Slow Riot – Trophy Wife

Photo by Steve Gullick Photography

Photo by Steve Gullick Photography

Earning thick acclaim and attention with their Cathedral EP, Irish trio Slow Riot are now poised to release their new single and a fresh inventive colour to their already magnetic sound. Their previous release and singles worn an open post punk inspiration drawing likenesses to bands such as Gang of Four, Television, and Wire, as well as a shoegaze scented melodic charm. Though Trophy Wife is still embracing such seeds, it swiftly shows a new adventure of swinging rhythms and imagination tantalising hooks with a vivacity to match that of the driving energy fuelling its body. The result is a compelling affair which still springs from an eighties spawned heart but with the tenacious urgency of the now.

art_RingMasterReviewFormed in 2013, Slow Riot consists of vocalist/bassist Niall Clancy, drummer Paul Cosgrave, and guitarist Aaron Duff. 2015 saw the band release their first pair of singles in City Of Culture and Demons, two intrigue sparking songs which made a bigger impact as part of the attention grabbing Cathedral EP last October. The time between its release and the new single has seen a new twist and exploration in the band’s sound which Trophy Wife is already showing as being a great fresh step.

As the last EP, the single was recorded with Kevin Vanbergen (The Pixies, The Maccabees, Dinosaur Pile-Up, The La’s, Biffy Clyro) at Brighton’s Park Studios and quickly gets to work persuading and exciting ears with its initial surge of beefy rhythms and sonic incitement. Guitars spring a melodic web from there as the bass invitingly prowls, the first cradling the warm tones of Clancy and his harmonic delivery. Almost straight away, that previous post punk spicing emerges as a more new wave hued character, nudging thoughts of bands like B-Movie and Modern English whilst the pounding drive of the song and its intensive undercurrent of virulence offers a Doves meets Editors like tempting.

The track is a vivacious captivation accompanied by B-side Awake For Days; a more laid back proposition revealing another shade in the new palette of enterprise used by Slow Riot in songwriting and sound. Though hopes are that the band do not entirely free themselves of the darker post punk hues found in their debut EP, there is no denying that Trophy Wife offers something just as exciting and easy to find a healthy appetite for.

Trophy Wife is out on April 15th via Straight Lines Are Fine @ http://www.thegenepool.co.uk/artists/SLOW+RIOT.htm

Upcoming live dates:

18/04 – Opium Rooms, Dublin w/ Mission Of Burma

23/04 – Kasbah Social Club, Limerick

25/04 – The Waiting Room, London (free show)

https://www.facebook.com/slowriot.theband   https://www.instagram.com/slowriot.theband/   https://twitter.com/Slow_Riot_Band

Pete RingMaster 14/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

States of Emotion – Black & White To Gold

soe_RingMaster Review

The journey of UK rock band States of Emotion and indeed debut album Black & White To Gold has been fraught with obstacles and disappointments, but it is fair to say that it has been well worth the fight and determination. Centred around vocalist/guitarist Olly Hookings and bassist Bonzai, States of Emotion has finally stepped into the fullest spotlights with a debut album which is destined to be one of the most tantalising and increasingly magnetic propositions this year.

The first days of States of Emotion go back to 2001 with Essex hailing school friends, Hookings, Bonzai, and drummer Luke Lloyd linking up to play “bad Green Day covers in the summer house at the bottom of Olly’s grandmother’s garden.” Within eight years, the band was playing the likes of the Great Escape Festival, Offset Festival, and Glastonbury’s Introducing Stage. It was at this point they also began recording their debut album with producer Greg Haver with their self released debut single, The Unsung stirring up eager appetites with its outing in 2010.Its success saw the band deciding to sign with urban label Rinse but though a successful tour with The Enemy followed there was little else apart from a half-hearted promotion of next single The Way That I’m Wired by the band’s label. With much frustration to the band, the album was of seemingly little interest to their label and with that lack of action and support highlighted by the “half-baked single release that wasn’t marketed properly”, they decided to walk away from Rinse.

