Martyr Art – FearFaith Machines

Self-Dubbed as digital metal, the Martyr Art sound is a voracious mix of varied metal and industrial/electronic textures with more besides from an artist which embraces technology as eagerly as the cauldron of flavours woven into his bold recipe of enterprise. FearFaith Machines is the new and fifth album from the band, a release which for fans and newcomers can only make for one compelling adventure.

Martyr Art is the one man project of Joe Gagliardi III, an Orange County musician whose skills on the guitar are as captivating as the songwriting, vocal prowess, and imagination which equally escape his invention. The band is truly a solo project with Gagliardi playing every instrument before recording, mixing and mastering every second of adventure making up FearFaith Machines. Since emerging in 2004, Martyr Art has shared stages with the likes of Corey Glover, Doyle, KMFDM, Drowning Pool, Saul Williams, Full Devil Jacket, Brick By Brick, Dead Empires, and Moon Tooth whilst releasing a host of well-received singles and EPs as well as those previous four full-lengths. Up to this point Martyr Art had evaded our radar but FearFaith Machines has corrected that and will for a whole new tide of fans such its striking offerings.

The album starts with Motion, metallic electronic pulses and temptations luring ears before raw steely smog brings a rousing scourge of groove and alternative metal awash with industrial espionage. Quickly Gagliardi shows his vocal diversity as throat scarred and clean tones intermingle with the former heading the virulent contagion. Equally his craft on the guitar further ignites the tempest, shredding and picking multi-cultural sonic temptations.

The following cyclone of The Pleasure of Pain is just as invasively magnetic, its industrial inclinations steering the listener towards the waiting metal bred uproar. The cycle repeats with even greater heat and intensity, vocals again a great blend of attack and enterprise matching the adventurous emprise of sound. Like a maelstrom of Rabbit Junk, Squidhead, and Cynical Existence, the track is a captivating fury more than matched by next up Who Are You. The third song scowls as it plunders the senses, raging with punk dissonance as again a web of styles and flavours unite with voracity and imagination on the way to forging another major highlight within the release.

Across the sinister almost psychotic Just and the superb Constrict, the album simply expands its landscape of sound and captivation, the second of the two almost primal in its breath yet precise in its layers of boldly varied texture and spicing while their successor, Thundering, is a dark seduction with hues of bands like Type O Negative and Sisters Of Mercy to its irresistible gothic rock/post punk serenade.

Final track is Binary Slavery, a carnivorous slice of industrial metal gnawing at the senses yet soothing the wounds with melodic caresses though they too come with an edge of trespass to their infectious exploits. It is a rousing end to the album highlighting the craft, imagination, and bold fusions making up the heart of FearFaith Machines.

Gagliardi creates something that is nothing less than unique from the familiar styles and sounds he weaves with, indisputable evidence coming with one of the most fascinatingly individual and simply enjoyable encounters this year.

FearFaith Machines is out now; available @ https://martyrart.bandcamp.com/album/fearfaith-machines

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Pete RingMaster 01/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Blacktop Mojo – Burn The Ships

The past four years since forming has seen Texan rock band Blacktop Mojo court a potent reputation for their sound and live presence, all the time increasingly nudging global attention to turn their way. The release of second album Burn The Ships is the moment that awareness just might happen, the release a striking and thickly accomplished slab of highly flavoursome, sinew moulded rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in September 2012 by vocalist Matt James and drummer Nathan Gillis, Blacktop Mojo swiftly leapt into the live scene with the intent of playing as many shows and tours as they could. It is a hunger which prevails to this day, the Palestine, TX quintet sharing stages with the likes of Bon Jovi, Candlebox, Drowning Pool, Aaron Lewis, Saving Abel, Puddle of Mudd, Whiskey Myers, Dirty River Boys, and The Bigsbys among a great many others over the years. Debut album I Am stirred things up at home with its release in 2014, similarly inviting broader notice of the band’s hearty hard/melodic rock sound. Burn The Ships though is a wake-up call to bigger spotlights upon the band, the Philip Mosley produced and Austin Deptula mixed and mastered encounter a fiery roar very hard to ignore or avoid finding a healthy appetite for.

