Mount Sinai – Weightless

 

As part of the indie virulence that was Black Black Hills to his solo temptation, the melancholically clothed troubadour-esque Rooster Cole, vocalist/songwriter Mark S. Aaron has been a magnet to our ears and imagination. We can swiftly say nothing has changed as the debut single from his new project, Mount Sinai, has been unveiled; in fact the temptation might just be as rich as it has ever been.

Mount Sinai sees Aaron linking back up with long term musical collaborator Tom Windsor (Black Black Hills/Coin-op),  with Alex Painter (Great Pagans/Speak Galactic), Max Numajiri (Spacenoid), and Jools Owen (Bear’s Den) alongside the pair. Musically Mount Sinai is a natural progression from Aaron’s Rooster Cole exploits; the swarthy psych rock flames and rich desert rock grandeur of first single Weightless bred in the more intimate but no less darkly dramatic sighs of his previous solo project. Even so, Mount Sinai is as individual as Rooster Cole was, a duskily lit almost saturnine proposition carrying its own minstrel like hue.

Weightless instantly lured ears with its initial melodic strum, its next joined by Aaron’s familiar and ever compelling tones. Unsurprisingly knowing his previous works, melancholy lines voice and melody but there is an edge to them which erupts as rhythms and sonic winds erupt. In full swing, the track becomes a heated draught across the senses; inspiring the imagination as much as swaying hips with its virulent temptation. Horns and the animated call of impassioned guitars only add to the track’s growing blaze, drama soaking note and syllable, melody and siren-esque lures all going to make for one striking debut.

Imagine a fusion of The Doors, Echo & The Bunnymen, and Helldorado and you get a shimmer of the Mount Sinai beauty going by the name Weightless; a proposition suggesting Aaron and co have started out on their greatest adventure yet.

Weightless is out now @ https://mountsinaiband.bandcamp.com/releases and other stores.

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Pete RingMaster 18/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Rousing waltzes and alluring confrontations: talking Calling All Astronauts with David Bury

Calling All Astronauts_RingMaster Review

British electro rockers Calling All Astronauts continued an inescapable trend of releasing some of the UK’s finest provocative and rousing encounters with their new album Anti-Social Network a short few weeks back. An uncaging of snarling and virulent rock ‘n’ roll with a political and emotional bite, the album showed the addictive prowess of CAA in getting bodies bouncing and thoughts exploring. Meaning for a long time to talk with the band, the outstanding album was the spark which made the time to act now. So with big thanks to band vocalist/writer/producer David Bury, we turned the spotlight on CAA and Anti-Social Network with plenty more insights in tow.

Hi David and thanks for sharing time with us.

Before we get into your new album, Anti-Social Network, can you tell us about the beginnings of Calling All Astronauts for those still new to the band? How did you all meet and what became the spark to the creation of the band?

J and I used to be in a band called US:UK together, J then went on to be in the pop-punk Caffeine. Caffeine had drawn to a standstill after numerous tours of the UK and US, we bumped into each other and just thought we’d like to have a jam for old time’s sake. One thing led to another and Calling All Astronauts was born. We originally had Andy the Caffeine drummer, but he went travelling, while he was away I decided to learn about programming drums and keys, and that’s how the sound we now have developed.

As you said all of you in the band now have experiences before and outside of Calling All Astronauts; how much has the band been shaped by those musical adventures either in where you want to go with it or in what not to get involved in again?

You learn a lot about the industry over the years; the good memories, the parties, the massive gigs are the ones you cherish, but the knowledge you gain about how the music business runs really shapes your attitude towards it.

We first caught on to the band through the single Winter Of Discontent in 2012, which was your second? This was already a lively and potent time for the band live, the playing with the likes of Echo & The Bunnymen, PWEI, Sigue Sigue Sputnik and A Place To Bury Strangers amongst your shows, and in making music as well as reactions to those early releases. What was the feeling in CAA back then and how has that differed over time, if at all?

The feeling than was actually pretty much the same as it is now, we always feel both flattered and humbled that anyone likes our music, we are just three guys recording in my lounge, yeah in modern terms that’s a studio, but it’s a lounge nonetheless; we’ve got Sky Sports on in the background, my cats walking through, and we are under the Heathrow flight path, so I regularly have to redo a vocal when a plane has been particularly low. 🙂  We do what we do; it’s a kind of love us or hate us, it’s your choice, we won’t take it personally if we are not to your tastes, but we’ll embrace you as a friend if you get what we do.