This was followed by Lloyd and fourth member Brick leaving the band, and the premature announcement of the end of States of Emotion. Thankfully Hookings and Bonzai then decided to carry on working on the album, writing new tracks, often sparked by the past issues and departures, to go with those already nurtured. This in time led to the pair creating their own Label White Room, through which after five or so years, Black & White To Gold finally gets its unveiling.

art_RingMaster ReviewWith the Rag n Bone Men EP offering a tasty teaser of the album a few weeks back, anticipation for the release was heightened and is quickly rewarded by outstanding opener I Broke The Mould. Straight away guitar brewed drama envelopes ears; a potent lure of dark bass led shadows and vocal expression from Hookings which only blossom further as melodies and anthemic tenacity bursts in the irresistible chorus. With keys caressing the imagination in alignment to tangy hooks from Hookings, the track smoulders and sizzles on ears and appetite with a prowess and majesty which reminds of bands like Doves and The Mighty Lemon Drops, the latter a regular thought across the album, especially in the following Lena.

The second track has a brighter climate and warmer melodic breath with matching rhythmic enterprise whilst bass and guitar again unite their contrasting tones and textures. In tandem it all makes for a catchy canvas for the excellent vocals of the band to dance upon with emotive flirtation. Feet and hips are as quickly enamoured as ears with the encounter, a persuasion easily matched by the album’s moodier title track. With Bonzai’s bass a rumbling incitement against the interlocking melodic intimacy and orchestral character of the song, it is a fiery serenade tightening the album’s early grip on ears.

Through the romancing sonic flights of Inside Out and Brooksys Box, the album continues to hold the listener close to its creative breast, the first an evocative swirl of melodic resourcefulness and its successor a celestially laced yet robust slice of balladry. Both carry a deliciously dark vein enriched by infectious basslines and openly anthemic fuel and each is increasingly impressive and highly alluring, as too in its more personal way Back to Back, where piano and vocals steal attention before Seeking Oblivion engagingly wraps ears in its guitar driven electronic seducing.

The album at this point is in a magnetic flow, each song like an inventive continuation and emotionally related follow on from its predecessor. The band raises the ante again with Rag & Bone Men though, the track a bold and boisterous adventure which saunters in with electronic beats and siren like keys around the melancholic but inviting coaxing of Hookings’ voice. All the time a low key but building virulence is at work, brewing and enhancing the swing of the song until it releases a chorus with the persuasive mastery any hypnotist would be proud of. The song is glorious, equipped with little twists and dramatic hooks that just pull the imagination deeper into its galvanic temptation.

Slowly has a Coldplay like scent to its calm but suggestive embrace next whilst Into The Dream Catcher uncages a melody rich rock ‘n’ roll stroll which as all the pinnacles on the album, draw emotional reflections and gentle tempting into an energetic and subsequently anthemic roar which is pure contagion and insistently memorable. It is an elegant flame of a song with the right amount of intensity to create an even feistier stir.

The final pair ensures Black & White To Gold ends on the kind of high it started on. She Cuts Shapes is first, casting rhythmically infectious bait within an equally zealous rock pop roar which again shows the band’s skill at creating a landscape of ebbing and flowing energy which in turn breeds gripping crescendos. Its superb revelry is instantly matched by the slower melancholic beauty of My South Drive. Possibly the most contagious track on the album with its welcome trespass of melodic and harmonic seducing, it provides the album with a last major triumph and the listener with a song which simply lingers.

Black & White To Gold may have had to bide it’s time to introduce itself but it needs little time to announce States of Emotion as a band no one with a melodic heart will want to ignore.

Black & White To Gold is out now via Label White Room @ http://labelwhiteroom.bigcartel.com/product/states-of-emotion-black-white-to-gold-signed-cd-album-pre-order

https://www.facebook.com/brooxhq   http://www.labelwhiteroom.com

Upcoming States Of Emotion Dates:

Wed 24th Feb – BRISTOL Thekla w/ The Rifles

Thu 25th Feb – PORTSMOUTH Wedgewood Rooms w/ The Rifles

Sat 27th Feb – LONDON Roundhouse w/ The Rifles

Pete RingMaster 22/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Joykill Collective – Battle Cry

Joykill Collective - Pic (1)_RingMaster Review

Emerging from an artistic commune in Northampton and a “dissatisfaction with the prevalent right wing politics and media”, alternative rock band Joykill Collective release debut single Battle Cry, a roar which emotionally and physically lives up to its title. It is not a particularly aggressive incitement on the ear but is certainly a melodically evocative and atmospherically commanding proposition with the same kind of uncompromising intensity, and one potent introduction to the band.

