Stu Rawle – Portland Pill

Stu Rawle_RingMasterReview

Stu Rawle is a name we might be hearing on an increasing number of lips in coming times, certainly if he can build on his potent and seriously engaging debut EP, Portland Pill. The release is a soulful three track shuffle bred from the British singer/songwriter’s individual electro acoustic/funk lined sound. It has an easily accessible character, hinting as to why Rawle’s music has lured names such as Ed Sheeran and Bon Iver when describing his sound. He has also been called the modern male equivalent to KT Tunstall but equally there is a uniqueness to his songs which, as shown by this first EP, increasingly sparks attention.

Originally hailing from East Anglia and now based in the Mile End, East London, Rawle has become an eagerly followed and praised live presence on the capital’s live scene. TV channel, London Live and local radio stations, have shown keen interest in and played his tracks to back up successful shows across venues such as the Troubadour and O2 Academy. Now the man is looking at stirring up his most successful year yet with the Portland Pill EP; national attention his next aim.

art_RingMasterReviewThe EP’s title track is first up to caress ears, it a song written back in 2013 and themed by “nostalgia and the growing complexities and pressures of young adulthood.” With its title inspired by Rawle’s own memories of Portland Bill in Dorset, where he spent numerous enjoyable times in his childhood, the song reflects on those imagination inspiring escapes we all have experienced at some time and temper times of pressure and intensity in life. Musically Portland Pill lays out an inviting melodic canvas for thoughts to swing across on a catchiness which swiftly has ears caught. Its body has a gentle sway and swell to it, like tender waves lapping the senses as the guitar courts the resonance of bass and crisp beats, and subsequently the emergence of floating harmonies and crawling keys.

In quick time feet and emotions are bounding along with the increasingly infectious and lively stroll of the song, a potent lure which is as ripe in the electronic and emotional reflection of Lightspeed too. The track was sparked by the death of Rawle’s grandfather, who suffered from Alzheimer’s. From the start Rawle’s emotive tones are immersed in electro smog, almost fighting to make their voice heard in a reflection of his grandfather’s inner suffering from the illness. Mesmeric and richly evocative, the lyrical perspective of the song and its imagination provide a gripping and powerful incitement for ears and thoughts, which in turn only offers greater insight into the talent and potential brewing within the artist.

Closing track is In Hindsight, an acoustic/electro pop tempting with bold energy and a flirtatious nature in sound. It quickly shows an enticing jazziness to its opening funk seeded swagger, a tenacious touch which is matched in appeal by the broody rising of shadows and their strings like enterprise. They simply court the imagination, adding another layer to the track’s provocative and feisty revelry where a great use of textures adds to the potency of sound around the ever impressing voice and expressive delivery of Rawle.

The first listen of the Portland Pill EP earned an appreciative nod, second and third a thicker want to know more, and fair to say from thereon in, the release and especially Lightspeed just continued to blossom with matching enjoyment. That name again which you might be hearing a lot of in the future? Stu Rawle.

The Portland Pill EP is out now on iTunes.

https://www.facebook.com/StuRawleMusic

Pete RingMaster 29/02/2016

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THE TiPS – TWISTS’N’TURNS

pic C_Helge_Tscharn

pic C_Helge_Tscharn

An album to get you dancing, thinking, and acting on your instincts, TWISTS’N’TURNS is a mighty reminder that its creators, THE TiPS, is a band you really need in your life, especially if reggae, ska, punk, and funk brings your ears and emotions to life. The third full-length from the German band, it is also their most eclectic and imaginative adventure yet and in turn their most rousingly enjoyable.

