Mils – We fight We love

There is a boldness to French outfit Mils which is within every aspect of their sound and invention, a fearless creativity and spirit within songwriting and its imagination, their sound and its execution which makes  We fight We love, their latest EP, one compelling encounter and pleasure.

Based in Montpellier, Mils began in 2008 initially as a studio seated collaboration. The release of their debut album, Man is a lonely Soldier, in 2012 lured strong attention the way of the outfit, especially with its re-energised push the following year through Dooweet Records. Praise carrying reviews and a host of new fans came with its reboot; support accelerated by the single Come Home in 2015 which was the first release with recently joined singer Mélodie alongside lead guitarist Tristan, rhythm guitarist Cerise, bassist/keyboardist Jack, and drummer Ben. Weaving a sound inspired by a host of flavours from varied rock, industrial, electronic, and new wave landscapes, Mils create a proposition as unpredictable as it is intriguing, again the evidence vocal within the Thomas ”Drop” Betrisey (Samaël / Sybreed / MXD) produced We fight We love.

Looking at themes inspired by “the confrontation of man with his own emotions and with others”, the EP opens up with that earlier mentioned single Come Home. The early steely union of guitar and keys is quickly joined by the alluring tones of Mélodie, an engaging growl to her tones matching that of the sound which already reveals an array of spices in its brewing roar. Once hitting its broad stride, electro and rock melodies weave their patterns around the firm kiss of beats, a more intimidating edge added by bass and riffs as things only continue to blossom and evolve. The track is sheer magnetism and easy to see why its potent draw and success as a single as well as the anticipation it nurtured for the EP.

The outstanding start is quickly and as powerfully backed by No Body; it’s opening electronic glide across industrial textures a blend of M83 and Nine Inch Nails. Soon the impressive tones of guest vocalist Duja, from electro rockers MXD, are captivating, his rich darker presence perfectly united with Mélodie’s fiery presence. Carrying a great eighties essence, the track is as thickly compelling as its predecessor, almost lava-esque in its emotive and energetic heat yet masterly controlled and harmonically elegant within its potent smoulder.

It is fair to say that Escape had a hard task to live up to the first pair but soon has the body bouncing with its lively electro shaped, muscular rock ‘n’ roll. Again there is a tempestuous edge to the great vocal presence of Mélodie, an aggressive instinct as tenacious in the broadly textured sound and boisterousness of the song. If it does not quite match up to those before it, it is a paper thin size miss as body and appetite can attest to as they devour its spirit rousing incitement.

A mellower but no less dramatic embrace comes with next up Strange Night; the song’s climate electronically seductive but with a sinister hue pushed by the controlled but rapier swings of Ben. Reminding a touch of Danish outfit Forever Still at times, the track smoulders and boils time and time again across its inflamed landscape, never being anything less than one incandescent proposition.

The EP closes with the equally roasting climate and emotive power of Casus Belli. Though the song has a firmer rein on its fire it persistently singes ears and stokes the imagination; a blaze which may have not lit the fires within as others before it but brings things to a striking piping hot conclusion.

Like for us, Mils may be a prospect which is new to ears. We suggest that you swiftly change that situation through the forcibly impressive We fight We love; and as to those in the know, the band has just grown to major new heights which real attention surely can no longer ignore.

We fight We love is out now via most online stores.

http://www.milsxperience.com/    https://www.facebook.com/MilsXperience/

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sahona – Self Titled

sahona_RingMasterReview

Some things are meant to be and seem to navigate to that outcome whatever the initial intent. French melodic rock band Sahona is one of those propositions. Originally, it was intended as a solo project but as musicians were brought in to help its creator, the dynamics and creativity of a band took over. Now they make their introduction with a self-titled debut album; a rousing drama of sound and imagination that simply grabs attention.