Initially intended as a solo design for vocalist/guitarist Leif, talented friends of the musician skilled in various mediums were soon drawn to the project and its idea. The embracing of local musicians, writers, poets, and filmmakers, many of whom lived and worked in the same commune and shared an angry voice against the devastating political situation that so many find themselves in, were subsequently a vibrant part of the emerging and impassioned project . Now ahead of and taken from their first EP Liberty Taker, which is due for release in December, Battle Cry has been unveiled and fair to say is already whipping up and potently engaging ears and thoughts with its climatic presence and breath.

A lone melancholic strum of guitar engages ears first, though within seconds rhythms, melodies, and the soft mesmeric tones of Leif are also flowing warmly over the senses. It is coaxing which never dissipates but becomes infused with a volatile atmosphere as rhythms and chords grow in dexterity and intensity whilst creative sonic flames enhance the melodic lure of the guitars. Thickening with every passing second, vocals becoming more agitated and imposing too, the track is increasingly a rich blaze of emotion and creative angst which only grows in size and power, again over every fascinating moment. Bands like Doves and Biffy Clyro sort of come to mind during the song but really it is a proposition which whilst not strikingly unique refuses to be clearly referenced to anyone else as it captivates.

It is only one song so probably too early to shout about the big potential and future of the band, we will reserve that opinion until the release of Liberty Taker, but with the band and associates currently exploring roads less travelled in Kazakhstan, China, and Morocco, they might find themselves coming back to a bit of a fuss over their very enjoyable first single.

The self-released Battle Cry is out Now!

Pete RingMaster 02/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Officer – Myriads

officer_RingMaster Review

Whether gripping attention with a rousing energy or laying an evocative caress on the senses, Myriads, the debut album from British singer-songwriter Officer, is an emotionally mesmeric and invigoratingly compelling adventure for ears and imagination. It is an exhilarating introduction to one of the most exciting songwriters to emerge in recent times and more than shows why its creator’s fans took it upon themselves to help push the release and artist towards a national recognition.

Officer is the musical moniker of Dc Logan, a musician born into the raw council estate life of Glasgow before spending much of his early upbringing in Northern Ireland during the height of the troubles. With poetry, short stories, and illustration already blooming from his imagination, Logan turned to music from the moment he picked up his father’s old guitar on the night The Good Friday Agreement was laid down. Eventually a move to London ensued and the creation of punk band Colourcode, they releasing a pair of EPs and one album across five years. Also dedicating his time and effort to helping the homeless and poor, Logan’s music and songs continued to evolve and breed their own heart and voice, every experience and aspects of life he has owes and come across seemingly adding another rich hue lyrically and musically to his songs. It has earned Officer a cult following, loyal fans which without the knowledge of Logan united and set up a support network to raise funds for the artist to record and now take his music to the broadest attention. The result is Myriads; a kaleidoscope of life, emotion, and invention which simply enthrals.

The album opens with Laughing Rafters and a gentle, suggestive shuffle of melodic and ambient sound. The potent coaxing is soon embracing the strong tones of Logan, his voice as vibrant as it is melancholic and a captivating mix matching the similarly provocative sounds continuing to brew around his engaging presence. As quickly as the song entices musically, so it does lyrically, an intimacy and easy relatable reflection wrapping every word and syllable. It is a potency fuelling every song in their individual adventures, and here casting a thick croon of folk and melodic rock tempting. Like The National meets Jeff Buckley with a touch of Doves thrown in, the song is a fiercely magnetic start.