Hailing from Dusseldorf, THE TiPS was formed in 2009 by vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Aljoscha Thaleikis after returning back to his homeland after spending some of his formative years in the United States where he was introduced to styles of music that he was previously unfamiliar with. Having explored the merger of flavours such as soul, ska, reggae and dub with the punk rock of his roots, his return to Germany led to the creation of THE TiPS. The band’s debut album High Sobriety was released in 2011 with its successor Trippin’ unveiled two years later, both to potent success. The past two years alone has seen the trio of bassist Philip Pfaff, drummer Janosch Holland, and Thaleikis play over 130 shows, the sharing of stages with band such as The Mad Caddies, Die Rakede, Ruts D.C., The Toasters, and Jaya the Cat amongst them. Now they are poised to stir up broader and stronger attention with the Alexander Beitzke (Jamiroquai, Ed Sheeran, Florence And The Machine) produced and Pete Maher (U2, Linkin Park, Lana Del Ray Nine Inch Nails) mastered TWISTS’N’TURNS; twelve tracks which swing and stomp whilst taken a bite at issues impacting on all.

The album opens with Birds in Trees, instantly clasping ears with vocal and melodic temptation before showing its sonic and rhythmic muscles. From that wall of energy a mellower but no less magnetic stroll emerges as the song saunters with its reggae bred gait. Thicker eruptions break throughout, grooves and spicy hooks adding to the welcome trespass before things relax into captivating calm again. It is a riveting persuasion, a rich tempting only blossoming further with the distinctive tones of Skindred frontman Benji Webbe who guests on the excellent start to the album.

THE_TiPS_TWISTSNTURNS_RingMaster ReviewThe following Leaving Home gently swings in next, its sultry sway aligned to the thick brooding tone of bass and gripped by the excellent vocal presence of Thaleikis. Impossible not to be hooked by its reserved yet anthemic chorus alone, the song has a By The Rivers meets The Skints nature which simply entices, a success matched by the seductive croon of Wasting Time. Similar spices line the infectious romancing of ears, as too an equally catchy and tenacious energy which soon has hips and voice in eager involvement. Both tracks are irresistible, easy going yet imposingly compelling proposals though both are overshadowed a touch by the outstanding Chosen Fool. Stabbing riffs collude with the grouchy bass to quickly excite ears; imagination and an already keen appetite swiftly inflamed by the Ruts like punk ‘n’ roll invention which also emerges to add fresh bite and attitude to the exceptional encounter.

The band’s punk heart is given full rein for Johnny’s Song next, another striking and virulent arousal of body and emotions carrying an essence of Russian punks Biting Elbows to it. Similarly THE TiPS brew flavours which hint at a Sublime/Living End link-up, but coming up with something distinct and incendiary to themselves. It is uniqueness just as apparent in the infectiously sultry funk infused saunter of If You Want To and the noir lit landscape of City Lights. The first glides through ears with a slightly mischievous enterprise whilst the second is pure aural and emotive drama. From vocals to keys, exotic hooks to the ever pungent tone of Pfaff’s bass, the transfixing incitement is a web of intrigue with a volatility that is seemingly Skindred seeded.

Alien emerges with the same shadowy hues and emotional intensity next, flowing from the provocative shadow of the previous track. It swiftly wraps heavily persuasive and seductive tendrils around ears, at times conjuring a darker climate of intimidation to contrast and unite with the bluesy hued flames also arising from the mellower strains of the slow burning treat of an encounter.

Igniting another devouring of the band’s punk ‘n’ roll imagination straight after, Parade shares a riveting steely bass lure amongst swinging rhythms from Holland, before Do It Right prowls and flirts with its predacious ska punk devilry. Managing to be as sinister as it is irresistibility tempting, the song has body and emotions bouncing, matching all feisty movements in catchy and melodic kind. Equally, it powerfully stirs up thoughts too; an impressive knack the band has leading to full involvement from all aspects of the listener as evidenced by the Red Hot Chili Peppers spiced Back in the Days. There are some songs which are instinctive manna for the soul; encounters which simply turn on the sweet spot for an everlasting romance and this definitely qualifies as one.