Calling All Astronauts Promo PictureSince then singles, EPs, and an impressive debut album has come and gone; all leading to the recent release of second album Anti-Social Network. Following the band over those encounters, your music has clearly evolved and grown over time. From the inside how do you see and hear that change?

I think that is a direct reflection on my production skills. I’ve learnt so much in the last four years about how to actually make a record. We are a Rock And Roll band that works in the manner of a dance act; we pay a lot of attention to how our records sound sonically. We took a long time recording Anti-Social Network because we wanted to make an album that we’ll still be proud of as a piece of art in 25 years’ time.

Apart from personnel, how too as CAA changed mentally in regard to making music and how you deal with the music scene.

I don’t think we have actually changed much, we are all kind of set into the people we are. We do however have an increasing dislike of the mainstream music industry, and how it brainwashes kids into thinking things that are mediocre at best are amazing. If you swallow diamonds your turds with contain diamonds, but they will still be turds.

The band is seems defiantly DIY; your releases for example being uncaged on your own Supersonic Media. Has that always been the intention or just how things have worked out?

It seems that way, as yet, we’ve never sent any demos or any of our releases to any record labels. Actually I lie. I did give a copy of the first album to Brett the radio guru at Epitaph. I met him in LA and just wanted him to know how we sound rather than looking for a deal, so gave him a copy of the album, but that’s about it. We like having artistic control; yes we would be a lot bigger than we are if we were with a big indie or major, but at what artistic cost. I’m doubtful any of them would allow us to make an album as eclectic as Anti-Social Network; they want their artists to make an album of the same track 11 times, all the different variations around the same three chords.

Let us get right into Anti-Social Network now. Did you approach its writing and creation as you have previous releases or try something different in its making?

Yes pretty much, except we had Paul on board for this one. We tend to start with a drum track and built up from there, it’s quite like building a house, and as we all know, without solid foundations you may as well build your house out of straw.

You seem to have woven essences of many of your inspirations over the decades in its sound which was an extra tasty spice for us as I know we share similar favourite artists and songs from the seventies and eighties especially. Was this something you set out to do or just an organic arising from the writing?

Not really, we had a bunch of ideas, and as they grew organically into the songs they now are, we often referenced them using the names of the bands that they had a feel of. All the album sounds like us; I don’t think any of it could be called a pastiche. I think it’s maybe more a case of, band X made some amazing records, let’s see if we can make something that can stand up in its own right against what they did. It would have been the easiest thing in the world for us to make 11 tracks all sounding like Time To Fight Back or conversely Always Be True, but that’s really not what we are about. CAA to us is about making music we like, it’s not some master plan to sell millions of records; we’d rather be Clock DVA than Coldplay every day of the week.

Like many we generally call CAA an electro punk/rock band. As the new album shows, your sound is much richer and varied than that suggests. How would you describe it for newcomers?

It’s kind of like a ride on the world biggest Rock And Roll Rollercoaster. You never know whether it’s going to turn, or drop or go upside down until it’s upon you. Wow that sounds pretentious; ok, just imagine all your favourite left field rock bands since 1976, i.e. Killing Joke, Ministry, PIL, Bauhaus, New Order, Psychedelic Furs, and then getting them produced by Skrillex and Prodigy

Lyrically Anti-Social Network is as biting as ever, something easy to expect from your music, but equally there seems a thicker intimacy to some songs too. Can you give some background to art_RingMasterReviewthe themes of songs and to the album in general?

I have been hoping somebody would ask this, this will be quite extensive but I’ve been longing to go through the album track by track, please feel free to edit this if you want.

  1. Living The Dream

I grew up in a northern town, not a city, and in towns you see people on the local music scene who are the “big cheese”, they walk around like Billy Big Bollocks, they get a little bit of interest from local radio and think all they have to do is move to the big city and world will be the oyster. When the reality is something far different, when you make that leap to pursue your dreams, you have to be prepared for the reality that you are suddenly a shrimp in an ocean of sharks.

  1. Empire

We are very active on social media, especially Twitter, where we have a lot of young followers, and I see their tweets about how in love they are and the next second they are broken hearted. It’s kind of sending the message that broken hearts are only temporary when you’re a teen and that you are going to fall in love many times during your life and that if one relationship doesn’t work out, move on to the next one.

  1. Time To Fight Back

The world and society is pretty much on the brink of imploding; if the majority of us don’t stand up and say, “enough is enough” 1% of the world’s population has 99% of the wealth. There are children dying because they don’t have clean water, how can that be right in 2016?