Officer cover_RingMaster Review   Glass Ceiling, also from an elegantly restrained start, builds its own drama of sound and intensity next, flowing twists through emotional calms and rousing crescendos colluding for an irresistible anthem for body, emotions, and simply one’s own energy. The song is wholly immersive but with a virulence which dictates body and energy to leave the listener on an inflamed high which the following Can We Talk? tempers with its warm serenade but also continues through its infectiously poetic musical and emotional presence. The song is pure bewitchment, thickening in tone and drama with every passing minute to also leave rich pleasure and fascination in its wake.

As impressive and thrilling as it and its predecessors are, Act of Survival strikes a new plateau of thrills and incitement. Straight away rapier like rhythms pierce strolling melody soaked riffs and chords as Logan’s voice paints another striking and gripping lyrical revelation. The track is glorious, at times finding hues which remind of The Cure and in other moments of bands like British Sea Power and Johnny Wore Black, whilst sculpting its own unique theatre of original songwriting and heart bred enterprise.

The gentle but increasingly tempestuous haunting kiss of One Day comes next, its emotive resonance a lingering hug which eventually makes way for the tenacious and lively roar of The Waters. Again early Cure springs to mind as guitars and rhythms unleash slim but inescapable lures, whilst melodically and vocally there is a Placebo like lilt to the breath-taking waltz. It is a track to get the mind turning and blood rushing through the body, all the better for the inspired almost hidden echo which simply adds an ingenious extra depth to the already full-blooded and rounded, and not forgetting quite brilliant encounter.

Both Ambulance and DATV ensure there is no noticeable dip after such a pinnacle. The first is a tantalising slice of dark folk with a sultry air around shadow wrapped strings and acoustic expression whilst its successor, from the same kind of template, explores an even darker heart enlivened with more of the haunting textures and imagination which Logan has already revealed being skilfully adept at brewing. The pair sublimely entices appetite and imagination before Elisabeth holds ears with a balladry which is as explosive as it is serene. As across every track on the album, resourceful unpredictability and inspired boldness shapes and guides the hypnotic proposal, and again a spellbinding proposition is the outcome.

   My Darling Defibrillator takes us next on another climatic and at times atmospherically sweltering flight of invention and emotional turmoil, the song absorbing the listener in raw and impassioned beauty whilst seducing ears through to psyche, with another major incitement within Myriads.

The album is completed by the thoughtful and provocative serenade of Burst and finally the sonic bordering on harrowing, emotionally imposing AFM. They are two tracks which may not find the heights of those before but bring the album to a hugely evocative closure. Many moons back certain tingles and pleasure was found in the Black debut album Wonderful Life, a solo release which has stayed in thoughts and an ever evolving personal soundtrack ever since with the same potency. Those same ‘chills’ arose with Myriads and it is easy to suspect Officer will become the same kind of persistent encounter for us and a great many more old and new hearts within his already impacting fan base.

Myriads is available from 31st July and can be pre-ordered now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/id1018844878

https://www.facebook.com/iamofficer     http://officer.uk.com

RingMaster 20/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The Barnum Meserve – Self Titled

The Barnum Meserve - Promo Shot

Let us introduce you to the next big thing in British rock music, The Barnum Meserve. It is a big claim but such the immense power, potency, and potential in their self-titled debut album, it is not as wild a suggestion as newcomers to the band might imagine. Consisting of thirteen epic and cinematic creative emprises, the release is a seriously fascinating and glorious proposition which bewitches and excites with every melodic embrace, vocal roar, and orchestral temptation.

The seeds to the Nottingham band were sown at the start of the millennium when bassist Dylan Griffiths met pianist/vocalist Leon Wiley while studying music in college. Swiftly finding a mutual passion for certain ‘musical exploits’ the pair began writing and playing together. One of their earlier shows brought drummer Paul Moss-Pearce on to their radar, their meeting subsequently leading to him completing the band’s line-up. A few years of writing and reinventing their sound in respective ways followed before the trio finally united and emerged as The Barnum Meserve, in 2007. Again the three took their time creating, evolving, and honing their sound with the next eighteen months seeing the band studio bound before hitting the live scene in late 2008. First EP Stories From The Paper House sparked keen interest with its release in 2011, attention especially potent in the underground scene once backed up and pushed on again by its successor, the Broken Window EP in the following year. Now national awareness is poised to be inflamed with the threesome’s first album; an attention grabbing wake-up call to The Barnum Meserve.