The Blacktop Mojo sound is arguably not the most unique, the band drawing comparisons to the likes of Shinedown, Black Stone Cherry, and Soundgarden yet has an individual character and diversity which lifts it from the crowd with ease. All the evidence lies within Burn The Ships and its inventive and impassioned rock ‘n’ roll; a proposition hitting the ground running with its majorly rousing opener Where The Wind Blows. A lone melody with a country rock twang makes the first beckon, a sister lure swiftly by its side before muscle bound rhythms loom over ears amidst the continuing invitation of that initial welcome. Soon into its thick and potent stride with the growling tones of Matt Curtis’ bass rich bait alongside the meaty swipes of Gillis, the track has its infectious claws firmly around ears and appetite with James’ delivery leading the way and in turn the listener into one peach of a chorus impossible not to get fully involved in. With the riffs of rhythm guitarist Kenneth Irwin equally steering the temptation as lead guitarist Ryan Kiefer spins wiry grooves, it is a seriously compelling proposal,

The following End Of Days is just as formidable and satisfying, its robust rhythms and gnarly grooves alone gripping body and an instinctive passion for heart bred rock ‘n’ roll. As its predecessor, the song carries an irresistible chorus to back up the already successful lures at play and the album’s powerful start, success its title track continues. As provocative guitar temptation wraps its flame lit charms around ears, Burn The Ships quickly shows itself an equal to those before in enticement, gaining even greater strength in that trait as its groove takes on a nagging quality as it meanders around the vocal potency of James. With Seether-esque hues involved, the song croons and roars; flexing its muscle as it spins its inventively intoxicating sonic web with each passing second. The track is pure drama and the pinnacle of the album though challenged throughout.

The earnest strains of Prodigal follow, its Staind lit serenade a mellow emotive caress allowing for a breath whilst enjoying its melodic heat, suggestive flames building  into a bigger blaze before Shadows On The Wall smoulders and erupts in a 3 Doors Down scented fire next, subsequently  followed by the virile throes of Sweat. The trio do not quite teach the heights of the first three tremendous tracks but each with their individual natures and temptations leave plenty to embrace and firmly enjoy.

The snarling properties of Pyromaniac bring the album back to its loftiest heights, the song as heated as its title suggests with irritability in its riffs and a bass grumble so easy to grow lustful for. Melodically, there is a 3 Days Grace air contrasted and complimented perfectly by the grungier textures at work on the senses, both linked by an instinctive catchiness  which again features in potent form within the predacious 8000 Lines, a song stalking ears with rapacious riffs and antagonistic beats as sonic enterprise and vocal drama ignite. The track is outstanding; its unpredictability enhanced by melodic beauty as an oasis of calm shares ears with its tempestuous heart.

Both Dog On A Leash with its red-blooded plaintive call and the reflective cries of Make A Difference leave satisfaction full, each revealing further twists in the album’s make-up and enterprise while Chains brings a web of athletic grooves and beefy rhythms in a burly persuasion raising the ante again. It is pure captivation preying on an already eager appetite for sound and encounter.

Concluded by the emotionally charged Dream On and the melancholic musing of Underneath, the impressive Burn The Ships has plenty to see the band make the next step towards global recognition. Its songs are shapely and sound rich if not always on the truly unique side. Its craft and imagination more than compensates though as ears embrace the open potential also lying within a triumph of a listen.

Burn The Ships is out now through Cuhmon Records @ https://blacktopmojo.bandcamp.com/releases or http://www.blacktopmojo.com/store

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Pete RingMaster 15/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Haster – The Current Sea

Photo Courtesy of David Trejo Photography

Photo Courtesy of David Trejo Photography

As explosive and dynamically striking as it is creatively imaginative, the new album from Californian metallers Haster is one of those offerings that bring the day, body and emotions alive. The Current Sea is anthemically huge and inventively bold yet weaves in to it a host of familiar styles and flavours which only go to enhance its virulently imposing and contagious roar. The result is a slab of defiant and emotive rock ‘n’ roll as intimidating and cantankerous as it is one mighty feel good incitement.