Completed by the simply mesmeric, emotive serenade of Still Turning, another song which leaves a lingering imprint, TWISTS’N’TURNS is one thoroughly and imposingly thrilling union between band and ears. It is surely the release to take THE TiPS to the attention of spotlights beyond their homeland’s borders and the underground scene in general, at the very least destined to make a mark on a great many end of year favourites lists.

TWISTS’N’TURNS is out now on Long Beach Records Europe @ http://thetips.de/shop/

http://thetips.de/   https://www.facebook.com/thetipsofficial

Pete RingMaster 22/02/2016

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Damn Vandals – I Hate School/Whisky Going Free

Damn Vandals_I Hate School_Packshot_RingMaster Review

News of any new Damn Vandals release always sparks a keen lick of the lips and a flutter of anticipation in the heart of The RR thanks to the band’s previous explosive roars of spiky rock ‘n’ roll posing as singles and albums. So no surprise that when the announcement of the UK rockers new single came through, the same reaction escaped. Consisting of I Hate School backed by Whisky Going Free, the release is a recognisable Damn Vandals stomp with the unapologetic attitude and fiery enterprise the London quartet is so renowned for.

At times it is hard to imagine that it is only back in 2012 that Damn Vandals started exciting ears with the release of the Beautiful Mind EP and soon after debut album Done For Desire, the band seeming to have incited ears for many more years. Each release made quick and potent impressions with the latter spawning a host of essential and thrilling singles luring as rich a dose of acclaim as the album sparked itself. Live the band’s hook loaded mix of garage, psych punk, and earthy rock ‘n’ roll has equally earned the band a big reputation and fiercely loyal following, a success only cemented and expanded with last year’s uncaging of second album Rocket Out Of London, it another web of contagiously addictive tracks working within the impressive body of the album or subsequently alone as incendiary singles. The two songs making up the new single have the same source, both I Hate School and Whisky Going Free taken from the Julian Simmons (Midlake, Ed Sheeran, Guillemots, Goldheart Assembly) produced, heavily praised full-length, and each rising to the challenge of making singular statements of persuasion.

I Hate School swings in on a sultry melodic lure and winy groove as vocalist Jack Kansas quickly adds his distinctive delivery and tone. As his voice takes hold so he and fellow guitarist Frank Pick continue that first enticement with fingers on guitar strings, but broadening its thickness with bluesy coatings for an increasingly tempting invitation. Alongside, the more grounded rhythms of bassist Adam Kilemore Gardens and drummer Chris Christianson stroll, emphasizing and shadowing the fiery textures around them perfectly.

Within the heart of Rocket Out Of London, it is fair to say that the song was a touch shaded by the more raucous dynamics and drama of other tracks around it but there is no denying that as a single, it seems to discover a new strength and character to bewitch and inflame ears with ease. Ending on a persuasive anthem of vocal roar from Kansas, again at perfect contrast to the smouldering sonic climate of guitar, the track has ears smiling and satisfaction full to bursting.

Second song Whisky Going Free has feet tapping and hips swaying within a breath of its start, hooks and grooves flirting like a casually flirtatious seductress as rhythms bring their own saucy revelry to the creative party. Bass and guitar soon unite in a tango which drives the song from start to finish, their tempting enticing cradling the matching swagger which too come from the breeding of imagination and temptation. Steely guitar jangles and punk seeded noise only adds to the thick and riveting persuasion on offer, the song undiluted and unfussy rock ‘n’ roll as inventive and instinctively compelling as anything out there and from anyone.

Whilst fans wait for new material, I Hate School/Whisky Going Free provides another essential Damn Vandals moment for 2015 whilst for newcomers, the single is a potent way to step into the creative and off-kilter ingenuity of Damn Vandals.

I Hate School/Whisky Going Free will be released November 6th.

https://www.facebook.com/damnvandals  http://damnvandals.co.uk  https://twitter.com/DamnVandals

Upcoming Live Show: The Dublin Castle, London on Fri 27 Nov 2015.