  1. Hands Up Who Wants To Die?

Is about youth crime and gang violence and how leaving the house with a weapon can lead to a whole heap of consequences due to one thoughtless move

  1. Life As We Know It

This is about envy and how people wish they were somebody else, it’s clichéd but life is what you make of it. If you’re happy in your life, embrace the fact you are happy and celebrate it, if you are not happy, do something about it. Sitting on your ass complaining is never going to improve things, unless you grasp the metal and go for it.

  1. The American Dream

It is not particularly about the US, but as the American Dream has always been held up as a goal for what people can achieve through hard work, I thought it was a good example for society as a whole, and how things have changed from the days that people left school with ambitions of professions or trades. They now want to be YouTubers or famous on Vine, they want fame from zero talent in a narcissistic shallow world.

  1. God Is Dead

God is a metaphor for consumerism; you don’t get consumerism without the word consume and society has become all consumed with the latest product X until they have it, and once they have it, their thirst for the net product X is instantly greater than their joy at getting the latest thing they’ve craved for.

  1. Always Be True

As I mentioned earlier we have a lot of young fans, this is a message to them not to bow to peer pressure. If you don’t like something or don’t want to do something never be afraid to say no, because one day, your day will come.

  1. Look In Your Eye

This is about the cynical people at major labels who only see artists as product and really have no feelings about the long term futures of said artists as long as they have them signed to 360 deals, make a profit and keep themselves in a job

  1. Black World

Is really saying, I don’t have all the answers, but if you listen to what I’m saying in my lyrics and think about them and join us in thinking that the world doesn’t have to be like this, together we can make the world a better place

  1. Divisive

Is about how the media and governments manipulate the news to suit their own agendas. They tell us they are doing it for righteous reasons when it’s all about greed and power and that once you turn to violence it becomes both self-perpetuating and self-defeating; hence the chant of Greed Equals Power Equals War Equals Death repeating almost to infinitum at the end because wars go on and on and only increase the misery.

Do the same things predominantly rile up the lyrical muse or are you adding to the recipe of sparks as years and records pass?

The constant in my psyche is that I don’t like inequalities in society.  I’m not saying that people shouldn’t be rewarded for doing good work or being enterprising but I don’t think people should be forced to live in poverty. I just think people need to keep their eyes open and feel compassion for others, see both sides of every story; never judge people on their race colour creed, religion or lack of it, or their sexual orientation. Judge people on whether they are good people or not. While these things still exist in society, I will maintain my motivation as a lyricist.

Can you give us some insight into the recording of Anti-Social Network; any unexpected dramas and surprises?

There were no real disasters along the way, however it did take way longer than we hoped or expected it would. In all it took 2000 hours to record;, I think that’s maybe on a par with some of the 70’s prog rock bands, but you have to be truly happy with your records as you have to live with them forever once you release them.

CAA_RingMasterReviewFor most artists it is fair to say that playing live is their favourite part of making music. When it comes to writing and recording something though, what is your favourite part or element?

It’s actually when people tell you that they have listened to your record and really got what you’re doing. It’s the greatest feeling in the world to know you are not the only people that think the way you do.

Is there any particular moment in Anti-Social Network which gives you an extra glow of satisfaction?

There are three parts I love; on the intro of Divisive where the combination of guitar drums and keys gives the impression of a weird pitch shift on the drop, it gets me every time. I also love the almost UK Garage drop on the middle 8 of Always Be True, and J’s guitars on Life As We Know that sound like Cellos. But we are very proud of all of it, I honestly believe there are no fillers on the album and that if we released all eleven tracks as singles, we could get radio play on all of them, I could however be delusional.

Tell us about the art work for the album which seems to sum up the air of the great release more and more every time you look at it.

It was amazing, we were trying to come up with ideas, and Paul had googled the word Anti-Social Network and up this came. It’s an actual sculpture by South African artist Maurice Mbiyaki. We contacted him and asked if we could use it on the cover, and he replied “he’d be honoured”; the rest is history. J

What is next in store for CAA fans and the band itself?

We are working on a new live set and will be out and about before too long. Time To Fight Back is set to be released as a single in June with David CAA VIP Remix and a specially recorded cover version.

Big thanks again David for chatting with us; anything you would like to add?

Not really other than a big thanks to you for being so supportive of our releases, we really do appreciate the kind words you have written about us.

And finally, give us an insight into the records and artists which could be claimed to have most inspired your own life and creativity.