Formed in 2010, the Huntington Beach quintet seemingly and unsurprisingly going by their latest offering, took little time stirring up attention and support, especially once releasing their debut album Searching in 2011. Its successor Let It Go cemented the band’s stature on the Orange County music scene with its unveiling in 2014 and now it is The Current Sea gearing up to push the band to new spotlights not only at home but within the broadest landscape of metal and rock.

Fusing dark and alternative metal with heavy rock ‘n’ roll; Haster creates a sound which will have something for most with a taste for metal and heavy rock. As proof The Current Sea offers a perpetual wave of familiar and unique essences bred from inspirations that range from Korn and Deftones, Chevelle and Tool, to Breaking Benjamin and System Of A Down, and as soon as opener Your Silence hits ears with its sonic coaxing, attention is on alert and swiftly gripped. Emerging on a looming almost foreboding energy and tone, the track aggressively and purposefully bounds towards the senses, then once up close as a growl of aggressiveness passes, it slips into a rugged stroll with melodic scenery wrapped in the fine clean tones of vocalist Jarret Stockmar. It is a delivery carrying a great persistent snarl though which is matched by the irritable riffs and punchy beats of drummer Brian Tew. Quickly those Chevelle/Breaking Benjamin references are understandable but there is plenty more to the character and air of the catchy encounter and as quickly realised, the album.

The-Current-Sea_RingMaster ReviewAs good as it is the song is soon overshadowed by the bands outstanding latest single, The Unscene. As keys caress whilst riffs grumble and burrow into ears, the bass of Mondo Salazar prowls like a predator skirting the similarly snarly tones of Stockmar holding a mutual attitude to its presence. In no time the track is an addiction, a Disturbed meets American Head Charge like contagion with a chorus you will only find yourselves involved in after it leaps into ears just the once. Elevated further by the tenacious and inventive weave of guitarists Patrick Nolan and David Heida, the track is prime anthemic bait and unavoidably irresistible.

Haunt Me has a slightly mellower air to its confrontation but still carries an emotive intensity that flows readily through the great blend of Stockmar’s lead and Nolan’s backing vocals. Becoming more agitated and antagonistic minute by minute, the track explores a Korn like enterprise lined with melodic toxins carrying a scent of Life Of Agony to them before making way for the grumbling emotion and rhythmically gripping prowess of Substance Low. It too mixes infectious and unpredictable resourcefulness with more abrasive textures, a merger simply igniting ears and appetite into a greed quickly fed by The Resistance and its fiercely enticing collusion of wiry and sultry grooves with rapier like beats and vocal dexterity; again it all coming with a touch of Korn at times.

Potent bait and rich satisfaction continue to come together as Asfixiate and The Artist’s Life share their creative narratives and individual dramas. The first initially sounds like a close relation to its predecessor though soon it explores its own emotive Drowning Pool/A Perfect Circle spiced journey whilst the second brings back that grouchier provocative nature of the band’s music to merge into a potent tempest of sound that at times plays like Linkin Park crossed with Bring Me the Horizon. As shown by next up Consumed though, there is a constantly shifting and evolving nature to the tracks which only excites and impresses. The new track is similarly volatile in temperament to those before, fluidly moving from aggressively rapacious to sonically calming with vocal invention to match.

Connection Error is a cranky protagonist next; a choleric encounter gnawing on the senses as it fires up ears and pleasure with an irritable rousing roar easy to get hooked up on, much as the album is as a whole to be fair. Its confrontational body is contrasted by the reflectively emotive and calmer Shoved Aside, though the album’s closer has plenty of creative and impassioned sparks to create a blaze able to erupt with heart driven anger. Though for no particular reason, it fails to make the same kind of impact as other tracks, the song brings The Current Sea to a powerful and richly enjoyable conclusion.