Emerging from the South of France, Sahona was formed in 2013 by vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Charly Sahona of progressive metallers Venturia. As mentioned, the project was set up as a solo venture with friend and drummer Stéphane Cavanez brought in to help out. Having produced some songs for the duo, guitarist Fabien Paraillac soon joined the pair, to be joined later by bassist Cédric Artaxet. As everything and everyone gelled, Charly proposed to turn the project into a full band venture with this their first album recorded in the spring of 2015. Now it is unveiled and ready to tempt and entice with its adventurous blend of melodic and progressive metal with electronic imagination.

The album makes a potent impression first time around but from a strong start and across a host of additional plays, it emerges as an even richer tapestry of sound and ideation which simply fascinates and enthrals. Opener Light of Day, Sense Of Life epitomises the increasingly magnetic journey; a song which draws ears into its melodic charms quite quickly but truly blossoms as each play allows a deeper exploration of its celestial aired depths. From an atmospheric entrance with dramatic keys soon adding additional drama, the song brews up into a busier and more energetic proposal veined by richly enticing guitar and the similarly potent tones of Charly’s vocals. Its melody rich epically throated yet intimate sound has a feel of Dream Theater meets Muse meets Absolace to it, a description which suits most of the release. Individual craft is as pungent and enjoyable as the united enterprise on show in the song, the band creating calm and reflective, raw and aggressive twists and turns which only increase in potency with every listen.

Album cover_RingMasterReviewThe same applies to the album’s outstanding second song, Fires of Passion. Straight away ears and thoughts feel they know the song, like it is a familiar friend returning to arouse the spirit, which it does from its opening web of grooves and flowing, expressive keys. That familiarity comes from again the Muse scent which is at its most fragrant in the song, but it only adds to the drama and tenacious roar of something ultimately distinct to Sahona. Riffs have a great niggle to their tempting whilst rhythms show a firm hand with every throbbing bassline and swinging drumstick as melodies and vocals caress as they seduce. It is the steely grooves and flaming tendrils of guitar enterprise which provide the icing on the flavoursome cake though, a feast which from its first play simply has the ears and emotions in rapture.

On This Winter Night brings an electronic coldness and shadowing into play next, its electro prowling the lining and introduction to further sonic resourcefulness and impressing vocals around a darkly alluring bassline. As its predecessor, it carries a recognisable hue to its creative attractiveness but it only colours something fresh and imaginative, a success echoed within the mellower emotive reflection of Under My Skin. Even with it’s a calmer climate it too shows great volatility to its intensity and heart, but equally equipped with the same infectious nature and sound which lit its predecessors

The electrified air and touch of the increasingly sonically exotic Words of Wisdom grips attention next whilst Little Jack spreads some bluesy tempting into its feverish mix of anthemic intensity and a predatory yet warm coaxing of the imagination. The pair continues the great variation in sound between tracks and offers more of the mouth-watering collusion and at times almost duelling guitar skills of Charly and Fabien. They are incendiary moments which never derailed or distract from the virulence of the song though, another skill shown by the band.

The haunting theatre of A Modern Sleeping Beauty follows the pair; its initial melodic romance leading into a fiery incitement complete with intoxicating grooves and a sinister air before Caught in Heaven descends on ears with glorious guitar jangles and sonic expulsions which in turn spark a boisterous and explosive devouring of ears. The track is glorious, part beast, part charmer, and a nonstop slice of merciless irresistibility. Again the band manages to spawn a predacious tone to their blaze of melodic and harmonic adventure in a track which, as the second, needs little time to ignite a lustful appetite for its presence.

Both Where’s The Path and I’m Alive keep enjoyment strong, if without reaching the heights of the last track. The first initially lays a lively simmer of energy and emotion on ears which, as in so many songs, grows into something bolder and more dramatic with every passing minute whilst its successor is an emotive croon which hugs the senses as Charly spills his lyrical heart.

Closing the album is the cosmic shimmer that is Book Of Life, a song which resonates and pulsates as it seduces body and mind. Sinew spun elements collude with candescent melodies and crystalline textures within it, helping colour a landscape as potent whether casting a mellow lure or a tempestuous agitation. With Cédric and Stéphane creating a sonic canvas which alone is easy to get tangled up in, the track is a superb end to a similarly impressing album.