_CardWallet     The album opens with War Games and a serenade of orchestral expression and piano elegance wrapped in haunting beauty. The immersive hug of sound warmly swirls around the senses, gaining more potency and depth with the joining of the instantly impressive gravelly vocals of Wiley. An epic air is crafted at the same time, a drama which sublimely sets ears, imagination, and appetite up for the rest of the album, and whilst the song itself feels more like a dawning to what is to come than an individual song it inescapably has imagination and anticipation licking lips ready for what is to come.

It is an intrigue and adventure immediately filled by Open Up Your Eyes. Keys alone tempt initially before being aligned to the dramatic and epically swung beats of Moss-Pearce aligned to the more predatory tones of Griffiths’ bass. With its first rhythmic breath an addictive temptation is luring ears and emotions whilst Wiley’s continually sculpting fingers and adventurous throat bellows craft potent narratives over and within the driving range of beats. The song is pure magnetism, a virulent persuasion of sound and creative theatre enthralling body and emotions continued with current single Colours. Again here is a song instantly smothering the senses in melody rich colours and emotional energy on waves of keys bred adventure and reflective intimacy. Listening to the song is like diving from the edge of a mountain peak soaked in intensive light and soaring through varying shades of immersive shadows and invigorating radiance from thereon in.

There is no let up with the contagious temptation as Don’t Be Afraid comes forward next with a simply irresistible rhythmic bait; the minimalistic and wholly anthemic shuffle conjured by Moss-Pearce is a gripping incitement which continues to spring its traps across the broadening and melodically expansive landscape of the track. Strings and brass swamp the senses, again taking them on a dramatic flight before the song relaxes into a calmer pasture of just as passionate and fiery emotion. It is spellbinding, a collusion of contrasts building to an epic and breath-taking escapade before making way for the more slender weight of Last Forever and the darker tones of Half Mast. Both tracks reveal new enterprise and invention in the songwriting and sound of the band, the first a minimalistic dance but a persistent lure to another climactic call of orchestral and vocal majesty. Its successor is just as an enthralling a proposition, its heart and body seemingly bred from the darkest shadows with an underlying nature to match but exploring almost conflicting realms of emotional voracity and inflamed exotic beauty.

Wonderfully it is already impossible to pin down The Barnum Meserve sound; you can suggest essences of Nine Inch Nails and Arcade Fire, which many have, but listening to the album for us and often for no obvious reasons, thoughts of bands like Doves, Fatima Mansions, and Elbow come to mind, yet it is creative alchemy distinct to The Barnum Meserve ultimately. A fact proven by the band’s latest single Underneath The Grey which comes next. A sultry and transfixing pop rock song, it is arguably the gentlest surrounding of the senses on the album and one of the most captivating with its sonic breezes and melodic elegance bound in orchestral grandeur.

Without Numbers is a similarly bred offering next, pop and stadium rock infused into another intimate and intoxicating anthem of emotive and melodic fire. If it was me, this would be the next single, its impact simply overwhelming and invigorating whilst revealing everything you need to know about the band to breed real excitement. You could suggest many of the tracks would make the ideal gateway into band and album to be fair though, the imposing balladry and haunted emotional atmosphere of After The Fire next another easy to devour candidate as is the sentimental embrace and orchestral authority of the sensational Losing Sleep.

Dust provides another intensive ballad of sound and emotion, and though it is a slow burner for personal reactions it simply engrosses and heavily pleases with its company whilst Take Shelter entwines its own emotive reflections with a pungent lure of rhythms. In a single breath though, it explodes into a tempest of mouth-watering enterprise and imposing musical drama, swinging between contrasts linked by rampantly addictive rhythms. The song is a blaze of horns, strings, and impacting vocals bound by piano charm, and quite sensational.

Ending now the album could not go out on a loftier high but the melancholic haunting that is Tides provides one final immersive exploration for listener and band to bond over, not as instant a persuasion as its predecessor but certainly a lingering and absorbing finale to leave the listener wanting, needing more.

As mentioned at the start, we predict that The Barnum Meserve is going to take the British rock scene by storm, if not now definitely in the future, though now almost looks inevitable such the brilliance of their first album.