To date it is probably fair to say that Haster is a name predominantly lent to US awareness but we suggest not for much longer thanks to their stirring new album.

The Current Sea is available from January 29th via Musicarchy Media through iTunes and more.

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Pete RingMaster 28/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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One Year Delay – Deep Breath

OYD_RingMaster Review

Turning a jumble of varied metal/rock styles into an unpredictable sound which eagerly romps in the ears and captures the imagination, Greek Hard Rockers One Year Delay make their full introduction with debut album Deep Breath. Offering seven songs which entwine flavours from nu and alternative metal with grunge and punk rock in rock ‘n’ roll also unafraid to embrace more classic/hard rock hues, the release is a roller coaster of invention and undulating but perpetual success.

One Year Delay began in early 2012, coming out of the Greek city Kalamata with a sound which through numerous line-ups, the current in place earlier this year, has evolved into the tapestry of adventure which potently marks Deep Breath. The album was recorded in 2014 with Toby Wright, the band travelling to the Sound Emporium Studios in Nashville to make it, with the release finally mastered by Andrew Mendelson. Unveiled through Pavement Entertainment, Deep Breath is an ear catching proposition fuelled with a potential suggesting a bright and for us all a rewarding horizon ahead of the sextet.

deep_breath_oyd_RingMaster Review   The album opens up with Gunpoint and badgering bursts of sound and energy which soon merge into a predatory stroll with intimidating riffs and threatening rhythms prowled by the instantly appealing vocals from Orestis Alimonos. As grooves spring their bait and intensity darkens, the song growls and lurches from one antagonistic twist and roar to another, but within this brews a melodic lure of clean vocals and keys seeded enterprise. The song has the unpredictability and imagination of a System Of A Down, if not the sound which is closer to the alternative metal prowess of Israeli band Onoma. Increasingly addictive the track gets the album off to a rousing start.

Headhunters steps up next and again riffs and beats make a potent invitation to which Alimonos once more adds vocal drama and energy backed by the equally strong tones of Steve Tsotras. Striding with an antagonistic swagger, the snarl and lure of the song is accentuated by short scything grooves and fiery sonic enticement through guitarists Nick Koumoundouros and Nick Trimandlilis, the former enticing with individual flames of hard rock enterprise across the metal bred proposal. A continuation of the riveting start to the release, the track makes way for the melodic rock meets groove metal triumph of Truth, Dare, Despair. The song dances on ears with a swirling web of riffs and rhythms, bait as much punk as it is metal and rock ‘n’ roll, to forge its own familiar but personal character; though imagining Drowning Pool meets Finger Eleven gives you an idea to another quickly persuasive encounter by One Year Delay

A sludgy air and gait comes with the following Water Under the Bridge, its slow movement and enticing croon stoner-esque but equally grunge coloured with a whiff of doom rapacity. Though not as immediate on ears and thoughts as its predecessors, or ultimately as dynamic, time allows the song to tempt and unveil intoxicating attributes which in turn gives a keen appetite for the album another reason to indulge often, the same applying to the Nirvana toned Miss You which takes over next. Its gentle voice and guitar entrance is a good welcome but it is when the song picks up its energy with the beats of Sotiris Papadeas a shuddering impact and the bass of George Manesiotis a highly agreeable heavy shadow that it comes into its own. Still the track lacks the same rich and inventive spark of earlier songs but satisfaction is nothing less than strong as it swings through ears.

The band is back spitting aggression with Try to Stay Alive but also entering a raw rap /groove metal crossover with warm rock melodies and Korn like boldness in ideas and unpredictability. It is a great adventure in idea which at times simply enthrals and thrills and in other moments loses its grip with unfulfilled promises, but again a want to hear it again is never far from thoughts after each venture into its potential.