For most Sahona will have been a new name; after their thoroughly enjoyable first album works its majesty, soon a highly recognisable one.

The Sahona album is out now through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/sahonamusic/

Pete RingMaster 02/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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91 Allstars – Retour vers la Lumière

91allstars_RingMaster Review

Not convinced by their name but having no problem breeding a healthy appetite for their ferocious sound, 91 Allstars quickly show themselves to be another voraciously rousing proposition within the French metal scene with new album Retour vers la Lumière. The first encounter from the band since a change in line-up, their second album is a thickly enticing assault of death inspired metal aligned to melodic hardcore and plenty of other ripe spices. It roars and brawls with the senses, grips the imagination, and provides plenty to get excited over as 91 Allstars show themselves ready to take on broader spotlights.

Formed in 2005, the Paris quintet has perpetually drawn praise and support with their releases and a live presence which has seen them over the years share stages with the likes of Sick of it all, Gojira, Do Or Die , 25 ta life, Born From Pain, Mass Hysteria, and Knuckledust. Their first year saw the release of a self-titled debut EP and two years later the band teamed up with Danforth for the split release Destroy The Past. Acclaim grabbed debut album Telle Est la Loi in 2010, its success though already being eclipsed by the dynamic and hellacious enterprise of Retour vers la Lumière since its recent release.

91AS_front_RingMaster Review     The atmospheric Intro starts things off, its portentous air full of drama and suggestiveness which is taken on by the tempestuous nature and body of Omniscience. Immediately grooves and hooks are swinging with zeal as raw gruff vocals incite and rhythms batter the senses from the second track. It is a rousing confrontation, one as magnetic as it is hostile with the track’s death metal canvas coated in thrash inspired animosity and hardcore cultured dexterity.

Across both Mon bien, mon mal and Opprimés, band and ears collide as tenacious and antagonistic elements collude to spring a creative animus as appealing as it is threatening. The first of the two songs lines its assault with gripping hooks and spicy grooves as snarling vocals leads its anthemic nature. There is definitely some familiarity to parts of its textures and air but that only adds to the magnetic pull whilst its successor similarly impresses as it stalks the senses with its rumbling bass cored predation and stabbing riffery. As across the album, certain essences remind of bands such as Black Dahlia Murder and Gojira whereas the hardcore spices offer up thoughts of others like Pigs and Every Time I Die, but it all gets woven into something relatively distinctive to and constantly appealing from the French quintet.

Richesse humaine provides a raw bluster of voice and virulent sound next, its body entwined in wiry grooves and viciously anthemic tendencies whilst Les ombres de la perdition stomps along spilling acidic sonic tendrils from its bulging intensity. Epitomising the whole of Retour vers la Lumière, the pair also explore catchy exploits and melodic incitements, each spinning a tapestry of inventive lures which temper yet accentuate the unbridled force of the propositions.

The impressive intent and heart of the album continues through the ravenous animus of Eclipse éternelle and escalates in the primal trespass offered by L’ère du verseau; both songs fierce contagion with plenty to defuse expectations and further ignite a hungry appetite. Their success is matched by that of L’aube des princes, an aurally rancorous intrusion again leaving a want for more by the final note of its masterful and imaginative violation. With the songs sung in French lyrically we floundered but as shown by the encounter there is no mistaking the emotion and heart of each encounter.

Completed by the incessant infiltration of the senses that is Un sombre destin and lastly the album’s rapacious imagination enveloping title track, Retour vers la lumière is a seriously accomplished and enjoyable proposal. Certainly there is a bit of a similarity between tracks at times which defuses some of its immediate potency but songs and the album as a whole only grows to be challenge which impresses again and again.