The Barnum Meserve is available via 34D Records from 6th April through all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/TheBarnumMeserve   https://twitter.com/BarnumMeserve

RingMaster 06/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

The Riptide Movement – All Works Out

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It is an understatement to say that last year was a big year for Irish rock band The Riptide Movement in their homeland. It was a massive attention grabbing time which saw the release of debut album Getting Through, a gold-selling release which provided a tremendous cap to a series of top 10 singles and sold-out headline tours. 2014 basically thrust the Lucan, Dublin quartet, on the back of their previous increasingly potent presence, into a major spotlight in Ireland, one the band is now looking to emulate in the UK and further afield with their first British single All Works Out. Taken from Getting Through, which will also be getting its own British unveiling later in the year, the new single grips ears and imagination with a rousing three and a half minutes of undemanding but infectiously captivating rock ‘n’ roll. A mix of melodic rock with folkish essences and just a hint of Irish Americana, the song is a highly enjoyable introduction to The Riptide Movement.

As suggested it has been an increasingly potent time for the band since forming in 2006 and especially heady over the past couple of years. Recent successes has seen the band play across numerous cities from Dublin through to Delhi, support The Rolling Stones in Hyde Park in 2013, and lure hordes of new appetites at Glastonbury 2014 with their acclaimed performance. Getting Through was not slow in luring success with its Irish release, the album being included on the Meteor Choice Music Prize Shortlist for Irish Album of the Year. The Riptide Movement is certainly 7e05df8f-175d-436c-9766-2324249034bca band on the march with Britain next in line as they reinforce their successful festival appearances with All Works Out and subsequently the album, which was recorded with Ted Hutt, one of the founder members of Flogging Molly, this summer.

     All Works Out makes a low key entrance, a simple countrified twang of guitar making the first beckoning. It is swiftly joined by the punchy beats of drummer Gar Byrne and a resourceful bassline from Ger McGarry though, creative flames constantly lit as the guitars of J.P.R Dalton and Mal Tuohy expand their initial lure. It is still a minimalistic and appetising coaxing, the song never exploring anything beyond a feisty liveliness, yet all the time building an anthemic climate to further captivate ears and attention. Vocals across the band unite in a seriously infectious lure for the chorus whilst the bass slips into heaver and darker tones after time to contrast the fiery melodies which similarly emerge in the growing roar of a song. A little like Doves meets fellow Dubliners K.N.O.T.S., the track bounds through ears with a contagious revelry, a vibrant enterprise which maybe is not testing originality but definitely employs familiar spices in an invigorating and a thickly appealing way to incite the imagination and appetite.

All Works Out gives us a healthy hint at the reasons for Ireland taking The Riptide Movement to their hearts, something The UK will be copying if not now indeed come the summer we suspect. With this release, it is hard to imagine that anticipation for Getting Through will anything but hungrily eager.

All Works Out is available from March 9th via Caroline International/Universal

http://www.trm.ie/     https://www.facebook.com/TheRiptideMovement

RingMaster 09/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Pineapple Thief – Magnolia

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     Magnolia is a melodic serenade, an album which across its immersive seduction is equally unafraid to roar and show a creative and sonic muscle. The new full-length form UK rock band The Pineapple Thief, it is an absorbing proposition, maybe not one to set the passions ablaze but certainly an encounter gripping ears and imagination in a riveting embrace.

The Pineapple Thief began in 1999, formed by vocalist/guitarist Bruce Soord as initially an ‘experimental bedroom project’. It has proceeded to be an attention grabbing band earning acclaim and success across its thought inspiring journey and releases, Magnolia their tenth album. The successor to the acclaimed Someone Here Is Missing and All The Wars of 2010 and 2012 respectively, the new release feels like the offspring of all the influences and essences of the band’s previous exploits; dreamy, progressive textures and enterprise combining to evolve into new bracing pop infused rock adventures. As mentioned, the Kscope released album might not ignite a lustful ardour but with ease it makes for one of the most vivaciously captivating propositions this year, managing to really bring the band’s renowned live power and intensity into a release for arguably the first time.