Pete RingMaster 02/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Following Foxes – Self Titled EP

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When an artist or band has a background which involves in part the Academy of Contemporary Music in Guildford, there is always an intrigue to learn more, partly because the town is a part of our musical heritage too and mostly because of some of the talent which has been nurtured at the ACM. From one of the UK’s most potent and impressive place of musical education, the likes of Newton Faulkner, Guy Davis who was part of the UK’s finest alternative rock antagonists Reuben, Joe Butterworth of Talanas, and Alexis Demetriou who formed the criminally unrecognised rockers Lost In Wonderland, have made varying impacting but potent marks on the British music scene. It is a long list also including members of Lawson and some bloke named Ed Sheeran, successes to which you can now add home town boys Following Foxes.

With its members all meeting at ACM, Following Foxes formed in 2013 and having a strong past year on the live scene now release their self-titled debut EP to nudge a broader attention to their presence. The five track release is a captivating introduction to the quartet, a handful of songs bred in a melodic caress of folk and indie/acoustic rock which energetically and skilfully bring a summery and creatively tenacious proposition to the senses. Drawing in inspirations from bands such as Biffy Clyro, Mumford & Sons, City and Colour, and Pink Floyd, Following Foxes shows themselves to be a thoroughly magnetic proposal and their EP more than likely to pick up wider media attention to back up already eager play on local radio stations across the South East of the UK.

The band’s new single, Almost Lost It is first up and right away with punchy bass lures from Mike Chapman and a great shuffle of beats within a caress of guitar, has ears and imagination paying close attention. The song relaxes soon after to welcome the strong vocals of Gid Sedgwick, his tones as warm and alluring as the melodic venture already shown by his and Alex Hill’s guitars. Subsequently with ears transfixed, another bait of thick beats from Steve Price adds fresh adventure before the song settles into a vibrant stroll loaded with a folkish revelry and melodic

Artwork by Harry Murr @ Roberts Clothing

Artwork by Harry Murr @ Roberts Clothing

swagger. There is still plenty of variety to gait and sound across the song though, sometimes more subtle than in others but a great unpredictable essence which grips the appetite and certain enjoyment.

The following I Saw, You Saw Me Back makes a less dramatic entrance though Sedgwick immediately holds court with his melodic croon and lyrical intimacy. It is still a strongly appealing first touch though which expands into a feisty but composed dance of voice and rhythms within a melodic seduction. As its predecessor, the track soon worms under the skin and into the psyche, a Lennon and McCartney whisper spicing part of the song whilst others times it romps along like a mix of Knots, Common Tongues, and The Radioactive Grandma.

Waiting for Someone, like those before it, simultaneously manages to be a warm reflective hug and a fiery little rocker, the great vocals across the band and occasionally a rigorously driving rhythmic thrust respectively igniting another memorable and increasingly enjoyable offering. It does not quite match up to the first pair such their might, but leaves satisfaction full before making way for Mother Brother. Though you cannot describe any of the songs as aggressive, there is a definite edge to the song when it steps up its energy around harmonically and melodically seductive embraces. It is a compelling end to a fine release; well not exactly an end as there is the brief melodic Outro to come but the party has ended by this point, its atmospheric haunting that drifting away of guests and excitement like after any slice of major fun.

Following Foxes has made a very impressive first step with a release which could straight away set them on a potent journey towards sparking the country’s attention. If not now it is impossible not to think or expect it will happen eventually but seems silly to wait, so go check out this highly pleasing release.