Retour vers la lumière is out now via Dooweet Records @ http://shop.season-of-mist.com/91-all-stars-retour-vers-la-lumiere-cd-digipack

https://www.facebook.com/91AllStarsOfficiel

http://www.91allstars.com

Pete RingMaster 05/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Gloomy Hellium Bath – Sistema Solera

ARTWORK GHB_RingMaster Review

Always partial to some creative bedlam or a seemingly deranged adventure which, no matter how much you think you understand it, never fails to surprise and leave a vacant expression of pleasure on the face, Sistema Solera was destined to spark an eager appetite here for its sonic psychosis. It is easy to predict that the riveting debut album from French trio Gloomy Hellium Bath is not going to be for everyone but if the likes of Pryapisme, Mr Bungle, or 6:33 light the fires, then this unique fusion of industrial, electronic, and metal bred incitement is well worth exploring.

Gloomy Hellium Bath is the union of former guitarist Würm Edgard Chevallier (guitar/machine/samples) and Christophe Denhez (guitar /vocals), the latter no stranger to exciting ears through his work and releases with Nerv, Mur, and Område. Emerging in 2014, the Val d’Oise hailing project, with a line-up completed by bassist Neil, also previously of Würm, takes no prisoners with its infestation of the senses and emotions. Their sound is compelling aural violence and off-kilter enticement spun with black humoured mischief and realism caked antagonism; the result a cacophony of raw and intricate ideas honed into a roaring storm of gripping chaos and as shown by Sistema Solera, deviously captivating.

Fight is first, instantly throwing a melee of voices and fizzing sound at ears before leaping into a psychotic stomp with carnivorous walls, ravenous vocals, and warped electronic flirtation. Imagine Mindless Self Indulgence and Rabbit Junk in a dirty fusion with Young Gods and you get a whiff of the lunacy soaked enterprise, though from its ‘mid-season’ break it returns as another fresh industrial shaped punk of a proposal with the vocal alone insanely bewitching.

It is a great start continuing with Alcoholique Djerk, the track organically evolving from certain aspects of its predecessor to explore an even more industrial metal hued canter quickly working its way into the psyche. Equally it is unafraid to expose raw nerves with caustic eruptions and abrasing animosity, or indeed to throw one or two exotic or incendiary sonic slithers of surprise in to the mix too.

Fuck It swings in next, warm yet fuzzy air and sound coating ears as melodic rock with grunge lined edges colours the song’s sinister intent before hardened and rapacious provocation blends with funk urged enterprise and vocal revelry. Across its body, the track reveals a host of flavours, country rock and jazzy scented essences amongst the metallic turbulence again walling in varied endeavours within the song.

The album’s title track merges haunted and dark natured ambience with atmospheric volatility straight after, its Nine Inch Nails toned electronic grumble drawing in lighter exploits throughout to evocatively spark ears and imagination whilst setting up the tenaciously energetic and dynamic Lady Boy with its steely schizophrenic rock ‘n’ roll carrying elements of Trepalium and We All Die (Laughing) to it.

Across the sonic dissonance of Ouarchhh and the industrial neurosis of Bloody Mary, band and album wrong-foot, ignite, and twist body and thoughts inside and out. The first of the pair has a slight whiff of US band Pere Ubu to it in many ways as essential grooves and hooks lurk and spear an unpredictable landscape of dark intrigue and disorientating aural dementia with emotions to match whilst its successor scythes through and permeates the senses via a debilitating cyber invasion.

A melodic calm of sorts mellows things a degree or two through Fucking Mashine, its emotive and enveloping croon expectantly laced with provocatively disturbed and manipulative additives bringing light and dark, reserved and twisted elements in potent collusion. The track brings another open and striking variation to the album as too the CD version’s closer Dead Rising Horse, a drama of piston driven rhythms and scuzzy temptation aligned to melodic seduction and tempestuous extremes in sound and creative provocation. It is a rousing conclusion to a release which might need time to get fully under the skin but is ultimately very likely to if the kind of warped imagination it holds is the kind of pleasure which gets the senses and passions inflamed.

As suggested for some it might be an adventure too far, but Sistema Solera for the rest of us is as easy to greedily devour treat.