For personal tastes the first half of Deep Breath easily outshines the second but as proven by the closing blues rock call of 5m, 9k, there is always plenty to seriously engage thoughts and have enjoyment fully on board. The last song is a potent weave of heavy riffs and provocative rhythms within scenery of spicy grooves and vocal tempting bringing the album to a rich and persuasive close.

You sense it is early creative days in the growth of One Year Delay but Deep Breath, as a first album, suggests things are definitely heading towards very exciting places. They are already there in many ways with their first full outing but when maturity and natural evolution comes to the fore too, keeping a close eye on One Year Delay might be a clever move.

Deep Breath is out now via Pavement Music through major online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 08/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Caustic Method – The Virus

CMPic_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

     The Virus is a scourge to the senses as potent and inescapable as the equivalent physical protagonist is to the flesh, but a fierce ravishing easy to develop a rabid appetite for. The album is the new incitement from US metallers Caustic Method, a fury of raw and contagious animosity that stirs up the blood and puts a fire in the belly. Though the band has been devouring audiences and fans since 2003, the new release is, like for so many, our introduction to the Syracuse roar, and no finer a way to get infected can you imagine.

Caustic Method has earned a rich reputation for their sound and live performances since forming, sharing stages with everyone from Hatebreed to Cypress Hill, American Head Charge to Otep, Hed P.E. to Korn and hordes more from all diversities of metal and voracious rock ‘n’ roll. Last year The Virus EP sparked thick attention and feisty anticipation for the band’s new album, its success a step towards the band signing with Pavement Entertainment for its successor’s release.

The album launches itself on ears and senses with an instant wall of sound and the vocal roar, the song’s title Virus, the first word expelled by the throat of Matt Caustic. Right there the infection has taken hold; that initial concussive touch the opening toxin in a tide of predatory rhythms and hellacious riffs driven by a sandstorm of a vocal delivery. The track is never an out and out savaging though, Darin Scott’s grooves and hooks given space to wind their temptation around the imagination, backed similarly by the dark throaty tones of Eric Maliszewski’s bass. The Caustic Method sound brings up thoughts of bands like Hatebreed, Bloodsimple, and Mushroomhead across song and release but ultimately there is a freshness and originality which offers a distinct proposal from the NY quartet.

The opener is also the band’s current single with an outstanding video to match its presence and an explosive start to The Virus quickly reinforced by the following Left to Die Alone. This too is a blaster to the senses set on the highest setting, riffs and beats stalking the listener as vocals rummage in the psyche with Caustic’s ever gravelly persuasion. The rhythmic jabs of drummer Angel Rivera are a deceptive lure, initially seemingly merciful whilst still resonating on bone before the man’s stick swings get more creatively agitated and venomous. The song even with a slightly mellower embrace midway continues to hunt down the passions before making way for the similarly ravenous tempting of The Lone Star Tragedy. The song is a more straight forward but enjoyable offering at first, holding back its imagination until it is well entrenched in ears. Clean vocals and spicy grooves soon break free, though are soon swamped by the hostility that set things off and the track ends as it began, snarling relentlessly.

CAUSTICMETHOD COV_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review  Integrity Fail continues the bruising next, but with a bluesy melodic seducing which spices up its hooks. Aligned to a less intensive energy and atmosphere, it ensures the track is a juggernaut with the hand brake on in attack but a heavyweight persuasion that prowls and lingers as more variety is shown within The Virus, and in turn S.D.V. straight after. The track unleashes its dirtiest heavy rock ‘n’ roll traits to collude with a metal ferocity, a mix of vocal delivery as enticing as the blend of flavours stirred into the tempest of sound.

Through the groove infested Six Feet and the rhythmically compelling Which Way the River Runs, the contagion grips even tighter. The first is a storm of again vocal diversity and tenacious guitar bait, a feverish turbulence of attitude and creative energy which is something akin to Drowning Pool meets Blunt Force Trauma, and another pinnacle of the album. The second of the two avails ears of its fearsome potency through an opening assault of beats from Rivera which sparks a torrential virulence of hungry riffs and cantankerous grooves, the bestial bass of Maliszewski offering the most magnetic one of all. Both tracks kick the album back to the impressive levels it began on, though to be fair the previous couple of songs or so were hardly lightweight in arousing pleasure and emotions either.