Blimey, this is a massive question for me; I think I can nail it down to genres rather than actual acts, I’m very influenced by, Punk, Northern Soul, Goth, Metal, 80’s Hiphop, Synthpop, Industrial, EDM, 90s Indie, Post-Punk, Hardcore, Big Beat, Reggae, Ska, and DnB.

Check out our review of Anti-Social Network @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/03/11/calling-all-astronauts-anti-social-network/

http://www.callingallastronauts.com    https://www.facebook.com/CallingAllAstronauts/     https://twitter.com/CAA_Official

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 16/04/2016

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Ghosts Of Social Networks – Love Potion

art gosn_RingMasterReview

A dark seduction for the senses and a provocative adventure for the imagination, Love Potion is the debut single from UK band Ghosts Of Social Networks. It is not always easy to spark real attention with your first offering on unsuspecting ears, but the Manchester outfit certainly have no trouble with their magnetic fusion of post punk, indie rock, and neo-psychedelia.

Produced by Gavin Monaghan (Editors, Scott Matthews, Robert Plant, Paolo Nutini), the song is a dark tale of unrequited love and the use of alcohol as a way of getting close to someone. Embraced by a potent emotive exploration; its provocative narrative is more than match by thick waves of sultry and haunting sound which wash imposingly yet engagingly over the senses. With bold textures and lingering sonic caresses, the track openly bears the band’s inspirations from the likes of The National through to The Jesus & Mary Chain, with Echo & The Bunnymen the overriding scent especially when melodies and harmonies entangle and fuzzily smoulder in a fiery seduction. Despite those colours, the song reveals a distinct character belonging to the band, one which greedily enthrals as it sublimely slips into the psyche.

Love Potion is one half of an AA sided offering; its companion Mockingbirds, a similarly dark and provocative proposal looking at those imitating celebrity culture rather than carving out their own identity. The first side of the single is our first glimpse at Ghosts Of Social Networks though, providing a mystique soaked romancing of ears and imagination within a tempest of emotion and instinctive adventure from a band already suggesting they are going places.

Love Potion/Mockingbirds will be released digitally through all major sites May 6th on Integrity Records (INT 054).

https://www.facebook.com/GhostsOfSocialNetworks

Pete RingMaster 22/03/2016

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CALLING ALL ASTRONAUTS UNVEIL THEIR “ANTI-SOCIAL NETWORK”

art_RingMasterReview

UK goth punks ‘Calling All Astronauts’ have just released their hotly tipped second album ‘Anti-Social Network’ through Supersonic Media.

Calling All Astronauts are a London based, politically charged three-piece who rose from the ashes of ‘US:UK’. Featuring vocalist/programmer/producer David B, ex-Caffeine guitarist J Browning and Marionettes bassist Paul McCrudden, Calling All Astronauts blend electro, rock, post-punk and even dubstep to a sound that ignites and engulfs.

Since their incarnation in 2012, the trio have racked up a slew of accolades including four Number One’s in the Twitter Music Charts (knocking Adele from the top spot), having their latest single “Empire” notch up a three-month stint in the ‘Official European Indie Chart’ peeking at Number 2, and sharing stages with the likes of Echo & The Bunnymen, PWEI, Sigue Sigue Sputnik and A Place To Bury Strangers. The band have also headlined and sold out ‘Alan Magee’s Death2Disco’ at Notting Hill Arts Club.

The electro punks have a prolific output, releasing seven singles to date; this has helped the band pick up a swell of support from all four corners of the globe with numerous rock and alternative radio shows taking the band into their hearts by putting them on heavy rotation. The threesome have been featured on BBC Introducing, and were invited into the studio by Tom Robinson for his BBC 6 Music show. Their underground attitude to video production has also received great praise from many, including Irvine Welsh, who, after viewing the video for ‘What’s So Good About’, proclaimed it as ‘Brilliant’.

Calling All Astronauts now press on with the release of their blistering new second album ‘Anti-Social Network’, which is out now in stores via Supersonic Media and rammed with eleven killer cuts. Look out for festival and summer shows later this year.

www.twitter.com/CAA_Official  www.facebook.com/callingallastronauts  www.youtube.com/+callingallastronauts

Calling All Astronauts – Empire

CAA_RingMaster Review

There is no disguising that we have a definite appetite for the politically charged electro punk/rock of Calling All Astronauts which governs anticipation each and every time a release approaches. It also makes extra demands on the London based trio, breeding a want to be surprised by a sound which is fiercely distinctive to them. The band has met the challenge each and every time with varying but always firm success so far, and with their new single Empire swept it aside with one of their finest moments yet.