Sistema Solera is out now via Dooweet Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/fm/artist/gloomy-hellium-bath/id1057587349

https://www.facebook.com/gloomyhelliumbath

Pete RingMaster 17/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Pavillon Rouge – Legio Axis Ka

Photo Groupe

If there were still to be active dance floors after the apocalypse then the new album from French industrial metallers Pavillon Rouge would be the perfect fit for the dark mood and decayed energy it assumedly would possess. A fusion of black metal with industrial/techno bred voracity, the band’s sound and second full-length Legio Axis Ka, make for an erosive and ravenous affair but with a contagion which never leaves the body to simply bask in pestilential depths, dictating its movement across nine pulsating predatory tracks. The accompanying press release also states that their sound and intent explores ethereal 80s new wave atmospheres, and though not always as immediate within the tempests there are elements of the dark wave scene of that era pervading their latest release, scents of bands like The Chameleons, Joy Division, and Pink Industry offering themselves to thoughts. Ultimately though, Pavillon Rouge casts a sound which has its own distinct presence and an album in Legio Axis Ka which constantly and aggressively stimulates ears and imagination.

The band was formed in 2008 by musicians Mervyn and YVH, with the intent to merge black metal with hardcore techno. Highly acclaimed debut album Solmeth Pervitine was released in 2011 and was soon declared one of the best industrial black metal albums. It was followed by shows for the band with the likes of Psygnosis, Himinbjorg, Svart Crown, and The CNK, supporting the album and pushing forward their increasing attention grabbing emergence. Recently signed with Dooweet Records, the quintet of vocalist Kra Cillag, guitarist/vocalist Mu Cephei, bassist E.Shulgin, drummer Sorthei, and guitarist/programmer Mervyn now return with their second onslaught on the senses. Released on the Swamp Records side of Dooweet, Legio Axis Ka is a vicious seduction, a mesmeric violation which however you want to look at it, leaves the senses raw and emotions entangled in its increasingly magnetic tempest.

10347166_793523130703256_1060036933092637261_n   An immediate embrace of synth beauty amidst an evocative ambience immerses ears as album opener Prisme vers l’odyssée shows its introduction, a potent and atmospheric lure which is soon consumed by a thunderous tirade of rhythms and rabid riffs. Vocally too the song offers a merciless and diverse squall yet within it all the keys continue to cast a provocative and emotionally expressive voice. That industrial element is a nagging incitement within the evolving theatre of guitars and keys too, keeping feet and body agitated as the heart of the track spills its venomous and caustically poetic premise. Lyrically the album is sung in the band’s native tongue so there is little to its obviously dark climate that we can reveal but if the words and premises match the passion of the delivery then it is a brooding exploration just as potent as the sounds around them.

The following L’enfer se souvient, l’enfer sait takes the strong start up another step with its muscular rhythms and riff clad prowling wrapped in an electro hued colouring. The dynamic and persistent techno bred heartbeat of the song again has limbs on alert whilst thoughts and emotions are entangled in the melodic and vocal imagination lighting up the abrasing atmosphere of the song. Track and album definitely need close attention and several plays to unveil all the underlying twists and creative nuances within inhospitable surface and murky air, but it only adds to the satisfaction and drama of the stark, almost visual soundscapes sculpted.

Mars stella patria does not hang about tempting the listener either, electronic percussion and anthemic band roars immediate virulent bait. Their infectiousness seems to seep into the industrial climate, which offers warped noise and textures, as well as the chilled melodic enterprise adding its weight to the song’s persuasion. It is an endeavour spiced with a touch of Sisters Of Mercy and Bauhaus, and as the track continues with open clarity around its warmer elements, shadows impose upon and the raw vocals prey on the senses. It is fair to say that each song individually brings a new step up in the presence and persuasion of Legio Axis Ka, this one with its increasing rabid turbulence another strong step in its ascent, a compelling move almost matched by the mercilessly tempestuous storm of A l’univers. Electro pulses resonate through bone and psyche from the off, enticing feet and emotions to lend their eager energies to its call whilst the melodic and sonic invention of the band provides a ravenous celestial and dirty terrestrial landscape for ears and emotions. Not as instant as its predecessor, the song subsequently wins over appetite and thoughts whilst revealing more of the inventive ideation and songwriting craft of Pavillon Rouge.

