by the following more bluesy rock ‘n’ roll of The dog you found. With a Tom Petty-esque scent and drawl to its stroll it too casts a contagious sixties power pop jangle with a truly virulent hook to grab ears and attention alike.

Though not quite finding the heights of its predecessors, Anything you want is no lightweight in persuasive rock ‘n’ roll either, its tenacious swing and sharp hooks leading the listener into eager involvement while Noone´s giving up in here, whilst keeping enjoyment full, allows a breath to be taken with its Americana kissed blues croon and suggestive guitar woven melodic web. Both tracks spread the rich flavours in the Royal Podencos sound further, each song so far revealing a different angle in the garage rock ‘n’ roll heart of the band.

A little creep has the inner bounce leaping again as it shares its pop rock contagion next, eager rhythms injecting its already enticing bait with moments of anthemic tenacity as riffs scythe across their swings before What´s wrong with you has thoughts going back to bands like Eddie and The Hot Rods, The Motors, and Tonight with its hepped up and highly enjoyable antics.

The discord lined canter of On and on hits the spot within seconds next, its punk nature and off-kilter harmony inescapable temptation against which Let me shake puts up its own blues laced raw pop ‘n’ roll to matching persuasive success. As with most tracks within the album, each has an instinctive knack in setting traps and hooks which are impossible to evade or ignore resulting in another very agreeable rock ‘n’ roll workout.

The closing pair of You got a home and Tell me why are no different even without quite hooking up with the passions as naturally as others within Broken Bones. Nevertheless, their respective individual moments of garage pop punk and classic blues rock leave pleasure high and the album impressing right up to its last breath.

While sensing something even more unique is lurking, just waiting to break out in the Royal Podencos sound, Broken Bones consistently hits the spot with moments of lustful pleasure on top. If you are looking for some new varied rock ‘n’ roll to get dancing too then Broken Bones is well worth tangling with.

Broken Bones is available now @ https://royalpodencos.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/royalpodencos/

Pete RingMaster 21/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Cavemen – Born To Hate

TC_RingMasterReview

It did not take the release of recent single Too High To Die/I’d Kill to stir up eager anticipation for the new album from The Cavemen, that instinct bred by the band’s debut album last year, but it certainly added to the energy of the lustful welcome offered to Born To Hate. Native New Zealanders now UK based within the “grimy streets of London”, The Cavemen is one of those proposals you naturally take to or not, but for raw and uncompromising spirit stirring rock ‘n’ roll, the quartet’s punk driven garage rock takes some beating.

That previously mentioned single suggested a new primal ferocity and trashy tenacity had been bred in the band’s sound, a lascivious urgency which again fuels Born To Hate. In many ways the release is a continuation of The Cavemen’s self-titled debut album; more of the same lo-fi devilry but with this fresh impetus of sonic corruption, the band breaches a new plateau in their salaciously dirty rock ‘n’ roll.

Savage is the first assault on ears, its blues scented impurity a swift involvement of ears and appetite as sixties garage rock puts on its punk pants for a stomping trespass driven by the rhythmic slaps of drummer Jake and the moody bassline of Nick. As with most songs from the band to date, involvement with feet and vocal chords is swift and full, its ease of persuasion just a warm up for the joys to come as I’m A Mess swoops in straight after. A teasing spicy hook starts things rolling, its inescapable lure soon backed by tenacious rhythms and the scuzzy enterprise of guitarist Jack, in turn his great unpolished vocal backing to the punk attitude bred delivery of front man Paul creating a rousing union hard to resist.

swamp-cover_RingMasterReviewI Hate Art romps in next, its raucous hook littered confrontation assaulting and exciting like a fusion of The Sonics and Eddie and The Hot Rods and quickly in control of hips and feet whilst stirring up a litter of trouble before Satan Is Her Name stalks ears and imagination with the same trashy deviancy and demonic wantonness as bound in its centre of attention. Fair to say floorboards bounce when the song is around, its infectiousness enslaving and instantly matched by that uncaged by the corrosive sixties pop bawdiness of In Love With You complete with eagerly chopping riffs and fab four inspired howls.