Stepping forward from the shadows in 2011, Calling All Astronauts has become one of Britain’s not only tenaciously creative and inventively confrontational bands but a strong supporter of other new and emerging artists. Musically they have been an acclaimed live presence which over subsequent years has shared stages with the likes of Echo & The Bunnymen, PWEI, Sigue Sigue Sputnik, and A Place To Bury Strangers, as well as headline and sell out Alan Magee’s Death2Disco at Notting Hill Arts Club, success backed up by a host of tracks and singles stirring up broader attention. It was with the release of debut album Post Modern Conspiracy though where more intense spotlights were provoked, it spawning further acclaim and support through its subsequent singles, all increasing the wealth of eager ears and fans surrounding the threesome. Last year saw the outstanding Who Wants to Die? single stir even more media and fan hunger, its success emulated again by Show Me Love earlier this year and now Empire, a track easy to suggest as being one of Calling All Astronauts’ very best incitements.

artwork_RingMaster Review     Straight away the song is igniting ears and emotions with its opening flame of guitar, the JJ Browning crafted coaxing aligning with the thick lures of bass offered by Paul McCrudden. Wrapped in the expressive caresses offered by the keys of David Bury, the song is an immediate seduction with a snarl in its heart and a lining of antagonism in its belly, a dark side accentuated by the distinctive and ever enjoyable dour throated tones of Bury. Quickly strolling along with an electro punk tenacity and irritable energy, the song hints at becoming a raging inferno but never erupts, instead holding back to persistently tease and entice as spiky and elegant melodies escape the guitar and keys respectively.

The track is one of those anthems which quickly get under the skin without forcing itself down the throat; its narrative and tone a slow burner of a persuasion infesting the imagination and psyche with consummate and inventive ease. That restraint never threatens to subdue the virulence of its enterprise though, only breeding a contagion of energy and spicy grooves to enlist quick and full involvement of the listener in body and thought. It is a quality Calling All Astronauts has had for a long time but honed it into its finest form yet for Empires.

The single is also equipped with quartet of remixes, each discovering and exploring a new aspect and depth to the song. The Skunxx Remix spreads mystique laced exoticism through its enthralling version whilst the Grover Remix delves into the more aggressive and imposing textures of the track, taking ears into a darker beguiling adventure. There is also the Angerwolf Remix which strips things back to the raw skin of the tracks’ heart before encasing it with dance-floor flirtation and to complete the release, the Pse Remix with its punk infused rock shaped take on the song. Each make fascinating proposals, enthralling and highly enjoyable fresh looks at the jewel in the crown, Empire itself.

Calling All Astronauts continue to impress and excite; similarly growing bigger and bolder and with Empire, again sure to entice another flock of new and eager followers.

Empire is out now via Supersonic Media @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/empire-ep/id1046265145

https://www.facebook.com/CallingAllAstronauts/    http://www.callingallastronauts.com   http://www.twitter.com/@CAA_Official

Pete RingMaster 04/12/2015

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Orange Vision – Dark Around the Eyes

OV_RingMaster Review

Listening to Dark Around the Eyes, the new single from UK quartet Orange Vision, is like delving into a treasure trove of sounds from the past five decades or so. It is a kaleidoscope of flavours bred from sixties psych rock, seventies post punk, eighties new wave/shoegaze, and twenty first century imagination, and one delicious temptation revealing why there is a hoo-hah brewing up around the band.

cover_RingMaster ReviewIt was almost two years to the day that Oxford hailing Orange Vision emerged from the creative bonding of vocalist/guitarist Edmund Quigley and lead guitarist Matthew Holford. Finding a mutual “love of clothes, music and a generally delinquent approach to their depressing surroundings and sapped music scene”, the pair formed the band with its line-up subsequently completed by the addition of bassist Daniel Jones, and drummer/backing vocalist Jacob Mott. The past year has seen Orange Vision impressively support Superfood and Honeyblood on the NME New Breed Tour, earn strong radio attention from the likes of Huw Stephens on BBC Radio 1 and Steve Lamacq on BBC 6 Music and more recently release the acclaimed How You Feel single. There is a certain feel going round that this is a band going somewhere, especially after Dark Around the Eyes works its compelling charm.