Both Aurore et Nemesis and Droge Macht Frei enthral and enslave, the first laying down its first potent tempting through a delicious dark bassline before brewing up a sonic and emotional tsunami of ferocious ire and intensity. Its successor provides the first truly insatiable full-on invitation to unleash the dance floor moves, its rhythmic stomp a pulsating infection which leads and drives the song even when enveloped in rabid smog of noise and sonic rapacity. As ever there is much more to the songs and both engross with melodic ingenuity and the often understated but open imagination which brings striking contrasts and unpredictability to all offerings on the album.

From a raucous stomp Pavillon Rouge offer a celestial flight with Kosmos Ethikos, synths and samples aligning for an atmospheric exploration with a big brother like edge to its air before Notre paradis takes its own similarly seeded soar through a new spatial climate. There is a much darker feel and texture to the track compared to the last though, an ominous breath which coats guitars and vocals, not forgetting intimidating rhythms, as keys warmly and eloquently swarm around the senses. The pair offers their own sparking new adventures for the imagination to interpret before the closing Klux santur provides a transfixing finale to the album. With the most distinct eighties feel to its body and melodic enterprise yet, the track is a swirling maelstrom of light and emotional malevolence. It is a cyclonic treat to close things up, a seducing and senses ravishing end to an album which increasingly enthrals given time and attention.

The Grenoble based Pavillon Rouge have not offered an easily accessible proposal with Legio Axis Ka but who wants easy when far greater rewards come with uncompromising intensity and evolving creative assaults. The band finds the perfect blend of industrial and black metal fury for a proposition which fans of either genre should seriously contemplate.

Legio Axis Ka is available now via Swamp Records @ http://findiemerch.com/fr/pavillon-rouge-legio-axis-ka/#

https://www.facebook.com/LuxDiscipline   http://www.luxdiscipline.com

RingMaster 22/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Beyond the Dust – Khepri

Beyond The Dust - Promo Pic 2013 HD 1

Beyond the Dust is a French progressive metal band which has a very potent future on the evidence of debut album Khepri. It is not a release which puts the band up alongside the weightier and more robustly adventurous protagonists of their genre, but one which suggests with the ripe potential coursing through their songs, that the Paris quartet could find that success some when within their evolution.

The band made a potent introduction to themselves with their six-track New Dawn EP in 2011, a release which led the band to shows with the likes of Periphery, Sybreed, Protest The Hero, Monuments, and Becoming The Archetype. The song Reality Deformed opened up a new gaze of attention with its unveiling at the beginning of 2012; the song which featured ex-Aliases singer Jay Berast already showing hints of the new maturity in songwriting and sound which is ripe within Khepri. The band signed with Dooweet Records last year for the release of their first full-length, it a 57 min concept album which has been compared to “references like Dream Theater’s Metropolis Part 2: Scenes From a Memory mixed with Meshuggah’s Catch 33 and Periphery’s albums.” That might be a grand suggestion for Khepri but certainly Beyond the Dust has grown in creative strength and imagination between releases and this certainly lights up the album.

A mature male voice sets the scene as first track Rise waits in the shadows to reveal its presence. It is a dramatic scene being cast under a stormy sky, one soon joined by the melodic charm of guitars and a darker foreboding bass tone. Similarly the ambience of the track becomes thicker in dramatic hue, providing an intriguing premise that Meshuggah bred enterprise agitates and ignites. The instrumental is a captivating opening to the album, alone sparking the imagination and anticipation of what is to follow.

Clarity is the next offering, its own elegant start a potent coaxing before being immersed in a vibrant but cloudier weave of riffs and rhythmic incitement. It is not a particularly stormy encounter though and is soon mixing in peaceful melodies and certain emotional calms, but still prone to eruptions of raw vocals squalls alongside the predominant clean delivery, as well as fierce intensive roars of sonic voracity. The track continues to seduce and blaze away in ears, the band persistently impressing in craft and ideation but, and something which applies to most of the album, not finding that final spark to push the band beyond familiar territories.