Fool Me Once finds yet another gear in the toxicity of the release, it’s addictively malicious and insatiable onslaught an evolving ravaging as able to stroll invitingly with spite in its eyes as it is in uncaging a tirade of raw intensity. It is another landmark in the album, a mix of Static X and Agnostic Front which is not emulated but strongly backed by the melody rich, blues grooved rocker Bottle of Scotch. At times there is a little surface similarity across the album which certainly does it no harm at all such the enterprise and invention within, but it is great to have something additionally unique from the first breath, and the penultimate track is nicely that.

The album injects its last dose of pathogen through Anti Hero, a final slab of metal and emotional vehemence to set ears and thoughts ablaze with a spiralling of inflamed grooves, caustic riffs, and a bass seducing which borders on the carnal. It is a tremendous end to an excellent release and though Caustic Method is not going to turn the metal world on its head with The Virus, they will and certainly are earning a new and broader enamoured spotlight on their presence as the album’s qualities live up to their biological namesake.

The Virus is available now via Pavement Entertainment @ http://www.pavementmusic.com/product/caustic-method-the-virus-pre-order/

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RingMaster 04/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Anti Clone – Hands Sewn Together

anti clone

If you thought nu-metal was a redundant flavour then hold on to your floral panties boys and girls because it is not only alive and viciously kicking but it has been twisted into a whole new glorious personality by UK geniuses Anti Clone. Genius is just what the Lincolnshire quintet is for not only has the band reaped the most flavoursome and essential essences of the genre and fused them with a healthy dose of varied other spices, they have bred those inspirations and accompanying familiarities into a fresh and new dawning. It is not the forging of a brand new ground-breaking exploit but without doubt the beginnings of a template destined to spark a fire in others.

Formed in 2011, the Boston band like so many went through a tempestuous time line-up wise before the two sets of brothers in Peter (lead vocals) and Drew Moore (drums/ programming) alongside Conor (guitar) and Liam Richardson (guitar) alongside Fraser Burch (bass) came together. The band from there were soon earning a powerful reputation for their live performances and sound locally which was emulated as Anti Clone spread their musical fury across the UK starting with a tour alongside Eridium last year. Since then the band has graced stages with the likes of American Head Charge, Sworn Amongst, ESO, Maplerun, Evil Scarecrow, and Bloodshot Dawn. Following the success of debut single 1984, the band’s Matt Hyde (Machine Head, Trivium, Fightstar, As I Lay Dying and Slipknot) produced Hands Sewn Together gets its national release and it is hard to see the British metal scene being the same ever again.

It only takes the first few moments of opener Take This Pill to turn attention and imagination on their heads and lay down bait which sets the seeds to a lingering ardour soaked reaction. Coarsely surfaced riffs size up ears first; their CDHSTSACtouch a rough rub before scythes of sonic enticement sears the senses through the guitars. With controlled yet punchy rhythms punctuating the initial lure to equally appealing success, Peter unveils his outstanding vocal expression, his deliver subsequently shown to be as inventive and varied as the sounds around him. The track continues to twist and flirt with the imagination and passions, elements of Korn making strong hints though maybe more so the song plays like a mix of Mudvayne and Fuckshovel with a rich dose of Drowning Pool incitement. That too is only a spice as Anti Clone proceeds to sculpt an antagonistic seduction which oozes originality and mouth-watering invention.