A stroke of jangly guitar is an instant lure, one quickly joined by more stringed bait and bass seduction speared by crisp and equally tempting beats. As soon as the sultry tang of melody breaks out persuasion is in full and relentless flow. The song’s early smouldering acidic charm is soon hugged by rumbling rhythms and spicy enterprise which is almost XTC entangled in Echo and The Bunneymen further embraced in Pulp meets The Cure honesty and pop alchemy. A relentless breeze of sparkling hooks, dark rhythms, and dourly tantalising vocal adventure entangle ears and imagination but all the time a host of other gripping twists and inventive essences enthral within the bewitching mix; a sixties pop shimmer of guitar just one irresistible element in the glorious infestation of dark pop.

Dark Around the Eyes is one half of the new double A-sided single from Orange Vision. Sadly we were not sent Wish You were Orange over to cover too, but if it is half as potent as its companion and the band’s other songs released to date, then it too will be part of possibly the best pop song unleashed this year.

Dark Around the Eyes/ Wish You were Orange is available from August 31st

Pete RingMaster 31/08/2015

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Kobadelta – The Hidden Door EP

Kobadelta

Expelling a captivating kaleidoscope of emotive shadows and sonic light, The Hidden Door EP is a transfixing and quite compelling proposition from a band beginning to draw intensive praise and acclaim its way. The creators of the magnetic release are UK rock band Kobadelta; a quintet from Newcastle who are stirring up an energetic and demanding appetite for their imaginative sounds. Consisting of five enthralling and expressive mergers of psychedelic and melodic rock with blues and spatial rock ‘n’ roll additives, the band’s new release is a masterful temptation which whether fully seducing or simply awakening eager attention leaves senses and imagination greedy.

With the Ritual (Time Flies) single of last year under their belt as well as the sharing of stages with bands such as Temples, Splashh, and Kobadelta-The-Hidden-Door-EP-e1394372154357Superfood, Kobadelta takes little time to excite ears whether new or old with the opening seconds of first track Supernatural Cause. Drums and bass cast the initial temptation to excite senses with the guitar soon adding its melodic lures to the coaxing. It is an instant web of persuasion which seemingly draws on The Doors and Echo & the Bunnymen, an embracing enticement which smooches and dances with the imagination whilst the vocals of Dom Noble croon with expressive strength. Throughout its heated narrative and melodic climate, the song sways before and leans bewitchingly upon the emotions, the tangy sonic design by guitarist Alex Malliris and mesmeric charm of the keys from Jordan Robson a potent spice for thoughts and passions. The track is an exceptional entrance, one which simply gets stronger and richer over time marking the band out alone as something potentially special.

The following Electric Chair as the first launches its bait with the crisp rhythms of drummer Chris Malliris and the especially alluring throaty bass prowl of Jonathan Marley leading the coaxing. There is a swagger to the song from the first note, one egged on by a delicious guitar twang and fiery sax caresses but most of all by the sheer inventive mischief of the song.  Also as its predecessor intriguing shadows and a heavy air to certainly the rhythmic intensity borrows the imagination in its own purposeful casting whilst the guitar and keys colour that emerging canvas with inspiring and immersive psychedelically bred hues. It is a masterful enticement continuing the impressive progress of the release.

Not Above & Not Behind moves in next with its acoustic and vocal union, Noble confirming his skilled and potent delivery is as varied and consistently compelling as the sounds. Admittedly taking a little longer to fully persuade than maybe other tracks, the song emerges as a thoroughly absorbing incitement before making way for the title track, a musically expansive encounter spawned from the same emotive reserve and descriptive strength as its predecessor. Big rangy beats steer the fire of passion and sonic design though arguably the drama and truly incendiary spark of earlier songs is lost somewhere in its flames. Nevertheless it is another heavily brooding and accomplished suasion for ears and satisfaction.

The closing Love Stoned Chic is a deliciously intensive smog of fuzzy sonics and raw atmospheres thickened further by an impacting rhythmic penetration and guitar causticity. Veined by a searing melodic toxin and gently invasive keys, the track ventures into the realm of The Doors once again though it is impossible to take too much of the originality of the song away from Kobadelta.

A release which increases its potency and persuasion the more you let its fingers tease and search the senses, The Hidden Door EP is a rousing and enthralling adventure proving Kobadelta to be on the frontline of the most exciting and fascinating emerging rock bands around in the UK. Expect big things for and from them ahead, something to eagerly anticipate.

https://www.facebook.com/Kobadelta

http://kobadelta.bandcamp.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 26/03/2014

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