There is a taste of Motorhead to next up Speed Of Death, its harsh ferocity and virulent antagonism as catchy as anything taunting from within Born To Hate while showing a broader diversity within the familiar Cavemen sound. That variety continues across the album as songs like I Hope They Drop The Bomb On Me bullies and flirts with its sonically befouling seventies punk/power pop inspired antagonism and straight after the crazed punk ‘n’ roll of Ain’t My Baby ignites an even greedier reaction and union between listener and release.

The band drops down a gear for the excellent Dead To Me, its meaty croon though still loaded with muscular energy as it strolls rabidly through ears with its psychobilly laced garage rock before Nasty Girl Nasty Boy whips up the passions all over again with its The Pirates meets The Flys romp. Pure rock ‘n’ roll in its most primordial punk breeding, the track is irresistible; a certain pinnacle though closely chased throughout the album by songs like the psychotic UK Subs coloured C.H.A.R.L.I.E. and the ever glorious I’d Kill (To See You Dead). One of the tracks on the last single, it is a belligerent nagging of the senses carrying a great groan of The Saints and The Lurkers to its grouchy contagion.

Born To Hate is completed by the persistent fingering of Why Won’t You; a song as seventies pop glam as it is punk in its sonically ravaged way, and an inescapable infection to bring a thrilling release to a boisterously rousing close. The band’s songs might and will draw comparisons to others at certain times but every flavour is devoured, twisted, than corrupted again until emerging as part of a riot unique to The Cavemen and right here helping create an album which simply leads you into dirty habits.

Born To Hate is available via Dirty Water Records at https://thecavemennz.bandcamp.com/album/born-to-hate  and http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/The-Cavemen/c/18119001/offset=0&sort=normal

 

https://www.facebook.com/thecavemennz

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Of Kings and Captains – Jack My Boy

of-kings-and-captains-pic_RingMasterReview

Ahead of their new EP Give ’em Hell Son, British pop rockers Of Kings and Captains have released new single Jack My Boy, a mercilessly infectious slice of robust rock ‘n’ roll lying somewhere between The Pirates, Eddie and the Hot Rods, and The Wildhearts. It is hard to imagine that the Black Country hailing band could have found a more rousing teaser for their new EP, the new single taken from it one of those proposals which instinctively grips ears, voice, and bodies easily enlisting their eager involvement in short time.

Stourbridge bred, Of Kings and Captains released their debut album in 2015 to eager reactions; its success backed up by a potent live reputation which has seen the band share stages with the likes of McFly and Kids in Glass Houses among many and recently undertake a five date stadium tour with Bon Jovi. The foursome of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Luke Wassell, lead guitarist Joshua Lomas, bassist Dean Greatbatch, and drummer Kieran Lock linked up with producer Gavin Monaghan (The Twang, Editors, Niplozi) and Joseph Murray for Give ’em Hell Son and if Jack My Boy is anything to go by, with thrilling success.

A song according to Wassell which is “…about self-confidence and defying people who doubt you! it’s all about sticking to your guns and being yourself regardless of how people might put you down. It’s about being individual and kicking back against the norm“, Jack My Boy has all attention leaning its way from the initial lure of drum enticement. Lock’s magnetic rhythms are quickly joined by an anthemic bassline and eager twang loaded riffs, they in turn turning to an array of fifties seeded hooks as Wassell’s tones whips up even more infectious bait to the already catchy encounter. From there the track continues to lead the listener, drawing them towards seriously virulent choruses, they irresistible peaks in one, from start to finish, spirit arousing stomp.

It takes just one listen to be firmly involved in the song with every encounter after drawing keen and full participation. If Jack My Body is a sign of things to come with Give ’em Hell Son, the EP is a must.

Jack My Boy is out now with the Give ’em Hell Son EP available for download from all good digital retailers September 9th.