The simply outstanding start alone would be enough to wax lyrical about the promise of the band, but that potential is shown to be far more than just a future possibility by the following Here Comes The Flood. As different in character as it is similar in its creative alchemy, the second song completes the persuasion that release and band is something special. Charging from the blocks like Usain Bolt caught short, muscles and attitude bulging with every beat and note, the track is a carnivorous tempest of sinew driven temptation coursing with a (Hed) PE like anger and contagion. It is a riveting swipe at the senses which only intensifies its might and coaxing with an insatiable torrent of rhythms from Drew which in turn inspires guitars, bass, and vocals to collide in a breath-taking brawl of ingenuity. To be quite honest if there has been a better track unleashed this year it will have been something really sensational.

The furious drama of the track is equalled by that of 1984 though it comes as a more reserved proposition. The slow courting of vocals and drums stabs skirted by the excellent dark throat of the bass is another irresistible lure from the band. Behind it a seeping breath of portentous atmosphere is released but it is also a slow brew which hints and taunts before the guitars begin to stretch their presence and narrative with melodic enticing amidst a similar rising of passionate energy vocally. Eventually taking big strides rhythmically with potent hues of guitar enterprise on board, the song swells with an American Head Charge seeded adventure before repeating its magnetic sequence but with a fuller weight and evocative dexterity. Glorious in its harmonious reflection and raw in its impassioned protest, the track is a masterful.

The following System, which also features John Knight of Synaptik, makes a more controlled entrance like its predecessor but this time within an openly voracious frame of sound and intent. There is an intimidation to the track from its first breath though which ignites a sudden twist as the song escapes its compelling rein to surge with inventive nostril flaring into a riveting stomp of crusading rhythms and sonic tenacity. As all tracks it is also as unpredictable as they come, playing like an aural jigsaw which is unafraid to let its moves make rude and clunky interruptions to enhance further an already thrilling beast.

The EP ends with its most hostile offering, vocals and grooves from the first syllable and note a raw abrasion which develops its own infection soaked enticing. The Usurper is a brute of an encounter, a hostile and uncompromising protagonist which deceptively loads up with hooks and squealing grooves to seduce as it gnaws on the senses. Again it is another facet to the sound and presence of Anti Clone, no two songs on the EP sharing a whisper of ideation and undeniably none as ferocious and unrelentingly invasive as the closer.

Hands Sewn Together is pure joy, an encounter which leaves the majority of releases this year standing in its shadow whilst as declared earlier making for a standard setting proposition. Even though Anti Clone has only just started redesigning and warping British metal, it is impossible not to get truly excited about the band.

The Hands Sewn Together EP is available now @ http://www.anticlonehq.com/

www.AntiCloneHQ.com

10/10

RingMaster 25/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Spirytus – The Fundamentals EP

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     An invigorating splatter fest of styles upon a nu-metal canvas, The Fundamentals EP from UK metallers Spirytus is one of those slaps around the chops reminding you just how thrilling the core genre to their sound is when explored with imagination and a snarl which ignites the primitive inside. The use of the word splatter in our description should not be read as meaning it is a random approach with flavours by the Nottingham and Leicester based band as they thoughtfully and skilfully weave those spices into a voracious attack which constantly hits the sweet spot. Not since those halcyon days of Korn at their best and when early Drowning Pool gripped attention has nu-metal sounded this good.

      As mentioned there is plenty to entice and seduce in the band’s sound, its funk rapaciousness showing seeds bred in the likes of Limp Bizkit and Sugar Ray whilst their almost carnivorous side and the spicy elements of the sound holds a close relation to bands such as Rage Against The Machine and even more so Clawfinger. It is a scintillating mix which the The Fundamentals EP brings in feverishly exciting encounter even if one you feel does not quite reap all the potential you suspect is brewing in the band’s inventive belly. It is a magnet of an EP all the same from a band which formed in 2004. though it was three years ago they truly erupted into action. Their self-titled debut album of 2010 sparked keen critical attention upon their presence with the band equally earning an impressive reputation for their live performances which has seen them alongside the likes of Skindred, Panic Cell, Breed 77, Ill Nino, Wolf, Evile and many more. Since that debut Spirytus has brought a shift in their sound through the loss of a guitarist and the welcome of a turntable master in 2012, a move which has only added depth and diversity to an aggressive and mouthwatering confrontational sound. The EP is the first seduction since the album and simply a masterful treat of metallic grooving.