After the Light is a valiant attempt though, a voracious predator from the start but guided by the excellent clean tones of the vocalist and almost as swiftly twisting into unexpected and khepricompelling detours. The song is quite gripping, luring in close attention as you wait to see where it goes next, and it does not disappoint with its imagination whilst still managing to stay within the original framework of the song’s tempest. There are moments where it veers towards the precipice of too much but always turns away and explores new just as sonically theatrical and engrossing ventures. A proposal to take your time exploring, much as Khepri itself to be fair, it emerges as a peak of the release which grows even more impressive over time.

A smoother embrace comes with Relief, melodies and harmonies as resourceful as the guitar escapades and vocal variety. There is a small sense of flamboyancy through the solo which will appeal to some and maybe less to others but it is the lack of the bold almost warped ingenuity of its predecessor which prevents the song lighting emotions as potently. As a rapacious melodic rock track though there is little to ignore and refuse, much as with Last Breath, though the song is much more volatile emotionally and aggressive creatively. The further into its short but eventful body it travels, the greater the creative temptation discovered where again a more twisted invention is allowed to flirt with the listener even if in short doses.

Both Zero and Silence and Sorrow have the imagination heavily invested and ears fully attentive, the first a tenaciously expressive and inflammatory instrumental coaxing thoughts and emotions into the savage jaws of its successor. The most carnivorous track on the album, riffs and rhythms a barbarous incitement, the song proceeds to explore a sonic tapestry of bedlamic enterprise and melodic ingenuity. Funk, jazz, and math rock all seem to have a part of its breeding whilst the ever impressing vocals in their harmonic styling only add to the magnetism of the tempestuous encounter. As After The Light, the track stands as a pinnacle of Khepri, the moments where something new is truly breached.

The three parts of The Edge of Earth and Sea complete the album, each a part of an epic twenty plus minute narrative also standing well individually if taken that way. Part 1: The Tears Of Departures is a mellow and evocative embrace, though as expected it has a fiercer energy to its air and a darker nature to its shadows. They subsequently boil over into a brawling hardcore-esque vocal expulsion over jagged riffs and tingling melodies, the evolving vocals and warm guitar expression ensuring though that there is plenty of adventure in the growing maelstrom, a stormy scene which slips into again the more restrained and charmed opening to Part 2: The Fear Of The Journey This in turn rumbles with storm like emotion and intent across its colourful and technically extravagant soundscape. The mid way collapse into hellish domains, where the safety of the narrative’s protagonist is lost, suddenly ignites the track to new heights matched by the voracious stalking of the senses from riffs and rhythms. There is a new inescapable drama to the scene which you wish was there sooner and longer as Part 3: The Bliss Of The Gathering comes in. With its rugged terrain and hungry hostility aligned to harmonic reassurance, the bliss of its title seems to come at a price thematically, but with a new pleasing adventure offered to the listener.

It is potent end to a fine first album from Beyond The Dust, not one to rave endlessly about but easily a release to recommend progressive metal fans take a good look at. Khepri is a seriously solid and enjoyable proposition, not pushing the band above the crowd but with songs like Silence and Sorrow and After The Light showing flair and promise which definitely excites, it hints that their time in a singular light will surely come.

Khepri is available via Dooweet Records now @ http://dooweet.bandcamp.com/album/khepri

https://www.facebook.com/beyondthedust   http://www.beyond-the-dust.com/

RingMaster 28/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Evenline – Dear Morpheus

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Hailing out of Paris, melodic metallers Evenline recently released their debut album and in the process made a rather potent impression. Richly enjoyable and impressively accomplished, Dear Morpheus is a sizeable persuasion of alternative rock and metal bound in the inspirations of bands such as Alter Bridge, Creed, Metallica, and Nickelback. It is a captivating proposition which lights a richly contented glow in ears and emotions whilst showing a potential of even greater things ahead as the band find their own distinctive sound and presence, which is not quite there on the album. It certainly makes for a pleasing companion, its familiarity to others a warm and easily accessible embrace to be fair, helping lead to a thoroughly satisfying engagement.