The Following Foxes EP is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/following-foxes-ep1-ep/id964894157

https://www.facebook.com/FollowingFoxes     http://followingfoxes.com/

RingMaster 02/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

 

 

Damn Vandals – Mad As Hell

Coverart_Damn Vandals_Mad As Hell

The British rock scene is not short on some rather exciting prospects and artists right now, bands which are stripping away its current landscape to create new primal and instinctively imaginative adventures. To the front of these propositions for the past few years, certainly since the release of their debut album Done For Desire in 2012 is Londoners Damn Vandals. They are the source of raw and aggressively inventive rock ‘n’ roll which seems to increase in virulence and creative rigour across every release, a success proven and reinforced once again by the band’s new single Mad As Hell. It is trade mark Damn Vandals yet again finds the band pushing new twists of sound and enterprise whilst providing another heady temptation into their warped sonic world for all newcomers.

Mad As Hell and its B-side, This Music Blows My Tiny Mind, both come from the band’s second album Rocket Out Of London, which as its predecessor was no stranger to widespread acclaim. In fact all Damn Vandal releases earn eager praise and it is hard not to suspect Mad As Hell doing the same. From an opening muscle bound grouchy bassline, the song has ears and attention firmly gripped ready for the distinctive and highly expressive tones of vocalist Jack Kansas. Just as swiftly his and Frank Pick’s guitars are weaving their flaming sonic seducing, a temptation ripe with spicy blues flavouring within a climate which shimmers and sizzles with melodic drama and fiery enterprise. Right away impressive on the album, the song has grown in stature and persuasive weight over time and now as a single, Mad As Hell sets the imagination and emotions sparking with pleasure. Within the embrace of the whole stunning full-length, its potency as a single initially might have been questioned but any doubts are soon tossed aside as the song revels in its spotlight proving that Rocket Out Of London in many ways is nothing but potential singles and essential slabs of rock ‘n’ roll.

The irresistible rhythmic frame of the single, cast by bassist Adam Kilemore Gardens and drummer Chris Christianson, is emulated in the equally contagious success of This Music Blows My Tiny Mind. Stretched sinews drive an even paced gait loaded with thick drum swipes and throaty bass riffs as vocals and guitars flirt with their caustic swagger. Littered with abrasing hooks and dirty melodies, the song is soon immersing ears into a unique tapestry of garage punk, psyche and raw punk with a stoner-esque tang, and swiftly infesting senses and psyche like a sonic virus. Charmingly psychotic and addictively feverish, the song is a creative brawl which again is only the strongest enticement into the ingenuity of Damn Vandals.

If you have yet to discover the quartet either Mad As Hell or This Music Blows My Tiny Mind provide a doorway to a theatre of original rock ‘n’ roll, and together make an inescapable sonic tempest. Though not labelled as such, the Julian Simmons (Midlake, Ed Sheeran, Guillemots, Goldheart Assembly) produced single is really a double A-sided offering in quality and striking impact, and proof that Damn Vandals still lead the current march of real rock ‘n’ roll.

Mad As Hell is released on 23rd February

http://www.damnvandals.co.uk/

RingMaster 22/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

 

Damn Vandals – Too Lazy To Die Too Stoned To Live/Cities Of A Plastic World

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Providing another irresistible taster and invitation to their widely acclaimed, album of the year contender Rocket Out Of London, UK psyche rockers Damn Vandals are unleashing a new double A-sided single. Comprised of two tracks distinctly different but deviously united in stealing the passions, the release is a ridiculously contagious and venomously caustic stomp. Both Too Lazy To Die Too Stoned To Live and Cities Of A Plastic World worm under the skin with compelling ingenuity and voracious enterprise, offering another inescapable temptation bred from a riveting brawl of garage punk infused with psyche and stoner rock from the London band. Quite simply it is punk infused rock ‘n’ roll at its most rigorously captivating and addictive.

Damn Vandals first gripped the passions with their Beautiful Mind EP, itself surpassed by debut album Done For Desire in 2012. Earlier this year the Julian Simmons (Midlake, Ed Sheeran, Guillemots, Goldheart Assembly) DE Ade Mulgrewproduced Rocket Out Of London set a new plateau for the band and template for emerging garage punk bands, the new single brings a stirring reminder with its sonic and deranged alchemy.