Upcoming Gig Dates:

Sept 9th – Katie Fitzgerald’s – Stourbridge (Acoustic Show)

Sept 29th – RiverRooms – Stourbridge

Sept 30th – The Shed – Leicester

Oct 15th Wulfrun Hall ­‐ Wolverhampton

https://www.facebook.com/ofkingsandcaptains   http://ofkingsandcaptains.com/   https://twitter.com/ofkingsandcaps

Pete RingMaster 08/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Los Chicos – Rockpile of Shit

Los Chicos_RingMasterReview

There are few rock ‘n’ roll parties as thrilling and irresistible as those provided by Spanish rockers Los Chicos, an experience they offer once again with new album Rockpile of Shit. Offering fourteen tracks which embrace everything from garage to pub rock, punk to funkily soulful shenanigans and plenty more, the release is a feast of boisterously rousing rock ‘n’ roll and a delicious echo of the Madrid quintets’ inimitable live show.

Formed in 2000, Los Chicos have released a quartet of increasing acclaim grabbing albums before Rockpile of Shit, the previous trio of Launching Rockets (2007), We Sound Amazing But We Look Like Shit (2009), and In the Age of Stupidity (2013) released, as the band’s new encounter this time in conjunction with Folc Records, on the always impressing Dirty Water Records. Live the band has ignited stages alongside the likes of Mudhoney, Southern Culture on the Skids, King Khan, The Sonics, Johnny Casino, Soundtrack of our Lives, Redd Kross, Cosmic Psychos, Spencer P Jones, The New Christs, The Young Fresh Fellows, The Meanies, Barrence Whitfield, Hi-Risers, Eddie And The Hot Rods, Roy Loney, and many others and toured across the globe, hitting Australian four times. Now they are ready to set a new stomp in motion across the world with Rockpile of Shit, a one hard to resist slab of fiercely flavoursome rock ‘n’ roll.

Feet and hips are soon as on board with band and album as ears when opener A Kingdom Of Coolness starts things off. Choppy beats and riffs soon tempt as grooves and vocals steer the course of the punk infused encounter. With its seeds seemingly in sixties garage rock and seventies punk, the track carries a great feel of old UK band The Cortinas to it as it emerges an undemanding yet seriously inescapable incitement to body and appetite as virulently infectious as it is commandingly rousing.

The same qualities fuel the following Rockanrolla, its own raw rock qualities making a potent temptation around the inviting tones of vocalist Rafa Suñén. Again the guitars of Gerardo Urchaga and Antonio Urchaga nag and jangle with remorseless enterprise and persuasion, bringing an Eddie And The Hot Rods hue to its boisterous catchiness before the even more virulent charms of I Don’t Wanna Learn Anymore steps forward. The swinging bassline of Guillermo Casanova makes for a powerful lure as the crisp beats of Ral García back up its invitation; they in turn matched in old school revelry by the guitars but with a modern spice which is inimitably Los Chicos.

FDW003_RingMasterReviewThe funky R&B of Older And Better has feet taking to the floor from its first rhythmic beckon, backed perfectly by the sizzling flames of sax which grace the outstanding encounter. With a hint of King Salami and the Cumberland Three to it, the song is mouth-watering devilry laying an early claim to best track on the album but soon rivalled by its Department S spiced title track. It too infests body and soul, bringing each alive and indeed eager vocal participation with its and the bands creative festivity.

Last Day Here offers a fiercer snarl while feasting on a fifties rockabilly inspiration. Equally though, it has a power pop vibrancy which lights up another impossible to escape chorus, voice and hips puppets to its manipulative magnetism. With discord flirting with the guitars and a Devo-esque quaintness emerging, the track epitomises the album; a seemingly simply flavoured proposition soon showing itself bursting with bold adventure and diversity.

The country/cow punk romp of Responsibility Ville hits the spot with ease next whilst More Beer is a melodic jangle sparking thoughts of countrymen The Pulsebeats as it too grips an already greedy appetite for release and sound. The wonderful relentless beats of García, as throughout the album, enslave ears and spirit alone, guitars and vocals playing with its conquest in an array of styles and devilish ways, Miami Beach soon employing its own surf hued punk ‘n’ roll web ensuring there is no respite for the listener’s  body and enjoyment.