      The quintet of vocalist Ryan Walton, guitarist Alistair Bell, bassist Ben Edis, drummer Ben McAlonan, and Daniel Jones on the Spirytus Cover Artworkturntables from an opening sample go straight to the passions with a sturdy rapacious snarl of riffs and equally intensive rhythms. The bass craft of Edis immediately stands out, intimidating and skilled but it is fair to say the guitar and drums similarly steals their share of the imagination whilst the excellent vocals of Walton toys with air and syllables in a varied and thoroughly enjoyable vocal delivery and incitement which never relents across opener Fundamentals and the whole EP. The track bounces and twists with a creative rabidity around its sinew driven spine of almost disorientating rhythms and predatory riffery. It is an incendiary mix for senses and emotions which to the rear of the song dips into a restrained yet still urgently excitable passage allowing the vocals clear rein to tease and coax. It provides the icing on the feisty cake whilst the British feel to the band’s sound where most might and do emulate the American tone and breath of the genre, is a final potent ingredient to the blistering triumph.

     The following Qandahar strolls in on a resonating throaty bassline before sending streams of riffs and sonically cast grooves around the ear. In seconds though the track is roaming thoughts with a simple but inciting reserve of guitar and vocals before all collude for a fiery infectious chorus which brings not for the last time on the release that Clawfinger reminder. Though not as explosively gripping and dramatic as its predecessor the song is another to swing funk clad hips and forge a groove sculpted swagger which sees the already awoken appetite licking its lips.

     Next up comes the outstanding forthcoming single Mandem, a track also with an accompanying video to eagerly latch onto. A Korn like sonic nagging opens the track whilst the bass again lays down irresistible bait before the song leaps out forward with melodic flames and the ridiculous potency tempting turntable skills of Jones. The antagonistic flow of vocals and the surrounding gritty sonic invention reminds of Hed (PE) at times whilst the groove and table splattering taunts as well as the alternative infectious air of Walton’s delivery is definite Limp Bizkit bred but all soaked in a juice and invention all of Spirytus’ own making. The guitar craft of Bell not for the first time is impressive and perfectly controlled furthering the virulently contagious lure of the song.

     Horses Will Bleed is an eyeballing blaze of provocation and again a track which merges intensity and clarity into a compelling mix which is incredibly addictive and powerfully resourceful without bludgeoning the ears with an overload of greedy ideas. The challenging breath of the song develops another funk toxicity which is irresistible and only the guitar solo, which this time feels a little like showing off and a little at odds with the track, a minor niggle.

     The senses carving electro start to Patience Of A Saint is another thrilling entrance to a song on the EP, an invitation which the track takes through a melodically fuelled smouldering, which again merges Clawfinger and Sugar Ray like essences, plus a pinch of early Papa Roach, into a sultry sonic heat rife with plenty of biting vocals. A slow burner of a track compared to those previous triumphs on the EP, it emerges as one of the most exhilarating and inventive propositions on the release to steal top honours.

     The final stretch of the release does not tempt and grip as strongly and feels like a lost opportunity. The brief instrumental/sample piece Horses is fun but wasted whilst All Because Of Me though again impressively presented and crafted lacks the spark and fire of the previous songs; not a filler but a song too far for this particular release and not really offering anything new upon it. It makes way for the Tribal Riot Edit of Fundamentals featuring Dave Chavarri of Ill Nino; it a more percussive endowed version of the great track which reprises the towering start without really stretching it further, but it is such a thrilling song there are no complaints here.

    The Fundamentals EP is an excellent slab of nu and funk metal devilry, a release soaked in old inspirations but forging its own path. Spirytus have re-ignited an arguably forgotten genre and are right on course to become one of its most inspirational tempters. This is a breath-stealing release from a thoroughly impressive band and they can only get better.

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9/10

RingMaster 13/01/2014

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