Both songs on the single provide a startling and magnetic scourge of unique sound and invention. Too Lazy To Die Too Stoned To Live makes an early vocal declaration before the track slips into a sultry and feverish stroll of melodic acidity and sonic expression. There is a sweet and sour twang to every slither of guitar incitement cast by Frank Pick whilst the bass of Adam Kilemore Gardens provides a throaty temptation which flirts with ears and imagination. Driven by the vibrant sinews of Chris Christianson’s beats and lorded over by the deliciously unique tones of Jack Kansas, the song finds a higher gear as it unleashes a captivating canter to its discord licked persuasion. Like Fatima Mansions meets Queens Of The Stone Age, with a flavoursome side dish of Engerica, the song is a glorious haunting of ears and passions.

   Cities Of A Plastic World breeds its own distinct veining of warped endeavour, a web of drama drenched sonic intrigue from the guitars aligning with jabbing beats for a delicious nagging on the senses and thoughts. A mischievous intimidation comes with the bass lures whilst vocally Kansas again parades the lyrical narrative with devious and raw expression whilst pure virulence soaks the dynamics and discord fuelled breath of the song. Complete with psychotic imagination to its rebellious nature, the track is one of the band’s finest moments to date.

If Damn Vandals has managed to escape the clutches of your attention then getting your teeth into the infectious heart of their new single is a must. Theirs is a sound which seduces and infests body relentlessly right through to emotions for the richest long lasting rewards; the twin temptation Too Lazy To Die Too Stoned To Live/Cities Of A Plastic World the perfect vehicle for their corruption of your soul.

Too Lazy To Die Too Stoned To Live/Cities Of A Plastic World is available on CD and digitally on iTunes and all major download sites from 22nd September.

www.damnvandals.co.uk

RingMaster 21/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Damn Vandals – Rocket Out Of London

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It is fair to say that psyche rockers Damn Vandals swiftly set themselves a place in British rock as one of the most exhilarating and promising propositions with their 2012 debut album, Done For Desire. It was an encounter drenched in originality and a feverishly diverse flavouring setting the band apart from most. To confirm and stretch all of its potency within a new mentally twisting maelstrom of psychotic goodness, the London band now unleash the senses infestation that is Rocket Out Of London. It is a glorious swagger of caustic abrasion and acidic ingenuity honed from a brawling incitement of garage punk, psyche and stoner rock, as well as a vein of raw punk, simply put demented rock ‘n’ roll at its most addictive.

As for a great many, our admittedly eager affair with Damn Vandals began with the release of their Beautiful Mind EP, a widely acclaimed encounter awakening attention and appetite for the potential and instantly impressive presence of the band. The release and subsequent songs though was only the taster for bigger and major things to come, Done For Desire thrusting the quartet to new levels and into a richer spotlight with its release. Uncompromising but with a contagion to its presence which works under the skin like a welcome niggling itch, the band’s sound has found a new depth and power to its virulence with the new release whilst still retaining the raw dark textures and unhinged threat which stirred up the passions so quickly upon their emergence. As evidenced by Rocket Out Of London, it has become a twisting intrusive beast which wraps with almost insidious intent around the ears, permeating every pore and synapse with an exhaustive toxicity which simply ignites the imagination and passions. Produced by Julian Simmons (Midlake, Ed Sheeran, Guillemots, Goldheart Assembly) as was its predecessor, the album takes the listener on a dirty and intimidatingly shadowed ride through explorations of themes such as celebrity stalking, hard liquor, death by dreams, madness and homeland security amongst many but ultimately just through the creative mad ingenuity of the band.