Through The Ramones meets The Members like Mommy’s On MDMA and the country punk of Little Man, there is no lessening in bouncing songs and bodies while Night Ride adds its own individual twist on the country rock scent. All three leave a big smile on the face, though each is eclipsed by the scuzzier funk ‘n’ roll of I Know I Don’t Know and finally the hypnotic shuffle of closing track Toga Land. The pair ensures that physical and emotional involvement is at its most eager as the album comes to a mighty conclusion, an event leading only to a hard deny urge to press play and start all over again.

A great many already know of the rock ‘n’ roll majesty spun by Los Chicos, and with Rockpile Of Shit we can be safe in suggesting so will a great many more. This is one party everyone should gate crash.

Rockpile Of Shit is out now via Dirty Water Records/ Folc Records @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/~/category/id=2801529&offset=0&sort=addedTimeDesc and http://folcrecords.tictail.com/product/fdw003-los-chicos-rockpile-of-shit-preventa-disponible-en-mayo

https://www.facebook.com/LOS-CHICOS-42339317978

Pete RingMaster 30/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

LaFlamme – Broken Hearted Sons

laflamme_RingMasterReview

Hailing from Surrey, LaFlamme is a punk ‘n’ roll fuelled band about to release charity single, Broken Hearted Sons, to raise funds and awareness for Muscular Dystrophy UK. It is a three track offering of instinctive and anthemic rock ‘n’ roll which, without fuss, pleases ears and sets attention the way of a great cause.

Formed in 2013 as floods and storms engulfed their home county, LaFlamme consists of guitarist/vocalists Richie Lambert and Kieron Robathan, drummer Dan Motchman, and bassist/vocalist Ditch. Breeding their sound and songs upon inspirations from the likes of AC/DC, The Ramones, Lou Reed, Blink 182, and Biffy Clyro, the band found itself headlining the Surrey Advertiser stage at Guilfest in 2014 and soon after playing support to bands such as The Ramonas and Sex P****Sed Dolls, as well lighting up a host of leading venues across the south east of England. A self-titled laflamme art_RingMasterReviewEP awoke further attention whilst the past few months has seen LaFlamme working upon Broken Hearted Sons in aid of Muscular Dystrophy UK; a release inspired by two of Kieron’s cousins who have muscular dystrophy and “have been such an inspiration to do what you love and never give up doing it.”

Broken Hearted Sons is the lead track; a rousing slice of rock ‘n’ roll which, from a subdued yet potent opening, uncages a torrent of rolling rhythms, spiky riffs, and sonic enterprise which simply flow with punk rock infectiousness. It is an undemanding but seriously catchy offering quickly whipping up involvement in feet and spirit, not forgetting an eager appetite for the band’s unassuming but magnetic sound.

With a whiff of Eddie and The Hot Rods to it, the track makes way for the more classic rock scented Breaking In. It’s initial hook and character has a Bowie-esque hue to it whilst further into its melody entwined body, a Thin Lizzy like flavouring colludes with the restrained but vibrant rock ‘n’ roll lighting up the ears.

The closing romp of Liar is similarly textured but soon reveals its own mischievous imagination and boisterous punk ‘n’ roll endeavour. Rhythms alone are a spark to keen physical involvement, eagerness only reinforced by the tenacious vocals and sonic exploits of the guitars.

All three tracks provide honest slices of perpetually enjoyable rock ‘n’ roll; straightforward uncomplicated proposals which get the job done whilst providing thick satisfaction. The fact they are raising funds and awareness for a very worthy cause only thickens the pleasure.

The LaFlamme charity single, Broken Hearted Sons is released 15TH April via Goloud Records.

http://www.laflammeband.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/LaFlamme/235358599953530   https://twitter.com/laflammeband   http://www.musculardystrophyuk.org/

laflamme show

Pete RingMaster 29/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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