As soon as the jangling touch of opener Simple As That hits ears, band and album are in control of attention with the swiftly following vocals of Soord even more coaxing through their mellow tone. It is a gentle caress initially, Soord’s guitar as gentle as his voice before the dramatically impacting and thrilling eruption which follows turns the track on its head. It is a glorious and contagious expulsion of riffs and crisp rhythms released by Soord and Dan Osborne respectively, an intensive flame of energy and emotion with the vocals a mesmeric lure. It is hard to avoid suggesting a Muse comparison, but with the richly enticing bait of Jon Sykes’ bass adding to the subsequently sultry and pleasingly imposing stance of the track, there is a uniqueness which belongs to The Pineapple Thief. Anthemic and gripping, it is an impressive start to the album matched immediately by Alone at Sea. Entering on a bubbly hug of keys from Steve Kitch, the song flirts with ears and thoughts through suggestive melodies and the vocal prowess of Soord. The track proceeds to weave and entwine around the senses with a provocative weave of melodies and harmonies, a shoegaze breath at times kissing the narrative, but also stirring them up with sinew sculpted flames of heavier rock endeavour. As with many tracks there is a familiarity to the fascinating canvas but only adding to the infectious bait and addictive enticement.

Neither Don’t Tell Me nor the title track quite touches the plateaus of the first pair but both cast engaging and impressively compelling persuasions. The first is an emotive shuffle of rhythms and acoustic chords under a warm yet cloudy TPT Magnolia cover artexpanse of keys. This is coloured with a riveting orchestral expression which as across the album is arranged by Andrew Skeet, and a rawer incitement of guitar, whilst the second of the pair soars through another sky of orchestral beauty into an emotive climate of smouldering passion and bewitching elegance. As said they do not quite match their predecessors, but forcibly leave appetite and feelings greedy for more with their enthralling enterprise and skilled composition.

The slow Coldplay like balladry of Seasons Past is a tantalising flame of vocals and provocative melodies which seduces thoughts if not emotions to the same success, already personal greed for the more forceful elements of the album steering reactions, as also found by Coming Home. Despite that though, there is no escaping the incendiary beauty and orchestrated radiance of the strings in both tracks and the dramatic intensity and adventure of the second of the two. Vocally too there is no defence from the potent lure of Soord’s voice and the supporting harmonies of Sykes, their individual and united contributions as poetically inciting as the sounds around them.

The tenacious twang of guitar, matched by a similar bass riff, through the heart of The One You Left to Die instantly grips ears and appetite, the track going on to bind an immersive web of intrigue and melodic intimacy around its thrilling spine. It is a hypnotic flight of invention which sets up the senses for the rowdy roar of Breathe perfectly. That mighty expulsion setting the song off though it is soon awash with crystalline melodies and floating vocals before merging its peace into the original rugged and explosive bellow of sound and energy. The track is like a blend of House of Love, Doves, and Feeder, and another pinnacle of the album.

The stringed and emotionally shadowed From Me comes next, its dark charm engrossing before making way for the outstanding Sense of Fear. Guitars lay an irresistible web of jagged riffs to capture the imagination before aligning them with jabbing beats and a climactic embrace of keys and fiery melodies. It is only a moment in the shifting scenery of the song though, a slow provocative vocal caress aided by glances of keys bringing a dulled yet tantalising breath before a sturdy stride of intensive sonic flames and rhythmic bait have their potent say. It is a scintillating encounter which brings the stage presence of the band closer to the comfort of the home.

Magnolia closes with first up the graceful flight of A Loneliness and lastly the bordering on sinister noir wrapped elegance of Bond. The former is a strong and satisfying offering but between the previous track and the cinematic brilliance of the final song it is unable to leap out of their shadow and soon forgotten against the magnificent weighty body and emotional colouring of its successor. Both songs ensure the album ends on a high though, The Pineapple Thief never relinquishing its hold on ears and imagination across its aural and creative fascination, emerging as quite simply a must investigate proposal.

Magnolia is available now via Kscope @ https://www.burningshed.com/store/kscope/collection/284/

http://www.pineapplethief.com

16/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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