The album opens with the first single uncaged from its wonderful aural rapaciousness, Twist Up And Tangle. Released mid-March, the dv coversong laid down the strongest bait for the full-length and still holds its intensive grip with an epidemic bait of granite sculpted rhythmic punches and scything sonic swipes of guitar. From its first second the song is an inescapable cage for the senses and emotions, a scarring provocation soon given richer fuel by the ever distinct and voraciously delivered vocals of Jack Kansas. The track is swiftly into a predatory stride, prowling around the ears with a sonically slavering intensity from the guitar of Frank Pick and the dark throated voice of bass held in rein by Adam Kilemore Gardens but still adding commanding menace to the whole of the psychotic fare. It is a masterful and insatiable stalking driven by the magnetic beats of Chris Christianson, but one which with its spewing discord and melodic flames as well as corrosive hooks and breath, provides a raucous dance to shield the fact we are being preyed upon.

Like a mix of Fatima Mansions meets The Birthday Party, the opener alone wakes a hunger to which the following Cities Of A Plastic World adds its own imaginative virulence. The track opens with a rhythmic drama speared by a ridiculously contagious hook, its abrasing hot touch a niggling pleasure just hard to get enough of. Around its tempting Kansas again parades the song’s narrative with unbridled expression whilst the guitar of Pick continuously lights up new corners and adventures to court his primary enticement with skill and enterprise, the album easily his finest inventive and moment yet, as it is of the band itself. The track sculpts another immediate pinnacle in the impending lofty range of the album and is soon equalled by Too Lazy To Die Too Stoned To Live, a sultry stroll with a citrus edge to its grooves and melodic teasing. There is a definite lick of Queens Of The Stone Age initially and Eagles of Death Metal later to its constant erosive taste and hypnotic stance.

I Bring You Love which made up part of the earlier mentioned single keeps the album coursing potently through the body, its psychobilly/Cajun swamp-esque stomp with sliding toxic mesmerism and blues bred frisking irresistible. The track just gets better and more virulent with every crossing of its red-neck terrain with dirty violating rock ‘n’ roll scenery. With more than a feel of Screaming Blue Messiahs to it and always an essence of the previously mentioned Cathal Coughlan led band to the presence of Damn Vandals, the track is a delicious lingering antagonist to unreservedly submit to.

Both Number One Fan and Whisky Going Free provide a new mischief to fully devote attention and passions to, the first merging classic and incendiary garage rock for a rampaging stomp built upon the intensive frame work of Christianson, a cage again laced with riveting guitar revelry and craft. Its successor sidles boisterously up to the ears with tight sinews and deviously coaxing addictive grooves, the track a less expansive dark tango than say the last but with a no less leaner determination in its air and voice to seduce and inflame the passions, which it does with ease.

The following I Hate School hits the spot perfectly but lacks the spark of other tracks, a familiarity and somewhat predictable essence to its body slipping up against the surrounding triumphs. To put it into context though, with absorbing blues/psychedelically teased guitar invention from Pick and a certain unavoidable catchiness to its lure, the song still has feet and emotions fully engaged before next up Mad As Hell takes them on a similarly successful and potent ride, if again without quite matching earlier heady heights. The track rumbles and strolls with attitude and a thought immersing design all the same to keep the fire for the album burning eagerly.

The closing pair of tracks takes the release back to its highest plateaus, the first This Music Blows My Tiny Mind, another incitement with the stance of a predator and the drive of a volcanic eruption expelling sizzling melodic flames, searing hooks, and climactic rhythms building to a quite scintillating final drama. Its successor, the title track brings the album to a glorious closure, its addiction forging rhythmic slavery and scorching guitar endeavour an inescapable virulence guided as masterly as ever by the gripping tones of Kansas. Like a mix of QOTSA, Julian Cope, and Rocket From The Crypt, the track is a brilliant finale to a quite outstanding taking of the soul.

Rocket Over London with ease reveals that Damn Vandals is no longer the potential future of certainly raw British rock ‘n’ roll and garage punk but the template.

http://www.damnvandals.co.uk

http://damnvandals.bandcamp.com/album/rocket-out-of-london

9.5/10

RingMaster 07/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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