Formed in 2009, Evenline first made a mark in with their first release, The Coming Life EP the following year. The band continued to build an increasingly attentive support and attention with their shows, including supporting Alter Bridge in Luxembourg in 2011, before the quartet settled down to record their debut full-length with producer Jim Dewailly. Its arrival in the flavoursome shape of Dear Morpheus, suggests the band is on the brink of a much wider recognition, something the release which without setting new standards firmly deserves with its eleven melodically crafted and emotionally eventful songs.

The album makes a swift persuasion on ears and imagination, the evocative opening to Misunderstood, a melodic caress matched by the potent tones of vocalist Aarno Gueziec. There is an almost hazy glaze to his voice which adds to the expressive start of the first song, a coaxing which eventually roars with passion and intensity as riffs break out with raw energy. Imposing rhythms match this emerging sturdy incitement whilst vocally there is also a powerful evocative flame to the delivery which captivates ears. With a Seether meets Breaking Benjamin like feel to its creative potency and easily pleasing sound, the track makes a gripping beginning to the release, especially with the sonic flame of enterprise from guitarist Fabrice Tedaldi which erupts across the encounter.

Without You keeps the album flying high with its almost rabid gait and energy, choppy riffs and magnetic grooves winding masterfully around ears as the beats of Olivier Stefanelli provide an equally compelling frame. With a virulently Album Covercontagious chorus and similarly rampant urgency to its whole body, the song romps with a Sick Puppies bred swagger and suasion, one loaded with passion and occasional outpourings of caustic growls and sonic fury. It is an outstanding slice of melodic metal increasing the appetite ready for the following Letter to a Grave and Insomnia. The first of the pair is an emotionally charged stroll with an enjoyably enticing throaty call from the bass of Thomas Jaegle through a cascade of vocal harmonies and fiery riffs. Gueziec provides an emotive croon to the skilled web of invention in the song which from a slow start increasingly impresses. Its successor flexes its sinews for an agitated and tenacious exploit which like its predecessor does not quite match the opening two tracks but provides another satisfying turn to the album. It is hard to avoid comparisons to Alter Bridge, Three Days Grace and the like, but such the craft and prowess of songs and band from vocals to sound, it does not defuse the enjoyment offered by the different songs.

Both the resourcefully catchy Over & Over and the heavily emotive Already Gone leave ears and thoughts richly contented if not surprised before the excellent title track weaves its intriguing enterprise. From a haunting atmospheric opening, a sultry melody flirts with the imagination. It is aided by the equally suggestive mystique of the bass, both laying a warm canvas for the excellent vocal skill and strength of Gueziec to further colour. It is a transfixing offering, the most inventive and unpredictable song on the album with its inventive rhythms and sonic exploration, and the pinnacle of Dear Morpheus.

The aggressive Hard to Breathe ignites the senses next, pounding beats the forerunner to carnivorous riffs and cantankerous grooves which are tempered by infectious vocals and the anthemic ingenuity of the raucous exploit. It is a quick match to the heights of the previous song and those setting things off, but also another weighty twist in the character of the songwriting and presence of the release.

The next up Judgement Day is no slouch in inflaming ears and emotions either, though it lacks the spark and lingering potency of those before it, even with its imagination entwining grooves and suggestive melodies. The same applies to the enthralling power balladry of You Should Have Left Me, a perfectly crafted and melodically coloured proposition but one which despite all its impressive elements is an exciting proposal in its company but soon forgotten away from its charms. Nevertheless both only add to the potential of the band before the closing slow croon of Eternal Regrets provides a gentle and mesmeric conclusion to the album with its emotive strings and acoustic hues.

Dear Morpheus might not be ground-breaking in originality but with its inventively sculpted songs and the open skill and imagination of the band, it is a very enjoyable reason to check out Evenline and their journey to finding that distinctive presence.

Dear Morpheus is available now via Dooweet Records @ http://store.dooweet.org/en/home/133_evenline-dear-morpheus.html

http://www.evenline-music.com/

RingMaster 18/09/2014

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